History Main / VoodooShark

15th Jun '18 5:52:30 AM Freezer
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* ''VideoGame/HenryStickminSeries'' really loves this trope, particularly in ''Fleeing the Complex''. Have [[FireForgedFriends Ellie]] zap a grenade with a taser, the resulting explosion blows a three-storey hole in the building. Electricity + Grenade = crazy explosion, apparently. And don't get us started on the horseshoe magnet to pull a giant airship closer to the building. The airship ends up embedded halfway into the building.
-->'''[[YetAnotherStupidDeath FAIL]] [[HaveANiceDeath Screen]]:''' Well you see, because of entropy the… uhh… [[GivingUpOnLogic Alright, I can't BS my way through this one.]]
14th Jun '18 9:00:09 PM Trogdor7620
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Added DiffLines:

* ''VideoGame/HenryStickminSeries'' really loves this trope, particularly in ''Fleeing the Complex''. Have [[FireForgedFriends Ellie]] zap a grenade with a taser, the resulting explosion blows a three-storey hole in the building. Electricity + Grenade = crazy explosion, apparently. And don't get us started on the horseshoe magnet to pull a giant airship closer to the building. The airship ends up embedded halfway into the building.
-->'''[[YetAnotherStupidDeath FAIL]] [[HaveANiceDeath Screen]]:''' Well you see, because of entropy the… uhh… [[GivingUpOnLogic Alright, I can't BS my way through this one.]]
14th Jun '18 9:38:55 AM MBG
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** In the series, Freeza suffered notoriously heavy UniquenessDecay, with pretty much every arc introducing stronger villains than him. To a lot of fans, this raised the question of why he was considered "the strongest in the universe" when, among other things, a group of cyborgs built by a random Earth scientist could be stronger than him, and Freeza himself personally knew the infinitely stronger Beerus. ''Film/ResurrectionF'' attempts to avert this by claiming that Freeza was UnskilledButStrong, and when he actually trains, he quickly ascends to a level of power on-par with Goku, But... why is a simple alien mutant able to get strength equal to an actual PhysicalGod? If Freeza hasn't trained at all, how come he can use things like specialized ki techniques? If all it takes is just four months of workout to hit Goku's level, why was he worried about Super Saiyans at all? How did he even train himself, for that matter? "Four months of training" has become something of a fandom joke for exactly this reason.

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** In the series, Freeza suffered notoriously heavy UniquenessDecay, with pretty much every arc introducing stronger villains than him. To a lot of fans, this raised the question of why he was considered "the strongest in the universe" when, among other things, a group of cyborgs built by a random Earth scientist could be stronger than him, and Freeza himself personally knew the infinitely stronger Beerus. ''Film/ResurrectionF'' ''Anime/ResurrectionF'' attempts to avert this by claiming that Freeza was UnskilledButStrong, and when he actually trains, he quickly ascends to a level of power on-par with above Goku, But...who at the time was comparable to Beerus. Okay, fair enough, Freeza's a lazy guy, but... why is a simple alien mutant able to get strength equal to an actual PhysicalGod? If Freeza hasn't trained at all, how come he can use things like specialized ki techniques? If all it takes is just four months of workout to hit Goku's level, why was he worried about Super Saiyans at all? How did he even train himself, for that matter? "Four months of training" has become something of a fandom joke for exactly this reason.
14th Jun '18 8:53:59 AM Freezer
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* While the entire ''Franchise/LawAndOrder'' franchise uses and abuses HollywoodLaw for [[RuleOfDrama dramatic purposes]], [[Series/LawAndOrder the Mothership]] episode "[[LawAndOrderS17E6Profiteer Profiteer]]'' pushed Hollywood Law into this trope: The murder of a CEO [[GonnaNeedABiggerWarrant led to the discovery]] that the victim's company knowingly shipped worthless body armor to [[TheWarOnTerror troops in Afghanistan]].[[note]]A batch had been sabotaged by an anti-war employee. Recalling the tainted vests would've put the company behind on their shipment quota[[/note]] When Jack [=McCoy=] files murder charges against the company's next-in-command, the Army steps in and tells [=McCoy=] to cut a deal, quickly and quietly, to make the case go away. Otherwise, the Army would step in on the defendant's behalf and trash his case. The problems with this:
## By the time the Army showed up, the state ([=McCoy=]) had already rested its case. As this case wasn't any media restriction, any damaging info that that the Army would want to keep quiet would already be in the record.
## At that point, there wouldn't possibly be anything the Army could offer in the defendant's case that [=McCoy=] couldn't rip apart the the simple question of why they waited so long to step in.
## And why would the Army wait so long to step in and protect one of its major contractors? Even story-wise, it wouldn't be the first time major chunks of an episode wouldn't feature [=McCoy=] [[JurisdictionFriction fighting another government branch]]

