History Main / ThouShaltNotKill

10th Aug '16 8:32:34 PM Godzillawolf
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* In ''WesternAnimation/StevenUniverse'':
** Steven and his mother Rose both view shattering a Gem (which would permanently kill them) as a horrible thing and refuse to do so. Rose took this to the point of having her personal sword forged specifically to be able to destroy a Gem's unimportant body (thus rendering them helpless, but able to regenerate eventually) but ''never'' their Gem. [[spoiler:Both end up refusing [[KnightTemplar Bismuth's]] offer of a OneHitKill weapon designed specifically for shattering Gems for this reason.]] However, Rose did seem to only apply this condition to herself, merely desiring her army treat shattering as a last resort rather than their go to battle strategy [[spoiler:given her interactions with Bismuth]] and [[spoiler:we learn [[BatmanGrabsAGun Rose had to make an exception to save Earth by killing Pink Diamond]], its reigning EvilOverlord.]]
** The Crystal Gems as a whole seem to have this mentality towards ''humans''. Which makes sense, given the entire reason they've done everything they have was for their protection. They're still willing to beat one up though if [[MamaBear they threaten Steven.]]
5th Aug '16 11:39:28 AM MarkLungo
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** Nineties anti-hero Comicbook/{{Cable}} (an amazingly powerful telekinetic infected by a nano-technological virus who used huge guns ... no, really) had no qualms about killing and invariably racked up a huge body county every issue. Always without any ramifications. And in his most recent shared series, he came across as the good partner. The other guy was {{Deadpool}}.
** A move towards this has actually become one of the significant driving arcs for Comicbook/{{X 23}}: She was bred and trained from birth to be the perfect assassin, and even after first joining the X-Men she was a ruthless killer who may have been even ''more'' efficient at it than Wolverine, with Matthew Risman telling her she was "bred for murder." However X herself hated what she was, and has increasingly tried to avoid resorting to lethal force. By the time of ''Comicbook/AllNewWolverine'' she has sworn off killing entirely.

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** Nineties anti-hero Comicbook/{{Cable}} ComicBook/{{Cable}} (an amazingly powerful telekinetic infected by a nano-technological virus who used huge guns ... no, really) had no qualms about killing and invariably racked up a huge body county every issue. Always without any ramifications. And in his most recent shared series, he came across as the good partner. The other guy was {{Deadpool}}.
SelfDemonstrating/{{Deadpool}}.
** A move towards this has actually become one of the significant driving arcs for Comicbook/{{X ComicBook/{{X 23}}: She was bred and trained from birth to be the perfect assassin, and even after first joining the X-Men she was a ruthless killer who may have been even ''more'' efficient at it than Wolverine, with Matthew Risman telling her she was "bred for murder." However X herself hated what she was, and has increasingly tried to avoid resorting to lethal force. By the time of ''Comicbook/AllNewWolverine'' ''ComicBook/AllNewWolverine'' she has sworn off killing entirely.
5th Aug '16 7:23:17 AM Ambaryerno
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** A move towards this has actually become one of the significant driving arcs for Comicbook/{{X 23}}: She was bred and trained from birth to be the perfect assassin, and even after first joining the X-Men she was a ruthless killer who may have been even ''more'' efficient at it than Wolverine, with Matthew Risman telling her she was "bred for murder." However X herself hated what she was, and has increasingly tried to avoid resorting to lethal force. By the time of ''Comicbook/AllNewWolverine'' she has sworn off killing entirely.
1st Aug '16 8:28:28 AM Tron80
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** Golden Age Superman, though, subverted this. Although he didn't like killing, he wasn't above threatening criminals with death or letting them die.
* ''Comicbook/{{Supergirl}}'' also avoids killing:
** In the ''Comicbook/NewKrypton'' arc, Supergirl was horrified when she [[spoiler:accidentally killed Superwoman, even though Superwoman had tried to kill her several times.]]
** In the ''Comicbook/{{New 52}}'' Supergirl does not know her own strength. She gets upset when her actions endanger people and is relieved once that she sees that nobody has been harmed.
** Subverted in ''Comicbook/RedDaughterOfKrypton''. Supergirl is horrified when she apparently kills mass murderer and hitman ''Comicbook/{{Lobo}}'' after kicking him. Then he takes advantage of her distress to catch her off guard, and almost fries her brains with an ultrasonic device. Right there and then she decides he has "got it coming".
** Subverted again at the end of that arc. She [[spoiler:executed an artificial, genocidal body-snatching alien abomination]] reasoning that "This is not murder. It is the end of a terrible mistake."
28th Jul '16 12:24:31 AM VVK
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* Franchise/{{Superman}} has taken a solemn vow ''never'' to kill. It's strongly implied - and outright {{invoked|Trope}} in ''ComicBook/WhateverHappenedToTheManOfTomorrow'' - that he believes that he should give up being Superman if he takes one. (He cannot kill himself, since his oath applies to himself as well. This was shown in a number of Bronze Age stories, including one where he is caught in a hallucination that supposedly shows the future and realizes that since it shows him killing himself, it must be false.)

