History MuggingTheMonster / VideoGames

19th Apr '18 2:02:29 PM Luigifan
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** ''[[VideoGame/TheElderScrollsIIIMorrowind Morrowind]]'' has a couple of random minor sidequests which see "highwayman" style bandits attempting to rob the PlayerCharacter. As ''Morrowind'' is the only game in the series without strict LevelScaling, these encounters can actually be challenging to a low-level player. For a high-level player, they very much become this trope instead as the bandit attempts to rob a ''[[KillTheGod god slayer]]''.
** ''[[VideoGame/TheElderScrollsIVOblivion Oblivion]]'': Merely being the Hero of Kvatch, Archmage of the Mage's Guild, Guildmaster of the Fighter's Guild, Champion of the Arena, the Divine Crusader, Champion of Cyrodiil and, (in the expansion) [[spoiler:Sheogorath's heir, the new God of Madness]], isn't enough to make highway robbers leave you alone. It could be a bit of a subversion: thanks to the feature that makes the enemies level up with you, bandits can still be quite tough for a while (although most {{NPC}}s have their levels capped, so at higher levels this trope is still in effect). Though the robbers get downright silly at high levels. They always ask for 100 gold, no matter when it is that you face them. At low levels, this can be a burden to pay. At higher levels, [[MoneyForNothing 100 gold is practically nothing]]. Plus, since the robber's equipment levels with you, the people demanding 100 gold are wearing glass armor that's worth thousands. However, this is truly averted if you are the [[MasterThief Grey Fox]] and wearing the Nocturnal's Cowl. Then the highwaymen turn into fanboys and won't attack you unless you attack them first. There's actually a little-known trick to escaping them. If you're wearing less than 100 gold worth of equipment when they speak to you (not carrying, just wearing), you can claim you don't have the money on you. They fall for it even if you're carrying 499lbs of Daedric equipment in your pack. Alternatively, if you do plenty of fame-increasing quests (the main quest in particular), the highwayman will instead greet you normally.

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** ''[[VideoGame/TheElderScrollsIIIMorrowind Morrowind]]'' has a couple of random minor sidequests which see "highwayman" style bandits attempting to rob the PlayerCharacter. As ''Morrowind'' is the only game in the series without strict LevelScaling, these encounters can actually be challenging to a low-level player. For a high-level player, they very much become this trope instead instead, as the bandit attempts to rob a ''[[KillTheGod god slayer]]''.
** ''[[VideoGame/TheElderScrollsIVOblivion Oblivion]]'': Merely being the Hero of Kvatch, Archmage of the Mage's Guild, Guildmaster of the Fighter's Guild, Champion of the Arena, the Divine Crusader, Champion of Cyrodiil and, Cyrodiil, and (in the expansion) [[spoiler:Sheogorath's heir, the new God of Madness]], isn't enough to make highway robbers leave you alone. It could be a bit of a subversion: thanks to the feature that makes the enemies level up with you, bandits can still be quite tough for a while (although most {{NPC}}s have their levels capped, so at higher levels this trope is still in effect). Though the robbers get downright silly at high levels. They always ask for 100 gold, no matter when it is that you face them. At low levels, this can be a burden to pay. At higher levels, [[MoneyForNothing 100 gold is practically nothing]]. Plus, since the robber's equipment levels with you, the people demanding 100 gold are wearing glass armor that's worth thousands. However, this is truly averted if you are the [[MasterThief Grey Fox]] and wearing the Nocturnal's Cowl. Then the highwaymen turn into fanboys and won't attack you unless you attack them first. first.
***
There's actually a little-known trick to escaping them. If you're wearing less than 100 gold worth of equipment when they speak to you (not carrying, just wearing), you can claim you don't have the money on you. They fall for it even if you're carrying 499lbs of Daedric equipment in your pack. Alternatively, if you do plenty of fame-increasing quests (the main quest in particular), the highwayman will instead greet you normally.



* ''VideoGame/GrandTheftAutoIV'' has {{serial killer}} Eddie Low have much hype about being a terror in Liberty City (he's killed a dozen people, most either unsuspecting joggers or hitchhikers). The optional encounters with him ends with his trying to kill Niko, who [[UsefulNotes/TheYugoslavWars fought in the Balkans]] and is now a freelance "problem solver" (read: he's killed a few hundred people, ''at least'', most of which include armed thugs and police). It's pretty obvious how this one turns out.

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* ''VideoGame/GrandTheftAutoIV'' has {{serial killer}} Eddie Low have much hype about being a terror in Liberty City (he's killed a dozen people, most being either unsuspecting joggers or hitchhikers). The optional encounters with him ends with his trying to kill Niko, who [[UsefulNotes/TheYugoslavWars fought in the Balkans]] and is now a freelance "problem solver" (read: he's killed a few hundred people, ''at least'', most of which include armed thugs and police). It's pretty obvious how this one turns out.



** Invoked again by the [[{{Cult}} Altruist Cult]] much later. After Trevor delivers a fourth victim to their doorstep, the Altruists decide to include Trevor (at gunpoint) in their [[CannibalTribe dinner plans]]. Unfortunately for them, Trevor is ''[[AxCrazy no]][[PsychoForHire thing]]'' like their usual dinner guests, and the Altruists only seal their fates by leaving an AK within arm's reach. [[StrawmanNewsMedia Weasel News]] would later report the event as [[CurbStompBattle "ritual suicide"]] -- an ironically apt description of what the cultists ended up [[TooDumbToLive "accomplishing"]].

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** Invoked again by the [[{{Cult}} Altruist Cult]] much later. After Trevor delivers a fourth victim to their doorstep, the Altruists decide to include Trevor (at gunpoint) in their [[CannibalTribe dinner plans]]. Unfortunately for them, Trevor is ''[[AxCrazy no]][[PsychoForHire thing]]'' like their usual dinner guests, and the Altruists only seal their fates by leaving an AK within arm's reach. [[StrawmanNewsMedia Weasel News]] would later report the event as [[CurbStompBattle "ritual suicide"]] -- an ironically apt description of what the cultists ended up [[TooDumbToLive "accomplishing"]].



*** Most notable as PVE players tend towards having higher hp and judging people on that; PVP gear has lower stats, but also has a Damage Multiplier and Resistance stat for PVP. This is beyond [=PVPers=] regularly having their setup oriented towards kiting, CC, self-healing, burst DPS, and other things that make or break player-versus-player combat while PVE players just go for raw Damage throughput, and the often ''massive'' skill difference between someone who sits behind a boss smacking a macro all day and one that fights other experienced PVP Players. A PVE player seeing a flagged person with about 4/5ths of their hp and feeling mean will attempt to kill them, only for their hits to whiff, get stunned, bursted to a tenth of their hp, panic, and get killed trying to run away.
** Or when a player tries to attack another player without realizing they are a higher level, have better gear, and/or very proficient with their class.
* An unintentional version used to happen in ''VideoGame/CityOfHeroes''. Certain missions would spawn an ambush waiting for the players when they exited the mission. What was supposed to happen is that the spawned mob would be at the appropriate level for the characters. On rare occasions, however, the ambush would be composed of critters of a rather lower level than the player(s). Like Level 1. Even if the player or group was level 50. This bug was in or around Issue 5. All ambushes would spawn at the minimum level available for that group (Council -- Level 1, Circle of Thorns, level 5). This also led to an unintentional spoiler for anyone who hadn't completed the level 35-40 Rikti story arc if they got an ambush, as the game would throw level 5 [[spoiler:Lost]] at them.

