History Main / WhiteDwarfStarlet

23rd Apr '17 2:09:57 PM WillBGood
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* Seedra from ''Series/OneThousandWaysToDie'''s episode "Inject-icide". She's an elderly former beauty queen who injected her face with corn oil as a cheap substitute for Botox (as she couldn't afford the actual treatments). Some of that got into her bloodstream, and then it started leaking out of her face...

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* Seedra Sidra from ''Series/OneThousandWaysToDie'''s episode "Inject-icide". She's an elderly former beauty queen who injected her face with corn oil as a cheap substitute for Botox (as she couldn't afford the actual treatments). Some of that got into her bloodstream, and then it started leaking out of her face...
23rd Apr '17 2:00:49 PM WillBGood
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* This is the entire premise of ''Film/WhateverHappenedToBabyJane?''. Jane Hudson shares a home with her crippled sister Blanche, who she constantly torments and starves. All the while Jane speaks of being a FormerChildStar and goes just about anywhere to see if anyone remembers her. She says something to the effect of "Someday I'm going to get up and dance, then everyone will gather around me." The audience sympathizes with Blanche, whom Jane allegedly crippled by running her over with a car. [[ItMakesSenseInContext When Jane decides that she must move away]] and finally takes Blanche out of the house she reveals that [[spoiler:Jane never hit her with the car. She'd gotten in an accident and blamed Jane when the cops arrived.]]. She's dying when she confesses this and Jane, [[TheOphelia has slipped into insanity.]] The film ends with [[spoiler: the authorities approaching the dead body. Jane (who had gone to get an ice cream cone) , starts dancing slowly as awe-struck people gather to see what has happened. In her mind, her dream has come true. They've all remembered Little Baby Jane Hudson.]].

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* This is the entire premise of ''Film/WhateverHappenedToBabyJane?''. Jane Hudson shares a home with her crippled sister Blanche, who she constantly torments and starves. All the while Jane speaks of being a FormerChildStar and goes just about anywhere to see if anyone remembers her. She says something to the effect of "Someday I'm going to get up and dance, then everyone will gather around me." The audience sympathizes with Blanche, whom Jane allegedly crippled by running her over with a car. [[ItMakesSenseInContext When Jane decides that she must move away]] and finally takes Blanche out of the house she reveals that [[spoiler:Jane never hit her with the car. She'd gotten in an accident and blamed Jane when the cops arrived.]]. She's dying when she confesses this and Jane, Jane [[TheOphelia has slipped into insanity.]] The film ends with [[spoiler: the authorities approaching the dead body. Jane (who had gone to get an ice cream cone) , starts dancing slowly as awe-struck people gather to see what has happened. In her mind, her dream has come true. They've all remembered Little Baby Jane Hudson.]].
16th Apr '17 5:28:02 AM GlitteringFlowers
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* ''Manga/PrivateActress'' is a manga about the acting and idol industries, so there are some of these:
* [[spoiler: Shiho's mother]] Sayuri Nagasawa ''almost'' became this in [[spoiler: While she IS both beautiful and a very talented actress, getting a huge scar on her face almost ruined her career. Ultimately, she's hinted to have averted the trope by returning to stage acting.]]

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* ''Manga/PrivateActress'' is a manga about the acting and idol industries, industry in the Japan of TheNineties, so there are some of these:
* ** [[spoiler: Shiho's mother]] Sayuri Nagasawa ''almost'' became this in [[spoiler: While she IS both beautiful and a very talented actress, getting a huge scar on her face almost ruined her career. Ultimately, she's hinted to have averted the trope by returning to stage acting.]]
16th Apr '17 5:27:21 AM GlitteringFlowers
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* [[spoiler: Shiho's mother Sayuri Nagasawa ''almost'' became this]] in ''Manga/PrivateActress''. [[spoiler: While she IS both beautiful and a very talented actress, getting a huge scar on her face almost ruined her career. Ultimately, she's hinted to have averted the trope by returning to stage acting.]] At the same time, [[spoiler: Sayuri]]'s old rival Ruriko Daichi deeply fears to become this.
** Beautifully lampshaded by Shiho:

