History Main / ThePoliticalOfficer

27th May '17 2:09:29 PM nombretomado
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** Catachans, being fiercely independent badass jungle fighter Ramboes, used to have a special rule ("Oops, sorry sir!") in which if a commissar is attached to them, you must roll before the game starts to find out whether or not he suffered an "unfortunate accident". Being based off of VietnamWar soldiers, [[TruthInTelevision such incident were commonplace]]. If you're an American officer and your soldiers don't like you, you ought to be prepared to get [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fragging fragged]]. Considering that most of them were drafted, they had low morale and didn't like their authority, i.e. you.

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** Catachans, being fiercely independent badass jungle fighter Ramboes, used to have a special rule ("Oops, sorry sir!") in which if a commissar is attached to them, you must roll before the game starts to find out whether or not he suffered an "unfortunate accident". Being based off of VietnamWar UsefulNotes/VietnamWar soldiers, [[TruthInTelevision such incident were commonplace]]. If you're an American officer and your soldiers don't like you, you ought to be prepared to get [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fragging fragged]]. Considering that most of them were drafted, they had low morale and didn't like their authority, i.e. you.
19th May '17 7:12:04 AM Kakai
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Added DiffLines:

* In ''Literature/TheMachineriesOfEmpire'', every Hexarchate moth has a Doctrine officer (or at least had in Jedao's times) to make sure there's no heresy brewing among the crew.
20th Apr '17 8:17:06 PM RoninMacbeth
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* The [[RedOctober Civil War-era]] Red Army is the Trope Codifier for these guys. They also played a large role early during WWII, only to be deactivated in 1942 when a reliable structure of regular commanding officers was finally established. Later the guys were renamed "zampolits" (political assistants) or "politruks" (political guides) and became little more than advisors to commanding officers and lectors on Communism among soldiers[[note]]Although one on the submarine B-59 did prevent his captain from turning the Cuban Missile Crisis into World War III[[/note]]. After TheGreatPoliticsMessUp, they were further nerfed and now are known as "educator officers", completely depoliticized and acting more like army psychologists than anything else.

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* The [[RedOctober Civil War-era]] Red Army is the Trope Codifier for these guys. They also played a large role early during WWII, only to be deactivated in 1942 when a reliable structure of regular commanding officers was finally established. Later the guys were renamed "zampolits" (political assistants) or "politruks" (political guides) and became little more than advisors to commanding officers and lectors on Communism among soldiers[[note]]Although one on the submarine B-59 did prevent his captain from turning the Cuban Missile Crisis into World War III[[/note]].soldiers. After TheGreatPoliticsMessUp, they were further nerfed and now are known as "educator officers", completely depoliticized and acting more like army psychologists than anything else.
19th Mar '17 5:12:58 PM Doug86
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** The terminology, unsurprisingly, is less confusing in Russian than English (seeing how that was the actual language of the USSR): a (People's) Commissariat was originally an organizational level of government, the same as "Ministry" which it replaced (due the popular connection with the ministries of the failed Russian Imperial government), or "Departments" in America. Since English-speakers can live with multiple meanings for both words ("Ministry" also means "Church" in many English-speaking locales), so too can Eurasians: a Military Commissariat was a Military ''Department'' charged with local recruitment. What the English-world calls "Commissars" are field officers; actual "Commissars" who used the title were the likes of Leon Trotsky, People's Commissar for War (War Minister). After the war, People's Commissariats became Ministries, and their heads became Ministers--since high-level bureaucrats [[WArhammer40000 aren't as interesting]], in English the ancillary meaning of the term has stuck.

