History Main / UndeadTaxExemption

4th Mar '17 11:46:00 AM AthenaBlue
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* Mentioned in ''Literature/TheDresdenFiles''. [[spoiler:The main character]] "died" but got better. At least a year passed with the world considering him dead. This has, however, happened enough to wizards that the White Council of Wizards has forms to fill out to get "reinstated." (Which makes sense given WizardsLiveLonger.)
* The eponymous character of Creator/GuyGavrielKay's ''Literature/{{Ysabel}}'' is briefly annoyed when, having been reincarnated in France for the umpteenth time since the Roman Empire, her old stash of francs that she hid last go-round is now useless. She steals another woman's purse instead.
* In the novel ''Literature/MethuselahsChildren'' by Creator/RobertAHeinlein, the problems with getting an UndeadTaxExemption are mentioned as one reason why the long-lived Howard Family members are attempting to see if they can end their {{masquerade}}. In ''Literature/TimeEnoughForLove'', it's shown that their descendants throughout the centuries continue to come up with ways to hide the fact that they're much longer lived than their fellow humans. The records of their genealogy, however, are fastidiously maintained in the secret Family files.
* Averted and touched upon in Creator/DouglasAdams' novel ''Literature/TheLongDarkTeaTimeOfTheSoul'', in which Dirk Gently realizes that the god Thor would have a huge amount of difficulty if he wanted to use an airplane because he has no passport, no birth certificate...
* In ''SpiritsThatWalkInShadow'', one of the main characters, a witch, has no official ID, but her father just magically creates a driver's license for her (which exists only until she puts it back in her pocket). This is so that she can attend university, something most of her people don't choose to do.

to:

* Mentioned in ''Literature/TheDresdenFiles''. [[spoiler:The main character]] "died" but got better. At least ''Literature/{{Animorphs}}'' has a year passed crash-landed Andalite posing as a college math teacher. His lack of contact with the world considering him dead. This has, however, happened enough to wizards that the White Council of Wizards has forms to fill out to get "reinstated." (Which makes sense given WizardsLiveLonger.)
* The eponymous character of Creator/GuyGavrielKay's ''Literature/{{Ysabel}}'' is briefly annoyed when, having been reincarnated in France for the umpteenth time since the Roman Empire, her old stash of francs that she hid last go-round is now useless. She steals another woman's purse instead.
* In the novel ''Literature/MethuselahsChildren'' by Creator/RobertAHeinlein, the problems with
others (like getting an UndeadTaxExemption are mentioned out of sight to morph/demorph every two hours) is handwaved as one reason why being a loner.
** Also
the long-lived Howard Family members are attempting Chee, nigh-immortal androids who use holograms to see if they can end their {{masquerade}}. In ''Literature/TimeEnoughForLove'', it's shown that their descendants throughout the centuries continue imitate humans and have each lived numerous lives going back to come up with ways to hide the fact that ancient Egypt. Of course, they're much longer lived than their fellow humans. The records advanced enough to easily take control of their genealogy, however, are fastidiously maintained in the secret Family files.
* Averted and touched upon in Creator/DouglasAdams' novel ''Literature/TheLongDarkTeaTimeOfTheSoul'', in which Dirk Gently realizes that the god Thor would have a huge amount of difficulty
every computer on Earth if he they wanted to use an airplane because he has no passport, no to, so forging a new birth certificate...
* In ''SpiritsThatWalkInShadow'', one
certificate every couple of the main characters, a witch, has decades is probably no official ID, but her father just magically creates a driver's license for her (which exists only until she puts it back in her pocket). This is so that she can attend university, something most of her people don't choose to do.big deal.



* Repeatedly averted in the ''RepairmanJack'' novels, in which Jack expends considerable thought and effort on establishing false identities, through which to obtain credit cards and other conveniences, while remaining off the grid of officialdom. When he ''does'' consider becoming a fully-documented citizen, because Gia wants him to legally marry her [[spoiler: before their baby comes]], the logistics of setting up a sufficiently solid identity for himself are so complex, Jack suspects it'll use up nearly all the gold he's been hoarding from his hired-vigilante work - and as the series begins, he's received UndisclosedFunds for fighting ''terrorists'' for the British government, and gets paid that ''again'' for the job that jump-starts the plot.

to:

* Repeatedly The immortals in Creator/PoulAnderson's ''Boat of a Million Years' do this. Some more regularly than others. It's occasionally averted when some don a GodGuise. The main character plays it the straightest. Changing identities over the years and keeping control over his, eventually rather large, business and financial interests. [[spoiler: It's not really primarily a CompoundInterestTimeTravelGambit as he's building up his corporate empire to search for other immortals, not purely financial gain. Though the money helps. ]] Another minor character has spent over a millennium in the ''RepairmanJack'' novels, in which Jack expends considerable thought and effort on establishing Byzantine/Ottoman/Turkish civil service, giving him the ability to create a false identities, through which to obtain credit cards paper trail for his next identity.
* {{Deconstructed}} in TheUnmasquedWorld of Creator/KevinJAnderson's ''Literature/DanShambleZombiePI'' novels. Dan's partner Robin is a civil rights lawyer who's made a career out of helping the newly-undead re-enter society
and other conveniences, while remaining off reclaim their legal status as citizens, spouses, and property-holders. As the grid of officialdom. When he Big Uneasy happened only a decade ago, courts are still hashing out how to apply the law to people who come back from the grave... but Dan ''does'' consider becoming a fully-documented citizen, because Gia wants him have to pay taxes, so doesn't get a literal UndeadTaxExemption.
* Subverted in ''Literature/{{Discworld}}'', when the first thing Arthur Winkling gets after being turned into a vampire is a derelict crumbling castle needing thousands and thousands spent on it in repair work; the second thing is a final demand for two hundred years worth of back taxes on the castle. He discovers there's no money worth a damn associated with the title of Count Notfaratoe, and because, legally, vampires never die, it ''is'' possible to be
legally marry her [[spoiler: before their baby comes]], liable for several hundred years worth of debts.
* Mentioned in ''Literature/TheDresdenFiles''. [[spoiler:The main character]] "died" but got better. At least a year passed with
the logistics of setting up a sufficiently solid identity for himself are so complex, Jack suspects it'll use up nearly all the gold he's been hoarding from his hired-vigilante work - and as the series begins, he's received UndisclosedFunds for fighting ''terrorists'' for the British government, and gets paid world considering him dead. This has, however, happened enough to wizards that ''again'' for the job that jump-starts the plot.White Council of Wizards has forms to fill out to get "reinstated". (Which makes sense given WizardsLiveLonger.)



