History Main / TheSimpleLifeIsSimple

28th Sep '16 5:57:28 PM JackG
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* The Khmer Rouge tried to reshape the whole of Cambodia into an self-sufficient agrarian society. The result was up to two million dead.
4th Sep '16 6:12:06 PM Yuihime
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* PBS historical reality show ''Frontier House'' showed three modern-day families trying to establish homesteads in Montana the way pioneers in 1883 would have lived. After filming from June to October, a panel of historical experts were called to judge which homesteads would survive the winter. All three families were found to have insufficient firewood, one didn't have enough food for themselves or the livestock, and one, while physically prepared, was crippled by [[DysfunctionJunction developing domestic strife]].
30th Aug '16 4:19:03 AM Morgenthaler
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[[folder: Film ]]

* ''Film/CityGirl'': Kate hates her life as a waitress in the hot, noisy, crowded city of Chicago. She dreams of the countryside as peaceful paradise, and gets the chance to make those dreams come true when she meets and marries Lem, a farmer in Chicago to sell his wheat. She arrives and finds that not only is a lot of hard work required, the people DownOnTheFarm can be just as selfish and brutal as the ones in the city.
* While discussing the industrial revolution in his classic documentary series ''The Ascent of Man'' Jacob Bronowski points out a common historical misconception. Namely, that people who used to be simple farmers were forced to work in hellish factories. Yes, he says, the factories were hellish, but farm labour in those days wasn't much better. (Though, of course, the labour of farming comes and goes with the seasons, not the case with factory life.)
* The Ba'ku in ''Film/StarTrekInsurrection'' run on this--for such a non-technological society, everything sure is clean! Then again, they ''were'' SpaceElves...
* Thoroughly deconstructed in ''[[Film/ManonDesSources Jean de Florette]]'', where a CityMouse buys a farm in rural Provence and fails utterly over the course of the film. While a lot of it is his own inexperience and over-reliance on book learnin', his job is made a lot harder by [[VillainProtagonist his neighbours]], who dam up a spring that drains onto his land, hoping to drive him off so they can buy him out cheaply; and by the villagers, who knew about the neighbours' plan, but didn't talk part out of cowardice, part out of disdain as they consider him "a stranger".
* Deconstructed in ''Film/HolidayInn'': Jim Hardy feels the CallToAgriculture and leaves showbiz to run a farm. He lasts less than a year before the hard work breaks him.
* The Disney Channel Original Movie ''HorseSense'' has a lazy and spoiled city boy being sent by his parents to Montana to work on his aunt's farm as punishment for his terrible behavior when his cousin came to visit. Both the cousin and the farm workers don't think much of the city boy and give him "simple" tasks, which he is having a lot of trouble with. Of course, the cousin deliberately withholds information that could vastly simplify those tasks (e.g. telling the city boy to move a pile of manure from one place to another, "forgetting" to mention a tractor behind the shed).
* Subverted in ''Literature/TessOfTheDurbervilles,'' where Angel, a pampered son of a preacher, gains a real admiration for those who have farmed, and will farm, all of their lives, especially in the face of catastrophe (such as one cow eating a garlic plant, resulting in that entire week's worth of butter being unusable because it tastes faintly of garlic).
* Subverted in ''Film/AnotherTimeAnotherPlace''. The work Janie does is exhausting, painful and poorly paid. The other workers aren't much company either.
* At the end of ''Film/TheOmegaMan'' after the [[LuddWasRight last scientist on Earth]] has died, the survivors leave the city for an implied idyllic life in the country.

