History Main / ThouShaltNotKill

20th Nov '17 2:53:07 AM Enter_User_Name
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[[WhatMeasureIsANonHuman Opinions differ on how this applies to sentient life other than humans.]] In general, it's still up to BigDamnVillains to kill other villains. It's perfectly fine to [[ImmortalLifeIsCheap "kill" immortals though]] as it is to kill the undead. The MercyKill sometimes winds up as an exception. KarmicDeath, SelfDisposingVillain, and HoistByHisOwnPetard provide alternate ways to kill off villains without forcing the hero to get his hands dirty.

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[[WhatMeasureIsANonHuman Opinions differ on how this applies to sentient life other than humans.]] In general, it's still up to BigDamnVillains to kill other villains. It's perfectly fine to [[ImmortalLifeIsCheap "kill" immortals though]] as it is to kill the undead. The MercyKill sometimes winds up as an exception. KarmicDeath, SelfDisposingVillain, and HoistByHisOwnPetard provide alternate ways to kill off villains without forcing the hero heroes to get his their hands dirty.
5th Nov '17 9:32:10 AM Discar
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* ''Webcomic/SchlockMercenary'': Petey avoids killing if at all possible, and at one point refuses to let a spy go back home because she'll just get needlessly mind-ripped. After [[spoiler:the oafans give everyone immortality]], he starts going to truly absurd lengths to avoid killing, like teraporting entire fleets that are in the middle of a massive fight. As he says, he can't be sure these people will still be his enemies in hundreds or thousands of years, so killing ''anyone'' is like killing future allies.
4th Nov '17 9:50:04 AM sgamer82
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* The Red Panda and Flying Squirrel of ''Podcast/RedPandaAdventures'' go out of their way to avoid using lethal force. Though the Red Panda owns a katana, for example, he won't take it into battle so as to not even have the option. They fight with fists, gadgets, and hypnosis. They aren't as firmly wedded to it as other superheroes with a "no killing" code, however. They can and will employ lethal force if the situation calls for it. Fighting non-living foes such as Professor Zombie's undead minions naturally falls into this, but the pair have also been willing to kill if the entire city, or even world is at stake, such as killing the Nazi Ubermensch, Tevas, to keep him away from the Normandy invasion. The one thing that will make either the Red Panda and Flying Squirrel outright ''abandon'' this edict is if a villain seems to have killed one or the other. A developing VillainTeamUp decides against killing the Squirrel to get to the Red Panda precisely because they know it ''will''.
6th Sep '17 6:09:07 AM CaptainPedant
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* In Creator/GeorgeCarlin's routine on The Ten Commandments, he ends with this one and says that, because more people have been killed in the name of God than for any other reason, it really comes down to who's doing the killing and who's getting killed. He decides it should be renamed "Thou shalt try ''really'' hard not to kill anyone, unless they prey to a different invisible man from the one you prey to."

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* In Creator/GeorgeCarlin's routine on The Ten Commandments, he ends with this one and says that, because more people have been killed in the name of God than for any other reason, reason[[note]]Untrue, of course. Neither Hitler nor Stalin nor Mao invoked any God before killing millions of their own people, Jenghiz Khan didn't care two hoots about religion, and we could go on and on with this.[[/note]], it really comes down to who's doing the killing and who's getting killed. He decides it should be renamed "Thou shalt try ''really'' hard not to kill anyone, unless they prey to a different invisible man from the one you prey to."
1st Aug '17 5:22:50 AM SeptimusHeap
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* In ''WebComic/TheAdventuresOfDrMcNinja'' [[spoiler: Mongo the superninja has learned the preciousness of life.]] [[{{Frankenstein}} And also]] that [[AltText fire bad]].

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* In ''WebComic/TheAdventuresOfDrMcNinja'' [[spoiler: Mongo the superninja has learned the preciousness of life.]] [[{{Frankenstein}} [[Film/{{Frankenstein|1931}} And also]] that [[AltText fire bad]].
19th Jul '17 5:53:54 AM TimG5
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SubTrope to NoHarmRequirement where characters for one reason or another are restricted in how much harm they can deal to or allow another being to take, if any.
15th May '17 5:34:24 PM KaputExaltation
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Thou Shalt Not Kill is closely related to JokerImmunity. Whilst many writers believe a never-kill creed makes the hero more likable and righteous, on another level it might simply be a plot device to prevent the hero from killing off popular recurring villains. Related is PacifismBackfire, where their reluctance to fight (or to kill as in this trope) may cause JokerImmunity. This trope is more common in serial fiction, such as TV shows and comic books, rather than one-shots like movies. In action movies [[SuperheroMovieVillainsDie it is common and acceptable for the hero to kill the villain]] because there is usually no planned sequel for the villain to appear in. It's also somewhat common for both stand alone and serial storytelling to feature a character who begins adhering to this trope, but over the course of various dramatic devices, such as a TraumaCongaLine, is finally forced to - or chooses to - cross the line.

