History Music / KingCrimson

29th Oct '17 2:27:04 AM SinNanna
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* LyricalDissonance: Quite often. "21st Century Schizoid Man", for example, is a swaggering, jazzy hard rock song with apocalyptic lyrics about the horrors of the modern world.



* MysteriousWaif: The titular figure in "Moonchild" seems to be one.



* WarIsHell: "Prince Rupert's Lament," the fourth segment of "Lizard", is an instrumental depiction of the death and destruction left in the wake of the horrific Battle of Glass Tears.

to:

* WarIsHell: "Prince Rupert's Lament," the fourth segment of "Lizard", is an instrumental depiction of the death and destruction left in the wake of the horrific Battle of Glass Tears. "21st Century Schizoid Man" also gets into this with its mention of "innocents raped with napalm fire".
3rd Oct '17 9:16:04 AM fauxtoast
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** "Coda: Marine 475" (from "VROOOM") lists things related to "a Lloyd's insurance syndicate which suffered huge financial losses...", in allusion to King Crimson's former label, E.G. Records' management. [[note]] Marine 475 was the name of one of Lloyd's of London's property schemes that E.G. Records execs had bought into with the money they kept from their artists. When Lloyd's became besieged with claims, along with accusations of fraud, it lead to the collapse of the label. E.G. stands for David '''E'''nthoven and John '''G'''aydon, the first managers of King Crimson and the founders of the label, who had both left the company by the mid-1970's, long before the scandal began. For the long version, see ExecutiveMeddling above.[[/note]]

to:

** "Coda: Marine 475" (from "VROOOM") lists things related to "a Lloyd's insurance syndicate which suffered huge financial losses...", in an allusion to King Crimson's former label, E.G. Records' management. [[note]] Marine 475 was the name of one of Lloyd's of London's property schemes that E.G. Records execs had bought into with the money they kept from their artists. When Lloyd's became besieged with claims, along with accusations of fraud, it lead to the collapse of the label. btw, E.G. stands for David '''E'''nthoven and John '''G'''aydon, the first managers of King Crimson and the founders of the label, who had both left the company by the mid-1970's, long before the scandal began. For the long version, see ExecutiveMeddling above.[[/note]]
3rd Oct '17 9:13:55 AM fauxtoast
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* LimitedSpecialCollectorsUltimateEdition: Starting in 2012, there have been six massive boxsets produced, each limited to a single production run of between 3000 and 7000 copies:
** A 15-disc boxset commemorating the 40th Anniversary of ''Larks' Tongues in Aspic'' in 2012;
** 2013's ''The Road to Red'', A 24-disc collection of material of the three-piece (Wetton/Bruford/Fripp) 1974 lineup;
** 2014's ''Starless'', a 27-disc collection of material of the 1973-1974 lineup that released ''Starless and Bible Black'';
** 2015's ''THRAKBOX'', is a 17-disc collection of material of the 'double trio' lineup of the mid-1990's.
** 2016's ''On (and Off) The Road 1981-1984'', a 19-disc box [[http://www.dgmlive.com/news.htm?entry=5576 documenting]] the Fripp / Belew / Levin / Bruford years.
** 2017's ''Sailor's Tales'', a 27-disc boxset the covers the 1970 to 1972 lineups that recorded and toured behind the albums ''The Wake Of Poseidon '', ''Lizard'' & ''Islands''.
3rd Oct '17 9:12:48 AM fauxtoast
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* ExecutiveMeddling: And how. The two executives who owned the label (E.G. Records) King Crimson was on, Sam Alder and Mark Fenwick, deliberately delayed paying out artists' royalties and used the money to invest in a multitude of insurance schemes and real estate deals, most notably with Lloyd's of London. They also took advantage of Fripp's semi-retirement in the mid-1970's to convince him to sign over the ''publishing rights'' of KC's catalog over to E.G. as well (meaning Fripp no longer had any control on how King Crimson music was released or used). Due to a real estate bubble bursting in the late '80s, coupled with a tidal wave of insurance claims made against Lloyd's (claims many thought Lloyd's knew about but deliberately delayed paying, to make it look more attractive to investors) Alder & Fenwick were bankrupted, and couldn't pay its artists what they were owed. So, they sold E.G. to Virgin Records, without telling Fripp, and then offered all the label's artists a lump-sum settlement (read: bribe), which included a clause to release E.G. for wrong-doing, to avoid them later getting taken to court for mismanagement. Fripp refused to take the pay-off, and took Alder & Fenwick to court. After a really long (and expensive) lawsuit, Fripp managed to get his publishing rights back, and eventually control of the entire Crimson catalog, so now any future releases and re-releases will all be through his own label, Discipline Global Mobile (or will be licensed by Fripp to other labels for distribution). The entire fiasco (along with his disdain for peer-to-peer sharing, including a well-publicized row with Grooveshark) was in part why he left public performance in 2009, not resurfacing until the whole matter was settled.
3rd Oct '17 7:54:00 AM fauxtoast
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* ExecutiveMeddling: And how. The two executives who owned the label (E.G. Records) King Crimson was on, Sam Alder and Mark Fenwick, deliberately delayed paying out artists' royalties and used the money to invest in a multitude of insurance schemes and real estate deals, most notably with Lloyd's of London. They also took advantage of Fripp's semi-retirement in the mid-1970's to convince him to sign over the ''publishing rights'' of KC's catalog over to E.G. as well (meaning Fripp no longer had any control on how King Crimson music was released or used). Due to a real estate bubble bursting in the late '80s, coupled with a tidal wave of insurance claims made against Lloyd's (claims many thought Lloyd's knew about but deliberately delayed paying, to make it look more attractive to investors) Alder & Fenwick were bankrupted, and couldn't pay its artists what they were owed. So, they sold E.G. to Virgin Records, without telling Fripp, and then offered all the label's artists a lump-sum settlement (read: bribe), which included a clause to release E.G. for wrong-doing, to avoid them later getting taken to court for mismanagement. Fripp refused to take the pay-off, and took Alder & Fenwick to court. After a really long (and expensive) lawsuit, Fripp managed to get his publishing rights back, and eventually control of the entire Crimson catalog, so now any future releases and re-releases will all be through his own label, Discipline Global Mobile (or will be licensed by Fripp to other labels for distribution). The entire fiasco (along with his disdain for peer-to-peer sharing, including a well-publicized row with Grooveshark) was in part why he left public performance in 2009, not resurfacing until the whole matter was settled.