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* ''Film/CityGirl'': Kate hates her life as a waitress in the hot, noisy, crowded city of Chicago. She dreams of the countryside as peaceful paradise, and gets the chance to make those dreams come true when she meets and marries Lem, a farmer in Chicago to sell his wheat. She arrives and finds that not only is a lot of hard work required, the people DownOnTheFarm can be just as selfish and brutal as the ones in the city.
* While discussing the industrial revolution in his classic documentary series ''The Ascent of Man'' Jacob Bronowski points out a common historical misconception. Namely, that people who used to be simple farmers were forced to work in hellish factories. Yes, he says, the factories were hellish, but farm labour in those days wasn't much better. (Though, of course, the labour of farming comes and goes with the seasons, not the case with factory life.)
* The Ba'ku in ''Film/StarTrekInsurrection'' run on this--for such a non-technological society, everything sure is clean! Then again, they ''were'' SpaceElves...
* Thoroughly deconstructed in ''[[Film/ManonDesSources Jean de Florette]]'', where a CityMouse buys a farm in rural Provence and fails utterly over the course of the film. While a lot of it is his own inexperience and over-reliance on book learnin', his job is made a lot harder by [[VillainProtagonist his neighbours]], who dam up a spring that drains onto his land, hoping to drive him off so they can buy him out cheaply; and by the villagers, who knew about the neighbours' plan, but didn't talk part out of cowardice, part out of disdain as they consider him "a stranger".
* Deconstructed in ''Film/HolidayInn'': Jim Hardy feels the CallToAgriculture and leaves showbiz to run a farm. He lasts less than a year before the hard work breaks him.
* The Disney Channel Original Movie ''HorseSense'' has a lazy and spoiled city boy being sent by his parents to Montana to work on his aunt's farm as punishment for his terrible behavior when his cousin came to visit. Both the cousin and the farm workers don't think much of the city boy and give him "simple" tasks, which he is having a lot of trouble with. Of course, the cousin deliberately withholds information that could vastly simplify those tasks (e.g. telling the city boy to move a pile of manure from one place to another, "forgetting" to mention a tractor behind the shed).
* Subverted in ''Literature/TessOfTheDurbervilles,'' where Angel, a pampered son of a preacher, gains a real admiration for those who have farmed, and will farm, all of their lives, especially in the face of catastrophe (such as one cow eating a garlic plant, resulting in that entire week's worth of butter being unusable because it tastes faintly of garlic).
* Subverted in ''Film/AnotherTimeAnotherPlace''. The work Janie does is exhausting, painful and poorly paid. The other workers aren't much company either.
* At the end of ''Film/TheOmegaMan'' after the [[LuddWasRight last scientist on Earth]] has died, the survivors leave the city for an implied idyllic life in the country.

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30th Aug '16 4:18:13 AM Morgenthaler
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* Inverted by ''Radio/TheArchers'', a long running BBC radio SoapOpera which was set up to [[{{Edutainment}} both entertain and advise]] farmers themselves, and they don't hesitate to write in and complain about the slightest mistake. As a lot of suburban and urban dwelling people also enjoy it, it's gradually moved away from the "farming advice" angle towards being more of a classic soap opera that happens to be in a rural setting. However, the show still has an "agricultural advisor" on staff to make sure they plough a straight furrow.

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* Inverted by ''Radio/TheArchers'', a long running BBC radio SoapOpera which was set up to [[{{Edutainment}} both entertain and advise]] farmers themselves, and they don't hesitate to write in and complain about the slightest mistake. As a lot of suburban and urban dwelling people also enjoy it, it's gradually moved away from the "farming advice" angle towards being more of a classic soap opera that happens to be in a rural setting. However, the show still has an "agricultural advisor" on staff to make sure they plough a straight furrow.

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* Hugely subverted in the late SovietUnion. When the Soviet authorities started to allot the general city population small plots of land for hobby farming (and small means '''''small''''' — they were usually 600 square meters, or about 0.15 acre), the city population, armed by the hundreds of tomes on modern agriculture, a desire to escape the dreary boredom and horrible quality of official produce and general interest, took to the farming with such gusto that within a decade the (unofficial) output of these plots begun to outstrip the output of the official, state-managed agriculture in some areas, especially vegetable production, despite most of these people having a day job and tending their suburban plots only on weekends. It spells volumes on the inefficiency of the official Soviet agriculture, but also about the intensity with which these {{City Mouse}}s cultivated their land.
* Many settlers of Canada (and other American countries) experienced this trope first hand. As Susannah Moodie describes it in her RealLife account in ''Roughing it in the Bush'': "[Folders advertising colonial farming] told of lands yielding forty bushels to the acre, but they said nothing of the years when these lands, with the most careful cultivation, would barely return fifteen; when rust and smut, engendered by the vicinity of damp over-hanging woods, would blast the fruits of the poor emigrant's labour, and almost deprive him of bread. They talked of log houses to be raised in a single day, by the generous exertions of friends and neighbours, but they never ventured upon a picture of the disgusting scenes of riot and low debauchery exhibited during the raising, or upon a description of the dwellings when raised–dens of dirt and misery, which would, in many instances, be shamed by an English pig-sty. The necessaries of life were described as inestimably cheap; but they forgot to add that in remote bush settlements, often twenty miles from a market town, and some of them even that distance from the nearest dwelling, the necessaries of life, which would be deemed indispensable to the European, could not be procured at all, or, if obtained, could only be so by sending a man and team through a blazed forest road,–a process far too expensive for frequent repetition."