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** The terminology, unsurprisingly, is less confusing in Russian than English (seeing how that was the actual language of the USSR): a (People's) Commissariat was originally an organizational level of government, the same as "Ministry" which it replaced (due the popular connection with the ministries of the failed Russian Imperial government), or "Departments" in America. Since English-speakers can live with multiple meanings for both words ("Ministry" also means "Church" in many English-speaking locales), so too can Eurasians: a Military Commissariat was a Military ''Department'' charged with local recruitment. What the English-world calls "Commissars" are field officers; actual "Commissars" who used the title were the likes of Leon Trotsky, People's Commissar for War (War Minister). After the war, People's Commissariats became Ministries, and their heads became Ministers--since high-level bureaucrats [[WArhammer40000 [[TabletopGame/Warhammer40000 aren't as interesting]], in English the ancillary meaning of the term has stuck.
12th Mar '17 6:28:13 AM Wuz
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* ''[[Literature/ThreeBodyProblem The Dark Forest]]'', by Cixin Liu, includes a rare example of a heroic political officer who actually accomplishes things by being good at being a political officer.

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* ''[[Literature/ThreeBodyProblem ''[[Literature/TheThreeBodyProblem The Dark Forest]]'', by Cixin Liu, includes a rare example of a heroic political officer who actually accomplishes things by being good at being a political officer.
3rd Feb '17 6:32:09 PM Meritocrat
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* The [[RedOctober Civil War-era]] Red Army is the Trope Codifier for these guys. They also played a large role early during WWII, only to be deactivated in 1942 when a reliable structure of regular commanding officers was finally established. Later the guys were renamed "zampolits" (political assistants) or "politruks" (political guides) and became little more than advisors to commanding officers and lectors on Communism among soldiers. After TheGreatPoliticsMessUp, they were further nerfed and now are known as "educator officers", completely depoliticized and acting more like army psychologists than anything else.

to:

* The [[RedOctober Civil War-era]] Red Army is the Trope Codifier for these guys. They also played a large role early during WWII, only to be deactivated in 1942 when a reliable structure of regular commanding officers was finally established. Later the guys were renamed "zampolits" (political assistants) or "politruks" (political guides) and became little more than advisors to commanding officers and lectors on Communism among soldiers.soldiers[[note]]Although one on the submarine B-59 did prevent his captain from turning the Cuban Missile Crisis into World War III[[/note]]. After TheGreatPoliticsMessUp, they were further nerfed and now are known as "educator officers", completely depoliticized and acting more like army psychologists than anything else.



* While the Soviet Union is the most obvious example, it was not the only modern dictatorship (communist or otherwise) to use political officers. Ironically enough, the Nazis established their own variant as the [[WorldWarII war]] went on and gave them increasing amounts of power over time, although they still never became as common or as powerful as their Soviet counterparts sometimes did. Maoist China, Communist Vietnam and their Vietcong counterparts, Republican Spain during the Spanish Civil War, Saddam's Iraq, and theocratic Iran also had their own variants, as did many others.

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* While the Soviet Union is the most obvious example, it was not the only modern dictatorship (communist or otherwise) to use political officers. Ironically enough, the Nazis established their own variant as the [[WorldWarII war]] went on and gave them increasing amounts of power over time, although they still never became as common or as powerful as their Soviet counterparts sometimes did. Maoist China, Communist Vietnam and their Vietcong counterparts, Republican Spain during the Spanish Civil War, and, Saddam's Iraq, and theocratic Iran Iraq also had their own variants, as did many others.
15th Jan '17 8:27:06 PM general_tiu
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* While the Soviet Union is the most obvious example, it was not the only modern dictatorship (communist or otherwise) to use political officers. Ironically enough, the Nazis established their own variant as the [[WorldWarII war]] went on and gave them increasing amounts of power over time, although they still never became as common or as powerful as their Soviet counterparts sometimes did. Maoist China, Communist Vietnam and their Vietcong counterparts, Republican Spain during the Spansih Civil War, Saddam's Iraq, and theocratic Iran also had their own variants, as did many others.
** NorthKorea uses their Political Officer corps as an efficient way to get the sons of high-ranking officials into prestigious and cushy but ultimately harmless positions so that the actually commanding is left to people with talent.

to:

