History Main / TheScottishTrope

14th Jan '18 10:37:50 PM gemnayal
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* {{Bears|AreBadNews}}. The Proto-Indo-European word for "bear" was *hrtkós, which became ''ursus'' in Latin, ''arktos'' in Greek and ''rkṣah'' in Sanskrit. But Indo-European peoples who lived closer to bears feared that if you said ''*hrtkós'', a ''*hrtkós'' would hear you; so in the Germanic languages, they were called "brown ones" (*beron, thus German ''Bär'', English ''bear''[[labelnote:*]]or maybe from Proto-Indo-European *ǵʰwer- ("wild animal"), a better-attested root overall[[/labelnote]]); in the Slavic languages, "honey-eaters" (Russian ''medved''); in the Celtic world, "honey pigs" or even "good calves"; in Lithuania, "lickers." And the Proto-Indo-European word might have been a euphemism, too[[labelnote:*]]possibly meaning "[[NamesToRunAwayFromReallyFast the destroyer]]"[[/labelnote]]...

to:

* {{Bears|AreBadNews}}. The Proto-Indo-European word for "bear" was *hrtkós, ''h₂ŕ̥tḱos'', which became ''ursus'' in Latin, ''arktos'' in Greek and ''rkṣah'' in Sanskrit. But Indo-European peoples who lived closer to bears feared that if you said ''*hrtkós'', ''h₂ŕ̥tḱos'', a ''*hrtkós'' ''h₂ŕ̥tḱos'' would hear you; so in the Germanic languages, they were called "brown ones" (*beron, thus German ''Bär'', English ''bear''[[labelnote:*]]or maybe from Proto-Indo-European *ǵʰwer- ("wild animal"), a better-attested root overall[[/labelnote]]); in the Slavic languages, "honey-eaters" (Russian ''medved''); in the Celtic world, "honey pigs" or even "good calves"; in Lithuania, "lickers." And the Proto-Indo-European word might have been a euphemism, too[[labelnote:*]]possibly meaning "[[NamesToRunAwayFromReallyFast the destroyer]]"[[/labelnote]]...
14th Jan '18 10:35:12 PM gemnayal
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* {{Bears|AreBadNews}}. The Proto-Indo-European word for "bear" was *rkto, which became ''ursus'' in Latin, ''arktos'' in Greek. But Indo-European peoples who lived closer to bears feared that if you said '*rkto', an *rkto would hear you; so in the Germanic languages, they were called "brown ones" (*beron, thus German ''Bär'', English ''bear''[[labelnote:*]]or maybe from Proto-Indo-European *ǵʰwer- ("wild animal"), a better-attested root overall[[/labelnote]]); in the Slavic languages, "honey-eaters" (Russian ''medved''); in the Celtic world, "honey pigs" or even "good calves"; in Lithuania, "lickers." And the Proto-Indo-European word might have been a euphemism, too...

to:

* {{Bears|AreBadNews}}. The Proto-Indo-European word for "bear" was *rkto, *hrtkós, which became ''ursus'' in Latin, ''arktos'' in Greek. Greek and ''rkṣah'' in Sanskrit. But Indo-European peoples who lived closer to bears feared that if you said '*rkto', an *rkto ''*hrtkós'', a ''*hrtkós'' would hear you; so in the Germanic languages, they were called "brown ones" (*beron, thus German ''Bär'', English ''bear''[[labelnote:*]]or maybe from Proto-Indo-European *ǵʰwer- ("wild animal"), a better-attested root overall[[/labelnote]]); in the Slavic languages, "honey-eaters" (Russian ''medved''); in the Celtic world, "honey pigs" or even "good calves"; in Lithuania, "lickers." And the Proto-Indo-European word might have been a euphemism, too...too[[labelnote:*]]possibly meaning "[[NamesToRunAwayFromReallyFast the destroyer]]"[[/labelnote]]...
5th Jan '18 9:54:08 PM Vir
Is there an issue? Send a Message