* In Creator/AnneRice's ''Literature/TheVampireChronicles'', newly-turned vampires usually just carry on pretending to be regular citizens for as long as reasonably possible. Older ones are shown to use a complex web of lawyers, front companies and multinational bank accounts to allow them to openly own property and engage in similar affairs. Of course, most supplement their income with assets taken from victims. Armand amasses a huge fortune very quickly by slaughtering drug smugglers in large numbers and then having the cash he takes laundered. The fact that they possess telepathic powers also goes a long way in enabling them to maintain the upper hand in dealings with mortals and modifying any memories as needed. Lestat selects his first attorney based at least partly on the fact that the man's mind is very easy to read.
* ''Literature/{{Twilight}}''
** The Cullen family move every few years and are able to assume identities, get jobs and enroll in school. ''Breaking Dawn'' reveals that they work with a professional fraudster who can provide them with fake passports, drivers licenses, etc. They've also been doing this for a long time and have also amassed a lot of money and contacts to grease the wheels.
** This is pointed out in Maryann Johanson's [[http://www.flickfilosopher.com/blog/2010/06/062910the_twilight_saga_eclipse_revi.html review of the film]]:
---->'''Maryann:''' Hes a century-old immortal, hes richer than God, and hes not even bound by the clichés of vampirism to avoid sunlight: he could be doing anything and everything fabulous with his endless, privileged life. Traveling the world. Living like a rock star. Anything. What does he choose to do? Attend high school in the rural Pacific Northwest.
* Averted in ''Literature/TheSistersGrimm''. The ever afters (all characters from fairy tales) are immortal (age only if they want to, can be killed but need a bit more than a normal human). Even though non-humans (e.g. the Three Little Pigs) can appear human, most are unemployed and hide in Ferryport or [[spoiler:an underground village in UsefulNotes/NewYorkCity Central Park]] because they do not have official papers. [[LaserGuidedAmnesia For those slip ups there is always memory dust.]]
* The immortals in Creator/PoulAnderson's ''Boat of a Million Years' do this. Some more regularly than others. It's occasionally averted when some don a GodGuise. The main character plays it the straightest. Changing identities over the years and keeping control over his, eventually rather large, business and financial interests. [[spoiler: It's not really primarily a CompoundInterestTimeTravelGambit as he's building up his corporate empire to search for other immortals, not purely financial gain. Though the money helps. ]] Another minor character has spent over a millennium in the Byzantine/Ottoman/Turkish civil service, giving him the ability to create a false paper trail for his next identity.

to:

* In Creator/AnneRice's ''Literature/TheVampireChronicles'', newly-turned vampires usually just carry ''Literature/JourneyToChaos'': Two aversions:
** A grown person dropping in from another world happens often enough in Tariatla that no one bats an eye at it. It's easy for Eric to gain citizenship papers, a job, an apartment, etc.
** Vaya is an ArtificialHuman created by a fugitive in hiding. Thus, when Professor Haburt wants to adopt her, he has to make up a cover story about finding her
on pretending the street because she was abandoned by her parents due to be the country's regular citizens food shortages. There's no Ceihan paperwork to support this but the scenarnio is plausible enough for as long as reasonably possible. Older ones are shown Ataidaran paperwork to use be created. [[spoiler: Since she's a complex web clone of lawyers, front companies and multinational bank accounts to allow them to openly own property and engage in similar affairs. Of course, most supplement their income with assets taken from victims. Armand amasses a huge fortune very quickly by slaughtering drug smugglers in large numbers and then having the cash his real daughter, he takes laundered. The fact that they possess telepathic powers also goes a long way in enabling them has to maintain the upper hand in dealings with mortals change her name as well as her hair and modifying any memories as needed. Lestat selects his first attorney based at least partly on the fact that the man's mind is very easy to read.
* ''Literature/{{Twilight}}''
** The Cullen family move every few years and are able to assume identities, get jobs and enroll in school. ''Breaking Dawn'' reveals that they work with
eye color so no one suspects a professional fraudster who can provide them with fake passports, drivers licenses, etc. They've also been doing this for a long time and have also amassed a lot of money and contacts to grease the wheels.
** This is pointed out in Maryann Johanson's [[http://www.flickfilosopher.com/blog/2010/06/062910the_twilight_saga_eclipse_revi.html review of the film]]:
---->'''Maryann:''' Hes a century-old immortal, hes richer than God, and hes not even bound by the clichés of vampirism to avoid sunlight: he could be doing anything and everything fabulous with his endless, privileged life. Traveling the world. Living like a rock star. Anything. What does he choose to do? Attend high school in the rural Pacific Northwest.
* Averted in ''Literature/TheSistersGrimm''. The ever afters (all characters from fairy tales) are immortal (age only if they want to, can be killed but need a bit more than a normal human). Even though non-humans (e.g. the Three Little Pigs) can appear human, most are unemployed and hide in Ferryport or [[spoiler:an underground village in UsefulNotes/NewYorkCity Central Park]] because they do not have official papers. [[LaserGuidedAmnesia For those slip ups there is always memory dust.
link between them.]]
* The immortals in Creator/PoulAnderson's ''Boat of a Million Years' do this. Some more regularly than others. It's occasionally averted when some don a GodGuise. The main character plays it In the straightest. Changing identities over ''Literature/LeeNez'' series the years and keeping control over his, eventually rather large, business and financial interests. [[spoiler: It's not really primarily a CompoundInterestTimeTravelGambit as eponymous vampiric state trooper lampshades it to himself at one point, noting that he's building up his corporate empire to search for other immortals, not purely financial gain. Though the money helps. ]] Another minor character has spent over a millennium just lucky nobody's noticed that he's been in the Byzantine/Ottoman/Turkish civil service, giving him New Mexico state police off and on since UsefulNotes/WorldWarII. He also doesn't know how much longer he can keep it up, considering the ability increasing use of electronic records and the like.
* Averted and touched upon in Creator/DouglasAdams' novel ''Literature/TheLongDarkTeaTimeOfTheSoul'', in which Dirk Gently realizes that the god Thor would have a huge amount of difficulty if he wanted
to create a false paper trail for his next identity.use an airplane because he has no passport, no birth certificate . . .
* In the novel ''Literature/MethuselahsChildren'' by Creator/RobertAHeinlein, the problems with getting an UndeadTaxExemption are mentioned as one reason why the long-lived Howard Family members are attempting to see if they can end their {{masquerade}}. In ''Literature/TimeEnoughForLove'', it's shown that their descendants throughout the centuries continue to come up with ways to hide the fact that they're much longer lived than their fellow humans. The records of their genealogy, however, are fastidiously maintained in the secret Family files.



