History Main / TheGoodOldBritishComp

19th Sep '15 3:23:56 PM HowlingSnail
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Comprehensive schools were set up in the 1960s by the UsefulNotes/HaroldWilson government, replacing the old system of Grammars and Secondary Moderns (where you went and a lot of your future depended on the dreaded 11 plus exams -- this system still prevails in Northern Ireland and small parts of England, and a variation on it can be seen in the ''Franchise/HarryPotter'' books and movies).
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Comprehensive schools schools, now generally just called "Secondary Schools", were set up in the 1960s by the UsefulNotes/HaroldWilson government, replacing the old system of Grammars and Secondary Moderns (where you went and a lot of your future depended on the dreaded 11 plus exams -- this system still prevails in Northern Ireland and small parts of England, and a variation on it can be seen in the ''Franchise/HarryPotter'' books and movies).

British school pupils in almost all cases are required to wear school uniform and you can spot a troublemaker from a mile off by the fact that he or she [[CustomUniform isn't wearing it properly]] (skirt too short, tie askew, top button undone). It is of note that in some schools, not wearing one's uniform correctly has encroached en masse, to the extent that very few pupils wear the entire uniform correctly. They generally include a white shirt, tie, dark bottoms (trousers or skirts) and smart dark shoes.
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British school pupils in almost all cases are required to wear school uniform and you can spot a troublemaker from a mile off by the fact that he or she [[CustomUniform isn't wearing it properly]] (skirt too short, tie askew, top button undone). It is of note that in some schools, not wearing one's uniform correctly has encroached en masse, to the extent that very few pupils wear the entire uniform correctly. They generally include a white shirt, tie, dark bottoms (trousers or skirts) and skirts), smart dark shoes. shoes and, quite often, a blazer.

Gangs are common, both of the good ("let's have a jape") and bad ("let's nick the smart kid's lunch money") variety. Kids in TV schools display a far greater degree of coordination on their own than one ever saw in real life. The teachers have to be called "miss" or "sir" (a policy that only actually happens in some schools) and are generally highly strict. Whatever you do, don't annoy the Head Teacher.
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Gangs are common, both of the good ("let's have a jape") and bad ("let's nick the smart kid's lunch dinner money") variety.variety, although most schools now have electronic payment for school dinners, so it's more "steal their dinner card/finger print". Kids in TV schools display a far greater degree of coordination on their own than one ever saw in real life. The teachers have to be called "miss" "Miss" or "sir" "Sir" (a policy that only actually happens in some schools) and are generally highly strict. Whatever you do, don't annoy the Head Teacher.

Scottish state schools aren't called comprehensives; typical terms are "high school", "academy" or "secondary school". There are a wide range of other differences, but none of them are relevant to the trope, except that uniforms seem to be more optional.
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Scottish state schools aren't called comprehensives; typical terms are "high school", "academy" or "secondary school". There are a wide range of other differences, differences between English and Scottish schools, but none of them are relevant to the trope, except that uniforms seem to be more optional.
11th Sep '15 10:15:42 AM Kitchen90
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Scottish state schools aren't called comprehensives; typical terms are "high school" "academy" or "secondary school". There are a wide range of other differences, but none of them are relevant to the trope, except that uniforms seem to be more optional.
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Scottish state schools aren't called comprehensives; typical terms are "high school" school", "academy" or "secondary school". There are a wide range of other differences, but none of them are relevant to the trope, except that uniforms seem to be more optional.

* [[Film/CarryOn Carry On Teacher]]
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* [[Film/CarryOn Carry On Teacher]]Film/CarryOnTeacher, even though the school is a secondary-modern.
9th Jul '15 9:51:02 AM DaibhidC
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* ''Literature/TheSecretDiaryOfAdrianMole'' went to one in the earlier books and many of his problems, especially in the first book, occur here, such as his dealings with [[TheBully Barry Kent]] and Headmaster Reginald "Popeye" Scruton. The sterotypical depiction is lampshaded when [[{{Eagleland}} Hamish Mancini]] visits the school and is disappointed that canings have been done away with.
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* ''Literature/TheSecretDiaryOfAdrianMole'' ''Literature/AdrianMole'' went to one in the earlier books and many of his problems, especially in the first book, occur here, such as his dealings with [[TheBully Barry Kent]] and Headmaster Reginald "Popeye" Scruton. The sterotypical depiction is lampshaded when [[{{Eagleland}} Hamish Mancini]] visits the school and is disappointed that canings have been done away with.
21st May '15 1:24:07 PM CaptainCrawdad
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* Immortalised in song by Music/{{Madness}} in ''Baggy Trousers'' from ''Music/{{Absolutely}}'' --> ''Lots of girls and lots of boys/ lots of smells and lots of noise.'' ** Interestingly, written partly as a reaction to 'Another Brick in the Wall'- the slightly younger, working class members of Madness didn't entirely relate to [[BoardingSchoolOfHorrors that image of school]] - their own education had been slightly more relaxed, and they were aware that the teachers were making do as best they could with their situation as much as the children.
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* Immortalised in song by Music/{{Madness}} in ''Baggy Trousers'' "Baggy Trousers" from ''Music/{{Absolutely}}'' --> ''Lots of girls and lots of boys/ lots of smells and lots of noise.'' ** '' Interestingly, written partly as a reaction to 'Another Brick in the Wall'- the slightly younger, working class members of Madness didn't entirely relate to [[BoardingSchoolOfHorrors that image of school]] - their own education had been slightly more relaxed, and they were aware that the teachers were making do as best they could with their situation as much as the children.

