History Main / TimeCrash

16th Mar '17 1:23:31 PM AthenaBlue
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''For the ''Series/DoctorWho'' mini-episode which could have ended in this trope, see Recap/DoctorWho2007CiNSTimeCrash.''

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''For the ''Series/DoctorWho'' mini-episode which could have ended in this trope, see Recap/DoctorWho2007CiNSTimeCrash.[[Recap/DoctorWho2007CiNSTimeCrash here]].''



* The movie ''Film/{{Millennium}}'' concludes with a massive paradox barreling its destructive way into the future whose time travel efforts caused it.



* ''Film/ThePhiladelphiaExperiment'' has this happen as an unanticipated side-effect of experiments in building an InvisibilityCloak. A Navy destroyer from 1943 and an entire Midwestern town from 1984 get [[MassTeleportation sucked into]] the resulting vortex, which has to be stopped (from within) lest it [[TheEndOfTheWorldAsWeKnowIt destroy the entire world]].



* The movie ''Film/{{Millennium}}'' concludes with a massive paradox barreling its destructive way into the future whose time travel efforts caused it.
* ''Film/ThePhiladelphiaExperiment'' has this happen as an unanticipated side-effect of experiments in building an InvisibilityCloak. A Navy destroyer from 1943 and an entire Midwestern town from 1984 get [[MassTeleportation sucked into]] the resulting vortex, which has to be stopped (from within) lest it [[TheEndOfTheWorldAsWeKnowIt destroy the entire world]].



* ''Literature/ElevenTwentyTwoSixtyThree'' makes use of the idea that if a time traveler changes the past too much, it will eventually destroy time itself (metaphorically, it is described as plucking the strings of an instrument until it vibrates itself to pieces). Jake manages to [[spoiler: save JFK from Lee Harvey Oswald]] only to return to his own time and find out that the Earth is well on its way to breaking apart into an asteroid belt and strange ripping noises are emanating from the sky, implied to be the sound of time collapsing. Jake's solution is [[spoiler: to create a brand new timeline where JFK was killed as before, and then never, ever time travel again.]]
* Creator/JohnMFord's "Alternities" stories are set in a multiverse where a major Time Crash (called the Fracture) has occured, and the survivors of Alteco are trying to pick up the pieces.
* Hal Duncan's ''Literature/TheBookOfAllHours'' duology starts with a very TimeyWimeyBall sort of cosmology that gets utterly trashed by the end of the first book when [[spoiler:nanites loaded with the language of magic and haunted by the spirits of dead gods are set loose and pull a magical GreyGoo scenario on the fabric of space and time]]. The second book picks up with the protagonists wandering between pockets of stability and causality by [[GenreSavvy taking advantage of - and fighting against - stories and cultural narratives]] to get around.
* Creator/GregBear's ''Literature/CityAtTheEndOfTime'' is all about a time crash [[spoiler:and an aeon-spanning GambitRoulette to ensure ''something'' will still exist afterwards]].
** This turns into easily the biggest MindScrew in the history of literature, because the Time Crash is taken [[UpToEleven to a logical extreme]]. Trying to preserve the universe during the event allows it to leak back in time, and as a result all alternate timelines collapse one by one, until by the late stage of the book, nearly all of every possible universe (including every timeline the event ''didn't happen in'') is RetGone in a [[NightmareFuel truly creepy]] fashion, and the surviving cast exist in the present, despite having no history; the entire past has been erased. The rest of the book is spent trying to make sure there is still ''enough'' of a future to fix it all in.
* As the title indicates, "The Day Time Stopped Moving" by Bradner Buckner is about a Time Crash -- specifically, a Time Freeze, for all but the protagonist, deuteragonist (who caused it) and an unknown number of others.



* ''Literature/TheLatheOfHeaven'' ends with something a lot like this happening because to the (ab)use of RealityWarper powers.
* M. Shayne Bell's short story "Lock Down" is about a team of time travelers trying to repair the continuum after one of these.



* M. Shayne Bell's short story "Lock Down" is about a team of time travelers trying to repair the continuum after one of these.