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*** Most notable as PVE players tend towards having higher hp and judging people on that; PVP gear has lower stats, but also has a Damage Multiplier and Resistance stat for PVP. This is beyond [=PVPers=] regularly having their setup oriented towards kiting, CC, self-healing, burst DPS, and other things that make or break player-versus-player combat combat, while PVE players just go for raw Damage throughput, hit points and damage output, and the often ''massive'' skill difference between someone who sits behind a boss smacking a macro all day and one that fights other experienced PVP Players. A PVE player seeing a flagged person with about 4/5ths of their hp and feeling mean will attempt to kill them, only for their hits to whiff, get stunned, bursted to a tenth of their hp, panic, and get killed trying to run away.
** Or when a player tries to attack another player without realizing they are a higher level, have better gear, and/or are very proficient with their class.
* An unintentional version used to happen in ''VideoGame/CityOfHeroes''. Certain missions would spawn an ambush waiting for the players when they exited the mission. What was supposed to happen is that the spawned mob would be at the appropriate level for the characters. On rare occasions, however, the ambush would be composed of critters of a rather lower level than the player(s). Like Level 1. Even if the player or group was level 50. This bug was in or around Issue 5. All ambushes would spawn at the minimum level available for that group (Council -- Level 1, Circle of Thorns, Thorns level 5). This also led to an unintentional spoiler for anyone who hadn't completed the level 35-40 Rikti story arc if they got an ambush, as the game would throw level 5 [[spoiler:Lost]] at them.



** There is another part later on that might count as this. You need to buy tickets to gain access to the laser guarded WTO HQ. The main ticket seller has been killed and replaced with a thug who grossly overcharges. You can [[AirVentPassageway sneak in through a vent]], kill all the thugs, and press the button to deactivate the lasers yourself.
** In ''VideoGame/DeusExHumanRevolution'', during Jensen's second visit to Hengsha, Belltower is on a manhunt for him. At some point, a random punk then decides to walk up to the wanted cyborg ex-SWAT SuperSoldier and threaten to turn him in if he doesn't pay up. [[SchmuckBait While the option to do so exists]], even people doing a hardcore PacifistRun will likely select the "Threaten" option which prompts Jensen to give a vague threat which then causes the idiot to sheepishly back down.

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** There is another part later on that might count as this. You need to buy tickets to gain access to the laser guarded laser-guarded WTO HQ. The main ticket seller has been killed and replaced with a thug who grossly overcharges. You can [[AirVentPassageway sneak in through a vent]], kill all the thugs, and press the button to deactivate the lasers yourself.
** In ''VideoGame/DeusExHumanRevolution'', during Jensen's second visit to Hengsha, Belltower is on a manhunt for him. At some point, a random punk then decides to walk up to the wanted cyborg ex-SWAT SuperSoldier and threaten to turn him in if he doesn't pay up. [[SchmuckBait While the option to do so exists]], even people doing a hardcore PacifistRun will likely select the "Threaten" option option, which prompts Jensen to give a vague threat threat, which then causes the idiot to sheepishly back down.



** ''VideoGame/{{Fallout 2}}'' averts this with the New Reno crime families. If you are a made man of a family, the other families will attack you on sight -- unless you are wearing a suit of [[PoweredArmor Power Armor]], in which case they will treat you with respectful politeness.

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** ''VideoGame/{{Fallout 2}}'' averts this with the New Reno crime families. If you are a made man of a family, the other families will attack you on sight -- unless you are wearing a suit of [[PoweredArmor Power Armor]], in which case they will treat you with respectful politeness.



*** If medals were being awarded for falling for this trope, though, the aliens that abduct you in the ''Mothership Zeta'' DLC deserve one. Every human living in Earth's various post-apocalyptic wasteland regions is a CombatPragmatist out of necessity for survival, and everybody this fact gets lost on is all but guaranteed a swift removal from the gene pool. The aliens abduct one of these humans and place them in a containment cell with another human from the wasteland. Cue the two wastelanders working together to hatch an escape plan, free several other humans aboard the ship, massacre the ship's security forces/crew, cripple its internal defense grid, disable its death ray, obliterate its research facilities, take control of the bridge, and then use the ship's remaining weapons to destroy its escort while slaughtering any boarding parties that try to retake the ship. For bonus points, the other humans they rescue from cryostasis are an American cowboy, a US Army CombatMedic, and a Japanese samurai. Three character archetypes typically associated with being badass.
** ''VideoGame/FalloutNewVegas'' takes this a step further with the Freeside Thugs. When you first show up, you are attacked by 2 or 3 unarmored and unwashed thugs armed only with a variety of crappy melee weapons. They pose very little threat even at low levels, yet they will attack the Power Armored wearing badass with an Avenger Minigun, followed by a Nightkin Super Mutant with a BFS and heavily modified Eyebot. They last roughly the amount of time it takes for you to decide which of the numerous means of killing them (which ranges from chainsaws to an [[KillSat orbital death laser]]) you feel like using at that moment in time.

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*** If medals were being awarded for falling for this trope, though, the aliens that abduct you in the ''Mothership Zeta'' DLC deserve one. Every human living in Earth's various post-apocalyptic wasteland regions is a CombatPragmatist out of necessity for survival, and everybody this fact gets lost on is all but guaranteed a swift removal from the gene pool. The aliens abduct one of these humans and place them in a containment cell with another human from the wasteland. Cue the two wastelanders working together to hatch an escape plan, free several other humans aboard the ship, massacre the ship's security forces/crew, cripple its internal defense grid, disable its death ray, obliterate its research facilities, take control of the bridge, and then use the ship's remaining weapons to destroy its escort while slaughtering any boarding parties that try to retake the ship. For bonus points, the other humans they rescue from cryostasis are an American cowboy, a US Army CombatMedic, and a Japanese samurai. Three samurai: three character archetypes typically associated with being badass.
** ''VideoGame/FalloutNewVegas'' takes this a step further with the Freeside Thugs. When you first show up, you are attacked by 2 or 3 unarmored and unwashed thugs armed only with a variety of crappy melee weapons. They pose very little threat even at low levels, yet they will attack the Power Armored wearing Armor-wearing badass with an Avenger Minigun, followed by a Nightkin Super Mutant with a BFS and a heavily modified Eyebot. They last roughly the amount of time it takes for you to decide which of the numerous means of killing them (which ranges from chainsaws to an [[KillSat orbital death laser]]) you feel like using at that moment in time.



*** ''New Vegas'' also features Orion Moreno, a bitter old man living near Camp [=McCarran=] and being harassed by the NCR, who claim that he is "squatting" on "their" land, even though he built the house he lives in decades before the NCR expanded into Nevada. [[spoiler:As it turns out, Moreno isn't just some random old coot, he's actually a RetiredBadass, being a former elite trooper for the Enclave, a OneManArmy who still has his PoweredArmor and [[GatlingGood minigun]] tucked away where he can get them.]] This trope is especially played straight if you complete [[spoiler:Arcade]]'s companion quest by persuading Moreno to fight on the side of the Legion, the NCR's mortal enemy.
* Early in ''VideoGame/ReturnToKrondor'', two random muggers attempt to rob legendary thief Jimmy the Hand -- who in fact scolds them for not recognizing a dangerous mark when they see one, yet they try it anyway.

