History Music / KingCrimson

30th Apr '16 4:22:52 PM DavidDelony
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* [[Music/FrankZappa Adrian Belew]] (1981–2013): guitar, vocals

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* [[Music/FrankZappa Adrian Adrian]] [[Music/TalkingHeads Belew]] (1981–2013): guitar, vocals
26th Apr '16 9:04:11 AM fauxtoast
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*** The song alludes to King Crimson's former label, E.G. Records. The two executives who owned the label, Sam Alder and Mark Fenwick, deliberately delayed paying out artists' royalties, instead using the money to invest in a multitude of insurance schemes and real estate deals, most notably with Lloyd's Of London. They also took advantage of Fripp's semi-retirement in the mid-1970's to convince him to sign over the publishing rights of KC's catalog over to E.G. as well (meaning Fripp no longer had any control on how King Crimson music was released or used). Due to a real estate bubble bursting in the late 80s, coupled with a tidal wave of insurance claims made against Lloyd's (claims many thought Lloyd's knew about but deliberately delayed paying, to make it look more attractive to investors) Alder & Fenwick were bankrupted, and couldn't pay its artists what they were owed. So they sold E.G. to Virgin Records, without telling Fripp, and then offered all the label's artists a lump sum settlement (read: bribe), which included a clause to release E.G. or wrong-doing, to avoid them later getting taken to court for mismanagement. Fripp refused, and took Alder & Fenwick to court. After a really long (and expensive) lawsuit, he managed to get his publishing rights back, and then ultimately control of the entire Crimson catalog, so now that any future releases and re-releases will all be through his own label, Discipline Global Mobile (or licensed by Fripp to other labels for distribution). The entire fiasco (along with his disdain for online distribution, including a well-publicized row with Grooveshark) is in part why he left public performance in 2009.

to:

*** The song alludes to King Crimson's former label, E.G. Records. The two executives who owned the label, Sam Alder and Mark Fenwick, deliberately delayed paying out artists' royalties, instead using the money to invest in a multitude of insurance schemes and real estate deals, most notably with Lloyd's Of London. They also took advantage of Fripp's semi-retirement in the mid-1970's to convince him to sign over the publishing rights of KC's catalog over to E.G. as well (meaning Fripp no longer had any control on how King Crimson music was released or used). Due to a real estate bubble bursting in the late 80s, coupled with a tidal wave of insurance claims made against Lloyd's (claims many thought Lloyd's knew about but deliberately delayed paying, to make it look more attractive to investors) Alder & Fenwick were bankrupted, and couldn't pay its artists what they were owed. So they sold E.G. to Virgin Records, without telling Fripp, and then offered all the label's artists a lump sum settlement (read: bribe), which included a clause to release E.G. or for wrong-doing, to avoid them later getting taken to court for mismanagement. Fripp refused, refused to take a pay-off, and took Alder & Fenwick to court. After a really long (and expensive) lawsuit, he managed to get his publishing rights back, and then ultimately control of the entire Crimson catalog, so now that any future releases and re-releases will all be through his own label, Discipline Global Mobile (or licensed by Fripp to other labels for distribution). The entire fiasco (along with his disdain for online distribution, including a well-publicized row with Grooveshark) is in part why he left public performance in 2009.
25th Apr '16 10:37:17 AM fauxtoast
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*** The song alludes to King Crimson's former label, E.G. Records. The two executives who owned the label, Sam Alder and Mark Fenwick, deliberately delayed paying out artists' royalties, instead using the money to invest in a multitude of insurance schemes and real estate deals, most notably with Lloyd's Of London. They'd also taken advantage of Fripp's semi-retirement in the mid-1970's to convince him to sign over his publishing rights to KC's catalog to E.G (meaning Fripp no longer had any control on how King Crimson music was released or used). Due to a real estate bubble bursting in the late 80s, coupled with a tidal wave of insurance claims made against Lloyd's (claims many thought Lloyd's knew about but deliberately delayed paying, to make it look more attractive to investors) Alder & Fenwick were bankrupted, and couldn't pay its artists what they were owed. So they sold E.G. to Virgin Records, without telling Fripp, and then offered all the label's artists a lump sum settlement with a gag clause (read: bribe) to avoid them getting taken to court for mis-management. Fripp refused and took the remnants of E.G. to court, and after a really long and expensive lawsuit, he managed to get his publishing rights back, and then ultimately control of the Crimson catalog back from Virgin, so now all future releases and re-releases will be through his own label, Discipline Global Mobile. The entire fiasco (along with his disdain for online distribution, including a well-publicized row with Grooveshark) is in part why he left public performance in 2009.
*** TL;DR: Marine 475 was the name of one of Lloyd's Of London property schemes, of which the E.G. Records execs had bought into with money the kept from their artists. When Lloyd's became besieged with claims, along with accusations of fraud, it lead to the collapse of the label. [[note]] E.G. stands for David '''E'''nthoven and John '''G'''aydon, the first managers of King Crimson and the founders of the label, who had both left the company before the scandal began. [[/note]]