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* M. Shayne Bell's short story "Lock Down" Played literally, if bizarrely, in Creator/GregEgan's ''Literature/{{Orthogonal}}'' trilogy. Since spacetime in this universe is about a team [[WrapAround closed loop in all dimensions]], clusters of matter that were thrown in all directions in time travelers trying to repair as well as space by the continuum after Big Bang occasionally collide with other clusters, many of which are traveling in different directions or even [[TitleDrop orthogonally]] to each other in time as well as space, which means they literally have [[TimeIsDangerous infinite velocity relative to each other]]. The plot is driven by one such [[EarthShatteringKaboom impending collision]], which threatens to [[ApocalypseHow annihilate]] the cluster in which the trilogy's cast originates.
* This is the end goal
of these.the villain BKR in {{Creator/Bruce Coville}}'s ''Literature/RodAlbrightAlienAdventures'' series: to cause time to break down at the moment of his greatest triumph.



* Creator/GregBear's ''Literature/CityAtTheEndOfTime'' is all about a time crash [[spoiler:and an aeon-spanning GambitRoulette to ensure ''something'' will still exist afterwards]].
** This turns into easily the biggest MindScrew in the history of literature, because the Time Crash is taken [[UpToEleven to a logical extreme]]. Trying to preserve the universe during the event allows it to leak back in time, and as a result all alternate timelines collapse one by one, until by the late stage of the book, nearly all of every possible universe (including every timeline the event ''didn't happen in'') is RetGone in a [[NightmareFuel truly creepy]] fashion, and the surviving cast exist in the present, despite having no history; the entire past has been erased. The rest of the book is spent trying to make sure there is still ''enough'' of a future to fix it all in.
* This is the end goal of the villain BKR in {{Creator/Bruce Coville}}'s ''[[Literature/RodAlbrightAlienAdventures Alien Adventures]]'' series: to cause time to break down at the moment of his greatest triumph.



* ''Literature/TheLatheOfHeaven'' ends with something a lot like this happening because to the (ab)use of RealityWarper powers.
* Hal Duncan's ''Literature/TheBookOfAllHours'' duology starts with a very TimeyWimeyBall sort of cosmology that gets utterly trashed by the end of the first book when [[spoiler:nanites loaded with the language of magic and haunted by the spirits of dead gods are set loose and pull a magical GreyGoo scenario on the fabric of space and time]]. The second book picks up with the protagonists wandering between pockets of stability and causality by [[GenreSavvy taking advantage of - and fighting against - stories and cultural narratives]] to get around.
* Played literally, if bizarrely, in Creator/GregEgan's ''Literature/{{Orthogonal}}'' trilogy. Since spacetime in this universe is a [[WrapAround closed loop in all dimensions]], clusters of matter that were thrown in all directions in time as well as space by the Big Bang occasionally collide with other clusters, many of which are traveling in different directions or even [[TitleDrop orthogonally]] to each other in time as well as space, which means they literally have [[TimeIsDangerous infinite velocity relative to each other]]. The plot is driven by one such [[EarthShatteringKaboom impending collision]], which threatens to [[ApocalypseHow annihilate]] the cluster in which the trilogy's cast originates.
* Creator/JohnMFord's "Alternities" stories are set in a multiverse where a major Time Crash (called the Fracture) has occured, and the survivors of Alteco are trying to pick up the pieces.
* As the title indicates, "The Day Time Stopped Moving" by Bradner Buckner is about a Time Crash -- specifically, a Time Freeze, for all but the protagonist, deuteragonist (who caused it) and an unknown number of others.
* ''Literature/ElevenTwentyTwoSixtyThree'' makes use of the idea that if a time traveler changes the past too much, it will eventually destroy time itself (metaphorically, it is described as plucking the strings of an instrument until it vibrates itself to pieces). Jake manages to [[spoiler: save JFK from Lee Harvey Oswald]] only to return to his own time and find out that the Earth is well on its way to breaking apart into an asteroid belt and strange ripping noises are emanating from the sky, implied to be the sound of time collapsing. Jake's solution is [[spoiler: to create a brand new timeline where JFK was killed as before, and then never, ever time travel again.]]