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*** ''New Vegas'' also features Orion Moreno, a bitter old man living near Camp [=McCarran=] and being harassed by the NCR, who claim that he is "squatting" on "their" land, even though he built the house he lives in decades before the NCR expanded into Nevada. [[spoiler:As it turns out, Moreno isn't just some random old coot, he's actually a RetiredBadass, being a former elite trooper for the Enclave, a OneManArmy who still has his PoweredArmor and [[GatlingGood minigun]] tucked away where he can get them.]] This trope is [[AwakenTheSleepingGiant especially played straight straight]] if you complete [[spoiler:Arcade]]'s companion quest by persuading Moreno to fight on the side of the Legion, the NCR's mortal enemy.
* Early in ''VideoGame/ReturnToKrondor'', two random muggers attempt to rob legendary thief Jimmy the Hand -- who in fact scolds them for not recognizing a dangerous mark when they see one, yet they try it anyway.



** Early in ''VideoGame/DragonAgeOrigins'', you come across some bandits trying to extort "tolls" from refugees. When they try to pull this on your group (typically at that point consisting of a mage, a mage-hunter, a war dog, and whatever the player character rolled as), one of your possible responses is basically "[[YouHaveGOTToBeKiddingMe Are you serious?]] [[LampshadeHanging Look at us!]]" You can actually turn the situation on its head, and demand that the bandits pay up. You can, alternately, reveal to them that you're a Grey Warden. The Grey Wardens are, by the by, wanted for treason and apparently murdering the king, which you can point out to the bandits, at which point the leader will immediately crap himself, stand aside, and bid you a good day and to "continue on with your king-killing ways." And, if you're playing a mage, you can make this known to them. Cue the whimpers of "[[BalefulPolymorph I don't wanna be a toad!]]"

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** Early in ''VideoGame/DragonAgeOrigins'', you come across some bandits trying to extort "tolls" from refugees. When they try to pull this on your group (typically at that point consisting of a mage, a mage-hunter, a war dog, and whatever the player character rolled as), one of your possible responses is basically "[[YouHaveGOTToBeKiddingMe Are you serious?]] [[LampshadeHanging Look at us!]]" You can actually turn the situation on its head, and demand that the bandits pay up. You can, alternately, reveal to them that you're a Grey Warden. The Grey Wardens are, by the by, way, wanted for treason and apparently murdering the king, which you can point out to the bandits, at which point the leader will immediately crap himself, stand aside, and bid you a good day and to "continue on with your king-killing ways." And, if you're playing a mage, you can make this known to them. Cue the whimpers of "[[BalefulPolymorph I don't wanna be a toad!]]"



** If you imported your Fereldan Warden in ''VideoGame/DragonAgeOriginsAwakening'', any non-Darkspawn trying to kill you will pretty much be trying this out, especially [[spoiler:Bann Esmerelle and her lackeys]]. From before the start of the expansion, half the nation of Ferelden led by a hero, the Antivan Crows, (a faction of) the Blackstone Irregulars, some Orlesian assassins, a dragon-worshipping cult (and their dragon), the Witch of the Wilds, some Tevinter smugglers, a forest full of werewolves, a dwarven political faction, some maleficars, some golems, some demons, and Maker only knows what else have ''all'' tried to kill you and ''all'' have failed. This isn't counting the countless darkspawn that all but died by your hand, and the archdemon itself, and some ass-headed jokers from Amaranthine think they could do any better?

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** If you imported your Fereldan Warden in ''VideoGame/DragonAgeOriginsAwakening'', any non-Darkspawn trying to kill you will pretty much be trying this out, especially [[spoiler:Bann Esmerelle and her lackeys]]. From before the start of the expansion, half the nation of Ferelden led by a hero, the Antivan Crows, (a faction of) the Blackstone Irregulars, some Orlesian assassins, a dragon-worshipping cult (and their dragon), the Witch of the Wilds, some Tevinter smugglers, a forest full of werewolves, a dwarven political faction, some maleficars, some golems, some demons, and Maker only knows what else have ''all'' tried to kill you and ''all'' have failed. This isn't counting the countless darkspawn that all but died by your hand, and the archdemon itself, and some ass-headed jokers from Amaranthine think they could do any better?



* In ''VideoGame/TheWitcher'', Geralt of Rivia is hired into finding a treasure in an abandoned house by a thug who attempts to ambush him with a small pack of friends in said abandoned house. Right before he butchers them all, Geralt [[LampshadeHanging points out that it was pretty stupid of them to pull that scheme on a Witcher]].
--> '''Geralt''': That was pretty stupid, hiring a Witcher against yourself."

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* In ''VideoGame/TheWitcher'', Geralt of Rivia is hired into finding to find a treasure in an abandoned house by a thug who attempts to ambush him with a small pack of friends in said abandoned house. Right before he butchers them all, Geralt [[LampshadeHanging points out that it was pretty stupid of them to pull that scheme on a Witcher]].
--> '''Geralt''': That was pretty stupid, hiring a Witcher against yourself."



** The list of people who threaten [[PlayerCharacter Commander Shepard]] and crew and are obliterated shortly thereafter could fill a short book. In the first game, it's excusable, as Shepard doesn't have much of a reputation outside of the Alliance. In the second game, after Shepard saved the Citadel and killed Sovereign, opposing him/her in any way is probably grounds for a Website/{{Darwin Award|s}} unless you happen to be living someplace really isolated (like a maximum security prison) or been in a coma. [[EldritchAbomination The Reapers]] are justified, being [[NighInvulnerability ridiculously powerful]], [[EldritchAbomination Cthulhu-esque]] ships of extinction. Others, not so much.

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** The list of people who threaten [[PlayerCharacter Commander Shepard]] and crew and are obliterated shortly thereafter could fill a short book. In the first game, it's excusable, as Shepard doesn't have much of a reputation outside of the Alliance. In the second game, after Shepard saved the Citadel and killed Sovereign, opposing him/her in any way is probably grounds for a Website/{{Darwin Award|s}} unless you happen to be living someplace really isolated (like a maximum security prison) or have been in a coma. [[EldritchAbomination The Reapers]] are justified, being [[NighInvulnerability ridiculously powerful]], [[EldritchAbomination Cthulhu-esque]] ships of extinction. Others, not so much.



** In ''VideoGame/AssassinsCreedBrotherhood'', there are [[RandomEncounters randomly encountered]] robbers who attack Ezio Auditore because he looks like a rich nobleman (which he essentially is, to be honest) and an easy mark (which he is hilariously '''''not'''''). This sometimes occurs even when he's on horseback, in which case he could just ride away... but him getting off of his horse only gives him more varied ways to butcher them. Worse yet for them, they somehow all have various baubles, trinkets and items he could make use of...
** It only gets worse for the poor sods when Ezio starts recruiting Assassin apprentices, and as a result can wipe out the entire ambush party with a wave of his hand and a flurry of Hidden Blades or [[RainOfArrows a storm of unseen arrows]]. (According to the community manager the apprentices are actually tailing Ezio discreetly, so they're actually ambushing the would-be ambushers.) It's implied by the Thief Assignments (or rather that completing them all causes the attacks to cease) that the robbers are from the Cento Occhi ("Hundred Eyes") gang in [[BigBad Cesare Borgia's]] employ, though none of them seem to recognize Ezio as an Assassin despite him (and his apprentices) being the only one(s) in Rome to "show their colors."