to:

* While the entire ''Franchise/LawAndOrder'' franchise uses and abuses HollywoodLaw for [[RuleOfDrama dramatic purposes]], [[Series/LawAndOrder the Mothership]] episode "[[LawAndOrderS17E6Profiteer Profiteer]]'' pushed Hollywood Law into this trope: The murder of a CEO [[GonnaNeedABiggerWarrant led to the discovery]] that the victim's company knowingly shipped worthless body armor to [[TheWarOnTerror troops in Afghanistan]].[[note]]A batch had been sabotaged by an anti-war employee. Recalling the tainted vests would've put the company behind on their shipment quota[[/note]] When Jack [=McCoy=] files murder Criminally Negligent Homicide charges against the company's next-in-command, the Army steps in and tells [=McCoy=] to cut a deal, quickly and quietly, to make the case go away. Otherwise, the Army would step in on the defendant's behalf and trash his case. The problems with this:
## By the time the Army showed up, the state ([=McCoy=]) [=McCoy=] had already rested its his case. As this case wasn't any media restriction, any damaging info that that the Army would want to keep quiet would already be in the record.
## At that point, there wouldn't couldn't possibly be anything the Army could offer in the defendant's case that [=McCoy=] couldn't rip apart the with the simple question of why they waited so long to step in.
## And why would the Army wait so long to step in and protect one of its major contractors? Even story-wise, from a narrative standpoint, it wouldn't be the first time major chunks of an episode wouldn't feature [=McCoy=] [[JurisdictionFriction fighting another government branch]]
14th Jun '18 8:28:22 AM louisXVI
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-->'''Homer:''' How is it that [[AliensSpeakingEnglish you speak English?]]\\

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-->'''Homer:''' How is it that -->'''Marge:'' [[AliensSpeakingEnglish you You speak English?]]\\perfect English!]]\\
11th Jun '18 1:32:09 AM nngnna
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** Whenever the Lich King reanimates someone of importance, they [[CameBackStrong come back strong.]] Presumably the resurrected players would each be more powerful than the previous raid bosses ''in addition'' to being perfectly able to work as a team.
** It gets even more annoying; the Scourge is powerful enough to wipe out all life on Azeroth. The reason they don't? The Lich King is holding them back. You know, the same Lich King that is trying to kill the player characters and resurrect them as his strongest champions in order to wipe out all life on Azeroth. His fatal flaw was that he wanted to dupe the players into a situation like the one that caused him to become a death knight. Azeroth's destruction was secondary.
** To justify why we would keep the Lich King around after defeating him, it was revealed that "there must always be a Lich King". The current Lich King was either the first or second (depending on whether Ner'zhul was supposed to have been gone), and had only been around for a a couple of decades. The explanation for why he was suddenly necessary was that without him, his undead Scourge would go wild and ravage the planet. There are several problems with this. Firstly, that the armies of the world fought long and hard to the Lich King's very doorstep in order to slay him. In other words, there shouldn't be that many minions left out in the world, relatively speaking. Second, that it implies that despite the Lich King being portrayed as a MagnificentBastard who wanted to take over the world, all of his plans were less effective than just letting his minions run rampant. Finally, and most contradictory, is that we had ''already seen'' what it was like when the Lich King was losing his power. The final arc of ''Warcraft III: The Frozen Throne'' was that the Frozen Throne was damaged and the Lich King would die if Arthas couldn't arrive in time to merge with him. The Lich King dying this way didn't cause the Scourge to run rampant, it ''gave them back their minds'', creating the Forsaken. The new explanation now begs the question as to how the Forsaken are even supposed to exist, and considering that they're a popular playable race, it's not a small question.