* In ''Series/TheOuterLimits1995'' episode "Déjà Vu", a time travel experiment goes wrong [[spoiler: after an attempt to weaponize it by a corrupt military official]], which results in a GroundhogDayLoop...with a nasty twist. Each iteration grows shorter, and eventually there will be no hope of preventing the Time Crash from destroying the world. [[spoiler: In the end, the disaster is averted, and the man responsible suffers a [[KarmicDeath Karmic]] FateWorseThanDeath, as the malfunctioning time machine traps him in the moment of his own annihilation.]]
* Parodied in the (as mentioned above) "[[TimeyWimeyBall wibbly-wobbly, timey-wimey]]" ''Series/DoctorWho'' universe. In the mini-episode "Time Crash", a short made for Children in Need (which WordOfGod says is canon), the Doctor accidentally somehow merges his TARDIS with the TARDIS of [[TheNthDoctor his fifth incarnation]]. Hilarity ensues at first as a starstruck Ten (and a real-life admiring Creator/DavidTennant, who was thrilled to be on the same set with [[Creator/PeterDavison his own childhood favourite Doctor]]) and a bewildered Five have to stop their inadvertent meeting from ripping a hole in space-time the exact size of Belgium.
** In a less humorous example, Rose causes a Time Crash in ''Father's Day'' when she saves her father from dying at a predetermined time. [[ClockRoaches Flying Killer Time Monkeys]] [[NiceJobBreakingItHero come out and eat everyone on Earth.]]

to:

* In ''Series/TheOuterLimits1995'' episode "Déjà Vu", a ''Series/TwelveMonkeys'', the [[BigBad Army of the Twelve Monkeys]] is trying to destroy time travel experiment goes wrong itself, believing [[UtopiaJustifiesTheMeans a world without time would be paradise.]] [[spoiler: after an attempt to weaponize it by a corrupt military official]], which results in a GroundhogDayLoop...with a nasty twist. Each iteration grows shorter, and eventually there will be no hope of preventing the Time Crash from destroying the world. [[spoiler: In the end, the disaster is averted, and the man responsible suffers a [[KarmicDeath Karmic]] FateWorseThanDeath, as the malfunctioning Fortunately, time machine traps him in itself is a conscious entity, and is fully capable of fighting back against them through the moment actions of his own annihilation.the protagonists.]]
* Parodied in the (as mentioned above) "[[TimeyWimeyBall wibbly-wobbly, timey-wimey]]" ''Series/DoctorWho'' universe. In the mini-episode "Time Crash", a short made for Children in Need (which WordOfGod says is canon), the Doctor accidentally somehow merges his TARDIS with the TARDIS of [[TheNthDoctor his fifth incarnation]]. Hilarity ensues at first as a starstruck Ten (and a real-life admiring Creator/DavidTennant, who was thrilled to be on the same set with [[Creator/PeterDavison his own childhood favourite Doctor]]) and a bewildered Five have to stop their inadvertent meeting from ripping a hole in space-time the exact size of Belgium.
''Series/DoctorWho'':
** In a less humorous example, Rose causes a Time Crash in ''Father's Day'' [[Recap/DoctorWhoS27E8FathersDay "Father's Day"]] when she saves her father from dying at a predetermined time. [[ClockRoaches Flying Killer Time Monkeys]] [[NiceJobBreakingItHero come out and eat everyone on Earth.]]]]
** Parodied in the mini-episode [[Recap/DoctorWho2007CiNSTimeCrash "Time Crash"]], a short made for Children in Need (which WordOfGod says is canon). The Doctor accidentally somehow merges his TARDIS with the TARDIS of [[TheNthDoctor his fifth incarnation]]. Hilarity ensues at first as a starstruck Ten (and a real-life admiring Creator/DavidTennant, who was thrilled to be on the same set with [[Creator/PeterDavison his own childhood favourite Doctor]]) and a bewildered Five have to stop their inadvertent meeting from ripping a hole in space-time the exact size of Belgium.



** ''The Wedding of River Song'': The entire timeline of the planet goes pear-shaped when [[spoiler: River refuses to kill The Doctor, even though it's meant to be a fixed point in time. Her failure to do so]] results in all of Earth's history happening at once - people travel by intercontinental steam trains and cars tethered to hot air balloons; pterodactyls are a nuisance in public parks; Creator/CharlesDickens is directing the BBC's big Christmas special; WinstonChurchill is ''Caesar'' of the Holy Roman Empire, which is headquartered in London, has classical Roman trappings, and is fighting the Wars of the Roses, and his barber is a Silurian; [=JFK=] and Cleopatra are a known item, and the great pyramid of Giza has an American flag painted on the side and is known as "[[{{Area 51}} Area 52]]".