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** In ''VideoGame/AssassinsCreedBrotherhood'', there are [[RandomEncounters randomly encountered]] robbers who attack Ezio Auditore because he looks like a rich nobleman (which he essentially is, to be honest) and an easy mark (which he is hilariously '''''not'''''). This sometimes occurs even when he's on horseback, in which case he could just ride away... but him getting off of his horse only gives him more varied ways to butcher them. Worse yet for them, they somehow all have various baubles, trinkets trinkets, and items he could make use of...
** It only gets worse for the poor sods when Ezio starts recruiting Assassin apprentices, and as a result can wipe out the entire ambush party with a wave of his hand and a flurry of Hidden Blades or [[RainOfArrows a storm of unseen arrows]]. (According to the community manager manager, the apprentices are actually tailing Ezio discreetly, so they're actually ambushing the would-be ambushers.) It's implied by the Thief Assignments (or rather that completing them all causes the attacks to cease) that the robbers are from the Cento Occhi ("Hundred Eyes") gang in [[BigBad Cesare Borgia's]] employ, though none of them seem to recognize Ezio as an Assassin despite him (and his apprentices) being the only one(s) in Rome to "show their colors."



* In ''VideoGame/MountAndBlade'', several of the unaffiliated wandering parties (read, bandits) can and will do this. The game seems to only read party size and occasionally the quality of troops in said party as the trigger for whether the bandits will pursue or flee from the player. This can lead to situations where Looters (the weakest NPC in the game, even below the much-abused peasant farmers and villagers), [[SuicidalOverconfidence will attempt to pursue a lone player]] whose weapon alone is worth more than the belongings of the entire Looter party combined wearing armor that ignores an overwhelming percentage of the damage done by the Looters' bottom-tier weapons. Seriously. A handful of stones and a stick versus a guy in plate armor carrying a [[{{BFS}} Sword of War]]. You might almost pity those Looters.

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* In ''VideoGame/MountAndBlade'', several of the unaffiliated wandering parties (read, bandits) can and will do this. The game seems to only read party size and occasionally the quality of troops in said party as the trigger for whether the bandits will pursue or flee from the player. This can lead to situations where Looters (the ([[TheGoomba the weakest NPC in the game, game]], even below the much-abused [[VideoGameCrueltyPotential much-abused]] [[ButtMonkey peasant farmers and villagers), villagers]]), [[SuicidalOverconfidence will attempt to pursue a lone player]] whose weapon alone is worth more than the belongings of the entire Looter party combined wearing armor that ignores an overwhelming overwhelmingly huge percentage of the damage done by the Looters' bottom-tier weapons. Seriously. A handful of stones and a stick versus a guy in plate armor carrying a [[{{BFS}} Sword of War]]. You might almost pity those Looters.



** In a cut-scene example, when Marston enters the Mexican town of Chuparosa for the first time, a trio of drunken locals -- obviously hell-bent on bullying some "gringo" -- decide it'd be a good idea to pick on him. Marston tries to defuse the situation calmly and without violence, but his respectful overtures are rejected, and when the trio steal his hat and make a play for his boots... well, you can probably guess how it ends for them.
* In ''VideoGame/KnightsOfTheOldRepublic'', a trio of Rodian punks start hassling the bounty hunter Calo Nord, who calmly tells them to go away and begins counting to three when they don't. Calo then blasts them all in under fives seconds and warns you to go away if you bother him as well. This can also lead to a NonStandardGameOver -- you can [[TooDumbToLive ignore his warnings to leave him alone]], after which he'll [[HopelessBossFight kill you in 2 hits. At most.]]

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** In a cut-scene example, when Marston enters the Mexican town of Chuparosa for the first time, a trio of drunken locals -- obviously hell-bent on bullying some "gringo" -- decide it'd be a good idea to pick on him. Marston tries to defuse the situation calmly and without violence, but his respectful overtures are rejected, and when the trio steal his hat and make a play for his boots... well, you can probably guess how it ends for them.
* In ''VideoGame/KnightsOfTheOldRepublic'', a trio of Rodian punks start hassling the bounty hunter Calo Nord, who calmly tells them to go away and begins counting to three when they don't. Calo then blasts them all in under fives five seconds and warns you to go away if you bother him as well. This can also lead to a NonStandardGameOver -- you can [[TooDumbToLive ignore his warnings to leave him alone]], after which he'll [[HopelessBossFight kill you in 2 hits. At most.]]



* In ''VideoGame/PoliceQuest II'', when Bonds is pursuing Bains in Steelton Park, you encounter a mugger who will mug you with his bare hands. Radioing your partner will scare him away and get arrested.

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* In ''VideoGame/PoliceQuest II'', when Bonds is pursuing Bains in Steelton Park, you encounter a mugger who will mug you with his bare hands. Radioing your partner will scare him away and get him arrested.



* Featured in trailers to ''VideoGame/TheSecretWorld'', in which the representatives each faction are attacked by minor demons and easily fight them off. Arguably the best example of this crops up in TheIlluminati trailer: in this case, [[TheMeanBrit Alex McCall]] is attacked in a pub bathroom by a tentacled monster; despite being less than three feet away from the creature [=McCall=] doesn't even step away from the urinal, distracting the monster with an illusion before obliterating it with a blast of chaos magic. Cut to black, as [=McCall=] ''finally'' zips up his fly and leaves.
* Entirely possible in ''VideoGame/SwordOfTheStars''. Admittedly in the first game, [[ViolenceIsTheOnlyOption war is the default option]] and you must opt in to ceasefire or better, but in the second game, you default to neutrality and due to ArtificialStupidity other factions are still very likely to declare war without considering that you might be much more powerful. It's not uncommon for the AI or an inexperienced player to stumble upon a fledgling colony as first contact, think the owners are easy prey and attack... only for a fleetful of dreadnoughts to pop up shortly after from the dozens of developed systems the owner really has, seeing red.

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* Featured in trailers to ''VideoGame/TheSecretWorld'', in which the representatives of each faction are attacked by minor demons and easily fight them off. Arguably the best example of this crops up in TheIlluminati trailer: in this case, [[TheMeanBrit Alex McCall]] is attacked in a pub bathroom by a tentacled monster; despite being less than three feet away from the creature creature, [=McCall=] doesn't even step away from the urinal, distracting the monster with an illusion before obliterating it with a blast of chaos magic. Cut to black, as [=McCall=] ''finally'' zips up his fly and leaves.
* Entirely possible in ''VideoGame/SwordOfTheStars''. Admittedly in the first game, [[ViolenceIsTheOnlyOption war is the default option]] and you must opt in to ceasefire or better, but in the second game, you default to neutrality and due to ArtificialStupidity other factions are still very likely to declare war without considering that you might be much more powerful. It's not uncommon for the AI or an inexperienced player to stumble upon a fledgling colony as first contact, think the owners are easy prey prey, and attack... only for a fleetful of dreadnoughts to pop up shortly after from the dozens of developed systems the owner really has, seeing red.



