History Main / TimedMission

13th Dec '17 2:21:08 PM TroperDoper
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

* A common challenge type in ''VideoGame/GrabbedByTheGhoulies'' whereupon the player must clear the level of all or a particular type of enemy in a set time in order to not summon the Grim Reaper who can Main/OneHitKill.
8th Dec '17 1:35:46 AM Cryoclaste
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* The ''VideoGame/MetroidPrime'' series wouldn't be complete without a timed mission:

to:

* The ''VideoGame/MetroidPrime'' ''VideoGame/{{Metroid Prime|Trilogy}}'' series wouldn't be complete without a timed mission:



* Every ''VideoGame/{{Metroid}}'' game (except ''Metroid II'') uses this trope at least once, and the vast majority of them are triggered by a LoadBearingBoss. ''MetroidPrime'' mildly subverted this, however; a timed mission at the start is standard fare, but the expected timed mission after the final boss turns out to just be a {{Cutscene}}.

to:

* Every ''VideoGame/{{Metroid}}'' ''Franchise/{{Metroid}}'' game (except ''Metroid II'') uses this trope at least once, and the vast majority of them are triggered by a LoadBearingBoss. ''MetroidPrime'' ''VideoGame/MetroidPrime'' mildly subverted this, however; a timed mission at the start is standard fare, but the expected timed mission after the final boss turns out to just be a {{Cutscene}}.
23rd Oct '17 10:20:02 PM DesertDragon
Is there an issue? Send a Message


Timed missions may end with an AlwaysClose moment, unaffected by the actual time left on the clock. One subversion is ContinueYourMissionDammit, where supporting characters constantly ''tell'' you that time is of the essence, but nothing is preventing you from completing the task at your leisure. Another is TakeYourTime, where the game heavily implies (without directly stating) that you have a limited time to kill the BigBad or rescue the DistressedDamsel, but in actual gameplay, you can do all the sidequests/random exploring you want as long as you don't do anything that advances the story.

to:

Timed missions may end with an AlwaysClose moment, unaffected by the actual time left on the clock. One The subversion is ContinueYourMissionDammit, where supporting characters constantly ''tell'' you that time is of the essence, but nothing is preventing you from completing the task at your leisure. Another is TakeYourTime, where the game heavily implies (without directly stating) ''tells'' you that you have a limited time to kill the BigBad is coming to town or rescue the DistressedDamsel, DistressedDamsel is in imminent danger, but in actual gameplay, you can do all the sidequests/random sidequests and exploring you want as long as you don't do anything that advances the story.
story. If your supporting cast is yelling at you to move things along anyway, that's ContinueYourMissionDammit.
23rd Oct '17 10:09:10 PM DesertDragon
Is there an issue? Send a Message


Level timers originated in UsefulNotes/{{arcade game}}s which needed some kind of mechanic to discourage players from hogging the machine without putting in more coins, and spread to many NintendoHard console and computer games that aimed to provide arcade-style gameplay. In a few cases, having the timer run out is the ''only'' way to get a GameOver, with all the other obstacles in the game merely serving to make the player waste valuable time. Many older arcade racing games had stricter time limits where unless you were moderately good, you were destined to run out of time; newer games have bigger time limits that aren't much of a threat unless you're pathetically slow or stop playing. In a similar vein, this is why fighting games have the ubiquitous 99-second timer; it was an arcade mechanic that carried over to the home consoles despite serving no purpose there (until the rise of online play, that is), and you'll notice that wrestling, boxing, and MMA games lack any kind of timer despite falling under the same genre; they ''originated'' on home consoles.

to:

Level timers originated in UsefulNotes/{{arcade game}}s which needed some kind of mechanic to discourage players from hogging the machine without putting in more coins, and spread to many NintendoHard console and computer games that aimed to provide arcade-style gameplay. In a few cases, having the timer run out is the ''only'' way to get a GameOver, with all the other obstacles in the game merely serving to make the player waste valuable time. Many older arcade racing games had stricter time limits where unless you were moderately good, you were destined to run out of time; newer games have bigger time limits that aren't much of a threat unless you're pathetically slow or stop playing. In a similar vein, this is why fighting games have the ubiquitous 99-second timer; it timer. It was an arcade mechanic that carried over to the home consoles despite serving no purpose there (until the rise of online play, that is), and you'll notice that wrestling, boxing, and MMA games lack any kind of timer despite falling under the same genre; they ''originated'' on home consoles.
23rd Oct '17 10:06:30 PM DesertDragon
Is there an issue? Send a Message


Timed missions may end with an AlwaysClose moment, unaffected by the actual time left on the clock. The subversion, when everyone ''acts'' like a mission is timed when the actual gameplay is not, is ContinueYourMissionDammit.

to:

Timed missions may end with an AlwaysClose moment, unaffected by the actual time left on the clock. The subversion, when everyone ''acts'' like a mission One subversion is timed when ContinueYourMissionDammit, where supporting characters constantly ''tell'' you that time is of the essence, but nothing is preventing you from completing the task at your leisure. Another is TakeYourTime, where the game heavily implies (without directly stating) that you have a limited time to kill the BigBad or rescue the DistressedDamsel, but in actual gameplay is not, is ContinueYourMissionDammit.
gameplay, you can do all the sidequests/random exploring you want as long as you don't do anything that advances the story.
23rd Oct '17 8:50:46 PM DesertDragon
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* ''VideoGame/WorldOfWarcraft'' doesn't have a lot of timed quests, but they exist. Some of them are {{Escort Mission}}s, no less. However, most of the timers are rather generous. Especially considering teleportation is usually fair game.
** However, even the most generously-timed quests can be well nigh (if not entirely) impossible to finish if they require you to go deep into a capital city and your computer isn't exactly new or your connection is bad. Putting timed quests in Orgrimmar is just cruel.

to:

* ''VideoGame/WorldOfWarcraft'' doesn't have a lot of ''VideoGame/WorldOfWarcraft'':
** While
timed quests, but quests are rare, they do exist. Some of them are {{Escort Mission}}s, no less. However, most of the timers are rather generous. Especially considering generous, especially since teleportation is usually fair game.
** However,
game. Mind you, even the most generously-timed quests can be well nigh (if not entirely) all but impossible to finish if they require you to go deep into a capital city and your computer isn't exactly new or your connection is bad. Putting timed quests in Orgrimmar is just cruel.
23rd Oct '17 8:43:20 PM DesertDragon
Is there an issue? Send a Message


Level timers originated in UsefulNotes/{{arcade game}}s which needed some kind of mechanic to discourage players from hogging the machine without putting in more coins, and spread to many NintendoHard console and computer games that aimed to provide arcade-style gameplay. In a few cases, having the timer run out is the ''only'' way to get a GameOver, with all the other obstacles in the game merely serving to make the player waste valuable time. Many older arcade racing games had stricter time limits where unless you were moderately good, you were destined to run out of time; newer games have bigger time limits that aren't much of a threat unless you're pathetically slow or stop playing. In a similar vein, this is why fighting games have the ubiquitous 99-second timer; it was an arcade mechanic that carried over to the home consoles despite serving no purpose there, and you'll notice that wrestling, boxing, and MMA games lack any kind timer despite falling under the same broad genre; they ''originated'' on home consoles.

to:

Level timers originated in UsefulNotes/{{arcade game}}s which needed some kind of mechanic to discourage players from hogging the machine without putting in more coins, and spread to many NintendoHard console and computer games that aimed to provide arcade-style gameplay. In a few cases, having the timer run out is the ''only'' way to get a GameOver, with all the other obstacles in the game merely serving to make the player waste valuable time. Many older arcade racing games had stricter time limits where unless you were moderately good, you were destined to run out of time; newer games have bigger time limits that aren't much of a threat unless you're pathetically slow or stop playing. In a similar vein, this is why fighting games have the ubiquitous 99-second timer; it was an arcade mechanic that carried over to the home consoles despite serving no purpose there, there (until the rise of online play, that is), and you'll notice that wrestling, boxing, and MMA games lack any kind of timer despite falling under the same broad genre; they ''originated'' on home consoles.
23rd Oct '17 8:40:18 PM DesertDragon
Is there an issue? Send a Message


