History Main / WantonCrueltyToTheCommonComma

22nd Jun '16 4:54:41 PM NotThisThing
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** Related, "who's" versus "whose". The former means "who is/has", the latter indicates possession. Consider: A car is being advertised for sale. You might ask, "Whose car is being sold?" or, "Who's the current owner of the car?"

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\n\n** Although in the neuter possessive, it's unlikely the dog would have balls to scratch.
*
Related, "who's" versus "whose". The former means "who is/has", the latter indicates possession. Consider: A car is being advertised for sale. You might ask, "Whose car is being sold?" or, "Who's the current owner of the car?"car?"
** You might also ask, "Who's car is being sold?" or, "Whose the current owner of the car?" If you do, surrounding crowds will probably beat you to the point of unconsciousness.
4th Jun '16 1:10:52 PM Morgenthaler
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* ''The Shelters of Stone'', the fifth book in Jean M. Auel's ''EarthsChildren'' series, is filled with comma splices.

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* ''The Shelters of Stone'', the fifth book in Jean M. Auel's ''EarthsChildren'' ''Literature/EarthsChildren'' series, is filled with comma splices.
13th Apr '16 3:27:21 PM GaidinBDJ
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* Two spaces after a period was standard in the days of fixed-width fonts. Since the period was so small yet took up a full character's space it could appear to be "floating" between the sentences and impact readability. A second space was added afterwards to firmly fix the period to the end of the preceding sentence. With the proliferation of variable-width fonts, the additional space became obsolete since the period could naturally fall immediately after the final letter of its sentence. Most modern applications render sentences without the additional space even if it's present in the underlying text and most style guides have call for only a single space these days. Typists who learned prior to the mid-to-late-90s still type the extra space simply because it's habit. Neither one space nor two spaces are absolutely incorrect but in professional settings your organization's style guide should be consulted and adhered to.
30th Mar '16 8:14:19 AM CaptainCrawdad
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* Due to the fact that it can be seen a lot on this very wiki, it might be worth mentioning that "due to the fact that" is unwieldy and ''should not'' be used. You can usually do the same thing with "because (reason)" ("Because I've seen it a lot...") or "due to (reason)", and if not, you should probably rework the sentence anyway.
** Inversion: Because the word "because" is a subordinating conjunction, many people think you are never supposed to begin a sentence with one, even if that's only when it ends up making it a sentence fragment. This is likely caused by students losing points when they are supposed to answer in complete sentences, but only put "Because (answer)."
*** "Since". "Since" is good, too.
*** The word "because" is replaceable with a semicolon. "I like pancakes because they taste delicious and are a good breakfast" becomes "I like pancakes; they taste delicious and are a good breakfast."
*** The sentences "I like pancakes because they taste delicious and are a good breakfast." and "Because they taste delicious and are a good breakfast, I like pancakes." mean the same thing at a grammatical and semantic level. Which you use is influenced by matters of prosody; the latter emphasizes that you like pancakes in particular, while the former puts the emphasis on why.

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* Due to the fact that it can be seen a lot on this very wiki, it might be worth mentioning that "due to the fact that" is unwieldy and ''should not'' be used. You can usually do the same thing with "because (reason)" ("Because I've seen it a lot...") or "due to (reason)", and if not, you should probably rework the sentence anyway.
** Inversion: Because the word "because" is
anyway. You could also use a subordinating conjunction, many people think you are never supposed to begin a sentence with one, even if that's only when it ends up making it a sentence fragment. This is likely caused by students losing points when they are supposed to answer in complete sentences, but only put "Because (answer)."
*** "Since". "Since" is good, too.
*** The word "because" is replaceable with a semicolon.
semicolon: "I like pancakes because they taste delicious and are a good breakfast" delicious" becomes "I like pancakes; they taste delicious and are a good breakfast."
*** The sentences "I like pancakes because they taste delicious and are a good breakfast." and "Because they taste delicious and are a good breakfast, I like pancakes." mean the same thing at a grammatical and semantic level. Which you use is influenced by matters of prosody; the latter emphasizes that you like pancakes in particular, while the former puts the emphasis on why.
delicious."


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* ''Film/{{Dope}}'' ends with a very ironic grammar error. The main character delivers a self-empowering speech to the camera in which he brags about getting straight A's and a near-perfect SAT score. In the end, he says, "Why do I want to go to Harvard? If I was white, would you even need to ask me that question?" The camera lingers on the last line, written out on his college application essay. He should have said "If I ''were'' white" because he's using the subjunctive mood. A straight-A Harvard applicant really ought to know that.
18th Mar '16 5:30:25 PM bwburke94
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** Note that this is ENTIRELY incorrect. English has specific capitalization rules, and muggle really shouldn't be capitalized any more than black should be. The reason is simple: while people capitalize nationalities (saying that someone or something is American, for instance), the reason for this is that they are derived from a proper noun. As muggle is not, it shouldn't be capitalized, and indeed in common parlance it is not.

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** Note that this is ENTIRELY incorrect. does not follow normal English has specific capitalization rules, and muggle really shouldn't be capitalized any more than black should be. The reason as "Muggle" is simple: while people capitalize nationalities (saying that someone or something is American, for instance), the reason for this is that they are a descriptive term not derived from a proper noun. As muggle is not, it shouldn't be capitalized, and indeed in common parlance it is not.
nationality. It was merely a deliberate stylistic choice on Rowling's part.
18th Mar '16 5:26:17 PM bwburke94
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** This is made worse when the plural form is inherently different from the singular, like when the grocer has a sale on "potatoe's" or "peach'es."

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** This is made worse when the plural form is inherently different from the singular, like when the grocer has a sale on "potatoe's" "potatoe's"[[note]]unless the grocer also happens to be Dan Quayle[[/note]] or "peach'es."



* To quote the sig of a GameFAQs user:

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* To quote the sig of a GameFAQs Website/GameFAQs user:
3rd Feb '16 6:53:15 AM Thranx
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*** Scare quotes are unfairly named, as they do have some legitimate uses. They can express subtle irony when used correctly. They're also used in academic or formal writing to introduce an important term or phrase that the author believes will be unfamiliar to readers.
23rd Jan '16 9:33:05 PM nombretomado
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* From a literary criticism by [[http://fofweb.com/Lit/default.asp?ItemID=WE54 John Fletcher]] of ''TheStranger'':

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* From a literary criticism by [[http://fofweb.com/Lit/default.asp?ItemID=WE54 John Fletcher]] of ''TheStranger'':''Literature/TheStranger'':
23rd Jan '16 4:31:04 PM nombretomado
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* A good example of an unintentional spoken example occurs in the final scene of ''Film/BigDaddy'', when Sonny Koufax (AdamSandler) tells the guests at his birthday party, "Let's go eat everybody!" [[IAmAHumanitarian Presumably, Sonny didn't believe that Hooters was a restaurant for cannibals.]]

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* A good example of an unintentional spoken example occurs in the final scene of ''Film/BigDaddy'', when Sonny Koufax (AdamSandler) (Creator/AdamSandler) tells the guests at his birthday party, "Let's go eat everybody!" [[IAmAHumanitarian Presumably, Sonny didn't believe that Hooters was a restaurant for cannibals.]]
22nd Jan '16 11:21:25 PM Midna
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* In ''VideoGame/{{Undertale}}'', the word-search Sans tries to use to stump the player is headlined with "Hey Kid's!" Since the rest of the game uses correct punctuation, it's definitely intentional.
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