History Main / WantonCrueltyToTheCommonComma

1st Feb '18 7:57:16 PM 64SuperNintendo
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15th Jan '18 5:17:24 AM Andyroid
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** "The Homestar Runner Gets Something Stuck in His Craw", a Homestar cartoon done in the style of ''Literature/TheHomestarRunnerEntersTheStrongestManInTheWorldContest'', deliberately abuses said-bookism as part of a parody of cheesy children's books.

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** "The Homestar Runner Gets Something Stuck in His Craw", a Homestar cartoon done in the style of ''Literature/TheHomestarRunnerEntersTheStrongestManInTheWorldContest'', deliberately abuses said-bookism SaidBookism as part of a parody of cheesy children's books.
11th Jan '18 10:31:12 AM Gosicrystal
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** This also applies to questions of usage where [[BothSidesHaveAPoint there are valid arguments either way]]. For instance, there's a BrokenBase among grammarians as to whether you should use a serial comma ("A, B, and C") or not ("A, B and C"). The most expedient answer is just to go with your publisher's style guide.
*** This is also known as the Oxford Comma argument and is discussed in the Underpunctuation section above.

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** * This also applies to questions of usage where [[BothSidesHaveAPoint there are valid arguments either way]]. For instance, there's a BrokenBase among grammarians as to whether you should use a serial comma ("A, B, and C") or not ("A, B and C"). The most expedient answer is just to go with your publisher's style guide.
***
guide. This is also known as the Oxford Comma argument and is discussed in the Underpunctuation section above.



** Spanish (or at least the Mexican dialect thereof) uses dashes to indicate the beginning and end of dialogue (-like this -for example).
*** International Spanish rules set the use of a long dash (—) for starting a dialogue, with additional long dashes to add an explanation:
*** —It would be like this —said this troper—, exactly like this.

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** Spanish (or at least the Mexican dialect thereof) uses dashes to indicate the beginning and end of dialogue (-like this -for example).
***
example). International Spanish rules set the use of a long dash (—) for starting a dialogue, with additional long dashes to add an explanation:
*** ---> —It would be like this —said this troper—, exactly like this.
23rd Dec '17 8:36:14 PM Prfnoff
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** Two question marks may be acceptable to some, to convey a certain tone of confusion and incredulity.

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** Two question marks may be acceptable to some, to convey a certain tone of confusion and incredulity. TabletopGame/{{Chess}} annotations often use them to indicate major tactical blunders.
1st Dec '17 2:33:28 AM Ezclee4050
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* Contractions using apostrophes to join words, then ultimately losing them, is a standard evolutionary form in the English language. Yet, "Halloween" has recently seen a trend of people putting the apostrophe back in and spelling it "Hallowe'en". Part of this is RuleOfCool (it looks appropriately archaic and spooky), but there also seems to be a mistaken belief that Halloween's apostrophe only disappeared in the last few decades (Wrong. The Oxford English Dictionary dates "Halloween" to 1786). In fact, "Hallowe'en" isn't even the original contracted form of All Hallows' Evening (which was Hallow-e'en). For comparison, see "God be with ye" becoming "good-b'ye"[[note]]which stuck around for much of the 1800s. Creator/CharlesDickens used it[[/note]] and then finally "goodbye", yet you don't see anyone putting the apostrophe back in there.

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* Contractions using apostrophes to join words, then ultimately losing them, is a standard evolutionary form in the English language. Yet, "Halloween" "[[AllHallowsEve Halloween]]" has recently seen a trend of people putting the apostrophe back in and spelling it "Hallowe'en". Part of this is RuleOfCool (it looks appropriately archaic and spooky), but there also seems to be a mistaken belief that Halloween's apostrophe only disappeared in the last few decades (Wrong. The Oxford English Dictionary dates "Halloween" to 1786). In fact, "Hallowe'en" isn't even the original contracted form of All Hallows' Evening (which was Hallow-e'en). For comparison, see "God be with ye" becoming "good-b'ye"[[note]]which stuck around for much of the 1800s. Creator/CharlesDickens used it[[/note]] and then finally "goodbye", yet you don't see anyone putting the apostrophe back in there.
26th Nov '17 10:34:11 AM nombretomado
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* Capitalizing odd Words in the middle of Sentences may have been common in the 18th century, but not any more. Back then, most nouns were capitalized (the same thing is still done in [[GermanLanguage German]]).