Level timers originated in UsefulNotes/{{arcade game}}s which needed some kind of mechanic to discourage players from hogging the machine without putting in more coins, and spread to many NintendoHard console and computer games that aimed to provide arcade-style gameplay. In a few cases, having the timer run out is the ''only'' way to get a GameOver, with all the other obstacles in the game merely serving to make the player waste valuable time. Many older arcade racing games had stricter time limits where unless you were moderately good, you were destined to run out of time; newer games have bigger time limits that aren't much of a threat unless you're pathetically slow or stop playing.

to:

Level timers originated in UsefulNotes/{{arcade game}}s which needed some kind of mechanic to discourage players from hogging the machine without putting in more coins, and spread to many NintendoHard console and computer games that aimed to provide arcade-style gameplay. In a few cases, having the timer run out is the ''only'' way to get a GameOver, with all the other obstacles in the game merely serving to make the player waste valuable time. Many older arcade racing games had stricter time limits where unless you were moderately good, you were destined to run out of time; newer games have bigger time limits that aren't much of a threat unless you're pathetically slow or stop playing.
playing. In a similar vein, this is why fighting games have the ubiquitous 99-second timer; it was an arcade mechanic that carried over to the home consoles despite serving no purpose there, and you'll notice that wrestling, boxing, and MMA games lack any kind timer despite falling under the same broad genre; they ''originated'' on home consoles.
22nd Oct '17 7:16:32 PM Kadorhal
Is there an issue? Send a Message


** One that's particularly notable in the original ''[[VideoGame/CommandAndConquerRedAlert Red Alert]]'' is a mission for the Allies, where the player must get Engineers to a building in time. What the game fails to tell you in advance is that ''this segues into another timed mission'' that '''shares the previous one's countdown''', meaning that if you completed the first half with only seconds to spare, you're screwed.
** ''[[VideoGame/CommandAndConquerTiberianSun Tiberian Sun]]'' has another interesting variation, where one of the Nod missions has you assaulting a GDI comms base under the cover of an ion storm, giving you an hour and a half to destroy their comms center.

to:

** One that's particularly notable in the original ''[[VideoGame/CommandAndConquerRedAlert Red Alert]]'' is a mission for the Allies, where the player must get Engineers to a building in time. communications center within a time limit, before multiple nuclear missiles can hit civilian cities across Europe. What makes things easier is that the time limit is one hour, and it starts when you do things like take out the power or get too close to the center, rather than starting from the beginning of the mission. What the game fails to tell you in advance advance, which makes it more difficult, is that ''this segues into another timed mission'' that '''shares the previous one's countdown''', meaning that if you completed the first half with only seconds to spare, you're screwed.
** ''[[VideoGame/CommandAndConquerTiberianSun Tiberian Sun]]'' has another interesting variation, where one of a few others primarily in the Nod missions has you assaulting campaign, including one where the player assaults a GDI comms base under the cover of an ion storm, giving you an hour and a half to destroy their comms center.center, and another in which they have to take out an important GDI base and place three artillery units in specific spots before time runs out to [[spoiler:shoot down GDI's space station headquarters]].
22nd Oct '17 4:58:57 AM PrinnyOverlord
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

* 88 Heroes takes this trope a step further than most. Not only do you only have 88 seconds to beat each level, but you must beat all 88 levels in 88 minutes or else Dr.H8 will blow up the earth.
This list shows the last 10 events of 221. Show all.
http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Main.TimedMission