History Main / WeirdnessSearchAndRescue

23rd Jul '17 10:47:32 PM KamenRiderOokalf
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* In ''WesternAnimation/Gargoyles'' one can move between any body of water (and we do mean any. In series, a swimming pool counted, and in the Comics, a large pot for boiling water for laundry did the trick) and the shores Avalon by invoking the spell. However, returning back isn't so precise. Avalon will send you to the real world, but it's not going to be your original location, but somewhere random (body of water still applies) with some weirdness going on. It's implied through the repeated description of the process ("Avalon doesn't send you where you want to go, it sends you where you need to be") that there is some consciousness making the arrival choice. Like wise, it's random as to how long this keeps happening, but all three onscreen uses do eventually wind up in the correct location (Tom finding the rest of the Manhattan Clan, King Author returning to England (only to be transported to another location by other magic, and Goliath and crew getting back to Manhattan). Of course, "where you need to be" is still in effect, so that means weirdness is about to go down.

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* In ''WesternAnimation/Gargoyles'' ''WesternAnimation/{{Gargoyles}}'' one can move between any body of water (and we do mean any. In series, a swimming pool counted, and in the Comics, a large pot for boiling water for laundry did the trick) and the shores Avalon by invoking the spell. However, returning back isn't so precise. Avalon will send you to the real world, but it's not going to be your original location, but somewhere random (body of water still applies) with some weirdness going on. It's implied through the repeated description of the process ("Avalon doesn't send you where you want to go, it sends you where you need to be") that there is some consciousness making the arrival choice. Like wise, it's random as to how long this keeps happening, but all three onscreen uses do eventually wind up in the correct location (Tom finding the rest of the Manhattan Clan, King Author returning to England (only to be transported to another location by other magic, and Goliath and crew getting back to Manhattan). Of course, "where you need to be" is still in effect, so that means weirdness is about to go down.
23rd Mar '17 12:56:48 PM hszmv1
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Added DiffLines:

* In ''WesternAnimation/Gargoyles'' one can move between any body of water (and we do mean any. In series, a swimming pool counted, and in the Comics, a large pot for boiling water for laundry did the trick) and the shores Avalon by invoking the spell. However, returning back isn't so precise. Avalon will send you to the real world, but it's not going to be your original location, but somewhere random (body of water still applies) with some weirdness going on. It's implied through the repeated description of the process ("Avalon doesn't send you where you want to go, it sends you where you need to be") that there is some consciousness making the arrival choice. Like wise, it's random as to how long this keeps happening, but all three onscreen uses do eventually wind up in the correct location (Tom finding the rest of the Manhattan Clan, King Author returning to England (only to be transported to another location by other magic, and Goliath and crew getting back to Manhattan). Of course, "where you need to be" is still in effect, so that means weirdness is about to go down.
16th Mar '17 4:39:23 PM AthenaBlue
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* Rufus gave ''Film/BillAndTed'' the time machine, showed them how to use it, and tended to turn up for advice when the boys found themselves in trouble. He was from the future of prosperity, peace, and excellence that they ushered in, and had a vested interest in helping them because without them his future would not exist.



* Rufus gave ''Film/BillAndTed'' the time machine, showed them how to use it, and tended to turn up for advice when the boys found themselves in trouble. He was from the future of prosperity, peace, and excellence that they ushered in, and had a vested interest in helping them because without them his future would not exist.



* In ''Series/DoctorWho'' The Doctor does this occasionally. He travels through time and space in the TARDIS dealing with various disasters of all sorts though.
* In the short "A Matter of Minutes" from ''Series/TheTwilightZone1985'', the foreman of a group of people (played by Adolph Caesar) takes time to explain to a couple who ended up 'outside time' how time really worked, even showing them an animated computer graphic prepared for such an event.
* In ''Series/QuantumLeap'' it was implied that [[MysteriousBacker some conscious force]] (possibly even God) was guiding Sam' jumps to ensure that he did the most good. This was a {{deconstruction}} since this mysterious guide was [[UnknownCharacter never actually seen or had a voice]] (although they met someone who ''might'' have been them). It only made itself known by directing events like an actual deity would and, of course, when it did more or less directly interact with the main character, it was a total MindScrew.