to:

** ''The [[Recap/DoctorWhoS32E13TheWeddingOfRiverSong "The Wedding of River Song'': Song"]]: The entire timeline of the planet goes pear-shaped when [[spoiler: River refuses to kill The Doctor, even though it's meant to be a fixed point in time. Her failure to do so]] results in all of Earth's history happening at once - people travel by intercontinental steam trains and cars tethered to hot air balloons; pterodactyls are a nuisance in public parks; Creator/CharlesDickens is directing the BBC's big Christmas special; WinstonChurchill is ''Caesar'' of the Holy Roman Empire, which is headquartered in London, has classical Roman trappings, and is fighting the Wars of the Roses, and his barber is a Silurian; [=JFK=] and Cleopatra are a known item, and the great pyramid of Giza has an American flag painted on the side and is known as "[[{{Area 51}} Area 52]]".



* In ''Series/TheOuterLimits1995'' episode "Déjà Vu", a time travel experiment goes wrong [[spoiler: after an attempt to weaponize it by a corrupt military official]], which results in a GroundhogDayLoop...with a nasty twist. Each iteration grows shorter, and eventually there will be no hope of preventing the Time Crash from destroying the world. [[spoiler: In the end, the disaster is averted, and the man responsible suffers a [[KarmicDeath Karmic]] FateWorseThanDeath, as the malfunctioning time machine traps him in the moment of his own annihilation.]]
* One of the more out-there episodes of ''Series/SeaquestDSV'' involved the Seaquest time traveling into the future by using their fusion reactors and laser weapon systems. The time they arrive in is a dead world inhabited only by an AI computer and 2 human children who spend all hours battling each other in a VR computer game involving real robots. The Seaquest can't return to the past, because the past doesn't exist because - get this - unless they help the 2 kids stop playing their game and procreate, then the human race has no future. And apparently if [[HumansAreSpecial the human race has no future then time breaks and the past ceases to exist.]]
* One episode of ''Series/{{Sliders}}'' has Quinn meddling in a world where time moves backwards... somehow. He changes the events that lead to his incarceration and the death of a police officer that was the double of someone he loved in his world, and a wormhole akin to ClockRoaches appears. We never know what happened to that world, as the heroes manage to slide out before things get serious, but we know messing with time created that paradox and the professor wonders if "[[TheEndOfTheWorldAsWeKnowIt there'll even be a tomorrow in that world]]".



* One episode of ''Series/{{Sliders}}'' has Quinn meddling in a world where time moves backwards... somehow. He changes the events that lead to his incarceration and the death of a police officer that was the double of someone he loved in his world, and a wormhole akin to ClockRoaches appears. We never know what happened to that world, as the heroes manage to slide out before things get serious, but we know messing with time created that paradox and the professor wonders if "[[TheEndOfTheWorldAsWeKnowIt there'll even be a tomorrow in that world]]".
* In ''Series/TwelveMonkeys'', the [[BigBad Army of the Twelve Monkeys]] is trying to destroy time itself, believing [[UtopiaJustifiesTheMeans a world without time would be paradise.]] [[spoiler: Fortunately, time itself is a conscious entity, and is fully capable of fighting back against them through the actions of the protagonists.]]
* One of the more out-there episodes of ''Series/SeaquestDSV'' involved the Seaquest time traveling into the future by using their fusion reactors and laser weapon systems. The time they arrive in is a dead world inhabited only by an AI computer and 2 human children who spend all hours battling each other in a VR computer game involving real robots. The Seaquest can't return to the past, because the past doesn't exist because - get this - unless they help the 2 kids stop playing their game and procreate, then the human race has no future. And apparently if [[HumansAreSpecial the human race has no future then time breaks and the past ceases to exist.]]
26th Feb '17 8:20:08 PM Amahn
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Added DiffLines:

* One of the more out-there episodes of ''Series/SeaquestDSV'' involved the Seaquest time traveling into the future by using their fusion reactors and laser weapon systems. The time they arrive in is a dead world inhabited only by an AI computer and 2 human children who spend all hours battling each other in a VR computer game involving real robots. The Seaquest can't return to the past, because the past doesn't exist because - get this - unless they help the 2 kids stop playing their game and procreate, then the human race has no future. And apparently if [[HumansAreSpecial the human race has no future then time breaks and the past ceases to exist.]]
20th Feb '17 3:36:02 AM jormis29
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* A series of three modules for Creator/{{TSR}} ''TabletopGame/MarvelSuperHeroes'', centered on the player characters becoming caught up in a plot of the time-travelling villain Kang the Conqueror. The second module of the series - ''The Weird, Weird West'' - saw the heroes, travelling home via time machine from the events of the first module, crashing in the old west ... with biplanes and pterodactyls flying overhead; cavemen, dinosaurs, and strange aliens from the distant future stalking the land; and the armies of Alexander the Great, Napoleon, and Ghengis Khan vying for control of the area. Fortunately, Albert Einstein is on hand to point them to the source of the TimeCrash: a "chronovore," devouring time itself.

to:

* A series of three modules for Creator/{{TSR}} Creator/{{TSR}}'s ''TabletopGame/MarvelSuperHeroes'', centered on the player characters becoming caught up in a plot of the time-travelling villain Kang the Conqueror. The second module of the series - ''The Weird, Weird West'' - saw the heroes, travelling home via time machine from the events of the first module, crashing in the old west ... with biplanes and pterodactyls flying overhead; cavemen, dinosaurs, and strange aliens from the distant future stalking the land; and the armies of Alexander the Great, Napoleon, and Ghengis Khan vying for control of the area. Fortunately, Albert Einstein is on hand to point them to the source of the TimeCrash: a "chronovore," devouring time itself.
20th Feb '17 3:35:49 AM jormis29
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* A series of three modules for the old TSR [[Creator/MarvelComics Marvel Superheroes]] Roleplaying Game, centered on the player characters becoming caught up in a plot of the time-travelling villain Kang the Conqueror. The second module of the series - ''The Weird, Weird West'' - saw the heroes, travelling home via time machine from the events of the first module, crashing in the old west ... with biplanes and pterodactyls flying overhead; cavemen, dinosaurs, and strange aliens from the distant future stalking the land; and the armies of Alexander the Great, Napoleon, and Ghengis Khan vying for control of the area. Fortunately, Albert Einstein is on hand to point them to the source of the TimeCrash: a "chronovore," devouring time itself.

to:

* A series of three modules for the old TSR [[Creator/MarvelComics Marvel Superheroes]] Roleplaying Game, Creator/{{TSR}} ''TabletopGame/MarvelSuperHeroes'', centered on the player characters becoming caught up in a plot of the time-travelling villain Kang the Conqueror. The second module of the series - ''The Weird, Weird West'' - saw the heroes, travelling home via time machine from the events of the first module, crashing in the old west ... with biplanes and pterodactyls flying overhead; cavemen, dinosaurs, and strange aliens from the distant future stalking the land; and the armies of Alexander the Great, Napoleon, and Ghengis Khan vying for control of the area. Fortunately, Albert Einstein is on hand to point them to the source of the TimeCrash: a "chronovore," devouring time itself.
20th Jan '17 12:42:21 AM IndigoFenix
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* In the ''AaahhRealMonsters'' episode "Clockwise", Ickis is forced to wear a huge clock around his neck as punishment for being late to class, that he discovers can manipulate time when its hands are set. He spends most of the episode abusing this power, ignoring the warnings from his friends that doing so can cause damage to the space-time continuum. Eventually the clock breaks, resulting in a Time Crash where duplicates of all the characters from different points of time start appearing all at once. Normality is restored when Ickis manages to fix the clock, sending Ickis back to the beginning of the day where he is happy to receive a more mundane punishment.

to:

* In the ''AaahhRealMonsters'' episode "Clockwise", Ickis is forced to wear a huge clock around his neck as punishment for being late to class, that he discovers can manipulate time when its hands are set. He spends most of the episode abusing this power, ignoring the warnings from his friends that doing so can cause damage to the space-time continuum. continuum. Eventually the clock breaks, resulting in a Time Crash where duplicates of all the characters from different points of time start appearing all at once. once. Normality is restored when Ickis manages to fix the clock, sending Ickis him back to the beginning of the day where he is happy to receive a more mundane punishment.
20th Jan '17 12:40:44 AM IndigoFenix
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Added DiffLines:

* In the ''AaahhRealMonsters'' episode "Clockwise", Ickis is forced to wear a huge clock around his neck as punishment for being late to class, that he discovers can manipulate time when its hands are set. He spends most of the episode abusing this power, ignoring the warnings from his friends that doing so can cause damage to the space-time continuum. Eventually the clock breaks, resulting in a Time Crash where duplicates of all the characters from different points of time start appearing all at once. Normality is restored when Ickis manages to fix the clock, sending Ickis back to the beginning of the day where he is happy to receive a more mundane punishment.
16th Jan '17 9:57:19 AM micabell
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* ''VideoGame/UnderTale'' features this as an outcome in one of the game's endings; one of the characters comments on tracking multiple timelines which suddenly stop [[spoiler: while he's fighting you to prevent this from happening]].

to:

* ''VideoGame/UnderTale'' ''VideoGame/{{Undertale}}'' features this as an outcome in one of the game's endings; one of the characters comments on tracking multiple timelines which suddenly stop [[spoiler: while he's fighting you to prevent this from happening]].
9th Jan '17 10:22:24 AM Someoneman
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* Inverted in the climax of [[Film/DoctorStrange2016]]. [[spoiler: Dormammu comes from the Dark Dimension, a place where time ''doesn't'' exist, so Strange pays him a visit and brings in [[PowerCrystal the Time Gem]], and time, with him. Strange sets up a stable [[GroundhogDayLoop time loop]] which he and Dormmamu relive over, and over...and over. Despite being a virtual god in his own home field, Dormammu has next to [[OutsideContextProblem no understanding of time, and thus time travel]], leaving him no effective counter. No matter how much more powerful he it and how many times he kills Strange, Dormammu is effectively Strange's prisoner, forcing him to accept Strange's bargain to leave Earth alone.]]

to:

* Inverted in the climax of [[Film/DoctorStrange2016]].''Film/DoctorStrange2016''. [[spoiler: Dormammu comes from the Dark Dimension, a place where time ''doesn't'' exist, so Strange pays him a visit and brings in [[PowerCrystal the Time Gem]], and time, with him. Strange sets up a stable [[GroundhogDayLoop time loop]] which he and Dormmamu relive over, and over...and over. Despite being a virtual god in his own home field, Dormammu has next to [[OutsideContextProblem no understanding of time, and thus time travel]], leaving him no effective counter. No matter how much more powerful he it and how many times he kills Strange, Dormammu is effectively Strange's prisoner, forcing him to accept Strange's bargain to leave Earth alone.]]
4th Jan '17 9:48:20 PM Yozzy
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Added DiffLines:

* Inverted in the climax of [[Film/DoctorStrange2016]]. [[spoiler: Dormammu comes from the Dark Dimension, a place where time ''doesn't'' exist, so Strange pays him a visit and brings in [[PowerCrystal the Time Gem]], and time, with him. Strange sets up a stable [[GroundhogDayLoop time loop]] which he and Dormmamu relive over, and over...and over. Despite being a virtual god in his own home field, Dormammu has next to [[OutsideContextProblem no understanding of time, and thus time travel]], leaving him no effective counter. No matter how much more powerful he it and how many times he kills Strange, Dormammu is effectively Strange's prisoner, forcing him to accept Strange's bargain to leave Earth alone.]]
4th Jan '17 9:33:30 PM Yozzy
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Added DiffLines:

* In ''VideoGame/LifeIsStrange'', a girl named Max finds out she spontaneously gained time powers, and uses them to save the life of another girl, who happens to be her former best friend Chloe, kicking off the plot. With that simple act, Time seems to have broke, and things around town start getting weird: it snows despite being 80 degrees; there's an unscheduled solar eclipse; whales and birds start dying inexplicably around town; a ''desynchronized double moon'' appears briefly in the sky; and finally the enormous twister that Max keeps having visions of threatens to wipe the town clean off the map. [[spoiler: It's implied that altering the fate of Chloe caused time and local reality to go haywire, rather than Max's abuse of her time powers, and everything is trying to right itself.]]
** In the ''Nightmare'' scene in Episode 5, [[spoiler: Max [[PowerStrainBlackout goes unconscious]] and has a surreal experience largely in a place that doesn't fully coincide with Earth. Whether it's a [[NightmareSequence sort of fever dream]] or was [[OrWasItADream an actual place that Max was actually sent to]] is left open to interpretation.]]
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Main.TimeCrash