* ''VideoGame/BeyondTwoSouls'' has an instance that is less Mugging the Monster than it is Mugging the Monster's Friend. Four {{Jerkass}} teens with a video camera and a baseball bat decide to beat up Stan, a defenseless homeless man, ForTheLulz. His newly-made friend Jodie - who has had CIA combat training - intervenes. ''Firmly''. The "[[CurbStompBattle fight]]" is made all the more satisfying by the fact that it's caught on the thugs' own camera.

to:

* ''VideoGame/BeyondTwoSouls'' has an instance that is less Mugging the Monster than it is Mugging the Monster's Friend. Four {{Jerkass}} teens with a video camera and a baseball bat decide to beat up Stan, a defenseless homeless man, ForTheLulz. His newly-made friend Jodie - who has had CIA combat training - intervenes. ''Firmly''. The "[[CurbStompBattle fight]]" is made all the more satisfying by the fact that it's caught on the thugs' own camera.



** Naturally, you can end up doing this yourself, usually when failing challenges and finding out your target was a bit sneakier, smarter, or stronger than you thought. Examples include getting thrown overboard by a docker's hidden help and trying to give the Minister a beating only to find out the chap used to be a very good boxer.

to:

** Naturally, you can end up doing this yourself, usually when failing challenges and finding out your target was a bit sneakier, smarter, or stronger than you thought. Examples include getting thrown overboard by a docker's hidden help and trying to give the Minister a beating beating, only to find out [[RetiredBadass the chap used to be a very good boxer.boxer]].



** And of course, the Devils themselves end up doing this when they try to sack Polythreme, which is an ''insanely'' active GeniusLoci to the point any inanimate objects within it gain a life of their own that acts both individually and like a HiveMind with the rest. One can only imagine the faces of the devils as their own ships, weapons and even ''clothes'' decided to stop cooperating and turn on them.

to:

** And of course, the Devils themselves end up doing this when they try to sack Polythreme, which is an ''insanely'' active GeniusLoci to the point any inanimate objects within it gain a life of their own that acts both individually and like a HiveMind with the rest. One can only imagine the faces of the devils as their own ships, weapons weapons, and even ''clothes'' decided to stop cooperating and turn on them.
27th Mar '18 7:18:03 AM BeerBaron
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* ''Franchise/TheElderScrolls''
** ''[[VideoGame/TheElderScrollsIVOblivion Oblivion]]'':
*** Merely being the Hero of Kvatch, Archmage of the Mage's Guild, Guildmaster of the Fighter's Guild, Champion of the Arena, the Divine Crusader, Champion of Cyrodiil and, (in the expansion) [[spoiler:Sheogorath's heir, the new God of Madness]], isn't enough to make highway robbers leave you alone. It could be a bit of a subversion: thanks to the feature that makes the enemies level up with you, bandits can still be quite tough for a while (although most {{NPC}}s have their levels capped, so at higher levels this trope is still in effect). Though the robbers get downright silly at high levels. They always ask for 100 gold, no matter when it is that you face them. At low levels, this can be a burden to pay. At higher levels, 100 gold is practically spare change. Plus, since the robber's equipment levels with you, the people demanding one hundred gold are wearing glass armor that's worth thousands. However, this is truly averted if you are the grey fox and wearing the Nocturnal's Cowl. Then the highwaymen turn into fanboys and won't attack you unless you attack them first.
*** There's actually a little-known trick to escaping them. If you're wearing less than 100 gold worth of equipment when they speak to you (not carrying, just wearing), you can claim you don't have the money on you. They fall for it even if you're carrying 499lbs of daedric equipment in your pack.
*** Alternatively, if you do plenty of fame-increasing quests (the main quest in particular), the highwayman will instead greet you normally.

to:

* ''Franchise/TheElderScrolls''
''Franchise/TheElderScrolls'':
** ''[[VideoGame/TheElderScrollsIIIMorrowind Morrowind]]'' has a couple of random minor sidequests which see "highwayman" style bandits attempting to rob the PlayerCharacter. As ''Morrowind'' is the only game in the series without strict LevelScaling, these encounters can actually be challenging to a low-level player. For a high-level player, they very much become this trope instead as the bandit attempts to rob a ''[[KillTheGod god slayer]]''.
** ''[[VideoGame/TheElderScrollsIVOblivion Oblivion]]'':
***
Oblivion]]'': Merely being the Hero of Kvatch, Archmage of the Mage's Guild, Guildmaster of the Fighter's Guild, Champion of the Arena, the Divine Crusader, Champion of Cyrodiil and, (in the expansion) [[spoiler:Sheogorath's heir, the new God of Madness]], isn't enough to make highway robbers leave you alone. It could be a bit of a subversion: thanks to the feature that makes the enemies level up with you, bandits can still be quite tough for a while (although most {{NPC}}s have their levels capped, so at higher levels this trope is still in effect). Though the robbers get downright silly at high levels. They always ask for 100 gold, no matter when it is that you face them. At low levels, this can be a burden to pay. At higher levels, [[MoneyForNothing 100 gold is practically spare change. nothing]]. Plus, since the robber's equipment levels with you, the people demanding one hundred 100 gold are wearing glass armor that's worth thousands. However, this is truly averted if you are the grey fox [[MasterThief Grey Fox]] and wearing the Nocturnal's Cowl. Then the highwaymen turn into fanboys and won't attack you unless you attack them first.
***
first. There's actually a little-known trick to escaping them. If you're wearing less than 100 gold worth of equipment when they speak to you (not carrying, just wearing), you can claim you don't have the money on you. They fall for it even if you're carrying 499lbs of daedric Daedric equipment in your pack.
***
pack. Alternatively, if you do plenty of fame-increasing quests (the main quest in particular), the highwayman will instead greet you normally.
9th Jan '18 12:59:21 PM FGHIK
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*** ''Skyrim'' even has a specific isolated example in Ravenscar Hollow, a cave occupied by a pair of [[WitchSpecies hagravens]] and their minions, including a cave troll. Partway into the cave, the player can find a caged bandit who begs to be released and will help you out; after you defeat the monsters (again, the very same ones that captured him and all his buddies), he announces his intent to rob you blind.

to:

*** ''Skyrim'' even has a specific isolated example in Ravenscar Hollow, a cave occupied by a pair of [[WitchSpecies hagravens]] and their minions, including a cave troll. Partway into the cave, the player can find a caged bandit who begs to be released and will help you out; after you defeat the monsters (again, the very same ones that captured him and all his buddies), he [[UngratefulBastard announces his intent to rob you blind.blind]].
18th Nov '17 10:18:47 PM Nylsa
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** in ''VideGame/SaintsRowTheThird'', after the Saints get hit with a campaign of desprestige, you can find random [=NPCs=] in the map, holding signs telling the Saints to Leave Steelport. Pass by them and they'll insult or even attack you. Yeah, not the smartest choice to attack someone [[RedBaron who is known as "The Stillwater Butcher"]].

to:

** in In ''VideGame/SaintsRowTheThird'', after the Saints get hit with a campaign of desprestige, you can find random [=NPCs=] in the map, holding signs telling the Saints to Leave Steelport. Pass by them and they'll insult or even attack you. Yeah, not the smartest choice to attack someone [[RedBaron who is known as "The Stillwater Butcher"]].



