History Main / WhyAreYouNotMySon

19th Mar '18 6:15:54 AM qwertyuiop[qweee
Is there an issue? Send a Message


Compare WellDoneSonGuy

to:


Compare WellDoneSonGuyWellDoneSonGuy.
19th Mar '18 6:15:41 AM qwertyuiop[qweee
Is there an issue? Send a Message



to:

Compare WellDoneSonGuy
27th Nov '17 5:38:55 PM thestormtrooper
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* In ''the Boy Who Drew Monsters'', both Jack's parents see Nick more as the normal son, which they could have had and favor him in many circumstances, not that this even bothers Jack in any way (too involved with his drawings), Tim (the father) especially envisions Nell (Nick's mother) as the wife he could have had and Nick as the son he could have had, in the life he could have had (at the hospital Tim even blurts to Nell, in front of his own son, that [[LikeaSontoMe Nick is like a son to him]], Nell then points towards Jack (his actual son), but Jack does not even care; Holly, in contrast, envisions her life at one point without any son, or any husband for that matter. True, both parents essentially blame Jack for ruining their lives with the troubles he has caused them and their marriage, it is quite clear that they both still care for and love their son, and acknowledge him as such. They even refer to him numerous times as their son, their 'baby boy', the boy that they want back.

to:

* In ''the Boy Who Drew Monsters'', both Jack's parents see Nick more as the normal son, which they could have had and favor him in many circumstances, not that this even bothers Jack in any way (too involved with his drawings), Tim (the father) especially envisions Nell (Nick's mother) as the wife he could have had and Nick as the son he could have had, in the life he could have had (at the hospital Tim even blurts to Nell, in front of his own son, that [[LikeaSontoMe Nick is like a son to him]], Nell then points towards Jack (his actual son), son) telling him that he is his son not Nick, but Jack does is not even care; aware of the entire dialogue; Holly, in contrast, envisions her life at one point without any son, or any husband for that matter. True, both parents essentially blame Jack for ruining their lives with the troubles he has caused them and their marriage, it is quite clear that they both still care for and love their son, and acknowledge him as such. They even refer to him numerous times as their son, their 'baby boy', the boy that they want back.
27th Nov '17 5:36:52 PM thestormtrooper
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* In ''the Boy Who Drew Monsters'', both Jack's parents see Nick more as the normal son, which they could have had and favor him in many circumstances, not that this even bothers Jack in any way (too involved with his drawings), Tim (the father) especially envisions Nell (Nick's mother) as the wife he could have had and Nick as the son he could have had, in the life he could have had (at the hospital Tim even blurts to Nell, in front of his own son, that [[LikeaSontoMe Nick]], Nell then points towards Jack (his actual son), but Jack does not even care; Holly, in contrast, envisions her life at one point without any son, or any husband for that matter. True, both parents essentially blame Jack for ruining their lives with the troubles he has caused them and their marriage, it is quite clear that they both still care for and love their son, and acknowledge him as such. They even refer to him numerous times as their son, their 'baby boy', the boy that they want back.

to:

* In ''the Boy Who Drew Monsters'', both Jack's parents see Nick more as the normal son, which they could have had and favor him in many circumstances, not that this even bothers Jack in any way (too involved with his drawings), Tim (the father) especially envisions Nell (Nick's mother) as the wife he could have had and Nick as the son he could have had, in the life he could have had (at the hospital Tim even blurts to Nell, in front of his own son, that [[LikeaSontoMe Nick]], Nick is like a son to him]], Nell then points towards Jack (his actual son), but Jack does not even care; Holly, in contrast, envisions her life at one point without any son, or any husband for that matter. True, both parents essentially blame Jack for ruining their lives with the troubles he has caused them and their marriage, it is quite clear that they both still care for and love their son, and acknowledge him as such. They even refer to him numerous times as their son, their 'baby boy', the boy that they want back.
27th Nov '17 5:36:03 PM thestormtrooper
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* In ''the Boy Who Drew Monsters'', both Jack's parents see Nick more as the normal son, which they could have had and favor him in many circumstances, not that this even bothers Jack in any way (too involved with his drawings), Tim (the father) especially envisions Nell (Nick's mother) as the wife he could have had and Nick as the son he could have had, in the life he could have had (at the hospital Tim even blurts to Nell, in front of his own son, that Nick is [[LikeaSontoMe]], Nell then points towards Jack (his actual son), but Jack does not even care; Holly, in contrast, envisions her life at one point without any son, or any husband for that matter. True, both parents essentially blame Jack for ruining their lives with the troubles he has caused them and their marriage, it is quite clear that they both still care for and love their son, and acknowledge him as such. They even refer to him numerous times as their son, their 'baby boy', the boy that they want back.