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** *** Whenever the Lich King reanimates someone of importance, they [[CameBackStrong come back strong.]] Presumably the resurrected players would each be more powerful than the previous raid bosses ''in addition'' to being perfectly able to work as a team.
** *** It gets even more annoying; the Scourge is powerful enough to wipe out all life on Azeroth. The reason they don't? The Lich King is holding them back. You know, the same Lich King that is trying to kill the player characters and resurrect them as his strongest champions in order to wipe out all life on Azeroth. His fatal flaw was that he wanted to dupe the players into a situation like the one that caused him to become a death knight. Azeroth's destruction was secondary.
** *** To justify why we would keep the Lich King around after defeating him, it was revealed that "there must always be a Lich King". The current Lich King was either the first or second (depending on whether Ner'zhul was supposed to have been gone), and had only been around for a a couple of decades. The explanation for why he was suddenly necessary was that without him, his undead Scourge would go wild and ravage the planet. There are several problems with this. Firstly, that the armies of the world fought long and hard to the Lich King's very doorstep in order to slay him. In other words, there shouldn't be that many minions left out in the world, relatively speaking. Second, that it implies that despite the Lich King being portrayed as a MagnificentBastard who wanted to take over the world, all of his plans were less effective than just letting his minions run rampant. Finally, and most contradictory, is that we had ''already seen'' what it was like when the Lich King was losing his power. The final arc of ''Warcraft III: The Frozen Throne'' was that the Frozen Throne was damaged and the Lich King would die if Arthas couldn't arrive in time to merge with him. The Lich King dying this way didn't cause the Scourge to run rampant, it ''gave them back their minds'', creating the Forsaken. The new explanation now begs the question as to how the Forsaken are even supposed to exist, and considering that they're a popular playable race, it's not a small question.
9th Jun '18 8:15:28 PM Freezer
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* While the entire ''Franchise/LawAndOrder'' franchise uses and abuses HollywoodLaw for [[RuleOfDrama dramatic purposes]], "LawAndOrderS17E6Profiteer'' pushed Hollywood Law into this trope: The murder of a CEO [[GonnaNeedABiggerWarrant led to the discovery]] that the victim's company knowingly shipped worthless body armor to [[TheWarOnTerror troops in Afghanistan]].[[note]]A batch had been sabotaged by an anti-war employee. Recalling the tainted vests would've put the company behind on their shipment quota[[note]] When Jack [=McCoy=] files murder charges against the company's next-in-command, the Army steps in and tells [=McCoy=] to cut a deal, quickly and quietly, to make the case go away. Otherwise, the Army would step in on the defendant's behalf and trash his case. The problems with this:

to:

* While the entire ''Franchise/LawAndOrder'' franchise uses and abuses HollywoodLaw for [[RuleOfDrama dramatic purposes]], "LawAndOrderS17E6Profiteer'' [[Series/LawAndOrder the Mothership]] episode "[[LawAndOrderS17E6Profiteer Profiteer]]'' pushed Hollywood Law into this trope: The murder of a CEO [[GonnaNeedABiggerWarrant led to the discovery]] that the victim's company knowingly shipped worthless body armor to [[TheWarOnTerror troops in Afghanistan]].[[note]]A batch had been sabotaged by an anti-war employee. Recalling the tainted vests would've put the company behind on their shipment quota[[note]] quota[[/note]] When Jack [=McCoy=] files murder charges against the company's next-in-command, the Army steps in and tells [=McCoy=] to cut a deal, quickly and quietly, to make the case go away. Otherwise, the Army would step in on the defendant's behalf and trash his case. The problems with this:




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[[/folder]]
9th Jun '18 8:12:08 PM Freezer
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[[/folder]]