* The title character from ''The Vampire Tapestry'', who got the urge to hibernate for decades every generation or so, was fearful of doing so in modern times, in part because of this trope. (Also because he was worried humanity [[WorldWarIII might not even be around anymore]] the next time he woke up.)
* ''Literature/{{Animorphs}}'' has a crash-landed Andalite posing as a college math teacher. His lack of contact with others (like getting out of sight to morph/demorph every two hours) is handwaved as being a loner.
** Also the Chee, nigh-immortal androids who use holograms to imitate humans and have each lived numerous lives going back to ancient Egypt. Of course, they're advanced enough to easily take control of every computer on Earth if they wanted to, so forging a new birth certificate every couple of decades is probably no big deal.
* In L. Jagi Lamplighter's ''Literature/ProsperosDaughter'', averted. Miranda contemplates the difficulty in getting her id updated nowadays after she slips by one guard only because she has white hair; a century ago, a letter of introduction was enough to establish someone. Later in the series, [[spoiler:we learn that they are trying to establish identities for lots and lots of people. They finally came to the conclusion that they would have to forge them in sequence. Even with the ability to compel people to issue birth certificates, etc, and the help of an extensive extended family, it's rough.]]
* {{Deconstructed}} in TheUnmasquedWorld of Creator/KevinJAnderson's ''Literature/DanShambleZombiePI'' novels. Dan's partner Robin is a civil rights lawyer who's made a career out of helping the newly-undead re-enter society and reclaim their legal status as citizens, spouses, and property-holders. As the Big Uneasy happened only a decade ago, courts are still hashing out how to apply the law to people who come back from the grave... but Dan ''does'' have to pay taxes, so doesn't get a literal UndeadTaxExemption.

to:

* The title character from ''The Vampire Tapestry'', who got the urge to hibernate for decades every generation or so, was fearful of doing so in modern times, in part because of this trope. (Also because he was worried humanity [[WorldWarIII might not even be around anymore]] the next time he woke up.)
* ''Literature/{{Animorphs}}'' has a crash-landed Andalite posing as a college math teacher. His lack of contact with others (like getting out of sight to morph/demorph every two hours) is handwaved as being a loner.
** Also the Chee, nigh-immortal androids who use holograms to imitate humans and have each lived numerous lives going back to ancient Egypt. Of course, they're advanced enough to easily take control of every computer on Earth if they wanted to, so forging a new birth certificate every couple of decades is probably no big deal.
* In L. Jagi Lamplighter's ''Literature/ProsperosDaughter'', averted. Miranda contemplates the difficulty in getting her id ID updated nowadays after she slips by one guard only because she has white hair; a century ago, a letter of introduction was enough to establish someone. Later in the series, [[spoiler:we learn that they are trying to establish identities for lots and lots of people. They finally came to the conclusion that they would have to forge them in sequence. Even with the ability to compel people to issue birth certificates, etc, and the help of an extensive extended family, it's rough.]]
* {{Deconstructed}} Repeatedly averted in TheUnmasquedWorld of Creator/KevinJAnderson's ''Literature/DanShambleZombiePI'' novels. Dan's partner Robin is a civil rights lawyer who's made a career out of helping the newly-undead re-enter society ''RepairmanJack'' novels, in which Jack expends considerable thought and reclaim their legal status as citizens, spouses, effort on establishing false identities, through which to obtain credit cards and property-holders. As other conveniences, while remaining off the Big Uneasy happened only a decade ago, courts are still hashing out how to apply the law to people who come back from the grave... but Dan grid of officialdom. When he ''does'' have consider becoming a fully-documented citizen, because Gia wants him to pay taxes, legally marry her [[spoiler: before their baby comes]], the logistics of setting up a sufficiently solid identity for himself are so doesn't get a literal UndeadTaxExemption.complex, Jack suspects it'll use up nearly all the gold he's been hoarding from his hired-vigilante work - and as the series begins, he's received UndisclosedFunds for fighting ''terrorists'' for the British government, and gets paid that ''again'' for the job that jump-starts the plot.



* Averted in ''Literature/TheSistersGrimm''. The ever afters (all characters from fairy tales) are immortal (age only if they want to, can be killed but need a bit more than a normal human). Even though non-humans (e.g. the Three Little Pigs) can appear human, most are unemployed and hide in Ferryport or [[spoiler:an underground village in UsefulNotes/NewYorkCity Central Park]] because they do not have official papers. [[LaserGuidedAmnesia For those slip ups there is always memory dust.]]
* In ''SpiritsThatWalkInShadow'', one of the main characters, a witch, has no official ID, but her father just magically creates a driver's license for her (which exists only until she puts it back in her pocket). This is so that she can attend university, something most of her people don't choose to do.



* In the ''Literature/LeeNez'' series the eponymous vampiric state trooper lampshades it to himself at one point, noting that he's just lucky nobody's noticed that he's been in the New Mexico state police off and on since UsefulNotes/WorldWarII. He also doesn't know how much longer he can keep it up, considering the increasing use of electronic records and the like.
* ''Literature/JourneyToChaos'': Two aversions:
** A grown person dropping in from another world happens often enough in Tariatla that no one bats an eye at it. It's easy for Eric to gain citizenship papers, a job, an apartment, etc.
** Vaya is an ArtificialHuman created by a fugitive in hiding. Thus, when Professor Haburt wants to adopt her, he has to make up a cover story about finding her on the street because she was abandoned by her parents due to the country's regular food shortages. There's no Ceihan paperwork to support this but the scenarnio is plausible enough for Ataidaran paperwork to be created. [[spoiler: Since she's a clone of his real daughter, he also has to change her name as well as her hair and eye color so no one suspects a link between them.]]
* Subverted in the ''Literature/{{Discworld}}'', when the first thing Arthur Winkling gets after being turned into a vampire is a derelict crumbling castle needing thousands and thousands spent on it in repair work; the second thing is a final demand for two hundred years worth of back taxes on the castle. He discovers there's no money worth a damn associated with the title of Count Notfaratoe, and because, legally, vampires never die, it ''is'' possible to be legally liable for several hundred years worth of debts.

to:

* ''Literature/{{Twilight}}''
** The Cullen family move every few years and are able to assume identities, get jobs and enroll in school. ''Breaking Dawn'' reveals that they work with a professional fraudster who can provide them with fake passports, drivers licenses, etc. They've also been doing this for a long time and have also amassed a lot of money and contacts to grease the wheels.
** This is pointed out in Maryann Johanson's [[http://www.flickfilosopher.com/blog/2010/06/062910the_twilight_saga_eclipse_revi.html review of the film]]:
---->'''Maryann:''' Hes a century-old immortal, hes richer than God, and hes not even bound by the clichés of vampirism to avoid sunlight: he could be doing anything and everything fabulous with his endless, privileged life. Traveling the world. Living like a rock star. Anything. What does he choose to do? Attend high school in the rural Pacific Northwest.
* In Creator/AnneRice's ''Literature/TheVampireChronicles'', newly-turned vampires usually just carry on pretending to be regular citizens for as long as reasonably possible. Older ones are shown to use a complex web of lawyers, front companies and multinational bank accounts to allow them to openly own property and engage in similar affairs. Of course, most supplement their income with assets taken from victims. Armand amasses a huge fortune very quickly by slaughtering drug smugglers in large numbers and then having the ''Literature/LeeNez'' series cash he takes laundered. The fact that they possess telepathic powers also goes a long way in enabling them to maintain the upper hand in dealings with mortals and modifying any memories as needed. Lestat selects his first attorney based at least partly on the fact that the man's mind is very easy to read.
* The title character from ''The Vampire Tapestry'', who got the urge to hibernate for decades every generation or so, was fearful of doing so in modern times, in part because of this trope. (Also because he was worried humanity [[WorldWarIII might not even be around anymore]] the next time he woke up.)
* The
eponymous vampiric state trooper lampshades it to himself at one point, noting that he's just lucky nobody's noticed that he's character of Creator/GuyGavrielKay's ''Literature/{{Ysabel}}'' is briefly annoyed when, having been reincarnated in France for the New Mexico state police off and on umpteenth time since UsefulNotes/WorldWarII. He also doesn't know how much longer he can keep it up, considering the increasing use Roman Empire, her old stash of electronic records and the like.
* ''Literature/JourneyToChaos'': Two aversions:
** A grown person dropping in from
francs that she hid last go-round is now useless. She steals another world happens often enough in Tariatla that no one bats an eye at it. It's easy for Eric to gain citizenship papers, a job, an apartment, etc.
** Vaya is an ArtificialHuman created by a fugitive in hiding. Thus, when Professor Haburt wants to adopt her, he has to make up a cover story about finding her on the street because she was abandoned by her parents due to the country's regular food shortages. There's no Ceihan paperwork to support this but the scenarnio is plausible enough for Ataidaran paperwork to be created. [[spoiler: Since she's a clone of his real daughter, he also has to change her name as well as her hair and eye color so no one suspects a link between them.]]
* Subverted in the ''Literature/{{Discworld}}'', when the first thing Arthur Winkling gets after being turned into a vampire is a derelict crumbling castle needing thousands and thousands spent on it in repair work; the second thing is a final demand for two hundred years worth of back taxes on the castle. He discovers there's no money worth a damn associated with the title of Count Notfaratoe, and because, legally, vampires never die, it ''is'' possible to be legally liable for several hundred years worth of debts.
woman's purse instead.