** "Coda: Marine 475" (from "VROOOM") lists things related to "a Lloyd's insurance syndicate which suffered huge financial losses...", in allusion to King Crimson's former label, E.G. Records' management. [[note]] The two executives who owned the label, Sam Alder and Mark Fenwick, deliberately delayed paying out artists' royalties, instead using the money to invest in a multitude of insurance schemes and real estate deals, most notably with Lloyd's of London. They also took advantage of Fripp's semi-retirement in the mid-1970's to convince him to sign over the publishing rights of KC's catalog over to E.G. as well (meaning Fripp no longer had any control on how King Crimson music was released or used). Due to a real estate bubble bursting in the late '80s, coupled with a tidal wave of insurance claims made against Lloyd's (claims many thought Lloyd's knew about but deliberately delayed paying, to make it look more attractive to investors) Alder & Fenwick were bankrupted, and couldn't pay its artists what they were owed. So they sold E.G. to Virgin Records, without telling Fripp, and then offered all the label's artists a lump sum settlement (read: bribe), which included a clause to release E.G. for wrong-doing, to avoid them later getting taken to court for mismanagement. Fripp refused to take a pay-off, and took Alder & Fenwick to court. After a really long (and expensive) lawsuit, he managed to get his publishing rights back, and then ultimately control of the entire Crimson catalog, so now that any future releases and re-releases will all be through his own label, Discipline Global Mobile (or licensed by Fripp to other labels for distribution). The entire fiasco (along with his disdain for online distribution, including a well-publicized row with Grooveshark) is in part why he left public performance in 2009. TL;DR: Marine 475 was the name of one of Lloyd's of London's property schemes that E.G. Records execs had bought into with the money they kept from their artists. When Lloyd's became besieged with claims, along with accusations of fraud, it lead to the collapse of the label. E.G. stands for David '''E'''nthoven and John '''G'''aydon, the first managers of King Crimson and the founders of the label, who had both left the company by the mid-1970's, long before the scandal began. [[/note]]

to:

