History Main / ThouShaltNotKill

16th Mar '17 8:55:08 PM Gamermaster
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** In fact, there is only ''one'' known case of a protagonist killing somebody during the events of the franchise, and it barely counts since [[spoiler:it's a SuicideByCop.]]
15th Mar '17 12:09:23 PM Delphi
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** Averted in volume 9 when she [[spoiler: kills Fleshmaster.]]
5th Mar '17 2:13:42 AM LadyJaneGrey
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** He came ''very'' close to breaking his oath in ''ComicBook/BatmanNoMansLand''. After the Joker murdered Gordon's wife, Batman still refused to kill him, but told Jim he would ''not'' stop him from doing so. (And Jim ''almost'' did, restraining himself only because there had been too much death already.)
23rd Feb '17 11:56:51 AM skidoo23
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* In the ''VideoGame/{{Thief}}'' series, higher difficulty levels prohibit players from killing the guards or bystanders, presumably not out of morality but for the sake of stealth and forcing them to rely on other means of defeating or evading them. A trail of corpses is likely going to be noticed by the guards, which makes it harder to sneak around. It's furthermore a canonical part of Garrett's character that he views killing as "unprofessional"; he's a thief, not a murderer, got to have some standards here. He (and the game) doesn't have a problem with killing animals or undead though.

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* In the ''VideoGame/{{Thief}}'' series, higher difficulty levels prohibit players from killing the guards or bystanders, presumably not out of morality but for the sake of stealth and forcing them to rely on other means of defeating or evading them. A trail of corpses is likely going to be noticed by the guards, which makes it harder to sneak around. It's furthermore a canonical part of Garrett's character that he views killing as "unprofessional"; he's a thief, not a murderer, got to have some standards here. He (and the game) doesn't have a problem with killing animals or undead though. At high difficulty there are levels where you aren't even allowed to render someone unconscious.
23rd Feb '17 11:54:46 AM skidoo23
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* Series/{{Daredevil 2015}} makes it a hard rule not to kill, and is one of the only heroes in the Franchise/MarvelCinematicUniverse to do so (The Hulk is a special case as Bruce Banner tries hard not to kill anyone but ultimately has no control over the Hulk's actions; the MCU version of Spider-Man has yet to be seen using deadly force and his views on the subject are as yet unknown). This mostly comes from the fact that he's a devout Catholic and knows he's toeing the line of morality already by administering brutal beatings to criminals. This rule is challenged in the second season when he's contrasted with remorseless killers ComicBook/{{Elektra}} and ComicBook/ThePunisher; Daredevil's appalled at how they kill their enemies, but at the same time his insistence at keeping everyone alive sometimes puts him and his allies at risk.

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* Series/{{Daredevil 2015}} ''Series/{{Daredevil 2015}}'' makes it a hard rule not to kill, and is one of the only heroes in the Franchise/MarvelCinematicUniverse to do so (The Hulk is a special case as Bruce Banner tries hard not to kill anyone but ultimately has no control over the Hulk's actions; the MCU version of Spider-Man has yet to be seen using deadly force and his views on the subject are as yet unknown). This mostly comes from the fact that he's a devout Catholic and knows he's toeing the line of morality already by administering brutal beatings to criminals. This rule is challenged in the second season when he's contrasted with remorseless killers ComicBook/{{Elektra}} and ComicBook/ThePunisher; Daredevil's appalled at how they kill their enemies, but at the same time his insistence at keeping everyone alive sometimes puts him and his allies at risk.risk.
* ''Series/{{Supergirl}}'': Supergirl follows the same general "Thou Shalt Not Kill" policy as her cousin, which has led to a few baddies escaping. That does not mean she has not had to destroy a few alien baddies from time to time, and she also destroys the Red Tornado in a fit of anger, not realizing that he'd become sentient a few moments before. The rule is decidedly ''not'' followed by her DEO colleagues, including her sister, Alex, who is a trained killer and uses such skills on more than one occasion. The Guardian, although he delivers Daredevil-style beatdowns on bad guys, also adheres to Supergirl's no-killing rule.
23rd Feb '17 11:51:01 AM skidoo23
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* Series/{{Daredevil 2015}} makes it a hard rule not to kill, and is the only hero in the Franchise/MarvelCinematicUniverse to do so. This mostly comes from the fact that he's a devout Catholic and knows he's toeing the line of morality already by administering brutal beatings to criminals. This rule is challenged in the second season when he's contrasted with remorseless killers ComicBook/{{Elektra}} and ComicBook/ThePunisher; Daredevil's appalled at how they kill their enemies, but at the same time his insistence at keeping everyone alive sometimes puts him and his allies at risk.