* In ''Series/{{Being Human|UK}}'', all the vampires seem to have jobs. For example, BigBad Herrick is a local policeman, and the vampires' lair is an undertakers. This is justified as vampire society has centuries of experience in hiding in plain sight, and it is implied there are vampires in high places. Also, Annie (a ghost) got a job as a barmaid. This isn't completely impossible, as Annie can (usually) pass for a normal human, and if she gets paid cash in hand, there wouldn't be the fact she's legally as well as biologically dead to worry about.
** In Season 2, the system starts coming apart after [[spoiler:Herrick's death]], and Mitchell has to work to cover up for the rest of the vampires. Especially whenever one of them slips and kills someone.
** In one of the ExpandedUniverse Books it's revealed that vampires get normal humans to act as body doubles so they can have passport photos.
*** They also use photoshop. Mitchell's Hospital ID badge is taken from a black and white photo he had back when he was alive.
* ''Franchise/{{Buffyverse}}'':
** Averted in one instance by ''Series/BuffyTheVampireSlayer'', when [[spoiler:Buffy]] is raised from the dead and is able to re-integrate immediately into society, just as if she'd never died at all. In real life, people who have mistakenly been declared dead in some government database can spend years trying to get the bureaucracy to acknowledge and correct the error. But [[spoiler:Buffy]] was never declared dead. The Scoobies actively hid her death through use of [[spoiler:the [=BuffyBot=]]].
*** Although she did get a gravestone. A gravestone in a remote area, so no one other than the Scoobies knew it existed.
*** The social worker handling the paperwork for the Buffy household went a little cuckoo bananas nutcakes after being tormented by an invisible woman. Perils of a Sunnydale life.
*** Anya Christina Emmanuella Jenkins (Lame-Ass Made-Up Maiden Name)? She even goes to high school after losing her powers! Although she ''did'' alter reality so that she'd appear to be a normal high school student and not a freaky-ass vengeance demon. She didn't account for the possibility that she'd lose her powers and be stuck that way.
** ''Series/{{Angel}}''
*** Spike and Angel himself both having learned to drive (and Angel holding a driving license). Angel successfully rents property in LA -- how many estate agents do you know will send someone out after dark to arrange a lease? This is lampshaded in one episode where someone asks Angel how he can order stuff over the Internet. Fred explains how to hack a company's computer system and steal whatever you want. Angel says he just memorized Cordy's credit card number.
*** Fred spent a few years in a Hell dimension. Afterward she lives in the Hyperion and gets all her resources from Angel and co, so legal documents are not necessary.
*** Kate comments in one episode about how real detectives have licenses and surnames.
*** They don't into the details of how Angel acquired his first place in L.A, but the team consulted a millionaire who owed them a big favor for financial advice when they decided to take over the Hyperion Hotel.
*** The deliberately ObstructiveBureaucrat Gavin Park quickly recognizes that they can shut Angel Investigations down simply by pointing out Angel's ID issues to the government. Just to spite Gavin, Lilah gets Angel all the documents he needs.
*** Humorously [[LampshadeHanging lampshaded]] in "The Girl in Question", when Spike's rant reveals that the Immortal had him thrown in prison for tax evasion.
* ''Series/CSICyber'' dealt with a hacker who had created several carefully-constructed identities that he had spent years putting together to provide both cover for his operations and as a fallback plan in case he was uncovered. As with the ''Series/WhiteCollar'' example, detailed scrutiny quickly reveals them as false.
* Both versions of ''Series/DarkShadows'' have this problem for the vampire Barnabas Collins. Pretending to be a cousin from England helps him be accepted by the family, and he can sell his old jewels to get money, but that isn't going to get him a Social Security number or credit card, or let him open up a bank account. Especially since he'll have needed those to buy a wardrobe and renovate the old house.
** Presumably he had Willie Loomis do most of the shopping for him, as well as bring him up to speed on how to blend in to the 20th century.



* {{Justified|Trope}} in the 2007 series of ''Series/DoctorWho'', where the Master's false identity is supported not only by some token documentation, but by creating a worldwide subliminal signal telling everyone to trust him.
** Although the new series at least did have various scenes where the various undercover aliens' disguises were imperfect enough for regular human journalists to pick up upon them, examples being Margaret Blaine/ Blon Slytheen, and the above mentioned Master - for example, because no one on the college he supposedly went to could recall him. Unfortunately, the villainous alien in question will typically make quick work of anyone who finds them out before the protagonists arrive...
** The original series didn't go into as much detail as to how the Third Doctor managed to keep covert in 1970s Britain, but it can be safely assumed that UNIT was more than able to provide him with enough documentation to keep Inland Revenue happy. By the time the Doctor reached his Ninth incarnation, his Psychic Paper usually managed to serve this purpose for him - and he's no longer stuck on Earth, anyway.

to:

* {{Justified|Trope}} in the 2007 series of ''Series/DoctorWho'', where the Master's false identity is supported not only by some token documentation, but by creating a worldwide subliminal signal telling everyone to trust him.
** Although the new series at least did have various scenes where the various undercover aliens' disguises were imperfect enough for regular human journalists to pick up upon them, examples being Margaret Blaine/ Blon Slytheen, and the above mentioned Master - for example, because no one on the college he supposedly went to could recall him. Unfortunately, the villainous alien in question will typically make quick work of anyone who finds them out before the protagonists arrive...
''Series/DoctorWho'':
** The original series didn't go into as much detail as to how the Third Doctor managed to keep covert in 1970s Britain, but it can be safely assumed that UNIT was more than able to provide him with enough documentation to keep Inland Revenue happy. By the time the Doctor reached his Ninth incarnation, his Psychic Paper usually managed to serve this purpose for him - -- and he's no longer stuck on Earth, anyway.