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* ''Manga/PrivateActress'' is a manga about the acting and idol industries, so there are some of these:
* [[spoiler: Shiho's mother mother]] Sayuri Nagasawa ''almost'' became this]] this in ''Manga/PrivateActress''. [[spoiler: While she IS both beautiful and a very talented actress, getting a huge scar on her face almost ruined her career. Ultimately, she's hinted to have averted the trope by returning to stage acting.]] At the same time, ]]
**
[[spoiler: Sayuri]]'s old rival Ruriko Daichi deeply fears to become this.
** Beautifully lampshaded by Shiho:
this, and Shiho spends some time posing as her assistant and helping her to deal with the prospect and her own inner demons. Shiho even gets to beautifully lampshade the trope:
25th Mar '17 9:42:04 AM rafi
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* ''WesternAnimation/BatmanTheAnimatedSeries'':
** Recurring villain Mary "Baby" Dahl, a White Dwarf Starlet, [[NotAllowedToGrowUp with emphasis on "Dwarf"]], who abducted her long-separated sitcom co-stars. Dahl had a peculiar form of dwarfism that made her look permanently like an 8-year old, making her attempts at legitimate acting after quitting her sitcom doomed from the start. Decades later, Dahl has become delusional and desperate to recapture the happiness she had felt in the glory days of her show, leading to her kidnapping her former co-stars to forcibly reunite the cast (and to get revenge on the annoying CousinOliver character that drove her out of the show).
** "The New Batman Adventures" episode "[[Recap/TheNewBatmanAdventuresE13MeanSeasons Mean Seasons]]" has a former model intent on killing the people who had led to her downfall, wearing full-body covering and a featureless mask to hide what she's become since her fame ran out. TheReveal shows that she looks to be in her 30s and is still beautiful, but she "can only see the flaws". Wanna know the kicker, though? Her voice actress was former model Sela Ward, which sort of makes the episode TruthInTelevision, although Ward obviously didn't go stark raving nuts in RealLife.
* WesternAnimation/BettyBoop's ''WesternAnimation/DrawnTogether'' [[{{Expy}} analog]], Toot Braunstein, is the burnt-out husk left after the collapse of a white dwarf starlet. She's a Planetary Nebula Starlet (not as hot but larger). Unlike most versions of this trope, she still looks exactly the same as she did in her prime since toons dont age, but what was considered an ideal body in the 1920's is seen as chubby and unappealing today (by mainstream entertainment standards).
* Slappy Squirrel from ''WesternAnimation/{{Animaniacs}}'' is an inversion of this. The gag behind Slappy isn't really that she's a fallen starlet seeking to regain her fame it's that she's a retired slapstick comedy star whose old antagonists don't seem to have let go as well as she has, only now, she's not only smarter than her opponents, she's old, grumpy, sarcastic and arthritic (think of an aged, vindictive WesternAnimation/BugsBunny), so not only is great harm befalling her geriatric rivals, it's gotten easier with practice and she enjoys it more.



* ''WesternAnimation/{{Animaniacs}}''
** Slappy Squirrel is an inversion of this. The gag behind Slappy isn't really that she's a fallen starlet seeking to regain her fame it's that she's a retired slapstick comedy star whose old antagonists don't seem to have let go as well as she has, only now, she's not only smarter than her opponents, she's old, grumpy, sarcastic and arthritic (think of an aged, vindictive WesternAnimation/BugsBunny), so not only is great harm befalling her geriatric rivals, it's gotten easier with practice and she enjoys it more.
** The episode "The Warners 65th Anniversary Special" (a parody of MilestoneCelebration specials) reveals that this is (supposedly) what happened with the Warners' original co-star Buddy (an actual WB cartoon character from the 1930's, infamous for his boring [to some] cartoons). Buddy was fired from the studio after Plotz decided that the Warners didn't need him anymore, though Buddy is seemingly okay with mundane life (he's a nut farmer in Ohio at this point). However, it's then revealed that the episode's mystery villain is in fact Buddy, bitter that the Warners cost him his career.
* ''WesternAnimation/BatmanTheAnimatedSeries'':
** Recurring villain Mary "Baby" Dahl, a White Dwarf Starlet, [[NotAllowedToGrowUp with emphasis on "Dwarf"]], who abducted her long-separated sitcom co-stars. Dahl had a peculiar form of dwarfism that made her look permanently like an 8-year old, making her attempts at legitimate acting after quitting her sitcom doomed from the start. Decades later, Dahl has become delusional and desperate to recapture the happiness she had felt in the glory days of her show, leading to her kidnapping her former co-stars to forcibly reunite the cast (and to get revenge on the annoying CousinOliver character that drove her out of the show).
** "The New Batman Adventures" episode "[[Recap/TheNewBatmanAdventuresE13MeanSeasons Mean Seasons]]" has a former model intent on killing the people who had led to her downfall, wearing full-body covering and a featureless mask to hide what she's become since her fame ran out. TheReveal shows that she looks to be in her 30s and is still beautiful, but she "can only see the flaws". Wanna know the kicker, though? Her voice actress was former model Sela Ward, which sort of makes the episode TruthInTelevision, although Ward obviously didn't go stark raving nuts in RealLife.
* Big Food from ''WesternAnimation/{{Chowder}}'' is a perfect example of this trope, even using the line "I am a big star, it's the roles that got small!" with her name and fridge replacing "a big star" and "roles" respectively.
* WesternAnimation/BettyBoop's ''WesternAnimation/DrawnTogether'' [[{{Expy}} analog]], Toot Braunstein, is the burnt-out husk left after the collapse of a white dwarf starlet. She's a Planetary Nebula Starlet (not as hot but larger). Unlike most versions of this trope, she still looks exactly the same as she did in her prime since toons dont age, but what was considered an ideal body in the 1920's is seen as chubby and unappealing today (by mainstream entertainment standards).