** In the "Between The Pines" special, Time Baby tries to invoke this for Bill, but Alex Hirsche ignores him;

to:

** In the "Between The Pines" special, Time Baby tries to invoke this for Bill, but Alex Hirsche Hirsch ignores him;



'''Alex Hirsche:''' Bill…\\

to:

'''Alex Hirsche:''' Hirsch:''' Bill…\\
24th Dec '17 4:27:55 PM nombretomado
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* The Scandal That Shall Not Be Named, as it's only ever euphemistically referred to around here, if at all, [[RuleOfCautiousEditingJudgment and for good reason]], has had this effect on [[Wiki/TVTropes This Very Wiki]]. It even got to the point where the very mention of its ''name'' caused an ExampleSectionectomy.[[note]]Specifically, {{Scandalgate}} became restricted to InUniverseExamplesOnly when an EditWar over a certain example there [[MinorCrimeRevealsMajorPlot turned up some serious]] TropeDecay.[[/note]]

to:

* The Scandal That Shall Not Be Named, as it's only ever euphemistically referred to around here, if at all, [[RuleOfCautiousEditingJudgment and for good reason]], has had this effect on [[Wiki/TVTropes This Very Wiki]]. It even got to the point where the very mention of its ''name'' caused an ExampleSectionectomy.Administrivia/ExampleSectionectomy.[[note]]Specifically, {{Scandalgate}} became restricted to InUniverseExamplesOnly when an EditWar over a certain example there [[MinorCrimeRevealsMajorPlot turned up some serious]] TropeDecay.[[/note]]
1st Nov '17 6:03:23 PM Jhonny
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

* Some politicians have an annoying habit of not mentioning the name of their opponent, saying "my opponent", "the other side", "certain parties" and so on instead of "Mister X" or "Senator Y". It can get particularly bizarre in three-way races or parliamentary systems where it becomes increasingly unclear just who is being smeared right now.
31st Oct '17 4:10:44 PM KingClark
Is there an issue? Send a Message


** DoubleSubversion in ''Theatre/{{Hamilton}}''. In the song "Take A Break," Hamilton quotes Macbeth, then sings "I trust you'll understand the reference to another Scottish tragedy without me having to name the play." [[TemptingFate He then immediately refers to himself as Macbeth]]. As many fans have pointed out, after this song, everything in Hamilton's life goes to shit. [[spoiler: Hamilton cheats on his wife, is blackmailed for years by both his lover's husband and then by Jefferson & Madison, loses his job when Washington leaves office, is the subject of a sex scandal when his affair is leaked ([[WhatAnIdiot in a document that he wrote and published, permanently wrecking his prospects]], being estranged from his wife, having his son killed in a duel in his honor, and ultimately being killed in a duel himself.]]

to:

** DoubleSubversion in ''Theatre/{{Hamilton}}''. In the song "Take A Break," Hamilton quotes Macbeth, then sings "I trust you'll understand the reference to another Scottish tragedy without me having to name the play." [[TemptingFate He then immediately refers to himself as Macbeth]]. As many fans have pointed out, after this song, everything in Hamilton's life goes to shit. [[spoiler: Hamilton [[spoiler:Hamilton cheats on his wife, is blackmailed for years by both his lover's husband and then by Jefferson & Madison, loses his job when Washington leaves office, is the subject of a sex scandal when his affair is leaked ([[WhatAnIdiot in (in a document that he wrote and published, published to clear his name of a different crime), permanently wrecking his prospects]], prospects of becoming President, being estranged from his wife, having his son killed in a duel in his honor, and ultimately being killed in a duel himself.]]
25th Oct '17 10:58:16 AM VanHohenheimOfXerxes
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* If two factions each refer to something by a different name, using either name is often tantamount to "picking a side," which can and will start a FlameWar. For example, should you refer to UsefulNotes/ThatSoutheastAsianCountry as ''Burma'' or ''Myanmar''? And regarding UsefulNotes/TheTroubles, should you refer to "Stroke City" in UsefulNotes/NorthernIreland as ''Derry'' or ''Londonderry''?