** The new series has had various moments where the various undercover aliens' disguises were imperfect enough for regular human journalists to pick up upon them, examples being Margaret Blaine[=/=]Blon Slitheen, and the Master -- for example, because no one at the university he supposedly went to could recall him. Unfortunately, the villainous alien in question will typically make quick work of anyone who finds them out before the protagonists arrive . . .
** {{Justified|Trope}} with the Master in [[Recap/DoctorWhoS29E12TheSoundOfDrums "The Sound of Drums"]]. He's using mind control to make most people think he's been around for decades. To the 1% of people who are immune to the mind control, his forgery is actually very obvious.



** Averted in ''Series/{{Torchwood}}'', where a young accidental time-traveller is provided with paperwork, gets herself a job, and heads off happily to London for her new life.
* Averted example in ''{{Series/Eureka}}'' after a women thought to be dead shows up in town due it having been a clone that died, Carter begins going on and on about how hard it'll be to convince all the bureaucracies that declared her dead that she now alive. Only to find out the town of Eureka [[CrazyPrepared has a standard Resurrection Form that takes care of everything.]]
* In ''Series/ForeverKnight'' the vampire-cop considers moving on at one point, and visits a vampire whose specialty is providing false identities for this very purpose.
** At one point he also has to dummy up birth records when someone starts looking into his past.
* Discussed on the later seasons of ''Series/{{Haven}}''. Various characters show up that have been helping Haven, Maine hide the suspiciously high numbers of deaths due to the various [[PowerIncontinence Troubles]] throughout the years, including falsifying news stories and death certificates. Duke Crocker goes missing for six months and is presumed dead, and when he returns, he gets arrested and accused of being an imposter for a while. Audrey Parker was missing for even longer than that, but since she is a police officer, her colleagues help her with the documentation.
* The ''Series/{{Highlander}}'' TV series deals with this a few times, although the exact treatment seems to vary DependingOnTheWriter, or maybe depending on the plot of an episode. Presumably most or all immortals have to do this in modern society, and do so successfully (perhaps relying on black market sources and fraud/forgery of official documents). Some even manage it despite very public deaths (most notable are a guy who made a circus act out of the fact that he couldn't be killed, and Richie, Duncan's {{sidekick}}, who had become a professional motorcycle racer and died on the track). Mostly, this is treated as little more than a bother and having to leave town for awhile, but a few times there have been attempts at justifications, such as Duncan complaining about how hard it is to forge/alter records and documentation for his friend Hugh Fitzcairn, who has not adopted well to new technology like computers.
** Another episode played with the trope: when a friend of Duncan's shows up on his doorstep with police right behind her she claims it was because she was in the same hotel as a VIP that was killed and afterward the police had realized that her paperwork didn't check out and have been following her since. The truth is that, haunted by her failure to assassinate Hitler and potentially save many lives, she has taken it upon herself to go around assassinating would-be dictators and [[PoliticallyIncorrectVillain those who spark off hate crimes]] so that the world will never go through that again.
* PlayedWith in ''Series/IDreamOfJeannie''. In one episode, Jeannie wanted to travel overseas with Major Nelson disguised as a normal woman, not hidden in her bottle. He told her that she'd need a passport, and that she could go with him if she could get one without using magic. Of course, he knew there was no way a centuries-old genie could produce the proper documentation.
* Tsukasa, the eponymous ''Series/KamenRiderDecade'', nicely skirts around this by instantly adjusting to his new dimension through some cosmic force. He always finds himself with the skills, documentation, equipment and attire for whatever his job may be. This is later explained in the GrandFinale movie: [[spoiler:Decade's job is to be whatever a given dimension needs him to be - hero or villain, savior or destroyer. Thus, the job adjustment is simply him being handed his role by ThePowersThatBe.]]
* ''Series/KnightRider'': After being presumed dead, Michael Knight got a shiny new identity from his rich employers, but its limitations come up more than once -- every time someone starts looking into him, they discover that he apparently didn't exist until just recently. Naturally this tends to make them suspicious. Of course this rather blatant, ongoing problem is never dealt with by his employers because TropesAreTools.
* ''Series/{{Leverage}}'': One of the cover identities [[PlayfulHacker Hardison]] set up for Parker is so thoroughly documented that she got called for jury duty.
** Then again, in some districts the jury duty officials are so lax, [[http://philadelphia.cbslocal.com/2014/04/14/nj-familys-dog-summoned-for-jury-duty they send summonses to household pets.]]



* Averted in ''Series/{{Torchwood}}'', where a young accidental time-traveller is provided with paperwork, gets herself a job, and heads off happily to London for her new life.
* Averted in one instance by ''Series/BuffyTheVampireSlayer'', when [[spoiler:Buffy]] is raised from the dead and is able to re-integrate immediately into society, just as if she'd never died at all. In real life, people who have mistakenly been declared dead in some government database can spend years trying to get the bureaucracy to acknowledge and correct the error. But [[spoiler:Buffy]] was never declared dead. The Scoobies actively hid her death through use of [[spoiler:the [=BuffyBot=]]].
** Although she did get a gravestone. A gravestone in a remote area, so no one other than the Scoobies knew it existed.
** The social worker handling the paperwork for the Buffy household went a little cuckoo bananas nutcakes after being tormented by an invisible woman. Perils of a Sunnydale life.
** Anya Christina Emmanuella Jenkins (Lame-Ass Made-Up Maiden Name)? She even goes to high school after losing her powers! Although she ''did'' alter reality so that she'd appear to be a normal high school student and not a freaky-ass vengeance demon. She didn't account for the possibility that she'd lose her powers and be stuck that way.
* ''Series/{{Angel}}''
** Spike and Angel himself both having learned to drive (and Angel holding a driving license). Angel successfully rents property in LA -- how many estate agents do you know will send someone out after dark to arrange a lease? This is lampshaded in one episode where someone asks Angel how he can order stuff over the Internet. Fred explains how to hack a company's computer system and steal whatever you want. Angel says he just memorized Cordy's credit card number.
** Fred spent a few years in a Hell dimension. Afterward she lives in the Hyperion and gets all her resources from Angel and co, so legal documents are not necessary.
** Kate comments in one episode about how real detectives have licenses and surnames.
** They don't into the details of how Angel acquired his first place in L.A, but the team consulted a millionaire who owed them a big favor for financial advice when they decided to take over the Hyperion Hotel.
** The deliberately ObstructiveBureaucrat Gavin Park quickly recognizes that they can shut Angel Investigations down simply by pointing out Angel's ID issues to the government. Just to spite Gavin, Lilah gets Angel all the documents he needs.
** Humorously [[LampshadeHanging lampshaded]] in "The Girl in Question", when Spike's rant reveals that the Immortal had him thrown in prison for tax evasion.
* In ''Series/ForeverKnight'' the vampire-cop considers moving on at one point, and visits a vampire whose specialty is providing false identities for this very purpose.
** At one point he also has to dummy up birth records when someone starts looking into his past.
* Tsukasa, the eponymous ''Series/KamenRiderDecade'', nicely skirts around this by instantly adjusting to his new dimension through some cosmic force. He always finds himself with the skills, documentation, equipment and attire for whatever his job may be. This is later explained in the GrandFinale movie: [[spoiler:Decade's job is to be whatever a given dimension needs him to be - hero or villain, savior or destroyer. Thus, the job adjustment is simply him being handed his role by ThePowersThatBe.]]