* ''WesternAnimation/{{SpongeBob SquarePants}}'' features Mermaid Man and Barnacle Boy, Bikini Bottom analogues of Batman and Robin (and actual superheroes within the [=SpongeBob=] universe, [[OldSuperhero albeit far past their prime]]) who (via the intervention of [=SpongeBob=]) frequently end up attempting to relive their past days of glory.
* Big Food from ''WesternAnimation/{{Chowder}}'' is a perfect example of this trope, even using the line "I am a big star, it's the roles that got small!" with her name and fridge replacing "a big star" and "roles" respectively.



* ''WesternAnimation/IAmWeasel'' once had I Am Weasel and I.R. Baboon as ghosts who are tasked with scaring a retired starlet (played, [[NewJobAsThePlotDemands as usual]], by The Red Guy), who spends all her time reminiscing about her glory days. However, we're shown that she only ever played bit parts (and she sucked at those too), and is completely delusional. By the end, [[spoiler: their failure to scare her has their boss return Weasel and Baboon to life, only to find out The Red Guy recently died and was assigned to be their ghost]].



* ''WesternAnimation/{{SpongeBob SquarePants}}'' features Mermaid Man and Barnacle Boy, Bikini Bottom analogues of Batman and Robin (and actual superheroes within the [=SpongeBob=] universe, [[OldSuperhero albeit far past their prime]]) who (via the intervention of [=SpongeBob=]) frequently end up attempting to relive their past days of glory.
* ''WesternAnimation/TinyToonAdventures'':
** The episode "Sepulveda Boulevard" is a parody of both ''Sunset Boulevard'' and the trope itself with Elmyra playing the Norma role, a former cartoon star whose career tanked because audiences no longer wanted cute (in her own mind, anyway).
** The episode "Who Bopped Bugs Bunny?" has Sappy Stanley, an embittered elephant who moved to France after losing the UsefulNotes/AcademyAward to WesternAnimation/BugsBunny.
** Both cartoons even paraphrase the "pictures that got small" speech from ''Sunset Boulevard''.



* ''WesternAnimation/TinyToonAdventures'' episode "Sepulveda Boulevard" is a parody of both ''Sunset Boulevard'' and the trope itself with Elmyra playing the Norma role, a former cartoon star whose career tanked because audiences no longer wanted cute (in her own mind, anyway).
** The episode "Who Bopped Bugs Bunny?" has Sappy Stanley, an embittered elephant who moved to France after losing the UsefulNotes/AcademyAward to WesternAnimation/BugsBunny.
** Both cartoons even paraphrase the "pictures that got small" speech from ''Sunset Boulevard''.
* ''WesternAnimation/IAmWeasel'' once had I Am Weasel and I.R. Baboon as ghosts who are tasked with scaring a retired starlet (played, [[NewJobAsThePlotDemands as usual]], by The Red Guy), who spends all her time reminiscing about her glory days. However, we're shown that she only ever played bit parts (and she sucked at those too), and is completely delusional. By the end, [[spoiler: their failure to scare her has their boss return Weasel and Baboon to life, only to find out The Red Guy recently died and was assigned to be their ghost]].
* ''Animaniacs'' reveals in the episode "The Warners 65th Anniversary Special" (a parody of MilestoneCelebration specials) that this is (supposedly) what happened with the Warners' original co-star Buddy (an actual WB cartoon character from the 1930's, infamous for his boring [to some] cartoons). Buddy was fired from the studio after Plotz decided that the Warners didn't need him anymore, though Buddy is seemingly okay with mundane life (he's a nut farmer in Ohio at this point). However, it's then revealed that the episode's mystery villain is in fact Buddy, bitter that the Warners cost him his career.
14th Mar '17 5:59:13 AM tropower
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* ''Animaniacs'' reveals in the episode "The Warners 75th Anniversery Special" that this is what happened with the Warners original co-star Buddy (an actual WB cartoon character from the 1930's, infamous for his boring cartoons). Buddy was fired from the studio after Plotz decided that the Warners didnt need him anymore, though Buddy is seemingly okay with mundane life (he's a nut farmer in Ohio now). However, it's then revealed that the episodes mystery villain is in fact Buddy, bitter that the Warners cost him his career.

