History Main / TokyoRose

9th Jul '17 10:41:00 AM nombretomado
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"Tokyo Rose" was the nickname given to Japanese female propaganda broadcasters by allied servicemen during the [[WorldWarTwo second global unpleasantness]]. The broadcasts were in generally excellent English, and appealed to Allied troops to give up their hopeless and unnecessary war against the mighty and invincible empire of Japan. You know, [[PropagandaMachine standard propaganda]] stuff.[[note]]And perhaps deliberately so, since the broadcasts were written and produced by coerced Allied prisoners under threat of torture. UsefulNotes/ImperialJapan, in direct contrast to modern Japan, had become so isolationist and parochial during the era of militarism that they did not have enough citizens with sufficient English skills to produce the broadcasts on their own.[[/note]]

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"Tokyo Rose" was the nickname given to Japanese female propaganda broadcasters by allied servicemen during the [[WorldWarTwo [[UsefulNotes/WorldWarII second global unpleasantness]]. The broadcasts were in generally excellent English, and appealed to Allied troops to give up their hopeless and unnecessary war against the mighty and invincible empire of Japan. You know, [[PropagandaMachine standard propaganda]] stuff.[[note]]And perhaps deliberately so, since the broadcasts were written and produced by coerced Allied prisoners under threat of torture. UsefulNotes/ImperialJapan, in direct contrast to modern Japan, had become so isolationist and parochial during the era of militarism that they did not have enough citizens with sufficient English skills to produce the broadcasts on their own.[[/note]]
29th May '17 6:46:10 AM Morgenthaler
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29th May '17 6:28:00 AM Morgenthaler
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"Tokyo Rose" was the nickname given to Japanese female propaganda broadcasters by allied servicemen during the [[WorldWarTwo second global unpleasantness]]. The broadcasts were in generally excellent English, and appealed to Allied troops to give up their hopeless and unnecessary war against the mighty and invincible empire of Japan. You know, [[PropagandaMachine standard propaganda]] stuff.[[note]]And perhaps deliberately so, since the broadcasts were written and produced by coerced Allied prisoners under threat of torture. ImperialJapan, in direct contrast to modern Japan, had become so isolationist and parochial during the era of militarism that they did not have enough citizens with sufficient English skills to produce the broadcasts on their own.[[/note]]

to:

"Tokyo Rose" was the nickname given to Japanese female propaganda broadcasters by allied servicemen during the [[WorldWarTwo second global unpleasantness]]. The broadcasts were in generally excellent English, and appealed to Allied troops to give up their hopeless and unnecessary war against the mighty and invincible empire of Japan. You know, [[PropagandaMachine standard propaganda]] stuff.[[note]]And perhaps deliberately so, since the broadcasts were written and produced by coerced Allied prisoners under threat of torture. ImperialJapan, UsefulNotes/ImperialJapan, in direct contrast to modern Japan, had become so isolationist and parochial during the era of militarism that they did not have enough citizens with sufficient English skills to produce the broadcasts on their own.[[/note]]
11th May '17 2:36:34 PM VanHohenheimOfXerxes
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Tokyo Rose was actually pretty popular with Allied servicemen. Either [[SoBadItsGood out of the comedy value of the obvious propaganda]], or because it was a female voice to people that might not have heard another for quite some time (and might not live to hear one again). Probably both. The moniker "Tokyo Rose" itself almost certainly orginated with the servicemen themselves, since it does not appear in any of the surviving broadcast scripts or documentation. The surviving scripts also show that rumors that she was remarkably well informed about Allied intentions, units and movements were purely apocryphal.

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Tokyo Rose was actually [[MexicansLoveSpeedyGonzales pretty popular with Allied servicemen.servicemen]]. Either [[SoBadItsGood out of the comedy value of the obvious propaganda]], or because it was a female voice to people that might not have heard another for quite some time (and might not live to hear one again). Probably both. The moniker "Tokyo Rose" itself almost certainly orginated with the servicemen themselves, since it does not appear in any of the surviving broadcast scripts or documentation. The surviving scripts also show that rumors that she was remarkably well informed about Allied intentions, units and movements were purely apocryphal.
13th Jul '16 10:13:35 AM Willbyr
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!!Examples in media:



* ''Series/{{Tour of Duty}}'' briefly featured a Vietnamese equivalent, with one GI asking another why he listened to that stuff. He replied that the propaganda was annoying, but that the ''music'' they played was actually pretty good.

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* ''Series/{{Tour of Duty}}'' ''Series/TourOfDuty'' briefly featured a Vietnamese equivalent, with one GI asking another why he listened to that stuff. He replied that the propaganda was annoying, but that the ''music'' they played was actually pretty good.


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14th Dec '15 11:07:12 PM jormis29
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* During Games' Workshop's ''TabletopGame/{{Warhammer 40000}}'' "Eye of Terror" event, a mini-campaign featured the Third Stage Expansion of the Tau, who were clear on the other side of the galaxy from the main action. During the event, one gamer started posting a series of "broadcasts" by a Human collaborator named "Sa'cea Sally". During the post-event articles in ''White Dwarf'' Magazine, these messages were [[FandomNod codified]] into actual events during the expansion.