* In ''VideoGame/TheWitcher'', Geralt of Rivia is hired into finding a treasure in an abandoned house by a thug who attempts to ambush him with a small pack of friends in said abandoned house. Right before he butchers them all, Geralt [[LampshadeHanging points out that it was pretty stupid of them to pull that scheme on a Witcher.]]
---> '''Geralt''': That was pretty stupid, hiring a Witcher against yourself."

to:

* In ''VideoGame/TheWitcher'', Geralt of Rivia is hired into finding a treasure in an abandoned house by a thug who attempts to ambush him with a small pack of friends in said abandoned house. Right before he butchers them all, Geralt [[LampshadeHanging points out that it was pretty stupid of them to pull that scheme on a Witcher.]]
--->
Witcher]].
-->
'''Geralt''': That was pretty stupid, hiring a Witcher against yourself."



* In ''VideoGame/MaxPayne 3'' Max gets a gun waved in his face by the punk son of a mob boss, who gets killed shortly after. He later gets robbed by a bunch of favela gangbangers and lets them do so for some reason or another. Later on he meets them again and kills them all. In fact, this happens a lot due to CutsceneIncompetence.

to:

* In ''VideoGame/MaxPayne 3'' ''VideoGame/MaxPayne3'', Max gets a gun waved in his face by the punk son of a mob boss, who gets killed shortly after. He later gets robbed by a bunch of favela gangbangers and lets them do so for some reason or another. Later on on, he meets them again and kills them all. In fact, this happens a lot due to CutsceneIncompetence.



* Entirely possible in ''VideoGame/SwordOfTheStars''. Admittedly in the first game [[ViolenceIsTheOnlyOption war is the default option]] and you must opt in to ceasefire or better, but in the second game you default to neutrality and due to ArtificialStupidity other factions are still very likely to declare war without considering that you might be much more powerful. It's not uncommon for the AI or an inexperienced player to stumble upon a fledgling colony as first contact, think the owners are easy prey and attack... only for a fleetful of dreadnoughts to pop up shortly after from the dozens of developed systems the owner really has, seeing red.
* {{VideoGame/Ingress}}: When 855 needs a new gun, he just goes and gets mugged.

to:

* Entirely possible in ''VideoGame/SwordOfTheStars''. Admittedly in the first game game, [[ViolenceIsTheOnlyOption war is the default option]] and you must opt in to ceasefire or better, but in the second game game, you default to neutrality and due to ArtificialStupidity other factions are still very likely to declare war without considering that you might be much more powerful. It's not uncommon for the AI or an inexperienced player to stumble upon a fledgling colony as first contact, think the owners are easy prey and attack... only for a fleetful of dreadnoughts to pop up shortly after from the dozens of developed systems the owner really has, seeing red.
* {{VideoGame/Ingress}}: ''{{VideoGame/Ingress}}'': When 855 needs a new gun, he just goes and gets mugged.



** You can invoke this in one of the Velocipede Squad options, disguising yourself as a mere drunk and letting people think they can rob you. Since the Velocipede Squad requires you to be a certified badass to join, these people are easily trounced and battered to hell if they so much as breathe on your pockets

to:

** You can invoke this in one of the Velocipede Squad options, options by disguising yourself as a mere drunk and letting people think they can rob you. Since the Velocipede Squad requires you to be a certified badass to join, these people are easily trounced and battered to hell if they so much as breathe on your pocketspockets.



** The entirety of London ended up doing this when they tried to invade Hell, and found out the Devils not only are more or less endless, but they also have anachronistic weaponry that trounced the Empire's own three times over.

to:

** The entirety of London ended up doing this when they tried to invade Hell, and Hell. They found out the Devils were not only are more or less endless, but they also have anachronistic weaponry that trounced the Empire's own three times over.
12th Sep '17 11:39:22 AM Abodos
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Added DiffLines:

* In ''VideoGame/TheLegendOfZeldaBreathOfTheWild'', the Gerudo traveler Lukan deliberately takes advantage of this trope. She is a soldier from Gerudo Town wandering the desert region disguised as a common merchant in order to fool the [[{{Ninja}} Yiga Clan]] into thinking she will be an easy target for them.
2nd Jul '17 5:36:39 PM Theokal3
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Added DiffLines:

** The base game also include a SerialKiller who lures people into his lair so he can dissect them. Unfortunately for him, ''you'' happen to be his new "victim". He makes for a decent boss fight, but unless your character really isn't built for combat, you should be able to kill him easily enough.
3rd Jun '17 6:56:26 AM DoctorNemesis
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Added DiffLines:

** In a cut-scene example, when Marston enters the Mexican town of Chuparosa for the first time, a trio of drunken locals -- obviously hell-bent on bullying some "gringo" -- decide it'd be a good idea to pick on him. Marston tries to defuse the situation calmly and without violence, but his respectful overtures are rejected, and when the trio steal his hat and make a play for his boots... well, you can probably guess how it ends for them.
14th May '17 9:50:43 AM Lopiny
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* ''VideoGame/GrandTheftAutoSanAndreas'': [[StupidCrooks Ryder]] attempts to rob a pizza joint [[StupidCrooks he is a regular at]] ("Ryder? Not this again!") with a pistol. Ryder turns to CJ long enough for the clerk to pull out his ''shotgun''.

to:

* ''VideoGame/GrandTheftAutoSanAndreas'': ''VideoGame/GrandTheftAutoSanAndreas'':
**
[[StupidCrooks Ryder]] attempts to rob a pizza joint [[StupidCrooks he is a regular at]] ("Ryder? Not this again!") with a pistol. Ryder turns to CJ long enough for the clerk to pull out his ''shotgun''.''shotgun''.
** While it turned out to be a case of CJ being mistaken for a burglar, Big Smoke coming out to meet the potential robber with [[BatterUp a baseball bat]] qualifies handily.
-->''"[[IncomingHam YOU PICKED THE WRONG HOUSE, FOOL!]]"''
5th May '17 6:35:48 AM BeerBaron
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** In ''[[VideoGame/TheElderScrollsIVOblivion Oblivion]]'', merely being the Hero of Kvatch, Archmage of the Mage's Guild, Guildmaster of the Fighter's Guild, Champion of the Arena, the Divine Crusader, Champion of Cyrodiil and, (in the expansion) [[spoiler:Sheogorath's heir, the new God of Madness]], isn't enough to make highway robbers leave you alone. It could be a bit of a subversion: thanks to the feature that makes the enemies level up with you, bandits can still be quite tough for a while (although most {{NPC}}s have their levels capped, so at higher levels this trope is still in effect). Though the robbers get downright silly at high levels. They always ask for 100 gold, no matter when it is that you face them. At low levels, this can be a burden to pay. At higher levels, 100 gold is practically spare change. Plus, since the robber's equipment levels with you, the people demanding one hundred gold are wearing glass armor that's worth thousands. However, this is truly averted if you are the grey fox and wearing the Nocturnal's Cowl. Then the highwaymen turn into fanboys and won't attack you unless you attack them first.

to:

** In ''[[VideoGame/TheElderScrollsIVOblivion Oblivion]]'', merely Oblivion]]'':
*** Merely
being the Hero of Kvatch, Archmage of the Mage's Guild, Guildmaster of the Fighter's Guild, Champion of the Arena, the Divine Crusader, Champion of Cyrodiil and, (in the expansion) [[spoiler:Sheogorath's heir, the new God of Madness]], isn't enough to make highway robbers leave you alone. It could be a bit of a subversion: thanks to the feature that makes the enemies level up with you, bandits can still be quite tough for a while (although most {{NPC}}s have their levels capped, so at higher levels this trope is still in effect). Though the robbers get downright silly at high levels. They always ask for 100 gold, no matter when it is that you face them. At low levels, this can be a burden to pay. At higher levels, 100 gold is practically spare change. Plus, since the robber's equipment levels with you, the people demanding one hundred gold are wearing glass armor that's worth thousands. However, this is truly averted if you are the grey fox and wearing the Nocturnal's Cowl. Then the highwaymen turn into fanboys and won't attack you unless you attack them first.



