History Main / Yakuza

28th May '16 4:55:58 AM Nintendoman01
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* ''FanFic/DigimonChildrenOfTime'': As revealed in ''Children of the Present'', Ryo Akiyama is the heir to a yakuza group, and Rika's grandmother Seiko was once a mob wife.
18th May '16 2:25:16 AM TheOneWhoTropes
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* ''DeadliestWarrior'' had the golden age Mafia [1920s] fight against the golden age Yakuza [post WorldWarII]. [[spoiler: The Yakuza lost, however.]]

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* ''DeadliestWarrior'' ''Series/DeadliestWarrior'' had the golden age Mafia [1920s] fight against the golden age Yakuza [post WorldWarII]. [[spoiler: The Yakuza lost, however.]]
15th May '16 12:39:15 PM GlitteringFlowers
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* ''Series/{{Oshin}}'' has examples of both noble Yakuza and corrupt Yakuza:
** Oshin's friend [[spoiler: and HopelessSuitor]] Ken is portrayed as quite the noble Yakuza who helps out the main protagonist when she tries to establish herself in Tokyo.
** When Oshin and her best friend Kayo work in an eatery and begin selling sake in it, the local Yakuza feel threatened and try to kick them out. Thanks to her deals with Ken, however, the GenreSavvy Oshin manages to win them over to her cause.
15th May '16 11:27:09 AM LucaEarlgrey
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* The Ashura-kai from ''VideoGame/ShinMegamiTenseiIV'' are essentially the game's own take on the Yakuza. They provide goods and shelter for civilians, but in exchange they are rarely ever not armed.

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* The Ashura-kai from ''VideoGame/ShinMegamiTenseiIV'' are essentially the game's own take on the Yakuza. They provide goods and shelter for civilians, but in exchange they are rarely ever not armed. They also run [[spoiler:a human trafficking operation based in a secret facility, drawing their neurotransmitters out by force to use as demon food, and raising children in said facility in order to keep up with demand.]]
28th Apr '16 7:22:16 AM GlitteringFlowers
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* Ryuuji Yamazaki from ''VideoGame/FatalFury'' and ''VideoGame/TheKingOfFighters'' fame is a Yakuza leader, though he lacks the typical tattoos. In fact, he's been in the Yakuza ever since his teen years and used to be TheDragon to a powerful ''oyabun'' named Sorimachi. [[spoiler: Sorimachi's death is what pushed the already unstable Yamazaki fully into AxCrazy mode.]]

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* Ryuuji Yamazaki from ''VideoGame/FatalFury'' and ''VideoGame/TheKingOfFighters'' fame is a Yakuza leader, though he lacks the typical tattoos. In fact, he's been in The [[AudioAdaptation Seventh SNK Character Sound Collection]] states that he entered the Yakuza ever since his teen years as a teenager and used to be TheDragon to a powerful ''oyabun'' named Sorimachi.from Okinawa, Sorimachi, who wanted him to be his successor. [[spoiler: Sorimachi's death is what pushed the already unstable Yamazaki fully into AxCrazy mode.]]



* ''VisualNovel/DramaticalMurder'' has Koujaku, one of Aoba's love interest, who was the son and heir of a yakuza. [[spoiler: But one day, his SuperPoweredEvilSide took over and killed his family.]]