With superpowered characters, attitudes toward no-kill policies range from utterly ignoring it (such as the protagonists of ''ComicBook/{{Watchmen}}''), to strict adherence except in extreme circumstances (such as Franchise/{{Superman}}). One rationale is that if, say, Superman were to kill a bad guy in one story, why wouldn't he simply resolve all situations by, for example, incinerating ComicBook/LexLuthor with his heat vision on sight.

Whatever the moral case is, this trope is often used to show off the hero's incredible precision, whether it be with a fist or a gun. This can include things like [[BlastingItOutOfTheirHands separating the mook from their weapon with a precisely aimed bullet]], or possibly [[TapOnTheHead knocking an opponent out]]. Whatever the case, their non-lethal attacks are due to their incredible skill. Note that this often a case of RealityIsUnrealistic as many of these attacks are very capable of causing serious injury or death.

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Thou Shalt Not Kill is closely related to JokerImmunity. Whilst many writers believe a never-kill creed makes the hero more likable and righteous, on another level it might simply be a plot device [[StatusQuoIsGod to prevent the hero from killing off popular recurring villains. villains]]: the rationale is that if a hero, say, Franchise/{{Superman}} were to kill a bad guy in one story, why wouldn't he simply resolve all of his problems by, for example, incinerating ComicBook/LexLuthor with his heat vision on sight? Related is PacifismBackfire, where their reluctance to fight (or to kill as in this trope) may cause JokerImmunity. This trope is more common in serial fiction, such as TV shows and comic books, rather than one-shots like movies. In action movies [[SuperheroMovieVillainsDie it is common and acceptable for the hero to kill the villain]] because there is usually no planned sequel for the villain to appear in. It's also somewhat common for both stand alone and serial storytelling to feature a character who begins adhering to this trope, but over the course of various dramatic devices, such as a TraumaCongaLine, is finally forced to - or chooses to - cross the line.

With superpowered superhero characters, attitudes toward no-kill policies range from utterly ignoring it (such as the protagonists of ''ComicBook/{{Watchmen}}''), to treating it as a [[BewareTheNiceOnes preferred outcome]] (such as Superman), to strict adherence except to it in extreme circumstances all cases (such as Franchise/{{Superman}}). One rationale is that if, say, Superman were to kill a bad guy in one story, why wouldn't he simply resolve all situations by, for example, incinerating ComicBook/LexLuthor with his heat vision on sight.

Franchise/{{Batman}}). Whatever the moral case is, this trope is often used to show off the hero's incredible precision, whether it be with a fist or a gun. This can include things like [[BlastingItOutOfTheirHands separating the mook from their weapon with a precisely aimed bullet]], or possibly [[TapOnTheHead knocking an opponent out]]. Whatever the case, their non-lethal attacks are due to their incredible skill. Note that this often a case of RealityIsUnrealistic as many of these attacks are very capable of causing serious injury or death.
6th May '17 4:04:08 AM jormis29
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* Some Superhero {{RPG}}s would invoke rules against killing. Two notable examples were ''Marvel Super Heroes'' and ''DC Heroes'', which would eliminate all Karma/Hero Points (a combination of experience points, and self-boosting reserves for various tasks) and keep you from accumulating more for the rest of the adventure (usually one night of gaming). In DC heroes, this punishment came from using lethal force at all.

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* Some Superhero {{RPG}}s would invoke rules against killing. Two notable examples were ''Marvel Super Heroes'' ''TabletopGame/MarvelSuperHeroes'' and ''DC Heroes'', ''TabletopGame/DCHeroes'', which would eliminate all Karma/Hero Points (a combination of experience points, and self-boosting reserves for various tasks) and keep you from accumulating more for the rest of the adventure (usually one night of gaming). In DC heroes, this punishment came from using lethal force at all.
15th Apr '17 8:42:14 PM NWolfman
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[[folder:Stand-Up Comedy]]
* In Creator/GeorgeCarlin's routine on The Ten Commandments, he ends with this one and says that, because more people have been killed in the name of God than for any other reason, it really comes down to who's doing the killing and who's getting killed. He decides it should be renamed "Thou shalt try ''really'' hard not to kill anyone, unless they prey to a different invisible man from the one you prey to."
[[/folder]]
30th Mar '17 5:00:04 PM Schol-R-LEA
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* Averted with extreme prejudice in the Literature/WhateleyUniverse. It's a sad commentary on a superheroic [[TheVerse 'verse]] when the person best known for having a code against killing is a super''villain'' (Mimeo, so it is not just out of good intentions - he wants to be able to keep getting the power-up from fighting superheroes so he can go after his real targets, so killing his 'donors' would be counterproductive).

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* Averted with extreme prejudice in the Literature/WhateleyUniverse. It's a sad commentary on a superheroic [[TheVerse 'verse]] when the person best known for having a code against killing is a super''villain'' (Mimeo, a veru high-end [[PowerCopying Power Mimic]], so it is not just out of good intentions - he wants to be able to keep getting the power-up from fighting superheroes so he can go after his real targets, so meaning that killing his 'donors' would be counterproductive).
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