* While the Soviet Union is the most obvious example, it was not the only modern dictatorship (communist or otherwise) to use political officers. Ironically enough, the Nazis established their own variant as the [[WorldWarII war]] went on and gave them increasing amounts of power over time, although they still never became as common or as powerful as their Soviet counterparts sometimes did. Maoist China, Communist Vietnam and their Vietcong counterparts, Republican Spain during the Spansih Spanish Civil War, Saddam's Iraq, and theocratic Iran also had their own variants, as did many others.
** NorthKorea UsefulNotees/NorthKorea for example uses their Political Officer corps corps, besides their typical job in a Communist army, as an efficient way to get the sons of high-ranking officials into prestigious and cushy but ultimately harmless positions so that the actually commanding actual command is left to for people with talent.
15th Jan '17 8:24:07 PM general_tiu
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* While the Soviet Union is the most obvious example, it was not the only modern dictatorship (communist or otherwise) to use political officers. Ironically enough, the Nazis established their own variant as the [[WorldWarII war]] went on and gave them increasing amounts of power over time, although they still never became as common or as powerful as their Soviet counterparts sometimes did. Maoist China, Saddam's Iraq, and theocratic Iran also had their own variants, as did many others.

to:

* While the Soviet Union is the most obvious example, it was not the only modern dictatorship (communist or otherwise) to use political officers. Ironically enough, the Nazis established their own variant as the [[WorldWarII war]] went on and gave them increasing amounts of power over time, although they still never became as common or as powerful as their Soviet counterparts sometimes did. Maoist China, Communist Vietnam and their Vietcong counterparts, Republican Spain during the Spansih Civil War, Saddam's Iraq, and theocratic Iran also had their own variants, as did many others.
30th Nov '16 4:05:24 AM Morgenthaler
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** Most {{Badass}} of them all is Commissar Sebastian J. Yarrick. He lost an arm in battle with an Ork Warboss and retorted by ''decapitating the Warboss'', only "allowing himself the luxury of passing out" after the battle was won. He then had the Warboss's Power Klaw converted into a prosthetic for his own missing arm, powered (presumably) by the sheer badass he radiates. The Orks have immortalized him in fearful legends, believing that he cannot be killed and that a single glance from him brings death. On hearing the latter part of this legend, Yarrick decided that if the Orks believed he had an evil eye, then by the Emperor, he would HAVE an evil eye. He then proceeded to PLUCK OUT HIS OWN EYE AND HAVE IT REPLACED WITH A LASER-SHOOTING BIONIC EYE. The short version? This man makes ''[[BloodKnight Orks]]'' wet themselves.

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** Most {{Badass}} badass of them all is Commissar Sebastian J. Yarrick. He lost an arm in battle with an Ork Warboss and retorted by ''decapitating the Warboss'', only "allowing himself the luxury of passing out" after the battle was won. He then had the Warboss's Power Klaw converted into a prosthetic for his own missing arm, powered (presumably) by the sheer badass he radiates. The Orks have immortalized him in fearful legends, believing that he cannot be killed and that a single glance from him brings death. On hearing the latter part of this legend, Yarrick decided that if the Orks believed he had an evil eye, then by the Emperor, he would HAVE an evil eye. He then proceeded to PLUCK OUT HIS OWN EYE AND HAVE IT REPLACED WITH A LASER-SHOOTING BIONIC EYE. The short version? This man makes ''[[BloodKnight Orks]]'' wet themselves.
22nd Nov '16 7:09:47 PM PaulA
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* In ''[[Literature/ChildeCycle Dorsai!]]'', the Friendlies have "Conscience Guardians" who seek out heresy among their troops. Interestingly enough, the Guardians authority is only over their Chruch members and not foreign mercenaries. In addition, they keep their forces from bickering with each other over issues of religious doctrine, preventing tensions within their army.

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* In ''[[Literature/ChildeCycle Dorsai!]]'', ''Literature/{{Dorsai}}'', the Friendlies have "Conscience Guardians" who seek out heresy among their troops. Interestingly enough, the Guardians Guardians' authority is only over their Chruch Church members and not foreign mercenaries. In addition, they keep their forces from bickering with each other over issues of religious doctrine, preventing tensions within their army.
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