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* ''VisualNovel/DramaticalMurder'' has ''VisualNovel/DramaticalMurder''
**
Koujaku, one of Aoba's love interest, who was is the son and heir of a yakuza. [[spoiler: But one day, his SuperPoweredEvilSide took over and killed his family.]]]]
** [[spoiler: Virus and Trip]] are members of the local yakuza, and ther aforementioned Koujaku recognizes them as such.
19th Apr '16 5:51:32 AM aye_amber
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* In ''{{Manga/Holyland}}'', Yuu's RoaringRampageOfRevenge after [[spoiler: Shinichi is attacked]] extends to attacking drug pushers, which leads to one of these telling Masaki to put a lid on Yuu's activities lest the latter wants their attention. Later on, he shows up again to tell Masaki to do something about the teen gangs pushing Shiromon/True before the adults have to get involved.
* The seme in Kazuma Kodaka's ''{{Manga/Kizuna}}'', Kei Enjouji, is the HeroicBastard of a Yakuza boss and has the ''perfect'' Yakuza looks except for the tattoo. [[spoiler: Enjouji himself didn't know about this until his mother died and he got a letter telling him the truth.]] His heritage bites him ''badly'' once when [[spoiler: some mooks run over his uke, Ranmaru, when they were actually trying to kill Enjouji and Ranmaru pulled a DivingSave for him.]]
** For worse, one of Kei's rivals for Ranmaru's love is his half-brother Kai Sagano, the legitimate heir to their Yakuza clan. [[spoiler: And then he starts falling for his [[BodyguardCrush bodyguard]], a rather BadAss Yakuza guy named Masanori Araki, who has been his caretaker ever since Kai was a child. Your mileage will HEAVILY vary on his being {{Squick}} or not.]]
* The erotic-comedy ''Manga/DanceTillTomorrow'' has some pretty funny scenes when the main character discovers his theater troupe is practicing in an office building shared by Yakuza. After accidently disrespecting their boss, they manage to placate him by offering half-price tickets to their next play. HijinksEnsue when he shows up with ten other serious-looking Yakuzas, scaring the actors so bad most of them forget their lines. [[spoiler: While remaining totally stoic during the play, the boss tells them afterward he found it hilarious. So much so that he winds up attending every showing. He later becomes a casual acquaintance of the protagonist, at one point helping him collect debts from people by using his intimidation tactics.]]
* The Haguro family from ''Manga/WolfGuyWolfenCrest''. The son of the leader, Haguro Dou, is the BigBad.
* They make an appearance in chapter 7 of ''Manga/NekoDeGomen''.
%%* Almost everybody in ''Gekkoh''.

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* In ''{{Manga/Holyland}}'', ''Manga/{{Holyland}},'' Yuu's RoaringRampageOfRevenge after [[spoiler: Shinichi is attacked]] extends to attacking drug pushers, which leads to one of these telling Masaki to put a lid on Yuu's activities lest the latter wants their attention. Later on, he shows up again to tell Masaki to do something about the teen gangs pushing Shiromon/True Shiromon / True before the adults have to get involved.
* The seme in Kazuma Kodaka's ''{{Manga/Kizuna}}'', ''Manga/{{Kizuna}},'' Kei Enjouji, is the HeroicBastard of a Yakuza boss and has the ''perfect'' Yakuza looks except for the tattoo. [[spoiler: Enjouji himself didn't know about this until his mother died and he got a letter telling him the truth.]] His heritage bites him ''badly'' once when [[spoiler: some mooks run over his uke, Ranmaru, when they were actually trying to kill Enjouji and Ranmaru pulled a DivingSave for him.]]
** For worse, one of Kei's rivals for Ranmaru's love is his half-brother Kai Sagano, the legitimate heir to their Yakuza clan. [[spoiler: And then he starts falling for his [[BodyguardCrush bodyguard]], bodyguard,]] a rather BadAss {{Badass}} Yakuza guy named Masanori Araki, who has been his caretaker ever since Kai was a child. Your mileage will HEAVILY vary on his being {{Squick}} or not.]]
* The erotic-comedy ''Manga/DanceTillTomorrow'' has some pretty funny scenes when the main character discovers his theater troupe is practicing in an office building shared by Yakuza. After accidently accidentally disrespecting their boss, they manage to placate him by offering half-price tickets to their next play. HijinksEnsue Hijinks Ensue when he shows up with ten other serious-looking serious looking Yakuzas, scaring the actors so bad most of them forget their lines. [[spoiler: While remaining totally stoic during the play, the boss tells them afterward he found it hilarious. So much so that he winds up attending every showing. He later becomes a casual acquaintance of the protagonist, at one point helping him collect debts from people by using his intimidation tactics.]]
* The Haguro family from ''Manga/WolfGuyWolfenCrest''. ''Manga/WolfGuyWolfenCrest.'' The son of the leader, Haguro Dou, is the BigBad.
* They make an appearance in chapter Chapter 7 of ''Manga/NekoDeGomen''.
''Manga/NekoDeGomen.''
%%* Almost everybody in ''Gekkoh''.''Gekkoh.''
14th Apr '16 8:05:08 PM Eievie
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->''"As Joseph Castellano… put it, 'What is a Gambino crime family?… Does this Gambino crime family have an office? Does the office have a plaque on the door that says, “Gambino crime family?”' In Japan, the answers would be, in reverse order, ‘yes,’ ‘yes,’ and ‘read our rules and creed.’"''