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* In ''Series/DoctorWho'' ''Series/DoctorWho'': The Doctor does this occasionally. He travels through time and space in the TARDIS dealing with various disasters of all sorts though.
though.
* In the short "A Matter of Minutes" ''Series/EerieIndiana'' episode "The Lost Hour" an old Milkman saves Marshall from ''Series/TheTwilightZone1985'', [[TimePolice the foreman Garbage Men]] in an empty, alternate dimension of a group of people (played by Adolph Caesar) takes time to explain to a couple who ended up 'outside time' how time really worked, even showing them an animated computer graphic prepared for such an event.
* In ''Series/QuantumLeap'' it was implied
Eerie. [[spoiler: The milkman implies that [[MysteriousBacker some conscious force]] (possibly even God) was guiding Sam' jumps to ensure that he did the most good. This was a {{deconstruction}} since this mysterious guide was [[UnknownCharacter never actually seen or had a voice]] (although they met someone who ''might'' have been them). It only made itself known by directing events like he's an actual deity would and, older version of course, when it did more or less directly interact with the main character, it was a total MindScrew. Marshall.]]



* In the ''Series/EerieIndiana'' episode "The Lost Hour" an old Milkman saves Marshall from [[TimePolice The Garbage Men]] in an empty, alternate dimension of Eerie. [[spoiler: The milkman implies that he's an older version of Marshall.]]

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* In the ''Series/EerieIndiana'' episode "The Lost Hour" an old Milkman saves Marshall from [[TimePolice The Garbage Men]] in an empty, alternate dimension of Eerie. [[spoiler: The milkman implies ''Series/QuantumLeap'' it was implied that he's [[MysteriousBacker some conscious force]] (possibly even God) was guiding Sam' jumps to ensure that he did the most good. This was a {{deconstruction}} since this mysterious guide was [[UnknownCharacter never actually seen or had a voice]] (although they met someone who ''might'' have been them). It only made itself known by directing events like an older version actual deity would and, of Marshall.]] course, when it did more or less directly interact with the main character, it was a total MindScrew.


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* In the short "A Matter of Minutes" from ''Series/TheTwilightZone1985'', the foreman of a group of people (played by Adolph Caesar) takes time to explain to a couple who ended up 'outside time' how time really worked, even showing them an animated computer graphic prepared for such an event.


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25th Jun '16 9:59:12 PM ChaoticNovelist
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When dealing with authority figures it can be justified (after all, the ruler of a country still has some responsibility to all their subjects and the police are supposed to serve the public, why should the ruler of a multiverse or the TimePolice be any different?) as well as heroes (a good hero will always help the needy, time travelers should be no exception) however when gods or [[SufficientlyAdvancedAlien other higher beings]] are involved it can invoke a bit of FridgeLogic (although they might have their reasons). The helper in question might not actually be that more powerful than the protagonist, but have a job dealing with much more important problems.

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When dealing with These can be authority figures it can be justified (after all, justified: the ruler of a country still has some responsibility to all their subjects and the police are supposed to serve the public, why should the ruler of a multiverse or the TimePolice be any different?) as well as heroes (a different?. They can be heroes: a good hero will always help the needy, time travelers should be no exception) however when gods exception. Gods or [[SufficientlyAdvancedAlien other higher beings]] are involved it can invoke a bit of FridgeLogic (although they might may be working InMysteriousWays or have their reasons).some hidden agenda. The helper in question might not actually be that more powerful than the protagonist, but have a job dealing with much more important problems.
25th Jun '16 9:57:12 PM ChaoticNovelist
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Some heroes have the misfortune of ending up in a strange place: maybe in the past, or in a world [[UnPerson where they never existed]] or (if they're really unlucky) a world where they're a completely different person (and their best friend hates their guts, while the villains have them under their thumb). From the narrative's point of view, TheHero's predicament is usually important to ''them'', but mean a lot less in the bigger picture. Luckily, people who are [[TimeTravel thrown back in time]] or TrappedInAnotherWorld will find a member of the TimePolice, another traveler (with more experience) or even a ''god'' who'll help them get safely home. This invokes a bit of FridgeLogic, as anyone who can help them has to be extremely powerful (being capable of traveling to and fro) and is usually implied to have more important things to worry about than one displaced peon (assuming that one person out of place ''isn't'' considered a [[ForWantOfANail serious problem]], of course).