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[[/folder]]
* While the entire ''Franchise/LawAndOrder'' franchise uses and abuses HollywoodLaw for [[RuleOfDrama dramatic purposes]], "LawAndOrderS17E6Profiteer'' pushed Hollywood Law into this trope: The murder of a CEO [[GonnaNeedABiggerWarrant led to the discovery]] that the victim's company knowingly shipped worthless body armor to [[TheWarOnTerror troops in Afghanistan]].[[note]]A batch had been sabotaged by an anti-war employee. Recalling the tainted vests would've put the company behind on their shipment quota[[note]] When Jack [=McCoy=] files murder charges against the company's next-in-command, the Army steps in and tells [=McCoy=] to cut a deal, quickly and quietly, to make the case go away. Otherwise, the Army would step in on the defendant's behalf and trash his case. The problems with this:
## By the time the Army showed up, the state ([=McCoy=]) had already rested its case. As this case wasn't any media restriction, any damaging info that that the Army would want to keep quiet would already be in the record.
## At that point, there wouldn't possibly be anything the Army could offer in the defendant's case that [=McCoy=] couldn't rip apart the the simple question of why they waited so long to step in.
## And why would the Army wait so long to step in and protect one of its major contractors? Even story-wise, it wouldn't be the first time major chunks of an episode wouldn't feature [=McCoy=] [[JurisdictionFriction fighting another government branch]]
## This all assumes the judge would even let anyone from the Army testify. In Real Life and in the show's history, judges don't like having last minute major witnesses sprung on them. And any argument for inclusion ran back into the "Why now" problem.
## And why would the Army want to continue to do business with a company that just defrauded them and who's faulty product had already cost one life that they about? It's not like there aren't plenty of companies that would leap into the space they vacated (which was the point of shipping the worthless vests: to keep their quota, thus their contract).
9th Jun '18 1:34:39 PM mariofan1000
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** In the series, Freeza suffered notoriously heavy UniquenessDecay, with pretty much every arc introducing stronger villains than him. To a lot of fans, this raised the question of why he was considered "the strongest in the universe" when, among other things, a group of cyborgs built by a random Earth scientist could be stronger than him, and Freeza himself personally knew the infinitely stronger Beerus. ''Film/ResurrectionF'' attempts to avert this by claiming that Freeza was UnskilledButStrong, and when he actually trains, he quickly ascends to a level of power on-par with Beerus. But... why is a simple alien mutant able to get strength equal to an actual PhysicalGod? If Freeza hasn't trained at all, how come he can use things like specialized ki techniques? If all it takes is just four months of workout to hit Beerus's level, why was he worried about Super Saiyans at all? How did he even train himself, for that matter? "Four months of training" has become something of a fandom joke for exactly this reason.

to:

** In the series, Freeza suffered notoriously heavy UniquenessDecay, with pretty much every arc introducing stronger villains than him. To a lot of fans, this raised the question of why he was considered "the strongest in the universe" when, among other things, a group of cyborgs built by a random Earth scientist could be stronger than him, and Freeza himself personally knew the infinitely stronger Beerus. ''Film/ResurrectionF'' attempts to avert this by claiming that Freeza was UnskilledButStrong, and when he actually trains, he quickly ascends to a level of power on-par with Beerus. Goku, But... why is a simple alien mutant able to get strength equal to an actual PhysicalGod? If Freeza hasn't trained at all, how come he can use things like specialized ki techniques? If all it takes is just four months of workout to hit Beerus's Goku's level, why was he worried about Super Saiyans at all? How did he even train himself, for that matter? "Four months of training" has become something of a fandom joke for exactly this reason.
9th Jun '18 12:44:57 AM mariofan1000
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** When [[NewPowersAsThePlotDemands Goku randomly reads Krillin's mind]], his only explanation for when he was able to do that is [[BrickJoke "Muffin Button!"]], the joke being that it makes about as much sense as the canon explanation. (The canon explanation being that he somehow acquired the ability while training in high gravity.)
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Main.VoodooShark