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* Hugely subverted in the late SovietUnion. When the Soviet authorities started to allot the general city population small plots of land for hobby farming (and small means '''''small''''' -- they were usually 600 square meters, or about 0.15 acre), the city population, armed by the hundreds of tomes on modern agriculture, a desire to escape the dreary boredom and horrible quality of official produce and general interest, took to the farming with such gusto that within a decade the (unofficial) output of these plots begun to outstrip the output of the official, state-managed agriculture in some areas, especially vegetable production, despite most of these people having a day job and tending their suburban plots only on weekends. It spells volumes on the inefficiency of the official Soviet agriculture, but also about the intensity with which these {{City Mouse}}s cultivated their land.
* Many settlers of Canada (and other American countries) experienced this trope first hand. As Susannah Moodie describes it in her RealLife account in ''Roughing it in the Bush'': "[Folders advertising colonial farming] told of lands yielding forty bushels to the acre, but they said nothing of the years when these lands, with the most careful cultivation, would barely return fifteen; when rust and smut, engendered by the vicinity of damp over-hanging woods, would blast the fruits of the poor emigrant's labour, and almost deprive him of bread. They talked of log houses to be raised in a single day, by the generous exertions of friends and neighbours, but they never ventured upon a picture of the disgusting scenes of riot and low debauchery exhibited during the raising, or upon a description of the dwellings when raised–dens raised--dens of dirt and misery, which would, in many instances, be shamed by an English pig-sty. The necessaries of life were described as inestimably cheap; but they forgot to add that in remote bush settlements, often twenty miles from a market town, and some of them even that distance from the nearest dwelling, the necessaries of life, which would be deemed indispensable to the European, could not be procured at all, or, if obtained, could only be so by sending a man and team through a blazed forest road,–a road,--a process far too expensive for frequent repetition."
"

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26th Aug '16 2:00:17 PM Doodler
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* While it's mainly baking with farming on the side, King Roland from ''WesternAnimation/SofiaTheFirst'' believes this, so much that when he accidentally wishes that he was a baker instead of a king he wants to stay for a while rather than undo the spell. RealityEnsues and the family fails to adapt, with them only getting by because Sofia and her mother have actual farming experience.
29th May '16 11:00:32 PM OnTheHillside
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* Jim Jones's Jonestown: the cult leader tried to create his own self-sufficient village where everyone worked in the fields and could get everything they needed by farming. Though the villagers actually did very well for themselves when sent on ahead to do this alone (the food was plentiful and delicious), they still faced shortages, fertile soil washing away in the rain, and once lost some of their harvest in a storm. And eventually, a depraved cult leader hoarding what crops they ''did'' produce.

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* Jim Jones's Jonestown: the cult leader tried to create his own self-sufficient village where everyone worked in the fields and could get everything they needed by farming. Though the villagers actually did very well for themselves when sent on ahead to do this alone (the food was plentiful and delicious), they still faced shortages, fertile soil washing away in the rain, and once lost some of their harvest in a storm. And eventually, a depraved cult leader hoarding what crops they ''did'' successfully produce.
29th May '16 11:00:11 PM OnTheHillside
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* Jim Jones's Jonestown: the cult leader tried to create his own self sufficient village, where everyone worked in the fields, and could get everything they needed by farming. But the village faced shortages and the once lost some of their harvest in a storm. Which show how really hard this can be.

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* Jim Jones's Jonestown: the cult leader tried to create his own self sufficient village, self-sufficient village where everyone worked in the fields, fields and could get everything they needed by farming. But Though the village villagers actually did very well for themselves when sent on ahead to do this alone (the food was plentiful and delicious), they still faced shortages shortages, fertile soil washing away in the rain, and the once lost some of their harvest in a storm. Which show how really hard this can be.And eventually, a depraved cult leader hoarding what crops they ''did'' produce.
29th May '16 5:39:24 AM Redmess
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This misconception of farming shows up fairly often in fiction -- more as a result of [[CityMouse Having No Experience.]]

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This misconception of farming shows up fairly often in fiction -- more usually as a result of [[CityMouse Having No Experience.]]
a character (or the writer) being a CityMouse.
11th May '16 9:07:24 AM JackG
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* At the end of ''Film/TheOmegaMan'' after the [[LuddWasRight last scientist]] has died, the survivors leave the city for an implied idyllic life in the country.

to:

* At the end of ''Film/TheOmegaMan'' after the [[LuddWasRight last scientist]] scientist on Earth]] has died, the survivors leave the city for an implied idyllic life in the country.
11th May '16 9:06:59 AM JackG
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* At the end of ''Film/TheOmegaMan'' after the [[LuddWasRight last scientist]] has died, the survivors leave the city for an implied idyllic life in the country.
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