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->''"As Joseph Castellano… put it, 'What ‘What is a Gambino crime family?… Does family? …does this Gambino crime family have an office? Does the office have a plaque on the door that says, “Gambino "Gambino crime family?”' family?"’ In Japan, the answers would be, in reverse order, ‘yes,’ ‘yes,’ and ‘read our rules and creed.’"''
24th Mar '16 7:42:13 AM 32_Footsteps
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* In ''Manga/{{Nisekoi}}'', the central plot is kicked off when the yakuza group run by the male lead's father gets into a turf war with an incoming {{Mafia}} family, which goes to a truce when he's declared the boyfriend of the MafiaPrincess daughter of the rival family. Naturally, the two can't stand each other, but they agree to maintain the facade because neither wants to see gang warfare. [[spoiler: Naturally, [[BecomingTheMask they start falling for each other for real]].]] Some moments analyze how the mafia and the yakuza differ, such as how openly each operates and how acceptable the concept is in Japan versus other parts of the world.
19th Mar '16 9:06:57 PM Fireblood
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* ''{{War}}'' features the Yakuza fighting {{the Triads|AndTheTongs}} in UsefulNotes/SanFrancisco.

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* ''{{War}}'' ''{{Film/War}}'' features the Yakuza fighting {{the Triads|AndTheTongs}} in UsefulNotes/SanFrancisco.



* ''Film/BrandedToKill'':The #3 killer in Japan botches a job and becomes a target for #1 in this highly stylized example from Creator/SeijunSuzuki.

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* ''Film/BrandedToKill'':The ''Film/BrandedToKill'': The #3 killer in Japan botches a job and becomes a target for #1 in this highly stylized example from Creator/SeijunSuzuki.
19th Mar '16 8:58:15 PM Fireblood
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Japanese mobsters, often called "the Japanese [[TheMafia Mafia]]" in Greater Europe, and euphemistically "anti-social organizations" and "violent groups" by native folks. The term refers solely to the members of crime organizations, not to the organizations themselves, which may take many different names. The yakuza insist that their organizations originated in RobinHood-style outlaw groups and vigilante groups during Japan's feudal era, but scholars believe that they are in fact descended from roving bands of {{Ronin}} who harassed and extorted the local peasantry.

Not that these are [[NotSoDifferent mutually exclusive descriptions]], though. Tired of robbing the penniless peasants, these Ronin bands often gravitated towards more affluent cities, where they sought employment as a [[HiredGuns hired muscle]]. There they mingled with and frequently joined local urban self-defense groups and mutual aid societies, and this is where their claim of the [[JustLikeRobinHood service to society]] comes from. The fact that these groups were often indistinguishable from the [[GangBangers petty gangs]] is usually blissfully ignored. The modern descendants of such gangs are the very Yakuza groups that are discussed here. Today some 70% of the Yakuza come from ''[[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Burakumin burakumin]]'' background and 10% of the yakuza members are [[UsefulNotes/KoreansInJapan ethnic Koreans]] (despite Koreans making up about 0.5% of the Japanese population).

It should be noted that some yakuza groups have close ties to [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Uyoku_dantai uyoku dantai]] groups (Japan's RightWingMilitiaFanatic nationalists). This is mainly because the Japanese constitution protects freedom of speech (including uyoku dantai ideology) and the yakuza use the uyoku dantai groups as camouflage to hide their criminal activities. That being said, it should be noted that many of the yakuza gangs that disguise themselves as uyoku dantai do [[BecomingTheMask eventually become right-wing members themselves]] and [[ReformedCriminal drop most of their criminal activities]], [[RuleOfCautiousEditingJudgement but let's leave it as that]].

There is an alternate hypothesis of their origin as descendants of legitimate organizations of tekiya (peddlers of shady or stolen goods), whose leaders were granted permission to carry swords by the Edo government. And less than legitimate organizations of gamblers, the term ya-ku-za even comes from the card game [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Oicho-Kabu Oicho-Kabu]].

to:

Japanese mobsters, often called "the Japanese [[TheMafia Mafia]]" in Greater Europe, and euphemistically "anti-social organizations" and "violent groups" by native folks. The term refers solely to the members of crime organizations, not to the organizations themselves, which may take many different names. The yakuza Yakuza insist that their organizations originated in RobinHood-style outlaw groups and vigilante groups during Japan's feudal era, but scholars believe that they are in fact descended from roving bands of {{Ronin}} who harassed and extorted the local peasantry.