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* Capitalizing odd Words in the middle of Sentences may have been common in the 18th century, but not any more. Back then, most nouns were capitalized (the same thing is still done in [[GermanLanguage [[UsefulNotes/GermanLanguage German]]).
25th Nov '17 6:48:12 PM Ezclee4050
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Added DiffLines:

* Contractions using apostrophes to join words, then ultimately losing them, is a standard evolutionary form in the English language. Yet, "Halloween" has recently seen a trend of people putting the apostrophe back in and spelling it "Hallowe'en". Part of this is RuleOfCool (it looks appropriately archaic and spooky), but there also seems to be a mistaken belief that Halloween's apostrophe only disappeared in the last few decades (Wrong. The Oxford English Dictionary dates "Halloween" to 1786). In fact, "Hallowe'en" isn't even the original contracted form of All Hallows' Evening (which was Hallow-e'en). For comparison, see "God be with ye" becoming "good-b'ye"[[note]]which stuck around for much of the 1800s. Creator/CharlesDickens used it[[/note]] and then finally "goodbye", yet you don't see anyone putting the apostrophe back in there.
7th Nov '17 12:35:47 PM morane
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** Part of the problem is that '''s'' is usually used both as a contraction (''x'' is) ''and'' as a possessive (of ''x''). Granted, the initial example makes no sense in either case: "Apple is $0.99 a pound" vs. "The $0.99 of Apple per pound"?[[note]]The commonly understood phrase is "Apples are $0.99 a pound and the verb is contracted out.[[/note]] The Japanese examples seem to run afoul of BlindIdiotTranslation.[[note]]e.g. A hanging possessive of a single "Ninja Master" rather than multiple Ninja Masters; the "Princess'es Adventure" example is a straight-play of this subtrope: the correct term is "Princess's Adventure Starts".[[/note]]

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** Part of the problem is that '''s'' is usually used both as a contraction (''x'' is) ''and'' as a possessive (of ''x''). Granted, the initial example makes no sense in either case: "Apple is $0.99 a pound" vs. "The $0.99 of Apple per pound"?[[note]]The commonly understood phrase is "Apples are $0.99 a pound and the verb is contracted out.[[/note]] The Japanese examples seem to run afoul of BlindIdiotTranslation.[[note]]e.g. A hanging possessive of a single "Ninja Master" rather than multiple Ninja Masters; the "Princess'es "Princn, ess'es Adventure" example is a straight-play of this subtrope: the correct term is "Princess's Adventure Starts".[[/note]]


Added DiffLines:

* There is an anecdote in Finnish language of the importance of proper punctuation. A convict sentenced for life in Siberia sent a letter to Czar, begging for mercy. He got reply "Armoa ei Siperiaan" (Mercy no Siberia)" So the poor bloke became even more desperate: did the Czar mean: "Armoa, ei Siperiaan" (Mercy, no Siberia) or "Armoa ei, Siperiaan" (Mercy no, Siberia!).
1st Nov '17 3:36:33 PM WillKeaton
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* A mildly famous scene from ''ComicBook/{{Preacher}}'': "Improper use of inverted commas, Hoover! [[http://www.freewebs.com/dobermansatplay/Preacher3.jpg Improper use of inverted commas!!]]"

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* A mildly famous scene from ''ComicBook/{{Preacher}}'': "Improper use of inverted commas, Hoover! [[http://www.freewebs.com/dobermansatplay/Preacher3.jpg Improper use of inverted commas!!]]"commas!!"]]
1st Nov '17 3:34:24 PM WillKeaton
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* An error whose commonness almost makes itself a trope is using the abbreviation "i.e." to mean "for example." This is wrong, '''wrong''', '''''wrong'''''. "e.g." means "''exempli gratia''," or "for example." "i.e." means "''id est[[note]]It is also often erroneously taken to mean "in essence"[[/note]]''," or "that is." Use i.e. for clarification and e.g. for demonstration. There is some overlap in meaning, but it's important to know the difference.

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* An error whose commonness almost makes itself a trope is using the abbreviation "i.e." to mean "for example." This is wrong, '''wrong''', '''''wrong'''''. "e.g." means "''exempli gratia''," or "for example." "i.e." means "''id est[[note]]It est,"[[note]]It is also often erroneously taken to mean "in essence"[[/note]]''," essence"[[/note]]'' or "that is." Use i.e. for clarification and e.g. for demonstration. There is some overlap in meaning, but it's important to know the difference.
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