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Some heroes have the misfortune of ending up in a strange place: maybe in the past, or in a world [[UnPerson where they never existed]] or (if they're really unlucky) a world where they're a completely different person (and their best friend hates their guts, while the villains have them under their thumb). From the narrative's point of view, TheHero's predicament is usually important to ''them'', but mean a lot less in the bigger picture. Luckily, people who are [[TimeTravel thrown back in time]] or TrappedInAnotherWorld will find a member of the TimePolice, another traveler (with more experience) or even a ''god'' who'll help them get safely home. This invokes a bit of FridgeLogic, as anyone who can help them has to be extremely powerful (being capable of traveling to and fro) and is usually implied to have more important things to worry about than one displaced peon (assuming that one person out of place ''isn't'' considered a [[ForWantOfANail serious problem]], of course).
20th Jun '16 2:52:20 PM margdean56
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* In ''Discworld/NightWatch'', Lu-Tze helps Sam Vimes after he's sent back in time (even as much as telling the other Time Monks he just feels like helping him out) even though they're pretty busy fixing the world's {{Continuity Snarl}}s. It's strongly implied that Vimes was sent back in the fist place because he was over [[AlienGeometries the Library]] when [[Discworld/ThiefOfTime the Glass Clock broke reality]], so Lu-Tze feels somewhat responsible.

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* In ''Discworld/NightWatch'', Lu-Tze helps Sam Vimes after he's sent back in time (even as much as telling the other Time Monks he just feels like helping him out) even though they're pretty busy fixing the world's {{Continuity Snarl}}s. It's strongly implied that Vimes was sent back in the fist first place because he was over [[AlienGeometries the Library]] when [[Discworld/ThiefOfTime the Glass Clock broke reality]], so Lu-Tze feels somewhat responsible.
24th Feb '16 9:48:12 AM LentilSandEater
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* ''Literature/TheWonderfulWizardOfOz''

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* %%* ''Literature/TheWonderfulWizardOfOz''
23rd Jan '16 9:58:45 AM nombretomado
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* The Three Bald Doctors in StephenKing's ''Literature/{{Insomnia}}''. Two of them, Clothos and Lachesis, were benevolent; the third, Atropos, was decidedly not.

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* The Three Bald Doctors in StephenKing's Creator/StephenKing's ''Literature/{{Insomnia}}''. Two of them, Clothos and Lachesis, were benevolent; the third, Atropos, was decidedly not.
25th Jul '15 11:22:41 AM MFLuder
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* In the short "A Matter of Minutes" from the second incarnation of ''Series/TheTwilightZone'', the foreman of a group of people (played by Adolph Caesar) takes time to explain to a couple who ended up 'outside time' how time really worked, even showing them an animated computer graphic prepared for such an event.

to:

* In the short "A Matter of Minutes" from the second incarnation of ''Series/TheTwilightZone'', ''Series/TheTwilightZone1985'', the foreman of a group of people (played by Adolph Caesar) takes time to explain to a couple who ended up 'outside time' how time really worked, even showing them an animated computer graphic prepared for such an event.
26th May '15 6:41:16 AM erforce
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* In ''FanFic/MyImmortal'', Ebony briefly ends up trapped in the past until [[Film/BackToTheFuture Marty McFly]] turns up to rescue her.

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* In ''FanFic/MyImmortal'', Ebony briefly ends up trapped in the past until [[Film/BackToTheFuture [[Franchise/BackToTheFuture Marty McFly]] turns up to rescue her.



* ''Film/TheWizardOfOz''

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* %%* ''Film/TheWizardOfOz''
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