** And for that matter, the free fan-made sequel for the PC called ''Klass of 99.''
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** And for that matter, the free fan-made sequel for the PC called ''Klass of 99.''
21st May '15 1:22:21 PM CaptainCrawdad
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These troublemakers also like to smoke behind the bike sheds, where romance also takes place. (Presumably, the smoke obscures said romance.) (These days smoking in the Staff Room is illegal, so pupils and teachers both disappear behind the bike sheds where they carefully ignore each other)
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These troublemakers also like to smoke behind the bike sheds, where romance also takes place. (Presumably, the smoke obscures said the romance.) (These These days smoking in the Staff Room is illegal, so pupils and teachers both disappear behind the bike sheds where they carefully ignore each other) other.
11th May '15 4:00:10 AM SeptimusHeap
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* ''WaterlooRoad'' * ''TheBootStreetBand''
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* ''WaterlooRoad'' ''Series/WaterlooRoad'' * ''TheBootStreetBand''''Series/TheBootStreetBand''

* ''{{Teachers}}'' * ''{{The Inbetweeners}}'' is the single best, most realistic depiction of British school life ever seen. Of particular note is how up-to-date the insults are (bellend and dickwad are particularly popular) and how they don't shy away from having kids swearing, watching porn and going on and on about sex (you know, as actual secondary schoolers and 6th formers actually do).
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* ''{{Teachers}}'' ''Series/{{Teachers}}'' * ''{{The ''Series/{{The Inbetweeners}}'' is the single best, most realistic depiction of British school life ever seen. Of particular note is how up-to-date the insults are (bellend and dickwad are particularly popular) and how they don't shy away from having kids swearing, watching porn and going on and on about sex (you know, as actual secondary schoolers and 6th formers actually do).
12th Mar '15 7:04:16 AM MPCaton
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* ''Theatre/TheHistoryBoys''
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* ''Theatre/TheHistoryBoys'' ''Theatre/TheHistoryBoys'' - though not a comprehensive (they go to grammar school), all the characters are working class and explicitly underdogs in their applications to Oxford.
2nd Mar '15 4:49:02 PM 493251gen
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** This can be split down to 1978-1989 or thereabouts - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BE7gAEsI0XY is the Tucker/Gripper/Ro-land era ** and younger viewers remember http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0E8AZ8bsdOY from 1990 onwards.
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** This can be split down to 1978-1989 or thereabouts - http://www.[[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BE7gAEsI0XY this]] is the Tucker/Gripper/Ro-land era era. ** and And younger viewers remember http://www.[[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0E8AZ8bsdOY this]] from 1990 onwards.
31st Jan '15 2:10:09 PM talltalltree
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* [[BritishComics British girls' comic]] ''Bunty'' had a long-running strip called ''The Comp'' about this type of school. The comic's flagship story, ''The Four Marys'', was set in an exclusive boarding school for girls; so ''The Comp'' was introduced as a more modern counterpart in an effort to represent the kind of school that readers might actually attend.
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* [[BritishComics British girls' comic]] ''Bunty'' had a long-running strip called ''The Comp'' about this type of school. The comic's flagship story, ''The Four Marys'', was set in an exclusive boarding school for girls; girls and had run since the magazine began in the 1950s; so ''The Comp'' was introduced as a more modern counterpart in an effort to represent the kind of school that readers might actually attend.

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* ''Series/{{Hollyoaks}}'' has several storylines set at the local version, Hollyoaks High (although its focus is on university students.)
23rd Jan '15 2:05:09 PM MarkLungo
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Comprehensive schools were set up in the 1960s by the Wilson government, replacing the old system of Grammars and Secondary Moderns (where you went and a lot of your future depended on the dreaded 11 plus exams -- this system still prevails in Northern Ireland and small parts of England, and a variation on it can be seen in the ''Franchise/HarryPotter'' books and movies).
to:
Comprehensive schools were set up in the 1960s by the Wilson UsefulNotes/HaroldWilson government, replacing the old system of Grammars and Secondary Moderns (where you went and a lot of your future depended on the dreaded 11 plus exams -- this system still prevails in Northern Ireland and small parts of England, and a variation on it can be seen in the ''Franchise/HarryPotter'' books and movies).
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