to:

* Averted in ''Series/{{Torchwood}}'', where ''Series/ThePlayer'' had a young accidental time-traveller is provided with paperwork, gets herself a job, and heads off happily to London for her new life.
* Averted in one instance by ''Series/BuffyTheVampireSlayer'', when [[spoiler:Buffy]] is raised from the dead and is able to re-integrate immediately
former Witness Protection officer go into society, just as if she'd never died at all. In real life, people who have mistakenly been declared dead in some government database can spend years trying to get the bureaucracy to acknowledge and correct the error. But [[spoiler:Buffy]] was never declared dead. The Scoobies actively hid her death through use of [[spoiler:the [=BuffyBot=]]].
** Although she did get a gravestone. A gravestone in a remote area, so no one other than the Scoobies knew it existed.
** The social worker handling the paperwork for the Buffy household went a little cuckoo bananas nutcakes after being tormented by an invisible woman. Perils of a Sunnydale life.
** Anya Christina Emmanuella Jenkins (Lame-Ass Made-Up Maiden Name)? She even goes to high school after losing her powers! Although she ''did'' alter reality so that she'd appear to be a normal high school student and not a freaky-ass vengeance demon. She didn't account for the possibility that she'd lose her powers and be stuck that way.
* ''Series/{{Angel}}''
** Spike and Angel himself both having learned to drive (and Angel holding a driving license). Angel successfully rents property in LA -- how many estate agents do you know will send someone out after dark to arrange a lease? This is lampshaded in one episode where someone asks Angel how he can order stuff over the Internet. Fred explains how to hack a company's computer system and steal whatever you want. Angel says he just memorized Cordy's credit card number.
** Fred spent a few years in a Hell dimension. Afterward she lives in the Hyperion and gets all her resources from Angel and co, so legal documents are not necessary.
** Kate comments in one episode about how real detectives have licenses and surnames.
** They don't into the details of how Angel acquired his first place in L.A, but the team consulted a millionaire who owed them a big favor for financial advice when they decided to take over the Hyperion Hotel.
** The deliberately ObstructiveBureaucrat Gavin Park quickly recognizes that they can shut Angel Investigations down simply by pointing out Angel's ID issues to the government. Just to spite Gavin, Lilah gets Angel all the documents he needs.
** Humorously [[LampshadeHanging lampshaded]] in "The Girl in Question", when Spike's rant reveals that the Immortal had him thrown in prison for tax evasion.
* In ''Series/ForeverKnight'' the vampire-cop considers moving on at one point, and visits a vampire whose specialty is providing
private business creating false identities for this very purpose.
** At one point he also has to dummy up birth records when someone starts looking into his past.
* Tsukasa, the eponymous ''Series/KamenRiderDecade'', nicely skirts around this by instantly adjusting to his new dimension through some cosmic force. He always finds himself
with the skills, documentation, equipment and attire assistance of an insider in a government records facility who entered fake births into the system which would form a basis for whatever his job may be. This is later explained the new [=IDs=]. The inside man was given away when it was noted how people connected with the forger seemed to have been born in a small rural county which just happened to have the records facility.
* Played oddly in ''Series/PowerRangersTimeForce'', with travelers from the year 3000. Its explicitly stated that their drivers' licenses are invalid
in the GrandFinale movie: [[spoiler:Decade's job present... but getting a new one is to be whatever a given dimension needs him to be - hero or villain, savior or destroyer. Thus, simple matter of taking the job adjustment is simply him being handed his role by ThePowersThatBe.]]test, with no problems of legal existence.



* ''Series/RemingtonSteele'': The eponymous character is actually a made-up persona taken over by a con man. He had no problems the first season, but the second season starts out with a visit from the IRS, curious about the lack of about twenty odd years of income tax filings.
* In ''Series/StargateSG1'', Jack O'Neill gets a clone who, due to a screw-up on [[MadScientist Loki]]'s part, is a teenager. In the end, the clone decides to go back to high school and make his own way. How they get him the necessary documents to do so is not explained. Of course, this is the same organization that can hide Stargate Command, which is an element at least the size of a few battalions. One kid oughta be easy.
** This is the US Federal Government we are talking about. They (admittedly a different part) routinely create new identities -- see the Witness Protection Program. If they can't use that apparatus to set up an identity, they are really slacking.
** In addition to Jack's younger clone, at least half a dozen aliens here and there have been found off-world, presumably brought to earth and integrated into human society, and never seen again. In the StargateVerse, the Witness Protection Program must have a permanent office set up in Colorado Springs, CO, and/or Stargate Command has a permanent liaison with the WPP.
** Ba'al would be a better example. He ends up on Earth, as a freaking CEO of a huge high-tech company, and no-one seems to know where he came from, or how he got to be in charge. Of course, one must remember that Ba'al has control of the Trust, a shadow organization that has roots in most major government agencies. No doubt they could manage to forge the relevant documents.



* ''Series/TimeTrax'': A basic premise of the series is that travelers from the future can easily manipulate 20th-century American electronic databases with their advanced 22nd-century computer technology. The protagonist once had to sit tight in a small county jail cell because they didn't check records with computers.
* Lampshaded on ''Series/TrueBlood'' with Sophie-Anne, the Vampire Queen of Louisiana. She amassed immense wealth over the years, using undead tax exemption to her advantage. But now that Vampires have come into the open, the IRS is after her.
** Indeed one of the central themes of the series is coming out, being taxed and having rights.
* In the start of ''Series/TheVampireDiaries'', Stefan tries to become a new student and is quizzed on his lack of vaccinations and paperwork. He has to hypnotize the secretary to believe that everything is in order.
* This is addressed on ''Series/WhiteCollar''. Neal Caffrey is a conman who regularly uses fake identities. However, he is fully aware that even his best identities cannot survive a thorough investigation. When he considers breaking his parole and fleeing the country, he is referred to a master forger who spent decades creating as set of 'perfect identities'. The man registered a number of fake births with the government and over the years he created fake school, medical and employment records for his 'kids'. He planted those records all over the country in government archives. He made sure that the identities had credit histories and that they all paid their taxes on time. Anyone doing a background check would have to do a very thorough in-person investigation to discover that these people never existed. For obvious reasons, the forger is asking a lot of money for one of these identities.
** In general the series presents fake identities only working until someone starts taking a closer look at you. Once the FBI starts investigating, it does not take them long to spot the tell-tale signs of a fake identity.