to:

*** The song alludes to King Crimson's former label, E.G. Records. The two executives who owned the label, Sam Alder and Mark Fenwick, deliberately delayed paying out artists' royalties, instead using the money to invest in a multitude of insurance schemes and real estate deals, most notably with Lloyd's Of London. They'd They also taken took advantage of Fripp's semi-retirement in the mid-1970's to convince him to sign over his the publishing rights to of KC's catalog over to E.G G. as well (meaning Fripp no longer had any control on how King Crimson music was released or used). Due to a real estate bubble bursting in the late 80s, coupled with a tidal wave of insurance claims made against Lloyd's (claims many thought Lloyd's knew about but deliberately delayed paying, to make it look more attractive to investors) Alder & Fenwick were bankrupted, and couldn't pay its artists what they were owed. So they sold E.G. to Virgin Records, without telling Fripp, and then offered all the label's artists a lump sum settlement with (read: bribe), which included a gag clause (read: bribe) to avoid them getting taken to court for mis-management. Fripp refused and took the remnants of release E.G. or wrong-doing, to court, avoid them later getting taken to court for mismanagement. Fripp refused, and after took Alder & Fenwick to court. After a really long and expensive (and expensive) lawsuit, he managed to get his publishing rights back, and then ultimately control of the entire Crimson catalog back from Virgin, catalog, so now all that any future releases and re-releases will all be through his own label, Discipline Global Mobile.Mobile (or licensed by Fripp to other labels for distribution). The entire fiasco (along with his disdain for online distribution, including a well-publicized row with Grooveshark) is in part why he left public performance in 2009.
*** TL;DR: Marine 475 was the name of one of Lloyd's Of London London's property schemes, of which the that E.G. Records execs had bought into with the money the they kept from their artists. When Lloyd's became besieged with claims, along with accusations of fraud, it lead to the collapse of the label. [[note]] E.G. stands for David '''E'''nthoven and John '''G'''aydon, the first managers of King Crimson and the founders of the label, who had both left the company by the mid-1970s, long before the scandal began. [[/note]]
25th Apr '16 10:26:28 AM fauxtoast
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*** TL;DR: Marine 475 was the name of one of the Lloyd's Of London property schemes, of which the E.G. execs had bought into with money kept from their artists. When Lloyd's became hit with claims and accusations of fraud, it lead to the collapse of the label.

to:

*** TL;DR: Marine 475 was the name of one of the Lloyd's Of London property schemes, of which the E.G. Records execs had bought into with money the kept from their artists. When Lloyd's became hit besieged with claims and claims, along with accusations of fraud, it lead to the collapse of the label.label. [[note]] E.G. stands for David '''E'''nthoven and John '''G'''aydon, the first managers of King Crimson and the founders of the label, who had both left the company before the scandal began. [[/note]]
25th Apr '16 10:12:15 AM fauxtoast
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** "Coda: Marine 475" (from "VROOOM") lists… ''something''… related to "a Lloyd's insurance syndicate which suffered huge financial losses and whose members included [the band's former managers]"
*** A bit of detail: The executives of the record label KC was on (EG Records) had been using artist royalties they were "delayed" in paying to invest in insurance schemes (like Lloyd's) and real estate deals; they'd also taken advantage of Fripp's spiritual retreat in the mid-70's to convince him to sign over his publishing rights (not only did the record company now own King Crimson's actual recordings, they owned the songs in totality, including licensing rights, royalties, etc...). Due to a real estate bubble bursting in the late 80s, coupled with a tidal wave of insurance claims made in that era, the execs were bankrupted, and couldn't pay up. So they sold the company, along with all of KC and Fripp's music, to Virgin Records without telling the band, and then offered all the label's artists a lump sum settlement with a gagging clause (read: bribe) to avoid getting taken to court. Fripp said fuck that (in a manner of speaking), and took the company to court; after a really long and expensive lawsuit, he managed to get the copyrights back, though to this day, he still deals with record labels selling/streaming KC stuff without authorization, one of the reasons he left public performance in 2009. More to the point: Marine 475 is the name of one of those Lloyd's Syndicates the execs had bought into with money stolen from their artists, and whose collapse led to this whole fiasco.

to:

** "Coda: Marine 475" (from "VROOOM") lists… ''something''… related to "a Lloyd's insurance syndicate which suffered huge financial losses and whose members included [the band's losses..."
*** The song alludes to King Crimson's
former managers]"
*** A bit of detail:
label, E.G. Records. The two executives of who owned the record label KC was on (EG Records) had been using artist royalties they were "delayed" in label, Sam Alder and Mark Fenwick, deliberately delayed paying out artists' royalties, instead using the money to invest in a multitude of insurance schemes (like Lloyd's) and real estate deals; they'd deals, most notably with Lloyd's Of London. They'd also taken advantage of Fripp's spiritual retreat semi-retirement in the mid-70's mid-1970's to convince him to sign over his publishing rights (not only did the record company now own to KC's catalog to E.G (meaning Fripp no longer had any control on how King Crimson's actual recordings, they owned the songs in totality, including licensing rights, royalties, etc...). Crimson music was released or used). Due to a real estate bubble bursting in the late 80s, coupled with a tidal wave of insurance claims made in that era, the execs against Lloyd's (claims many thought Lloyd's knew about but deliberately delayed paying, to make it look more attractive to investors) Alder & Fenwick were bankrupted, and couldn't pay up. its artists what they were owed. So they sold the company, along with all of KC and Fripp's music, E.G. to Virgin Records Records, without telling the band, Fripp, and then offered all the label's artists a lump sum settlement with a gagging gag clause (read: bribe) to avoid them getting taken to court. court for mis-management. Fripp said fuck that (in a manner of speaking), refused and took the company remnants of E.G. to court; court, and after a really long and expensive lawsuit, he managed to get the copyrights his publishing rights back, though to this day, he still deals with record labels selling/streaming KC stuff without authorization, one and then ultimately control of the reasons Crimson catalog back from Virgin, so now all future releases and re-releases will be through his own label, Discipline Global Mobile. The entire fiasco (along with his disdain for online distribution, including a well-publicized row with Grooveshark) is in part why he left public performance in 2009. More to the point: 2009.
*** TL;DR:
Marine 475 is was the name of one of those the Lloyd's Syndicates Of London property schemes, of which the E.G. execs had bought into with money stolen kept from their artists, artists. When Lloyd's became hit with claims and whose accusations of fraud, it lead to the collapse led to this whole fiasco.of the label.
*** Epilogue: Fripp, once in control of Crimson's catalog, has overseen an extensive re-release of the band's recordings, including versions created especially for online distribution like iTunes.
25th Apr '16 9:23:00 AM fauxtoast
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* ''Starless and Bible Black''[[note]]partially recorded live[[/note]] (LP, 1974) - "The Great Deceiver", "The Night Watch", "Fracture"

