History Main / TontoTalk

11th Dec '15 7:18:28 PM BattleMaster
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* Averted in ''VideoGame/RedDeadRedemption'', where the Native American Nastas speaks fluent English; however, supposed anthropologist [=MacDougal=] treats him as though this trope applies.
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**Chief Scalpem, who is an obvious Native American, also speaks this way, saying "Me ready for Powwow," and "Me Powwowed out" before and after his boss fight, respectively. * Averted in ''VideoGame/RedDeadRedemption'', where the Native American Nastas speaks fluent English; however, supposed anthropologist [=MacDougal=] [[KnowNothingKnowItAll [=MacDougal=]]] treats him as though this trope applies.
12th Nov '15 5:29:16 PM nombretomado
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* The Geronimo Brothers of [[RobertRankin the Brentford Trilogy.]] Neither brother is in fact any kind of Native American, but Paul believes he and Barry are the dual reincarnation of Geronimo and feels obliged to "act the part". Sadly he learned everything he knows about Native Americans from watching old Westerns. Barry tags along because he likes playing dress-up.
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* The Geronimo Brothers of [[RobertRankin [[Creator/RobertRankin the Brentford Trilogy.]] Neither brother is in fact any kind of Native American, but Paul believes he and Barry are the dual reincarnation of Geronimo and feels obliged to "act the part". Sadly he learned everything he knows about Native Americans from watching old Westerns. Barry tags along because he likes playing dress-up.
31st Oct '15 4:45:37 PM nombretomado
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* "Little Plum" from ''TheBeano'' peppers his sentences with "um" so much that it becomes almost a self-parody.
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* "Little Plum" from ''TheBeano'' ''ComicBook/TheBeano'' peppers his sentences with "um" so much that it becomes almost a self-parody.
27th Sep '15 12:19:01 PM Morgenthaler
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Added work page links and namespaces.
* In ''The Frisco Kid'', when Avram and Tommy are captured by Native Americans, they attempt some Tonto Talk, e.g. something like, "Me rabbi. Jewish Rabbi. I cross big ocean. I read much book about Indians." The chief is not amused and replies "You don't speak English very well." * In the MaAndPaKettle movies, Geoduck and Crowbar speak this way. * Averted in the negotiations with Cochese in ''FortApache'', where we have a somewhat reverse situation: the focus is not on Cochese not being able to speak English, but on the negotiating officer York not being ''fluent enough'' in ''Apache''. Therefore, York decides to use a Spanish interpreter to interpret for Cochese, who is rather fluent in Spanish.
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* In ''The Frisco Kid'', ''Film/TheFriscoKid'', when Avram and Tommy are captured by Native Americans, they attempt some Tonto Talk, e.g. something like, "Me rabbi. Jewish Rabbi. I cross big ocean. I read much book about Indians." The chief is not amused and replies "You don't speak English very well." * In the MaAndPaKettle ''Film/MaAndPaKettle'' movies, Geoduck and Crowbar speak this way. * Averted in the negotiations with Cochese in ''FortApache'', ''Film/FortApache'', where we have a somewhat reverse situation: the focus is not on Cochese not being able to speak English, but on the negotiating officer York not being ''fluent enough'' in ''Apache''. Therefore, York decides to use a Spanish interpreter to interpret for Cochese, who is rather fluent in Spanish.
24th Aug '15 5:45:18 PM cheedo
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* Averted in ''Film/TheMissing'', where all the Native tribes do speak realistically, though with accents.
24th Jul '15 5:10:24 PM Shoebox
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-->'''Pronto:''' Me go Harvard. Me [[IncrediblyLamePun Boston brave.
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-->'''Pronto:''' Me go Harvard. Me [[IncrediblyLamePun Boston brave. brave.]]
24th Jul '15 5:09:16 PM Shoebox
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* Parodied in a 1949 Radio/BobAndRay skit featuring Pronto, sidekick to the Lone Agent: -->'''Pronto''' ''(Bob)'': Ug. Lone, that be completely impossible. You would be implicating me in crime, in which I can have no hand. -->'''Lone''' ''(Ray)'': Huh? Is this Pronto speaking? -->'''Pronto:''' Ug. -->'''Lone:''' Where'd you get the education? -->'''Pronto:''' Me go Harvard. Me [[IncrediblyLamePun Boston brave.
20th Jul '15 3:28:30 PM ScorpiusOB1
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A variation of YouNoTakeCandle, but one which applies specifically to Native Americans. For decades (if not centuries) American Indians were portrayed in fiction speaking a form of broken English characterised by the phrases "heap big", "ugh" and "how", and verbs conjugated with "um". Trains are referred to as "iron horses", white people as "palefaces" (who speak with forked tongue), a baby as a "papoose", the tribal leader as "Big Chief", money as "wampum" and whiskey as "firewater"[[note:in Spanish -in humoristic depictions- there's something similar too, with them conjugating verbs just in infinitive as well as knowing stuff as trains or whiskey as mentioned before]].
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A variation of YouNoTakeCandle, but one which applies specifically to Native Americans. For decades (if not centuries) American Indians were portrayed in fiction speaking a form of broken English characterised by the phrases "heap big", "ugh" and "how", and verbs conjugated with "um". Trains are referred to as "iron horses", white people as "palefaces" (who speak with forked tongue), a baby as a "papoose", the tribal leader as "Big Chief", money as "wampum" and whiskey as "firewater"[[note:in "firewater"[[note]]in Spanish -in humoristic depictions- there's something similar too, too (the YouNoTakeCandle style), with them conjugating verbs just in infinitive as well as knowing stuff as trains or whiskey as mentioned before]]. before[[/note]].
20th Jul '15 3:27:17 PM ScorpiusOB1
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A variation of YouNoTakeCandle, but one which applies specifically to Native Americans. For decades (if not centuries) American Indians were portrayed in fiction speaking a form of broken English characterised by the phrases "heap big", "ugh" and "how", and verbs conjugated with "um". Trains are referred to as "iron horses", white people as "palefaces" (who speak with forked tongue), a baby as a "papoose", the tribal leader as "Big Chief", money as "wampum" and whiskey as "firewater".
to:
A variation of YouNoTakeCandle, but one which applies specifically to Native Americans. For decades (if not centuries) American Indians were portrayed in fiction speaking a form of broken English characterised by the phrases "heap big", "ugh" and "how", and verbs conjugated with "um". Trains are referred to as "iron horses", white people as "palefaces" (who speak with forked tongue), a baby as a "papoose", the tribal leader as "Big Chief", money as "wampum" and whiskey as "firewater". "firewater"[[note:in Spanish -in humoristic depictions- there's something similar too, with them conjugating verbs just in infinitive as well as knowing stuff as trains or whiskey as mentioned before]].
20th Jul '15 12:06:19 PM Morgenthaler
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Added namespaces.
* In a short story set in the {{Shadowrun}} Verse, a mercenary company is led by an ork and his Native American second-in-command. Joking around, these long-time friends speak to each other in their respective minstrel-show-dialect equivalents: the Native saying they'll "make-um heap hot for paleface", and the ork replying "smash 'em good, ook ook!"
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* In a short story set in the {{Shadowrun}} Literature/{{Shadowrun}} Verse, a mercenary company is led by an ork and his Native American second-in-command. Joking around, these long-time friends speak to each other in their respective minstrel-show-dialect equivalents: the Native saying they'll "make-um heap hot for paleface", and the ork replying "smash 'em good, ook ook!"

