History Main / TontoTalk

9th Jun '17 12:53:24 PM BattleMaster
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** Chief Scalpem, who is an obvious Native American, also speaks this way, saying "Me ready for Powwow," and "Me Powwowed out" before and after his boss fight, respectively.

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** Chief Scalpem, who is an obvious Native American, also speaks this way, saying "Me ready for Powwow," and "Me Powwowed out" before and after his boss fight, respectively. His sister, who appears after he's defeated to beg the main characters not to kill him, speaks perfect English, however.
3rd Apr '17 3:56:18 PM WillKeaton
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* Spoofed in the Creator/MontyPython sketch [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=a54Ch8-7g6I "Red Indian in Theatre"]]. "She fine actress... she make interpretation heap subtle."

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* Spoofed in the Creator/MontyPython sketch [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=a54Ch8-7g6I "Red Indian in Theatre"]]. Theatre."]] "She fine actress... she make interpretation heap subtle."
3rd Apr '17 3:55:05 PM WillKeaton
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A variation of YouNoTakeCandle, but one which applies specifically to Native Americans. For decades (if not centuries) American Indians were portrayed in fiction speaking a form of broken English characterised by the phrases "heap big", "ugh" and "how", and verbs conjugated with "um". Trains are referred to as "iron horses", white people as "palefaces" (who speak with forked tongue), a baby as a "papoose", the tribal leader as "Big Chief", money as "wampum" and whiskey as "firewater"[[note]]in Spanish -in humoristic depictions- there's something similar too (the YouNoTakeCandle style), with them conjugating verbs just in infinitive as well as knowing stuff as trains or whiskey as mentioned before[[/note]].

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A variation of YouNoTakeCandle, but one which applies specifically to Native Americans. For decades (if not centuries) American Indians were portrayed in fiction speaking a form of broken English characterised by the phrases "heap big", "ugh" and "how", and verbs conjugated with "um". Trains are referred to as "iron horses", white people as "palefaces" (who speak with forked tongue), a baby as a "papoose", the tribal leader as "Big Chief", money as "wampum" and whiskey as "firewater"[[note]]in "firewater."[[note]]In Spanish -in humoristic depictions- there's something similar too (the YouNoTakeCandle style), with them conjugating verbs just in infinitive as well as knowing stuff as trains or whiskey as mentioned before[[/note]].
before.[[/note]]
8th Jan '17 4:04:56 AM Andyroid
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* In a short story set in the Literature/{{Shadowrun}} Verse, a mercenary company is led by an ork and his Native American second-in-command. Joking around, these long-time friends speak to each other in their respective minstrel-show-dialect equivalents: the Native saying they'll "make-um heap hot for paleface", and the ork replying "smash 'em good, ook ook!"

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* In a short story set in the Literature/{{Shadowrun}} ''TabletopGame/{{Shadowrun}}'' Verse, a mercenary company is led by an ork and his Native American second-in-command. Joking around, these long-time friends speak to each other in their respective minstrel-show-dialect equivalents: the Native saying they'll "make-um heap hot for paleface", and the ork replying "smash 'em good, ook ook!"




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* Parodied in ''Discworld/ReaperMan'': Mrs. Cake's spirit guide, One Man Bucket, is from "one of them heathen Howondaland tribes", and talks like this... but only when he's on the job. He was actually born and raised in Ankh-Morpork, so his exaggerated use of "-um" and talk of spirits and the Happy Hunting Grounds are an affectation for the benefit of Mrs. Cake's customers.
1st Jan '17 3:05:12 PM FF32
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[[caption-width-right:248: [[http://superdickery.com/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=825:im-pretty-sure-native-americans-were-pretty-fluent-in-english-by-the-70s&catid=30:frames-and-panels-index&Itemid=34 "The way this guy's talking, I don't know if it's supposed to be some sort of racist caricature or if he's brain damaged somehow..."]]]]

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[[caption-width-right:248: [[http://superdickery.com/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=825:im-pretty-sure-native-americans-were-pretty-fluent-in-english-by-the-70s&catid=30:frames-and-panels-index&Itemid=34 [[http://www.superdickery.com/im-pretty-sure-native-americans-were-fluent-in-english-by-the-70s/ "The way this guy's talking, I don't know if it's supposed to be some sort of racist caricature or if he's brain damaged somehow..."]]]]
21st Sep '16 8:47:34 PM PaulA
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* In the Literature/PhilipMarlowe novel ''Literature/FarewellMyLovely'', a {{Mook}} named Second Planting shows up and engages in this. Marlowe doesn't buy it for a minute, finally telling him to "Skip the pig Latin". The mook's English improves, indicating he ''was'' faking most of it, but it's still a little broken.
30th Aug '16 8:11:36 AM TheCuza
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* Wumba in ''VideoGame/BanjoTooie'' speaks like this - but then, most of the characters use some form of broken English.

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* Humba Wumba in ''VideoGame/BanjoTooie'' speaks like this - but then, most of then again practically everyone ([[AnimateInanimateObject and every]]''[[AnimateInanimateObject thing]]'') speaks in HulkSpeak anyway, so the characters use some form of broken English.
only thing particularly unique about Humba is that she throws in the odd "heap big" every once in a while.



* In a ''WesternAnimation/FamilyGuy'' episode, Peter and Lois decide to enter a community talent show by reviving their old folk act in the '60s ([[MultipleChoicePast or]] [[FloatingTimeline whatever]]) called [[DoubleEntendre "Pocket Full of Peter"]]. They flash back to the longhaired duo playing a song lamenting the plight of Native Americans, which used various speech stereotypes, such as the "ababababababa" sound made by vibrating the hand against the mouth, and at the end Peter speaking the lyric, "How did this happen... HOW" (speaking the last word like the stereotypical Native American greeting, with his hand held palm out).

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* In a ''WesternAnimation/FamilyGuy'' episode, Peter and Lois decide to enter a community talent show by reviving their old folk act in the '60s ([[MultipleChoicePast or]] [[FloatingTimeline whatever]]) called [[DoubleEntendre "Pocket Full of Peter"]]. They flash back to the longhaired duo playing a song lamenting the plight of Native Americans, which used various speech stereotypes, such as the "ababababababa" sound made by vibrating the hand against the mouth, and at the end Peter speaking the lyric, "How did this happen... HOW" (speaking the last word like the stereotypical Native American greeting, with his hand held palm out). Although it turns out that they were ''very'' high for this performance and this was merely their own interpretation of how it went. What actually happened was them wailing on their instruments randomly while screaming like lunatics.
29th Aug '16 5:05:13 AM JackG
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* Used for the obligatory dirty joke: While scouting with the Lone Ranger, Tonto puts his ear to the ground to listen.
-->'''Tonto:''' Buffalo come.
-->'''Lone Ranger:''' That's amazing, Tonto! How do you know?
-->'''Tonto:''' Ear sticky.
29th Aug '16 4:59:35 AM JackG
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* In the Australian current affairs show ''Real Life'', indigenous reporter Stan Grant showed an OldShame clip with an American actor in BlackFace portraying an indigenous Australian (with the genuine article as literal {{Spear Carrier}}s) talking exactly like this.
6th Aug '16 3:30:51 PM nombretomado
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* As the image above demonstrates, this was how Indians in the DCUniverse spoke in the 1970s.

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* As the image above demonstrates, this was how Indians in the DCUniverse Franchise/DCUniverse spoke in the 1970s.
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