to:

* ''Animaniacs'' reveals in the episode "The Warners 75th Anniversery 65th Anniversary Special" (a parody of MilestoneCelebration specials) that this is (supposedly) what happened with the Warners Warners' original co-star Buddy (an actual WB cartoon character from the 1930's, infamous for his boring [to some] cartoons). Buddy was fired from the studio after Plotz decided that the Warners didnt didn't need him anymore, though Buddy is seemingly okay with mundane life (he's a nut farmer in Ohio now). at this point). However, it's then revealed that the episodes episode's mystery villain is in fact Buddy, bitter that the Warners cost him his career.
14th Mar '17 5:46:24 AM tropower
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* ''Film/WhoFramedRogerRabbit'' finds WesternAnimation/BettyBoop working as a nightclub cigarette girl, having been put out of business by cartoons going to color.[[note]]There actually is one color Betty cartoon, ''Poor Cinderella'' (1934). And Betty's a SignificantGreeneyedRedhead in it![[/note]] She's fairly philosophical about it, though. Counts for a bit of a TearJerker, especially Eddie's sad, "Sure, Betty" after she assures him she's "Still got it." You can thank this movie for helping to [[CareerResurrection revive Betty Boop's career]], if not as an animated film star then as a merchandising icon.

to:

* ''Film/WhoFramedRogerRabbit'' finds WesternAnimation/BettyBoop working as a nightclub cigarette girl, having been put out of business by cartoons going to color.[[note]]There actually is one color Betty cartoon, ''Poor Cinderella'' (1934). And Betty's a SignificantGreeneyedRedhead in it![[/note]] She's fairly philosophical about it, though. Counts for a bit of a TearJerker, especially Eddie's sad, "Sure, Betty" sad after she assures him she's "Still got it." "[[note]]Eddie: "Yeah, you still got it."[[/note]] You can thank this movie for helping to [[CareerResurrection revive Betty Boop's career]], if not as an animated film star then as a merchandising icon.[[note]]It should be noted however, that she technically never "lost" it in the first place, making it a slight subversion of this trope.[[/note]]
5th Mar '17 12:43:28 PM SilentStranger
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* Creator/MerylStreep as Madeline Ashton in ''Film/DeathBecomesHer''. Happily, Streep has averted this trope in real life.

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* Creator/MerylStreep as Madeline Ashton in ''Film/DeathBecomesHer''. ''Film/DeathBecomesHer'' is one, with the added twist that even in her prime, she actually kinda sucked at performing (she's introduced while starring in a horrendous musical version of ''Sweet Bird Of Youth'' that has the audience walk out on it), with her only real appeal being her beauty. Happily, Streep has averted this trope in real life.life, being one of the longest-lasting starlets in Hollywood history.



* Gloria van Gouton from ''VideoGame/{{Psychonauts}}'', though her decline was a result of [[spoiler:her mother's suicide]] rather than a harsh industry. She's incredibly bipolar and delusional (performing for a collection of pots with faces drawn on them) until Raz goes into her mind and cures her. Her mother was also this, and it was Gloria's success outshining her own that led to her [[spoiler:jumping off a building]].

to:

* Gloria van Gouton from ''VideoGame/{{Psychonauts}}'', though her decline was a result of [[spoiler:her mother's suicide]] rather than a harsh industry.industry, though that certainly didnt help. She's incredibly bipolar and delusional (performing for a collection of pots with faces drawn on them) until Raz goes into her mind and cures her. Her mother was also this, and it was Gloria's success outshining her own that led to her [[spoiler:jumping off a building]]. When Raz fixes her mental issues, she decides to retire from acting permanently (which she never really wanted to do in the first place, having been pushed into it by her StageMom).