* Both versions of ''Series/DarkShadows'' have this problem for the vampire Barnabas Collins. Pretending to be a cousin from England helps him be accepted by the family, and he can sell his old jewels to get money, but that isn't going to get him a Social Security number or credit card, or let him open up a bank account. Especially since he'll have needed those to buy a wardrobe and renovate the old house.
** Presumably he had Willie Loomis do most of the shopping for him, as well as bring him up to speed on how to blend in to the 20th century.
* The ''Series/{{Highlander}}'' TV series deals with this a few times, although the exact treatment seems to vary DependingOnTheWriter, or maybe depending on the plot of an episode. Presumably most or all immortals have to do this in modern society, and do so successfully (perhaps relying on black market sources and fraud/forgery of official documents). Some even manage it despite very public deaths (most notable are a guy who made a circus act out of the fact that he couldn't be killed, and Richie, Duncan's {{sidekick}}, who had become a professional motorcycle racer and died on the track). Mostly, this is treated as little more than a bother and having to leave town for awhile, but a few times there have been attempts at justifications, such as Duncan complaining about how hard it is to forge/alter records and documentation for his friend Hugh Fitzcairn, who has not adopted well to new technology like computers.
** Another episode played with the trope: when a friend of Duncan's shows up on his doorstep with police right behind her she claims it was because she was in the same hotel as a VIP that was killed and afterward the police had realized that her paperwork didn't check out and have been following her since. The truth is that, haunted by her failure to assassinate Hitler and potentially save many lives, she has taken it upon herself to go around assassinating would-be dictators and [[PoliticallyIncorrectVillain those who spark off hate crimes]] so that the world will never go through that again.
* In ''Series/StargateSG1'', Jack O'Neill gets a clone who, due to a screw-up on [[MadScientist Loki]]'s part, is a teenager. In the end, the clone decides to go back to high school and make his own way. How they get him the necessary documents to do so is not explained. Of course, this is the same organization that can hide Stargate Command, which is an element at least the size of a few battalions. One kid oughta be easy.
** This is the US Federal Government we are talking about. They (admittedly a different part) routinely create new identities -- see the Witness Protection Program. If they can't use that apparatus to set up an identity, they are really slacking.
** In addition to Jack's younger clone, at least half a dozen aliens here and there have been found off-world, presumably brought to earth and integrated into human society, and never seen again. In the StargateVerse, the Witness Protection Program must have a permanent office set up in Colorado Springs, CO, and/or Stargate Command has a permanent liaison with the WPP.
** Ba'al would be a better example. He ends up on Earth, as a freaking CEO of a huge high-tech company, and no-one seems to know where he came from, or how he got to be in charge. Of course, one must remember that Ba'al has control of the Trust, a shadow organization that has roots in most major government agencies. No doubt they could manage to forge the relevant documents.
* In ''Series/{{Being Human|UK}}'', all the vampires seem to have jobs. For example, BigBad Herrick is a local policeman, and the vampire's lair is an undertakers. This is justified as vampire society has centuries of experience in hiding in plain sight, and it is implied there are vampires in high places. Also, Annie (a ghost) got a job as a barmaid. This isn't completely impossible, as Annie can (usually) pass for a normal human, and if she gets paid cash in hand, there wouldn't be the fact she's legally as well as biologically dead to worry about.
** In Season 2, the system starts coming apart after [[spoiler:Herrick's death]], and Mitchell has to work to cover up for the rest of the vampires. Especially whenever one of them slips and kills someone.
** In one of the ExpandedUniverse Books it's revealed that vampires get normal humans to act as body doubles so they can have passport photos.
*** They also use photoshop. Mitchell's Hospital ID badge is taken from a black and white photo he had back when he was alive.
* ''Series/KnightRider'': After being presumed dead, Michael Knight got a shiny new identity from his rich employers, but its limitations come up more than once -- every time someone starts looking into him, they discover that he apparently didn't exist until just recently. Naturally this tends to make them suspicious. Of course this rather blatant, ongoing problem is never dealt with by his employers because TropesAreTools.
* ''Series/TimeTrax'': A basic premise of the series is that travelers from the future can easily manipulate 20th-century American electronic databases with their advanced 22nd-century computer technology. The protagonist once had to sit tight in a small county jail cell because they didn't check records with computers.
* Lampshaded on TrueBlood with Sophie-Anne, the Vampire Queen of Louisiana. She amassed immense wealth over the years, using undead tax exemption to her advantage. But now that Vampires have come into the open, the IRS is after her.
** Indeed one of the central themes of the series is coming out, being taxed and having rights.
* ''Series/RemingtonSteele'': The eponymous character is actually a made-up persona taken over by a con man. He had no problems the first season, but the second season starts out with a visit from the IRS, curious about the lack of about twenty odd years of income tax filings.
* In the start of ''Series/TheVampireDiaries'', Stefan tries to become a new student and is quizzed on his lack of vaccinations and paperwork. He has to hypnotize the secretary to believe that everything is in order.
* Played oddly in ''Series/PowerRangersTimeForce'', with travelers from the year 3000. Its explicitly stated that their drivers' licenses are invalid in the present... but getting a new one is a simple matter of taking the test, with no problems of legal existence.
* Averted example in ''{{Series/Eureka}}'' after a women thought to be dead shows up in town due it having been a clone that died, Carter begins going on and on about how hard it'll be to convince all the bureaucracies that declared her dead that she now alive. Only to find out the town of Eureka [[CrazyPrepared has a standard Resurrection Form that takes care of everything.]]
* ''Series/{{Leverage}}'': One of the cover identities [[PlayfulHacker Hardison]] set up for Parker is so thoroughly documented that she got called for jury duty.
** Then again, in some districts the jury duty officials are so lax, [[http://philadelphia.cbslocal.com/2014/04/14/nj-familys-dog-summoned-for-jury-duty they send summonses to household pets.]]
* This is addressed on ''Series/WhiteCollar''. Neal Caffrey is a conman who regularly uses fake identities. However, he is fully aware that even his best identities cannot survive a thorough investigation. When he considers breaking his parole and fleeing the country, he is referred to a master forger who spent decades creating as set of 'perfect identities'. The man registered a number of fake births with the government and over the years he created fake school, medical and employment records for his 'kids'. He planted those records all over the country in government archives. He made sure that the identities had credit histories and that they all paid their taxes on time. Anyone doing a background check would have to do a very thorough in-person investigation to discover that these people never existed. For obvious reasons, the forger is asking a lot of money for one of these identities.
** In general the series presents fake identities only working until someone starts taking a closer look at you. Once the FBI starts investigating, it does not take them long to spot the tell-tale signs of a fake identity.
* ''Series/CSICyber'' dealt with a hacker who had created several carefully-constructed identities that he had spent years putting together to provide both cover for his operations and as a fallback plan in case he was uncovered. As with the ''Series/WhiteCollar'' example, detailed scrutiny quickly reveals them as false.
* Discussed on the later seasons of ''Series/{{Haven}}''. Various characters show up that have been helping Haven, Maine hide the suspiciously high numbers of deaths due to the various [[PowerIncontinence Troubles]] throughout the years, including falsifying news stories and death certificates. Duke Crocker goes missing for six months and is presumed dead, and when he returns, he gets arrested and accused of being an imposter for a while. Audrey Parker was missing for even longer than that, but since she is a police officer, her colleagues help her with the documentation.