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* Series/{{Daredevil 2015}} makes it a hard rule not to kill, and is one of the only hero heroes in the Franchise/MarvelCinematicUniverse to do so.so (The Hulk is a special case as Bruce Banner tries hard not to kill anyone but ultimately has no control over the Hulk's actions; the MCU version of Spider-Man has yet to be seen using deadly force and his views on the subject are as yet unknown). This mostly comes from the fact that he's a devout Catholic and knows he's toeing the line of morality already by administering brutal beatings to criminals. This rule is challenged in the second season when he's contrasted with remorseless killers ComicBook/{{Elektra}} and ComicBook/ThePunisher; Daredevil's appalled at how they kill their enemies, but at the same time his insistence at keeping everyone alive sometimes puts him and his allies at risk.
23rd Feb '17 11:46:37 AM skidoo23
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Thou Shalt Not Kill is closely related to JokerImmunity. Whilst many writers believe a never-kill creed makes the hero more likable and righteous, on another level it might simply be a plot device to prevent the hero from killing off popular recurring villains. Related is PacifismBackfire, where their reluctance to fight (or to kill as in this trope) may cause JokerImmunity. This trope is more common in serial fiction, such as TV shows and comic books, rather than one-shots like movies. In action movies [[SuperheroMovieVillainsDie it is common and acceptable for the hero to kill the villain]] because there is usually no planned sequel for the villain to appear in.

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Thou Shalt Not Kill is closely related to JokerImmunity. Whilst many writers believe a never-kill creed makes the hero more likable and righteous, on another level it might simply be a plot device to prevent the hero from killing off popular recurring villains. Related is PacifismBackfire, where their reluctance to fight (or to kill as in this trope) may cause JokerImmunity. This trope is more common in serial fiction, such as TV shows and comic books, rather than one-shots like movies. In action movies [[SuperheroMovieVillainsDie it is common and acceptable for the hero to kill the villain]] because there is usually no planned sequel for the villain to appear in. It's also somewhat common for both stand alone and serial storytelling to feature a character who begins adhering to this trope, but over the course of various dramatic devices, such as a TraumaCongaLine, is finally forced to - or chooses to - cross the line.



"Thou shalt not kill" is derived from the Bible's Ten Commandments, and the religious implications of taking life in apparent violation of this commandment (which is often translated as "Thou shalt not murder," which results in debates over semantics) are sometimes also invoked in storytelling.



** Some editions of the Bible do indeed use the phrase "Thou shalt not murder", rather than kill. Coupled with one of the definitions of murder as being the unjustified taking of life, this difference in semantics is often used in military and other circles to reassure religious individuals (particularly after a first kill) that they have not violated the spirit of the Commandment. "Gone Missing," an episode of the TV series ''Series/TheUnit'', contains just such a discussion between a character who is preparing for an assassination and a chaplain.

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** Some editions of the Bible do indeed use the phrase "Thou shalt not murder", rather than kill. Coupled with one of the definitions of murder as being the unjustified ''unjustified'' taking of life, this difference in semantics is often used in military and other circles to reassure religious individuals (particularly after a first kill) that they have not violated the spirit of the Commandment. Commandment (though at the same time the word "unjustified" is in and of itself subject to wide interpretation: one person's war crime might be another person's good works). "Gone Missing," an episode of the TV series ''Series/TheUnit'', contains just such a discussion between a character who is preparing for an assassination and experiencing a crisis of conscience after having had to terminate a young boy during a mission, and a chaplain.



** Although the media makes it appear as if every police officer has a licence to kill, in reality only a small percentage of police officers ever fire their weapons at anything other than a paper target during their careers.

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** Although the media makes it appear as if every police officer has a licence to kill, kill - and while, indeed, police officers are trained in the use of deadly force - in reality only a small percentage of police officers ever fire their weapons at anything other than a paper target during their careers.


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*** The Canadian TV series ''Series/{{Flashpoint}}'' illustrates this frequently, as any time an officer uses deadly force, he or she is depicted as having to submit to a thorough investigation to ensure their actions were justified.
22nd Feb '17 8:47:34 AM Zaptech
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* Unfortunately, Superman's strict adherence to this oath is why critics and fans gave ''Film/BatmanVersusSuperman'' the cold shoulder. (Superman ''has'' to fight because Lex Luthor is holding Ma and Pa Kent hostage? Right, a spoiled rich kid whose criminal actions are obvious to everyone is getting away with this because the Man of Steel doesn't dare raise a hand to him. In this day and age it was kind of pushing WillingSuspensionOfDisvelief a little too far.)
22nd Feb '17 6:58:16 AM LadyJaneGrey
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* Unfortunately, Superman's strict adherence to this oath is why critics and fans gave ''Film/BatmanVersusSuperman'' the cold shoulder. (Superman ''has'' to fight because Lex Luthor is holding Ma and Pa Kent hostage? Right, a spoiled rich kid whose criminal actions are obvious to everyone is getting away with this because the Man of Steel doesn't dare raise a hand to him. In this day and age it was kind of pushing WillingSuspensionOfDisvelief a little too far.)
13th Feb '17 9:30:45 AM ConnorJohn
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* ''Film/DoctorStrange2016'' is the first MCU film to have a protagonist who tries to follow this. However, [[spoiler: he'll happily let Dormammu absorb his followers - who aren't ''dying'', technically, just going to Hell]].

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* ''Film/DoctorStrange2016'' is the first MCU film to have a protagonist who tries to follow this. Justified as he is a doctor and has taken the Hippocratic Oath. However, [[spoiler: he'll happily let Dormammu absorb his followers - who aren't ''dying'', technically, just going to Hell]].
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