** Recurring villain Mary "Baby" Dahl, a White Dwarf Starlet, [[NotAllowedToGrowUp with emphasis on "Dwarf"]], who abducted her long-separated sitcom co-stars.

to:

** Recurring villain Mary "Baby" Dahl, a White Dwarf Starlet, [[NotAllowedToGrowUp with emphasis on "Dwarf"]], who abducted her long-separated sitcom co-stars. Dahl had a peculiar form of dwarfism that made her look permanently like an 8-year old, making her attempts at legitimate acting after quitting her sitcom doomed from the start. Decades later, Dahl has become delusional and desperate to recapture the happiness she had felt in the glory days of her show, leading to her kidnapping her former co-stars to forcibly reunite the cast (and to get revenge on the annoying CousinOliver character that drove her out of the show).



* WesternAnimation/BettyBoop's ''WesternAnimation/DrawnTogether'' [[{{Expy}} analog]], Toot Braunstein, is the burnt-out husk left after the collapse of a white dwarf starlet. She's a Planetary Nebula Starlet (not as hot but larger).

to:

* WesternAnimation/BettyBoop's ''WesternAnimation/DrawnTogether'' [[{{Expy}} analog]], Toot Braunstein, is the burnt-out husk left after the collapse of a white dwarf starlet. She's a Planetary Nebula Starlet (not as hot but larger). Unlike most versions of this trope, she still looks exactly the same as she did in her prime since toons dont age, but what was considered an ideal body in the 1920's is seen as chubby and unappealing today (by mainstream entertainment standards).



* ''WesternAnimation/IAmWeasel'' once had I Am Weasel and I.R. Baboon as ghosts who are tasked with scaring a retired starlet (played, [[NewJobAsThePlotDemands as usual]], by The Red Guy). Her "glory days" aren't as glorious as he/she keeps thinking they were, though. By the end, [[spoiler: their failure to scare her has their boss return Weasel and Baboon to life, only to find out The Red Guy recently died and was assigned to be their ghost]].

to:

* ''WesternAnimation/IAmWeasel'' once had I Am Weasel and I.R. Baboon as ghosts who are tasked with scaring a retired starlet (played, [[NewJobAsThePlotDemands as usual]], by The Red Guy). Her "glory days" aren't as glorious as he/she keeps thinking they were, though. Guy), who spends all her time reminiscing about her glory days. However, we're shown that she only ever played bit parts (and she sucked at those too), and is completely delusional. By the end, [[spoiler: their failure to scare her has their boss return Weasel and Baboon to life, only to find out The Red Guy recently died and was assigned to be their ghost]].ghost]].
* ''Animaniacs'' reveals in the episode "The Warners 75th Anniversery Special" that this is what happened with the Warners original co-star Buddy (an actual WB cartoon character from the 1930's, infamous for his boring cartoons). Buddy was fired from the studio after Plotz decided that the Warners didnt need him anymore, though Buddy is seemingly okay with mundane life (he's a nut farmer in Ohio now). However, it's then revealed that the episodes mystery villain is in fact Buddy, bitter that the Warners cost him his career.
5th Mar '17 2:58:59 AM SirRed
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** A rare [[DistaffCounterpart Spear Counterpart]] episode "The Trouble With Templeton" has an actor who misses his late wife and his time as a Broadway actor in 1927. He escapes to the past, only to find his wife and close friends callous and indifferent to him. He runs out of the speakeasy and returns to the present. But, when he reads a playbill he snatched from his wife in 1927, it says "What to Do When Booth Comes Back."

to:

** A rare [[DistaffCounterpart Spear Counterpart]] episode "The Trouble With Templeton" has an actor actor, Booth Templeton, who misses his late wife and his time as a Broadway actor in 1927. He escapes to the past, only to find his wife and close friends callous and indifferent to him. He runs out of the speakeasy and returns to the present. But, when he reads a playbill he snatched from his wife in 1927, it says "What to Do When Booth Comes Back."
24th Feb '17 1:53:33 AM The_Glorious_SOB
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Like actual stars of the outer space, sometimes the White Dwarf Starlet can go nova - [[CareerResurrection burst in new brightness]], if the character indeed does manage to get a role in a hit movie, tv show, or play (even a minor role that's [[EnsembleDarkhorse well remembered]]), or releases a comeback album.

to:

Like actual stars of the outer space, sometimes the White Dwarf Starlet can go nova - [[CareerResurrection burst in new brightness]], if the character indeed does manage to get a role in a hit movie, tv TV show, or play (even a minor role that's [[EnsembleDarkhorse well remembered]]), or releases a comeback album.
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