* ''Series/ThePlayer'' had a former Witness Protection officer go into private business creating false identities with the assistance of an insider in a government records facility who entered fake births into the system which would form a basis for the new [=IDs=]. The inside man was given away when it was noted how people connected with the forger seemed to have been born in a small rural county which just happened to have the records facility.
* PlayedWith in ''Series/IDreamOfJeannie''. In one episode, Jeannie wanted to travel overseas with Major Nelson disguised as a normal woman, not hidden in her bottle. He told her that she'd need a passport, and that she could go with him if she could get one without using magic. Of course, he knew there was no way a centuries-old genie could produce the proper documentation.
24th Feb '17 6:34:00 PM Katsuhagi
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Added DiffLines:

* In ''WesternAnimation/StevenUniverse'', Pearl at one point mentions how she doesn't have a driver's license since she's an alien who's been on Earth for over 5,000 years. A throwaway line also makes explicit that [[InterspeciesRomance Greg and Rose]] never technically married, making Steven a HeroicBastard.
19th Feb '17 10:24:24 PM Gamermaster
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* Tooru in ''Manga/KobayashiSanChiNoMaidDragon'' is shown using magic to make the necessary paperwork when Kanna wants to go to school.

to:

* Tooru Tohru in ''Manga/KobayashiSanChiNoMaidDragon'' ''Manga/MissKobayashisDragonMaid'' is shown using magic to make the necessary paperwork when Kanna wants to go to school.school. For some reason, [[AdaptationExplanationExtrication the anime cut out this scene]].
11th Feb '17 6:58:40 PM EdwardGil
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** Marie in ''[[UpdatedRerelease Golden]]'' somehow is even worse than Teddie in logistic department; with her previously living in a place between conscious and uncosncious, even less social skill than the previous attendants of the Velvet Room, without identity and memory, [[spoiler:said memory turns out to be a part of AnthropomorphicPersonification of mankind's desire shaped like a Japanese Goddess tasked to be the garbage bin for the fog her fellow aspects expelled after they were defeated, and disappeared after you kick said Japanese Goddess' ass in final boss fight]]. Cue a year later, and she becomes a weather forecaster on TV, a quite famous one at that. [[spoiler: Porbably justified as after the final battle, said Goddess and her aspects fused with Marie, and she gained their powers. When you can do things such as ''change the weather on a cheerful whim'', you likely don't need to worry about little things such as establishing a paper identity.]]

to:

** Marie in ''[[UpdatedRerelease Golden]]'' somehow is even worse than Teddie in logistic department; with her previously living in a place between conscious and uncosncious, even less social skill than the previous attendants of the Velvet Room, without identity and memory, [[spoiler:said memory turns out to be a part of AnthropomorphicPersonification of mankind's desire shaped like a Japanese Goddess tasked to be the garbage bin for the fog her fellow aspects expelled after they were defeated, and disappeared after you kick said Japanese Goddess' ass in final boss fight]]. Cue a year later, and she becomes a weather forecaster on TV, a quite famous one at that. [[spoiler: Porbably Probably justified as after the final battle, said Goddess and her aspects fused with Marie, and she gained their powers. When you can do things such as ''change the weather on a cheerful whim'', you likely don't need to worry about little things such as establishing a paper identity.]]
11th Feb '17 5:58:53 PM MicoolTNT
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** It occurs with Rukia when she starts going to Ichigo's school. It's justified since the forces of Soul Society are comparable to TheMenInBlack, right down to the LaserGuidedAmnesia).

to:

** It occurs with Occurs when Rukia when she starts going to Ichigo's school. It's justified since the The forces of Soul Society are comparable to TheMenInBlack, right down to the LaserGuidedAmnesia).LaserGuidedAmnesia, so they are capable of this.
4th Feb '17 10:32:28 AM ultimomant
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Added DiffLines:

* In ''Fanfic/GodSlayingBladeWorks'', Shirou and Illya get sent to the world of Campione. Shirou notes that they don't have any documentation, until they get the expert accountant Yusuke to forge them some and get them enrolled in school. Only a few people get suspicious, as they used their real names, and there are no Emiya and von Einzbern families in this world.
27th Jan '17 1:19:38 PM PikaHikariKT
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* Tooru in ''Manga/KobayashiSanChiNoMaidDragon'' is shown using magic to make the necsecary paperwork when Kanna wants to go to school.

to:

* Tooru in ''Manga/KobayashiSanChiNoMaidDragon'' is shown using magic to make the necsecary necessary paperwork when Kanna wants to go to school.


Added DiffLines:

* Two of the main characters of ''Anime/OjamajoDoremi'' use magic to pose as Hana's parents and enroll her into school. The questions that arise from suspiciously having the same name as [[PlotRelevantAgeUp the baby the girls have been taking care of the past two years]] is excused by baby and tween using different characters to spell their names.
21st Jan '17 6:32:39 PM nombretomado
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* In AnneRice's ''Literature/TheVampireChronicles'', newly-turned vampires usually just carry on pretending to be regular citizens for as long as reasonably possible. Older ones are shown to use a complex web of lawyers, front companies and multinational bank accounts to allow them to openly own property and engage in similar affairs. Of course, most supplement their income with assets taken from victims. Armand amasses a huge fortune very quickly by slaughtering drug smugglers in large numbers and then having the cash he takes laundered. The fact that they possess telepathic powers also goes a long way in enabling them to maintain the upper hand in dealings with mortals and modifying any memories as needed. Lestat selects his first attorney based at least partly on the fact that the man's mind is very easy to read.

to:

* In AnneRice's Creator/AnneRice's ''Literature/TheVampireChronicles'', newly-turned vampires usually just carry on pretending to be regular citizens for as long as reasonably possible. Older ones are shown to use a complex web of lawyers, front companies and multinational bank accounts to allow them to openly own property and engage in similar affairs. Of course, most supplement their income with assets taken from victims. Armand amasses a huge fortune very quickly by slaughtering drug smugglers in large numbers and then having the cash he takes laundered. The fact that they possess telepathic powers also goes a long way in enabling them to maintain the upper hand in dealings with mortals and modifying any memories as needed. Lestat selects his first attorney based at least partly on the fact that the man's mind is very easy to read.
16th Jan '17 9:12:34 AM JustinCognito
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Added DiffLines:

*** This has been averted in 2e, however, as the act of completing the Pilgrimage now means that reality rewrites itself so that the Promethean was ''always'' human, complete with an appropriate background for their particular Pilgrimage.
24th Dec '16 10:40:24 AM Malitia
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* In ''ComicBook/TheUnbelievableGwenpool'', Gwenpool is a girl from the real room transported to the Marvel Universe. As she has no legal identity, she is unable to open a bank account or get a drivers license or passport. Eventually, she befriends ComicBook/DoctorStrange, who uses his magic to alter some records and memories to solve her problem.

to:

* In ''ComicBook/TheUnbelievableGwenpool'', Gwenpool is a girl from the real room world (or someplace similar) transported to the Marvel Universe. As she has no legal identity, she is unable to open a bank account or get a drivers license or passport. Eventually, she befriends gets an appointment with ComicBook/DoctorStrange, who uses his magic to alter some records and memories to solve her problem.
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