** In ''[[VideoGame/TheElderScrollsVSkyrim Skyrim]]'', you can actually respond to a random highwayman ambush by telling the moronic robber that "I don't have time for this" and walking away. Or intimidating them into letting you go. Or, if you've completed the Thieves guild questline, pointing out that you're their ''boss'', before proceeding to shake ''them'' down for cash instead!

to:

** In ''[[VideoGame/TheElderScrollsVSkyrim Skyrim]]'', you Skyrim]]'':
*** You
can actually respond to a random highwayman ambush by telling the moronic robber that "I don't have time for this" and walking away. Or intimidating them into letting you go. Or, if you've completed the Thieves guild questline, pointing out that you're their ''boss'', before proceeding to shake ''them'' down for cash instead!



** ''Skyrim'' even has a specific isolated example in Ravenscar Hollow, a cave occupied by a pair of [[WitchSpecies hagravens]] and their minions, including a cave troll. Partway into the cave, the player can find a caged bandit who begs to be released and will help you out; after you defeat the monsters (again, the very same ones that captured him and all his buddies), he announces his intent to rob you blind.
** ''Skyrim'' has another example in the Hearthfire {{DLC}}, where a random scripted event involves a bandit named Rochelle the Red [[IHaveYourWife kidnapping your character's spouse]] and demanding a ransom. It's unfortunately subverted in regards to your spouse: doesn't matter if you married a super-powerful warrior who can turn into a werewolf, an arch-wizard who knows Master-level magic, or a vampire who's older than the current Empire, [[DistressBall they all get kidnapped without putting up a fight because the plot says so.]]

to:

** *** ''Skyrim'' even has a specific isolated example in Ravenscar Hollow, a cave occupied by a pair of [[WitchSpecies hagravens]] and their minions, including a cave troll. Partway into the cave, the player can find a caged bandit who begs to be released and will help you out; after you defeat the monsters (again, the very same ones that captured him and all his buddies), he announces his intent to rob you blind.
** *** ''Skyrim'' has another example in the Hearthfire {{DLC}}, where a random scripted event involves a bandit named Rochelle the Red [[IHaveYourWife kidnapping your character's spouse]] and demanding a ransom. It's unfortunately subverted in regards to your spouse: doesn't matter if you married a super-powerful warrior who can turn into a werewolf, an arch-wizard who knows Master-level magic, or a vampire who's older than the current Empire, [[DistressBall they all get kidnapped without putting up a fight because the plot says so.]]
27th Apr '17 11:10:39 AM Luigifan
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** In ''[[VideoGame/TheElderScrollsIVOblivion Oblivion]]'', merely being the Hero of Kvatch, Archmage of the Mage's Guild, Guildmaster of the Fighter's Guild, Champion of the Arena, the Divine Crusader, Champion of Cyrodiil and, (in the expansion) [[spoiler:Sheogorath's heir, the new God of Madness]], isn't enough to make highway robbers leave you alone. It could be a bit of a subversion: thanks to the feature that makes the enemies level up with you, bandits can still be quite tough for a while (although most {{NPC}}s have their levels capped, so at higher levels this trope is still in effect). Though the robbers get downright silly at high levels. They always ask for 100 gold, no matter when it is that you face them. At low levels, this can be a burden to pay. At higher levels, 100 gold is practically spare change. Plus, since the robber's equipment levels with you, the people demanding one hundred gold are wearing glass armor that's worth thousands. However this is truly averted if you are the grey fox and wearing the Nocturnal's Cowl. Then the highwaymen turn into fanboys and won't attack you unless you attack them first. There's actually a little-known trick to escaping them. If you're wearing less than 100 gold worth of equipment when they speak to you (not carrying, just wearing), you can claim you don't have the money on you. They fall for it even if you're carrying 499lbs of daedric equipment in your pack.

to:

** In ''[[VideoGame/TheElderScrollsIVOblivion Oblivion]]'', merely being the Hero of Kvatch, Archmage of the Mage's Guild, Guildmaster of the Fighter's Guild, Champion of the Arena, the Divine Crusader, Champion of Cyrodiil and, (in the expansion) [[spoiler:Sheogorath's heir, the new God of Madness]], isn't enough to make highway robbers leave you alone. It could be a bit of a subversion: thanks to the feature that makes the enemies level up with you, bandits can still be quite tough for a while (although most {{NPC}}s have their levels capped, so at higher levels this trope is still in effect). Though the robbers get downright silly at high levels. They always ask for 100 gold, no matter when it is that you face them. At low levels, this can be a burden to pay. At higher levels, 100 gold is practically spare change. Plus, since the robber's equipment levels with you, the people demanding one hundred gold are wearing glass armor that's worth thousands. However However, this is truly averted if you are the grey fox and wearing the Nocturnal's Cowl. Then the highwaymen turn into fanboys and won't attack you unless you attack them first. first.
***
There's actually a little-known trick to escaping them. If you're wearing less than 100 gold worth of equipment when they speak to you (not carrying, just wearing), you can claim you don't have the money on you. They fall for it even if you're carrying 499lbs of daedric equipment in your pack.



** ''Skyrim'' has another example in the Hearthfire {{DLC}}, where a random scripted event involves a bandit named Rochelle the Red kidnapping your character's spouse and demanding a ransom. It's unfortunately subverted in regards to your spouse: doesn't matter if you married a super-powerful warrior who can turn into a werewolf, an arch-wizard who knows Master-level magic, or a vampire who's older than the current Empire, [[DistressBall they all get kidnapped without putting up a fight because the plot says so.]]

to:

** ''Skyrim'' has another example in the Hearthfire {{DLC}}, where a random scripted event involves a bandit named Rochelle the Red [[IHaveYourWife kidnapping your character's spouse spouse]] and demanding a ransom. It's unfortunately subverted in regards to your spouse: doesn't matter if you married a super-powerful warrior who can turn into a werewolf, an arch-wizard who knows Master-level magic, or a vampire who's older than the current Empire, [[DistressBall they all get kidnapped without putting up a fight because the plot says so.]]