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* ''Starless and Bible Black''[[note]]partially recorded live[[/note]] Black'' (LP, 1974) - "The Great Deceiver", "The Night Watch", "Fracture""Fracture" [[note]] While ''technically'' a studio album, nearly all of the album was recorded live during the 1973 tour, with crowd noise later removed and certain pieces enhanced with studio overdubs. [[/note]].
25th Apr '16 9:14:35 AM fauxtoast
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* ''Red''[[note]]also partially recorded live[[/note]] (LP, 1974) - "Red", "Starless"

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* ''Red''[[note]]also partially recorded live[[/note]] ''Red'' (LP, 1974) - "Red", "Starless""Starless" [[note]]the song "Providence" was recorded live in Providence, RI (natch) during the tour for ''Starless And Bible Black''. [[/note]]



* ''The Power to Believe'' (LP, 2003) - studio versions of "Level Five" & "Dangerous Curves" [[note]] Songs initially developed during the [=ProjKct=] years [[/note]] , new versions of "Eyes Wide Open" and "Happy With What You Have To Happy With"

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* ''The Power to Believe'' (LP, 2003) - studio versions of "Level Five" & "Dangerous Curves" [[note]] Songs initially developed during the [=ProjKct=] years [[/note]] , [[/note]], new versions of "Eyes Wide Open" and "Happy With What You Have To Happy With"
25th Apr '16 9:01:54 AM fauxtoast
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The band has released several live albums, the most-well known are arguably ''Earthbound'' (1972) and ''USA'' (1974) from its John Wetton-led early lineup. Fripp also has released ''forty-seven'' King Crimson and ProjKct live albums between 1998-2016, independently through the ''King Crimson Collector's Club'' series, which was subscription-based at its inception, but of which all are now available individually.

Fripp's label, Discipline Global Mobile, also has nearly ''six hundred'' recordings available for sale via download, ranging from full concerts (at times even ''entire tours'') from every stage of the band, along with compliations of rehearsals, rare mixes, and demos. Fripp, ever the archivist, notes each recording's sound quality and source, at times along with notes from his diary. [[note]] Fripp has two full-time engineers working for Discipline Global Mobile who work on unearthing, organizing, and re-mastering content. [[/note]]

to:

The band has released several live albums, the most-well known are arguably ''Earthbound'' (1972) and ''USA'' (1974) from its John Wetton-led early lineup. Fripp also has released ''forty-seven'' King Crimson and ProjKct [=ProjKct=] live albums between 1998-2016, independently through the ''King Crimson Collector's Club'' series, which was subscription-based at its inception, but of which all are now available individually.

Fripp's label, Discipline Global Mobile, also has nearly ''six hundred'' recordings available for sale via download, ranging from full concerts (at times even ''entire tours'') from every stage of the band, along with compliations of rehearsals, rare mixes, and demos. Fripp, ever the archivist, notes each recording's sound quality and source, at times along with notes from his diary. [[note]] Fripp also has two full-time engineers working for Discipline Global Mobile who work on unearthing, organizing, and re-mastering content. [[/note]]
25th Apr '16 9:00:33 AM fauxtoast
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* ''The Power to Believe'' (LP, 2003) - studio versions of "Level Five" & "Dangerous Curves" [[note]] Songs initially developed during the ProjKct years [[/note]] , new versions of "Eyes Wide Open" and "Happy With What You Have To Happy With"

to:

* ''The Power to Believe'' (LP, 2003) - studio versions of "Level Five" & "Dangerous Curves" [[note]] Songs initially developed during the ProjKct [=ProjKct=] years [[/note]] , new versions of "Eyes Wide Open" and "Happy With What You Have To Happy With"
25th Apr '16 8:59:29 AM fauxtoast
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* ''The [=ContruKction=] of Light'' (LP, 2000) - "[[=FraKctured=]]", "Larks' Tongues in Apsic Part IV"

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* ''The [=ContruKction=] of Light'' (LP, 2000) - "[[=FraKctured=]]", "[=FraKctured=]", "Larks' Tongues in Apsic Part IV"
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