** "Coda: Marine 475" (from "VROOOM") lists things related to "a Lloyd's insurance syndicate which suffered huge financial losses...", in allusion to King Crimson's former label, E.G. Records' management. [[note]] The two executives who owned the label, Sam Alder and Mark Fenwick, deliberately delayed paying out artists' royalties, instead using the money to invest in a multitude of insurance schemes and real estate deals, most notably with Lloyd's of London. They also took advantage of Fripp's semi-retirement in the mid-1970's to convince him to sign over the publishing rights of KC's catalog over to E.G. as well (meaning Fripp no longer had any control on how King Crimson music was released or used). Due to a real estate bubble bursting in the late '80s, coupled with a tidal wave of insurance claims made against Lloyd's (claims many thought Lloyd's knew about but deliberately delayed paying, to make it look more attractive to investors) Alder & Fenwick were bankrupted, and couldn't pay its artists what they were owed. So they sold E.G. to Virgin Records, without telling Fripp, and then offered all the label's artists a lump sum settlement (read: bribe), which included a clause to release E.G. for wrong-doing, to avoid them later getting taken to court for mismanagement. Fripp refused to take a pay-off, and took Alder & Fenwick to court. After a really long (and expensive) lawsuit, he managed to get his publishing rights back, and then ultimately control of the entire Crimson catalog, so now that any future releases and re-releases will all be through his own label, Discipline Global Mobile (or licensed by Fripp to other labels for distribution). The entire fiasco (along with his disdain for online distribution, including a well-publicized row with Grooveshark) is in part why he left public performance in 2009. TL;DR: Marine 475 was the name of one of Lloyd's of London's property schemes that E.G. Records execs had bought into with the money they kept from their artists. When Lloyd's became besieged with claims, along with accusations of fraud, it lead to the collapse of the label. E.G. stands for David '''E'''nthoven and John '''G'''aydon, the first managers of King Crimson and the founders of the label, who had both left the company by the mid-1970's, long before the scandal began. For the long version, see ExecutiveMeddling above.[[/note]]
3rd Oct '17 7:36:15 AM fauxtoast
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* LimitedSpecialCollectorsUltimateEdition: Starting in 2012, there have been five massive boxsets produced, each limited to a single production run of between 3000 and 7000 copies:

to:

* LimitedSpecialCollectorsUltimateEdition: Starting in 2012, there have been five six massive boxsets produced, each limited to a single production run of between 3000 and 7000 copies:


Added DiffLines:

** 2017's ''Sailor's Tales'', a 27-disc boxset the covers the 1970 to 1972 lineups that recorded and toured behind the albums ''The Wake Of Poseidon '', ''Lizard'' & ''Islands''.
8th Sep '17 1:52:15 PM Shedlessguy
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* Mel Collins (197072, 2013): saxophone, flute, Mellotron

to:

* Mel Collins (197072, 2013): saxophone, flute, MellotronMellotron [[note]] Session Musician in 1974. [[/note]]



* Ian [=McDonald=] (196869): saxophone, flute, Mellotron

to:

* Ian [=McDonald=] (196869): saxophone, flute, MellotronMellotron [[note]] Session Musician in 1974 [[/note]]
30th Aug '17 2:59:55 PM Sunburst
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* BoleroEffect: They first tried this out with their simplified cover version of Gustav Holst's "Mars", and by five years on, "Starless" used this to the point where it could be considered an UrExample of PostRock. It's not their only usage of the trope; "Lizard" and "The Devil's Triangle" are other good examples. [[note]] "The Devil's Triangle" is basically their rewrite of "Mars", so it figures. [[/note]]

to:

* BoleroEffect: They first tried this out with their simplified cover version of Gustav Holst's "Mars", and by five years on, "Starless" used this to the point where it could be considered an UrExample of PostRock. It's not their only usage of the trope; "Lizard" "Lizard", "The Talking Drum", "Dangerous Curves" and "The Devil's Triangle" are other good examples. [[note]] "The Devil's Triangle" is basically their rewrite of "Mars", so it figures. [[/note]]
30th Jul '17 2:53:45 PM bt8257
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** "Get Thy Bearings" by Music/{{Donovan}}, "Mars, the Bringer of War" (from ''The Planets'') by Music/GustavHolst, "Prism" by Pierre Favre, "'Music/{{Heroes}}'" by Music/DavidBowie. [[note]] Fripp played guitar on the original version of this song, and Belew played the song live as a member of Bowie's touring band. [[/note]]
** Don't forget [[Music/{{Revolver}} "Tomorrow Never Knows!"]]

to:

** "Get Thy Bearings" by Music/{{Donovan}}, "Mars, the Bringer of War" (from ''The Planets'') by Music/GustavHolst, "Prism" by Pierre Favre, "'Music/{{Heroes}}'" "'Heroes'" by Music/DavidBowie. [[note]] Fripp played guitar on the original version of this song, and Belew played the song live as a member of Bowie's touring band. [[/note]]
** Don't forget [[Music/{{Revolver}} "Tomorrow Never Knows!"]]Knows"]]!
7th Jul '17 10:56:39 PM SinNanna
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Added DiffLines:

* LighterAndSofter: ''Islands'' is a lot softer and airier than the albums that came before and after it.
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