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* During Games' Workshop's ''TabletopGame/{{Warhammer 40000}}'' "Eye of Terror" event, a mini-campaign featured the Third Stage Expansion of the Tau, who were clear on the other side of the galaxy from the main action. During the event, one gamer started posting a series of "broadcasts" by a Human collaborator named "Sa'cea Sally". During the post-event articles in ''White Dwarf'' ''Magazine/WhiteDwarf'' Magazine, these messages were [[FandomNod codified]] into actual events during the expansion.
11th Aug '15 5:43:40 AM justanid
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A wartime broadcaster who transmits propaganda to the enemy in order to undermine their morale.

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A wartime broadcaster who transmits propaganda {{propaganda|Piece}} to the enemy in order to undermine their morale.
31st May '15 7:15:23 PM gallium
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* In ''Film/TwelveOClockHigh'' the commander of the 918th Bomber Group, already depressed after a raid went badly, is further irritated when Lord Haw-Haw taunts the Allies with knowledge of the raid and specifically mentions the 918th.
19th May '15 11:04:56 AM YT45
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* Though we don't hear her broadcast, ''Film/HamburgerHill'' has a scene in which the platoon's RTO describes Hanoi Hannah's broadcast (which [=GIs=] call the "Bullshit Net") to the [[NewMeat FNGs]]. He gets ''particularly'' bitter when he mentions this part:
-->Sometimes they get American assholes to come on the show, talk about how ''we're'' such assholes to be fighting against the "Brave People's Army of Vietnam, Republic of."
19th May '15 10:58:53 AM YT45
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Only one person was ever prosecuted for these broadcasts: [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Iva_Toguri_D%27Aquino Iva Toguri D'Aquino]], an American daughter of Japanese immigrants who was stranded in Japan while visiting relatives there at the begining of the war, admitted to broadcasting under the name "Orphan Ann". Though neither the occupation authorities nor the FBI could find sufficient evidence to prosecute her in Japan she was prosecuted on multiple counts of treason upon her return to the United States in 1948. Her prosecution was a pet project for politicians seeking to make a name for themselves with help from some particularly unscrupulous journalists. Despite the complete lack of credible evidence against her and considerable evidence that she'd risked her life aiding the allied prisoners forced to write and produce the broadcasts (Japanese society looked down on American-born Nisei like her, and the [[SecretPolice Kempei-tai]] would have [[FateWorseThanDeath taken a dim view]] of her smuggling food and medical supplies into POW camps--which she did a lot), she was convicted on only one count in 1949 and served six years of a ten year sentence. Still, she was forcibly separated from her husband, an Italian national who was denied entry to the United States, and was warned that if she left the country she would not be allowed back in (made even worse when you remember that the stress of her wrongful prosecution caused her to miscarry their baby). She received a full pardon in 1977 due to the proven unreliability of her key accusers (who both claimed they'd been coerced into perjuring themselves) and the lack of any proof that she had actually said anything treasonous. An FBI case study found that her effect on Allied morale was, if anything, positive, and in a crowning irony the US World War Two Veteran's Committee gave her their highest award for her bravery and patriotism in aiding Allied POWs at the risk of her own life shortly before she died in 2006.

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Only one person was ever prosecuted for these broadcasts: [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Iva_Toguri_D%27Aquino Iva Toguri D'Aquino]], an American daughter of Japanese immigrants who was stranded in Japan while visiting relatives there at the begining of the war, admitted to broadcasting under the name "Orphan Ann". Though neither the occupation authorities nor the FBI could find sufficient evidence to prosecute her in Japan she was prosecuted on multiple counts of treason upon her return to the United States in 1948. Her prosecution was a pet project for politicians seeking to make a name for themselves with help from some particularly unscrupulous journalists. Despite the complete lack of credible evidence against her and considerable evidence that she'd risked her life aiding the allied prisoners forced to write and produce the broadcasts (Japanese society looked down on American-born Nisei like her, and the [[SecretPolice Kempei-tai]] would have [[FateWorseThanDeath taken a dim view]] of her smuggling food and medical supplies into POW camps--which she did a lot), she was convicted on only one count in 1949 and served six years of a ten year sentence. Still, she was forcibly separated from her husband, an Italian national who was denied entry to the United States, and was warned that if she left the country she would not be allowed back in (made even worse when you remember that the stress of her wrongful prosecution caused her to miscarry their baby). She received a full pardon in 1977 due to the proven unreliability of her key accusers (who both claimed they'd been coerced into perjuring themselves) and the lack of any proof that she had actually said anything treasonous. An FBI case study found that her effect on Allied morale was, if anything, positive, and in a crowning irony the US World War Two Veteran's Committee gave her their highest award for her bravery and patriotism in aiding Allied POWs [=POWs=] at the risk of her own life shortly before she died in 2006.
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