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* Franchise/{{Superman}} has taken a solemn vow ''never'' to kill. It's strongly implied - -- and outright {{invoked|Trope}} used in ''ComicBook/WhateverHappenedToTheManOfTomorrow'' - -- that he believes that he should give up being Superman if he takes one.a life. (He cannot kill himself, since his oath applies to himself as well. This was shown in a number of Bronze Age stories, including one where he is caught in a hallucination that supposedly shows the future and realizes that since it shows him killing himself, it must be false.)


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** ''Whatever Happened to the Man of Tomorrow'' also has SelfDemonstrating/{{Bizarro}} [[InvertedTrope go on a murderous rampage on the basis that he wants to be more closely the opposite of Superman]], though he's really being manipulated into thinking that by the BigBad. He also kills himself.
1st Jul '16 8:16:42 AM Gorank
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** This actually tends to be a case of CharacterExaggeration in the English dubs. While Goku will try to spare his opponents, it's usually less out of moral righteousness and more because [[BloodKnight he]] [[WorthyOpponent wants a rematch]]. In fact, this tendency is presented as a character flaw in ''Resurrection F''.[[spoiler: It got the earth blown up.]]

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** This actually tends to be a case of CharacterExaggeration in the English dubs. While Goku will try to spare his opponents, it's usually less out of moral righteousness and more because [[BloodKnight he]] [[WorthyOpponent wants a rematch]]. In fact, this tendency is presented as a character flaw in ''Resurrection F''. [[spoiler: It got the earth blown up.]]
18th Jun '16 5:08:14 AM jormis29
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* ''TabletopGames/{{GURPS}}'' has the Pacifist disadvantage, which comes in several flavors, one of which is Cannot Kill. Characters with the "Cannot Kill" disadvantage can start fights and use any tactics they like, but they cannot kill, or be responsible for a death, or leave a wounded enemy to die. They also cannot stand by while their teammates administer the CoupDeGrace. If they do, they {{angst}} about it for days and are effectively rendered useless to the team.

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* ''TabletopGames/{{GURPS}}'' ''TabletopGame/{{GURPS}}'' has the Pacifist disadvantage, which comes in several flavors, one of which is Cannot Kill. Characters with the "Cannot Kill" disadvantage can start fights and use any tactics they like, but they cannot kill, or be responsible for a death, or leave a wounded enemy to die. They also cannot stand by while their teammates administer the CoupDeGrace. If they do, they {{angst}} about it for days and are effectively rendered useless to the team.
14th Jun '16 11:06:29 PM Ahnyo
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* ''Fanfic/PlasmasFolly'''s interpretation of N fiercely opposes killing after having to witness the deaths of many of the injured Pokémon Ghetsis gave him to play with as a child. This becomes a bit of an issue when he realizes that putting the suffering Genesect [[MercyKill to death]] may be the best option.
10th Jun '16 9:44:11 PM DariusAngel
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* Recited verbatim by Brother Gilbert in ''Film/{{Dragonheart}}'' before deciding to kill the evil king Einon.

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* Recited verbatim by Brother Gilbert in ''Film/{{Dragonheart}}'' before deciding to kill the evil king Einon. Einon survives the attack however.
10th Jun '16 3:25:52 PM MarkWilder
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* As this page's introduction notes, modern English translations of Literature/TheBible don't say "Thou shalt not kill", they say "You shall not murder/shed innocent blood". In other words, don't kill someone without a very good reason. Warfare and capital punishment were accepted practice in ancient Israel and in many cases sanctioned by God. Killing in self-defense of your own life, or killing someone who is currently attempting to murder someone else, is likewise permissible and obligatory under Biblical law, as elaborated in the Literature/{{Talmud}}; a would-be murderer is considered legally "dead" for the period of time in which he is attempting to commit murder, and killing them during that period is therefore not considered murder at all. (It is still preferable to stop them in another way if possible.)
** Sometimes God's direct orders violated this commandment, such as His command to massacre the Canaanites, including women and children.

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* As this page's introduction notes, modern English translations of Literature/TheBible don't say "Thou shalt not kill", they say "You shall not murder/shed innocent blood". In other words, don't kill someone without a very good reason. Warfare and capital punishment were accepted practice in ancient Israel and in many cases sanctioned by God. Killing in self-defense of your own life, or killing someone who is currently attempting to murder someone else, and execution of convicted murderers is likewise permissible and even obligatory under Biblical law, as elaborated in the Literature/{{Talmud}}; a would-be murderer is considered legally "dead" for the period of time in which he is attempting to commit murder, and killing them during that period is therefore not considered murder at all. (It is still preferable to stop them in another way if possible.)
** Sometimes God's direct orders violated this commandment, such as His command to massacre the Canaanites, including women and children.
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