to:

* In ''the Boy Who Drew Monsters'', both Jack's parents see Nick more as the normal son, which they could have had and favor him in many circumstances, not that this even bothers Jack in any way (too involved with his drawings), Tim (the father) especially envisions Nell (Nick's mother) as the wife he could have had and Nick as the son he could have had, in the life he could have had (at the hospital Tim even blurts to Nell, in front of his own son, that Nick is [[LikeaSontoMe]], [[LikeaSontoMe Nick]], Nell then points towards Jack (his actual son), but Jack does not even care; Holly, in contrast, envisions her life at one point without any son, or any husband for that matter. True, both parents essentially blame Jack for ruining their lives with the troubles he has caused them and their marriage, it is quite clear that they both still care for and love their son, and acknowledge him as such. They even refer to him numerous times as their son, their 'baby boy', the boy that they want back.
27th Nov '17 5:35:06 PM thestormtrooper
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* In ''the Boy Who Drew Monsters'', both Jack's parents see Nick more as the normal son, which they could have had and favor him in many circumstances, not that this even bothers Jack in any way (too involved with his drawings), Tim (the father) especially envisions Nell (Nick's mother) as the wife he could have had and Nick as the son he could have had, in the life he could have had (at the hospital Tim even blurts to Nell, in front of his own son, that Nick is [[Like a Son to Me]], Nell then points towards Jack (his actual son), but Jack does not even care; Holly, in contrast, envisions her life at one point without any son, or any husband for that matter. True, both parents essentially blame Jack for ruining their lives with the troubles he has caused them and their marriage, it is quite clear that they both still care for and love their son, and acknowledge him as such. They even refer to him numerous times as their son, their 'baby boy', the boy that they want back.

to:

* In ''the Boy Who Drew Monsters'', both Jack's parents see Nick more as the normal son, which they could have had and favor him in many circumstances, not that this even bothers Jack in any way (too involved with his drawings), Tim (the father) especially envisions Nell (Nick's mother) as the wife he could have had and Nick as the son he could have had, in the life he could have had (at the hospital Tim even blurts to Nell, in front of his own son, that Nick is [[Like a Son to Me]], [[LikeaSontoMe]], Nell then points towards Jack (his actual son), but Jack does not even care; Holly, in contrast, envisions her life at one point without any son, or any husband for that matter. True, both parents essentially blame Jack for ruining their lives with the troubles he has caused them and their marriage, it is quite clear that they both still care for and love their son, and acknowledge him as such. They even refer to him numerous times as their son, their 'baby boy', the boy that they want back.
27th Nov '17 5:34:44 PM thestormtrooper
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* In ''the Boy Who Drew Monsters'', both Jack's parents see Nick more as the normal son, which they could have had and favor him in many circumstances, not that this even bothers Jack in any way (too involved with his drawings), Tim (the father) especially envisions Nell (Nick's mother) as the wife he could have had and Nick as the son he could have had, in the life he could have had, Holly, in contrast, envisions her life at one point without any son, or any husband for that matter. True, both parents essentially blame Jack for ruining their lives with the troubles he has caused them and their marriage, it is quite clear that they both still care for and love their son, and acknowledge him as such. They even refer to him numerous times as their son, their 'baby boy', the boy that they want back.

to:

* In ''the Boy Who Drew Monsters'', both Jack's parents see Nick more as the normal son, which they could have had and favor him in many circumstances, not that this even bothers Jack in any way (too involved with his drawings), Tim (the father) especially envisions Nell (Nick's mother) as the wife he could have had and Nick as the son he could have had, in the life he could have had, had (at the hospital Tim even blurts to Nell, in front of his own son, that Nick is [[Like a Son to Me]], Nell then points towards Jack (his actual son), but Jack does not even care; Holly, in contrast, envisions her life at one point without any son, or any husband for that matter. True, both parents essentially blame Jack for ruining their lives with the troubles he has caused them and their marriage, it is quite clear that they both still care for and love their son, and acknowledge him as such. They even refer to him numerous times as their son, their 'baby boy', the boy that they want back.
11th Sep '17 9:50:58 PM thestormtrooper
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* In ''the Boy Who Drew Monsters'', both Jack's parents see Nick more as the normal son, which they could have had and favor him in many circumstances, not that this even bothers Jack in any way (too involved with his drawings), Tim (the father) especially envisions Nell (Nick's mother) as the wife he could have had and Nick as the son he could have had, in the life he could have had, Holly, in contrast, envisions her life at one point without any son, or any husband for that matter. True, both parents essentially blame Jack for ruining their lives with the troubles he has caused them and their marriage, it is quite clear that they both still love their son and acknowledge him as such. They even refer to him numerous times as their son, their 'baby boy.'

to:

* In ''the Boy Who Drew Monsters'', both Jack's parents see Nick more as the normal son, which they could have had and favor him in many circumstances, not that this even bothers Jack in any way (too involved with his drawings), Tim (the father) especially envisions Nell (Nick's mother) as the wife he could have had and Nick as the son he could have had, in the life he could have had, Holly, in contrast, envisions her life at one point without any son, or any husband for that matter. True, both parents essentially blame Jack for ruining their lives with the troubles he has caused them and their marriage, it is quite clear that they both still care for and love their son son, and acknowledge him as such. They even refer to him numerous times as their son, their 'baby boy.'boy', the boy that they want back.
11th Sep '17 8:27:56 AM thestormtrooper
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* In ''the Boy Who Drew Monsters'', both Jack's parents see Nick more as the normal son, which they could have had and favor him in many circumstances, not that this even bothers Jack in any way (too involved with his drawings), Tim (the father) especially envisions Nell (Nick's mother) as the wife he could have had and Nick as the son he could have had, in the life he could have had, Holly, in contrast, envisions her life at one point without any son, or any husband for that matter. True, both parents essentially blame Jack for ruining their lives with the troubles he has caused them and their marriage, it is quite clear that they both still love their son and acknowledge him as such. They even refer to him numerous times as their son, their 'baby boy.'



* In ''the Boy Who Drew Monsters'', both Jack's parents see Nick more as the normal son, which they could have had and favor him in many circumstances, not that this even bothers Jack in any way (too involved with his drawings), Tim (the father) especially envisions Nell (Nick's mother) as the wife he could have had and Nick as the son he could have had, in the life he could have had, Holly, in contrast, envisions her life at one point without any son, or any husband for that matter. True, both parents essentially blame Jack for ruining their lives with the troubles he has caused them and their marriage, it is quite clear that they both still love their son and acknowledge him as such. They even refer to him numerous times as their son, their 'baby boy.'
11th Sep '17 8:27:04 AM thestormtrooper
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

* In ''the Boy Who Drew Monsters'', both Jack's parents see Nick more as the normal son, which they could have had and favor him in many circumstances, not that this even bothers Jack in any way (too involved with his drawings), Tim (the father) especially envisions Nell (Nick's mother) as the wife he could have had and Nick as the son he could have had, in the life he could have had, Holly, in contrast, envisions her life at one point without any son, or any husband for that matter. True, both parents essentially blame Jack for ruining their lives with the troubles he has caused them and their marriage, it is quite clear that they both still love their son and acknowledge him as such. They even refer to him numerous times as their son, their 'baby boy.'
This list shows the last 10 events of 113. Show all.
http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Main.WhyAreYouNotMySon