Not that these are [[NotSoDifferent mutually exclusive descriptions]], though. Tired of robbing the penniless peasants, these Ronin bands often gravitated towards more affluent cities, where they sought employment as a [[HiredGuns hired muscle]]. There they mingled with and frequently joined local urban self-defense groups and mutual aid societies, and this is where their claim of the [[JustLikeRobinHood service to society]] comes from. The fact that these groups were often indistinguishable from the [[GangBangers petty criminal gangs]] is usually blissfully ignored. The modern descendants of such gangs are the very Yakuza groups that are discussed here. Today some 70% of the Yakuza come from ''[[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Burakumin burakumin]]'' background and 10% of the yakuza Yakuza members are [[UsefulNotes/KoreansInJapan ethnic Koreans]] (despite Koreans making up about 0.5% of the Japanese population).

It should be noted that some yakuza Yakuza groups have close ties to [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Uyoku_dantai uyoku dantai]] groups (Japan's RightWingMilitiaFanatic right-wing nationalists). This is mainly because the Japanese constitution protects freedom of speech (including uyoku dantai ideology) and the yakuza Yakuza use the uyoku dantai groups as camouflage to hide their criminal activities. That being said, it should be noted that many of the yakuza Yakuza gangs that disguise themselves as uyoku dantai do [[BecomingTheMask eventually become right-wing members themselves]] and [[ReformedCriminal drop most of their criminal activities]], [[RuleOfCautiousEditingJudgement but let's leave it as that]].

There is an alternate hypothesis of their origin as descendants of legitimate organizations of tekiya (peddlers of shady or stolen goods), whose leaders were granted permission to carry swords by the Edo government. And government (and less than legitimate organizations of gamblers, the term ya-ku-za even comes from the card game [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Oicho-Kabu Oicho-Kabu]].
Oicho-Kabu]]).



The stereotyped yakuza character matches the real-world profile fairly closely: he is heavily {{tattooed|Crook}} (so identified with delinquency that many bathhouses forbid people with tattoos on the premises), male, and may be [[{{Yubitsume}} missing a finger]] (either as a loyalty test or as punishment, one reason FourFingeredHands are rarely seen in Japanese media). He [[SharpDressedMan wears an expensive suit]] and [[SinisterShades dark sunglasses]], and walks with a distinctive swagger that announces his profession. While he claims a benign interest in the community, he is as likely to be as violent and destructive as his Western counterpart, especially if he feels he is not receiving the respect he deserves. In this sense, the yakuza crams part of both the finesse of the classic [[TheMafia Italian mafia]] and the brutality of the [[TheMafiya Russian one]], as in an intermediate step between them.

Yakuza are so prominent in Japanese culture that they have even spawned an entire genre of films which are as distinct from western gangster films as the yakuza are from western gangsters. While many of these films are little known in the west, movies like ''Film/TokyoDrifter'' and ''Film/BattlesWithoutHonorAndHumanity'' pioneered many tropes that western audiences have since come to associate with martial arts and action pictures, and their influence can be detected in productions as diverse as ''Film/KillBill'' and ''Anime/CowboyBebop''.

Female yakuza are very rare in the male-dominated Japanese society, but if one appears, she is either a DragonLady or [[MafiaPrincess the boss's daughter]]. A Yakuza princess is typically fully aware of her families' business activities and may even support them.

to:

The stereotyped yakuza Yakuza character matches the real-world profile fairly closely: he is heavily {{tattooed|Crook}} (so identified with delinquency that many bathhouses forbid people with tattoos on the premises), male, and may be [[{{Yubitsume}} missing a finger]] (either as a loyalty test or as punishment, one reason FourFingeredHands are rarely seen in Japanese media). He [[SharpDressedMan wears an expensive suit]] and [[SinisterShades dark sunglasses]], and walks with a distinctive swagger that announces his profession. While he claims a benign interest in the community, he is as likely to be as violent and destructive as his Western counterpart, especially if he feels he is not receiving the respect he deserves. In this sense, the yakuza Yakuza crams part of both the finesse of the classic [[TheMafia Italian mafia]] and the brutality of the [[TheMafiya Russian one]], as in an intermediate step between them.

Yakuza are so prominent in Japanese culture that they have even spawned an entire genre of films which are as distinct from western Western gangster films as the yakuza Yakuza are from western Western gangsters. While many of these films are little known in the west, movies like ''Film/TokyoDrifter'' and ''Film/BattlesWithoutHonorAndHumanity'' pioneered many tropes that western Western audiences have since come to associate with martial arts and action pictures, and their influence can be detected in productions as diverse as ''Film/KillBill'' and ''Anime/CowboyBebop''.

Female yakuza Yakuza are very rare in the male-dominated Japanese society, but if one appears, she is either a DragonLady or [[MafiaPrincess the boss's daughter]]. A Yakuza princess is typically fully aware of her families' business activities and may even support them.
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