History Main / WantonCrueltyToTheCommonComma

9th Sep '17 3:20:40 AM WillBGood
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* MTV's short-lived reality show ''The 70's House'' put the apostrophe in the wrong place, the correct usage would have been ''The '70s House''.

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* MTV's short-lived reality show ''The 70's House'' put the apostrophe in the wrong place, place; the correct usage would have been ''The '70s House''.
3rd Sep '17 3:54:14 AM Divra
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* Subverted by, of all organizations, the British Army. When the regiment now known as "21 Special Air Service Regiment (Artists) (Reserve)" was established, it was known as "The Artist's Rifles" after its founder, who had fancied himself a painter in his youth. However, since no two Army clerks could agree on where the apostrophe went, the Army eventually decided to leave it out altogether.
7th Aug '17 6:38:51 PM PaulA
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* Creator/JamesJones, best known for his war trilogy (''From Here To Eternity'', ''The Thin Red Line'', ''Whistle'') also wrote ''Some Came Running'', a thinly veiled semi-autobiographical novel about his backwater hometown of Robinson, Illinois. Whereas the war books feature a terse, grammatically correct style (rather like most military communication), in ''Running'' he used intentional misspellings and punctuation errors, to underscore the rural nature of his subject.

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* Creator/JamesJones, best known for his war trilogy (''From Here To Eternity'', ''The Thin Red Line'', (''Literature/FromHereToEternity'', ''Literature/TheThinRedLine'', ''Whistle'') also wrote ''Some Came Running'', a thinly veiled semi-autobiographical novel about his backwater hometown of Robinson, Illinois. Whereas the war books feature a terse, grammatically correct style (rather like most military communication), in ''Running'' he used intentional misspellings and punctuation errors, to underscore the rural nature of his subject.
27th Jul '17 7:00:49 AM CityOfTheDead
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* ''Fanfic/MiTruLov'' contains many examples of this, including this gem at the start of chapter 10:
---> moss cow and eye raun, ova da, hill, an m d, toards, the, hose, wasre, da ,c urj ahad bean da list tim I was with dem
13th Jul '17 9:20:46 AM Ccook1956
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* "Converse" is a valid word. "Conversation" is as well. "Conversate"...not so much.
17th Jun '17 10:23:44 AM trumpetmarietta
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*** Switching type of parenthesis can be just as wrong in natural language. In a quote, brackets usually delimit remarks [sic!] or edits by the quoting author, so if nested parentheses are turned into brackets then the result could get very hard to quote properly.

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*** Switching type of parenthesis can be just as wrong in natural language. In a quote, square brackets usually delimit remarks [sic!] [''sic''!] or edits by the quoting author, so if nested parentheses are turned into brackets then the result could get very hard to quote properly.
14th Jun '17 11:16:00 PM bfunc
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* Implied (because we didn't see it written, only heard it pronounced) in a Creator/BennyHill skit by an actress who persisted in reading lines such as "What's that in the road ahead?" as "What's that in the road, a head?" or "What is this thing called love?" as "What is this thing called, Love?"
26th May '17 11:26:45 AM Malady
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** Part of the problem is that '''s'' is usually used both as a contraction (''x'' is) ''and'' as a possessive (of ''x''). Granted, the initial example makes no sense in either case: "Apple is $0.99 a pound" vs. "The $0.99 of Apple per pound"?[[note]]The commonly understood phrase is "Apples are $0.99 a pound and the verb is contracted out.[[/note]] The Japanese examples seem to run afoul of BlindIdiotTranslation.[[note]]e.g. A hanging possessive of a single "Ninja Master" rather than multiple Ninja Masters; the "Princess'es Adventure" example is a straight-play of this subtrope: the correct term is "Princess' Adventure Starts".[[/note]]

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** Part of the problem is that '''s'' is usually used both as a contraction (''x'' is) ''and'' as a possessive (of ''x''). Granted, the initial example makes no sense in either case: "Apple is $0.99 a pound" vs. "The $0.99 of Apple per pound"?[[note]]The commonly understood phrase is "Apples are $0.99 a pound and the verb is contracted out.[[/note]] The Japanese examples seem to run afoul of BlindIdiotTranslation.[[note]]e.g. A hanging possessive of a single "Ninja Master" rather than multiple Ninja Masters; the "Princess'es Adventure" example is a straight-play of this subtrope: the correct term is "Princess' "Princess's Adventure Starts".[[/note]]
22nd Apr '17 4:59:05 PM nombretomado
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* The English translation of ''SuikodenII'' is absolutely ''notorious'' for punctuation abuse. Multiple question marks or exclamation points, ellipses that stretch out into infinity, oddly-placed commas - and that's just the tip of the iceberg. Certain characters - like Nanami and Luca, who are both prone to ''very'' strong displays of emotion - get hit especially bad with it in their dialogue.

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* The English translation of ''SuikodenII'' ''VideoGame/SuikodenII'' is absolutely ''notorious'' for punctuation abuse. Multiple question marks or exclamation points, ellipses that stretch out into infinity, oddly-placed commas - and that's just the tip of the iceberg. Certain characters - like Nanami and Luca, who are both prone to ''very'' strong displays of emotion - get hit especially bad with it in their dialogue.
12th Apr '17 2:18:37 PM jharrison3051
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* MTV's short-lived reality show ''The 70's House'' put the apostrophe in the wrong place, the correct usage would have been ''The '70s House''.
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