* In the ''{{Winnetou}}'' novels, Indians often use the word "howgh" and some other terms like "palefaces" and "firewater", but the Indian protagonist speaks pretty good English.
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* In the ''{{Winnetou}}'' ''Literature/{{Winnetou}}'' novels, Indians often use the word "howgh" and some other terms like "palefaces" and "firewater", but the Indian protagonist speaks pretty good English.

* Subverted in ''PeterAndTheStarcatchers'': When the heroes meet Fighting Prawn, chief of the Mollusk tribe, they assume this trope and greet him with "How", to which Fighting Prawn replies "Can we start the conversation along, old chap? I'm getting frightfully tired of 'How'."
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* Subverted in ''PeterAndTheStarcatchers'': ''Literature/PeterAndTheStarcatchers'': When the heroes meet Fighting Prawn, chief of the Mollusk tribe, they assume this trope and greet him with "How", to which Fighting Prawn replies "Can we start the conversation along, old chap? I'm getting frightfully tired of 'How'."

* Inexplicably, the Sparra tribe, otherwise entirely based on English sparrows, speak this way in {{Redwall}}, with the additional use of the word "worm" to mean either "food", "anyone that's not a sparrow", or "anything the sparrow dislikes". Probably why they didn't show up again after ''Mattimeo'', when it became less acceptable to use this trope.
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* Inexplicably, the Sparra tribe, otherwise entirely based on English sparrows, speak this way in {{Redwall}}, ''Literature/{{Redwall}}'', with the additional use of the word "worm" to mean either "food", "anyone that's not a sparrow", or "anything the sparrow dislikes". Probably why they didn't show up again after ''Mattimeo'', when it became less acceptable to use this trope.

* On OneLifeToLive, a woman tries to endear herself to the son of the man she's dating by talking like this when she sees his Halloween costume--he's dressed as a Native American boy. Unfortunately, the boy's already upset by her presence in the first place--his beloved stepmother died only two months earlier and his {{Jerkass}} father is refusing to deal with either his or his own grief--and her act makes him blow up at her.
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* On OneLifeToLive, ''Series/OneLifeToLive'', a woman tries to endear herself to the son of the man she's dating by talking like this when she sees his Halloween costume--he's dressed as a Native American boy. Unfortunately, the boy's already upset by her presence in the first place--his beloved stepmother died only two months earlier and his {{Jerkass}} father is refusing to deal with either his or his own grief--and her act makes him blow up at her.
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