* An unintentional version used to happen in ''VideoGame/CityOfHeroes''. Certain missions would spawn an ambush waiting for the players when they exited the mission. What was supposed to happen is that the spawned mob would be at the appropriate level for the characters. On rare occasions, however, the ambush would be composed of critters of a rather lower level than the player(s). Like Level 1. Even if the player or group was level 50. This bug was in or around Issue 5. All ambushes would spawn at the minimum level available for that group (Council -- Level 1, Circle of Thorns, level 5). This also lead to an unintentional spoiler for anyone who hadn't completed the level 35-40 Rikti story arc if they got an ambush, as the game would throw level 5 [[spoiler:Lost]] at them.

to:

* An unintentional version used to happen in ''VideoGame/CityOfHeroes''. Certain missions would spawn an ambush waiting for the players when they exited the mission. What was supposed to happen is that the spawned mob would be at the appropriate level for the characters. On rare occasions, however, the ambush would be composed of critters of a rather lower level than the player(s). Like Level 1. Even if the player or group was level 50. This bug was in or around Issue 5. All ambushes would spawn at the minimum level available for that group (Council -- Level 1, Circle of Thorns, level 5). This also lead led to an unintentional spoiler for anyone who hadn't completed the level 35-40 Rikti story arc if they got an ambush, as the game would throw level 5 [[spoiler:Lost]] at them.



** ''VideoGame/{{Fallout 3}}'' plays it straight, though. No matter how well armed, armored, and guarded by followers you may be, Talon Company or the Regulators (or both if you've been both good and evil) will not hesitate to attack you if you fast travel in certain locations. Also with one of the RandomEncounters, which features what has to be the most suicidal mugger in the entire freaking universe. He will try to rob you with a shotgun ''that isn't loaded''. Although finding this guy early in the game would have made sense, being a random encounter means you're far more likely to find him when you've already beaten half the game. You have the choice of either turning him into hamburger or telling him to jog on, and you can even point out that his gun isn't loaded, or point out the idiocy of mugging when the average raider just murders their victims for their stuff. Seriously, by the end of the game, any time pretty much anyone short of Enclave troops or Super Mutants attacks you would count as this.

to:

** ''VideoGame/{{Fallout 3}}'' plays it straight, though. No matter how well armed, well-armed, armored, and guarded by followers you may be, Talon Company or the Regulators (or both if you've been both good and evil) will not hesitate to attack you if you fast travel in certain locations. Also with one of the RandomEncounters, which features what has to be the most suicidal mugger in the entire freaking universe. He will try to rob you with a shotgun ''that isn't loaded''. Although finding this guy early in the game would have made sense, being a random encounter means you're far more likely to find him when you've already beaten half the game. You have the choice of either turning him into hamburger or telling him to jog on, and you can even point out that his gun isn't loaded, or point out the idiocy of mugging when the average raider just murders their victims for their stuff. Seriously, by the end of the game, any time pretty much anyone short of Enclave troops or Super Mutants attacks you would count as this.



* In ''VideoGame/TheWitcher'' Geralt of Rivia is hired into finding a treasure an abandoned house by a thug who attempts to ambush him with a small pack of friends in said abandoned house. Right before he butchers them all, Geralt [[LampshadeHanging points out that it was pretty stupid of them to pull that scheme on a Witcher.]]

to:

* In ''VideoGame/TheWitcher'' ''VideoGame/TheWitcher'', Geralt of Rivia is hired into finding a treasure in an abandoned house by a thug who attempts to ambush him with a small pack of friends in said abandoned house. Right before he butchers them all, Geralt [[LampshadeHanging points out that it was pretty stupid of them to pull that scheme on a Witcher.]]



** The list of people who threaten [[PlayerCharacter Commander Shepard]] and crew and are obliterated shortly thereafter could fill a short book. In the first game, it's excusable, as Shepard doesn't have much of a reputation outside of the Alliance. In the second game, after Shepard saved the Citadel and killed Sovereign, opposing him/her in any way is probably grounds for a Website/{{Darwin Award|s}} unless you happen to be living someplace really isolated (like a maximum security prison) or been in a coma. [[EldritchAbomination The Reapers]] are justified being [[NighInvulnerability ridiculously powerful]], [[EldritchAbomination Cthulhu-esque]] ships of extinction. Others, not so much.

to:

** The list of people who threaten [[PlayerCharacter Commander Shepard]] and crew and are obliterated shortly thereafter could fill a short book. In the first game, it's excusable, as Shepard doesn't have much of a reputation outside of the Alliance. In the second game, after Shepard saved the Citadel and killed Sovereign, opposing him/her in any way is probably grounds for a Website/{{Darwin Award|s}} unless you happen to be living someplace really isolated (like a maximum security prison) or been in a coma. [[EldritchAbomination The Reapers]] are justified justified, being [[NighInvulnerability ridiculously powerful]], [[EldritchAbomination Cthulhu-esque]] ships of extinction. Others, not so much.



** Shepard's teammates does it again if you pick the Renegade options when recruiting Jack:

to:

** Shepard's teammates does do it again if you pick the Renegade options when recruiting Jack:



** For that matter Jack was set upon and raped by a group of thugs. She hunted down and killed every last one of them.

to:

** For that matter matter, Jack was set upon and raped by a group of thugs. She How they managed to get close enough to penetrate her without being immediately terminated is a mystery for the ages, but they didn't get to enjoy their "success" for long, as she hunted down and killed every last one of them.



-->"[[LampshadeHanging Thought I was harmless did you?]]"
** The ''Citadel'' [[DownloadableContent DLC]] for ''VideoGame/MassEffect3'' has one that strangely hits both this trope and BullyingTheDragon. A batarian and vorcha go up to Shepard and Ashley in a bar, the first two human Spectres, and start hassling them and trying to start a fight as they "[[Franchise/StarWars don't like Alliance types]]". [[CurbStompBattle They of course get the crap beaten out of them in seconds.]] It's MuggingTheMonster because they don't know exactly who they are messing with. It's also BullyingTheDragon because they are Alliance soldiers that they are trying to start an even fight with.
*** By ''Mass Effect 3''', however, the most common reaction normal would-be antagonists have is [[TheDreaded "Oh, shit! It's SHEPARD!"]], so the whole Mugging the Monster is far far rarer.
* ''Franchise/AssassinsCreed''

to:

-->"[[LampshadeHanging Thought I was harmless harmless, did you?]]"
** The ''Citadel'' [[DownloadableContent DLC]] for ''VideoGame/MassEffect3'' has one that strangely hits both this trope and BullyingTheDragon.BullyingADragon. A batarian and vorcha go up to Shepard and Ashley in a bar, the first two human Spectres, and start hassling them and trying to start a fight as they "[[Franchise/StarWars don't like Alliance types]]". [[CurbStompBattle They of course get the crap beaten out of them in seconds.]] It's MuggingTheMonster because they don't know exactly who they are messing with. It's also BullyingTheDragon BullyingADragon because they are Alliance soldiers that they are trying to start an even fight with.
with ''Alliance soldiers''.
*** By ''Mass Effect 3''', however, the most common reaction normal would-be antagonists have is [[TheDreaded "Oh, shit! It's SHEPARD!"]], so the whole Mugging the Monster scenario is far far, far rarer.
* ''Franchise/AssassinsCreed''''Franchise/AssassinsCreed'':
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=MuggingTheMonster.VideoGames