to:

* If two factions each refer to something by a different name, using either name is often tantamount to "picking a side," side" -- which can and will start a FlameWar. For example, should you refer to UsefulNotes/ThatSoutheastAsianCountry as ''Burma'' or ''Myanmar''? And regarding UsefulNotes/TheTroubles, should you refer to "Stroke City" in UsefulNotes/NorthernIreland as ''Derry'' or ''Londonderry''?
17th Sep '17 12:06:26 AM Azaram
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

** Happens in Tech Support as well. It's the Unmentionable Law; if you talk about it, if it's good it goes away, if it's bad, it happens. There's also a dash of He Who Shall Not Be Named; there's usually one or more Known Problems that will appear if you speak the name.
11th Sep '17 12:57:18 AM PaulA
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* Robert W. Chambers' ''Literature/TheKingInYellow'', a major inspiration for Creator/HPLovecraft that was eventually absorbed into his mythos, was all about this. There's a reason the King's name, which is probably [[spoiler:Hastur]], is rarely used, and [[BrownNote a reason]] that the play about him has never been produced. The word "Hastur" is used freely in Chambers' short stories -- in one it's the name of a quite human servant! The idea that it shouldn't be spoken out loud is later MemeticMutation caused by August Derleth's creative interpretations. Even the protagonist of [[Creator/HPLovecraft Lovecraft's]] ''Whisper in Darkness'' didn't see a need to avoid mentioning the word. Incidentally, the word's exact meaning is left deliberately unclear in most contexts, and may just as well refer to a place as to an entity.
** Speaking of H.P. Lovecraft, there's one deity that is so hated and horrible, that even [[Franchise/CthulhuMythos C'Thulhu]] and his followers fear even the writing of his name! Mentioning his name, or even thinking of it correctly, is enough to summon this freak who will fulfill your {{squick}}iest desires in exchange for complete servitude. His name is [[spoiler:Y'golonac]].

to:

* Creator/HPLovecraft's Franchise/CthulhuMythos:
**
Robert W. Chambers' ''Literature/TheKingInYellow'', a major inspiration for Creator/HPLovecraft that was eventually absorbed into his mythos, was all about this. There's a reason the King's name, which is probably [[spoiler:Hastur]], is rarely used, and [[BrownNote a reason]] that the play about him has never been produced. The produced.
** In Mythos works by Creator/AugustDerleth, the King in Yellow's name is said to be [[spoiler:Hastur]], and speaking it out loud risks summoning an EldritchAbomination. However, the
word "Hastur" is used freely in Chambers' short stories -- in one it's the name of a quite human servant! The idea that it shouldn't be spoken out loud is later MemeticMutation caused by August Derleth's creative interpretations. Even the protagonist of [[Creator/HPLovecraft Lovecraft's]] ''Whisper in Darkness'' Lovecraft's "Literature/TheWhispererInDarkness" didn't see a need to avoid mentioning the word. Incidentally, the word's exact meaning is left deliberately unclear in most contexts, and may just as well refer to a place as to an entity.
** Speaking of H.P. Lovecraft, According to Ramsey Campbell's Mythos story "Cold Print", there's one deity that is so hated and horrible, that even [[Franchise/CthulhuMythos C'Thulhu]] C'Thulhu and his followers fear even the writing of his name! Mentioning his name, or even thinking of it correctly, is enough to summon this freak who will fulfill your {{squick}}iest desires in exchange for complete servitude. His name is [[spoiler:Y'golonac]].
10th Sep '17 4:07:03 PM jamespolk
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

* ''Film/TheDresser'': When an addled Sir quotes from ''Theatre/{{Macbeth}}'' Norman freaks out, yelping "You've quoted from the Scottish tragedy!" He makes Sir do some dumb ritual where Sir has to leave the dressing room, turn around three times, and knock to gain re-entry.
This list shows the last 10 events of 526. Show all.
http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Main.TheScottishTrope