History Main / TheFarmerAndTheViper

21st Sep '16 7:20:41 PM RuskieRampage
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* Certain refugees which were given asylum in Germany and then went on to commit the Cologne attacks
14th Sep '16 8:25:31 PM PaulA
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* The villain Achilles from Bean's side of the ''Literature/EndersGame'' series has a pathological need to kill anyone who has ever seen him helpless -- including but not limited to a girl who lifted him from low-ranking thug to leader of a prosperous gang, a nun who got him off the streets entirely and enrolled him in a good school, and a doctor who dared use anesthesia to help fix his bad leg.

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* The villain Achilles from Bean's side of the ''Literature/EndersGame'' ''Literature/EndersShadow'' series has a pathological need to kill anyone who has ever seen him helpless -- including but not limited to a girl who lifted him from low-ranking thug to leader of a prosperous gang, a nun who got him off the streets entirely and enrolled him in a good school, and a doctor who dared use anesthesia to help fix his bad leg.
12th Sep '16 8:40:34 AM MacedonianKing
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* {{ComicBook/Deadshot}} references the frog and scorpion version in ''ComicBook/SecretSix'' after apparently betraying the team.

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* {{ComicBook/Deadshot}} references the frog and scorpion version in ''ComicBook/SecretSix'' after apparently betraying the team. [[spoiler: Averted in that he was actually trying to protect the rest of his friends.]]
11th Sep '16 8:16:37 PM PaulA
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* Creator/OrsonScottCard used something similar in his story ''The Princess and the Bear''. Having attempted to [[LoveRedeems redeem]] the EvilPrince, the princess [[spoiler:gives up on him and lets the Bear kill him.]] If this sounds like a FamilyUnfriendlyAesop, it ought to be mentioned that the prince and the princess follow the standard cycle of an abusive relationship.

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* Creator/OrsonScottCard used something similar in his story ''The "The Princess and the Bear''. Bear", collected in ''Literature/MapsInAMirror''. Having attempted to [[LoveRedeems redeem]] the EvilPrince, the princess [[spoiler:gives up on him and lets the Bear kill him.]] him]]. If this sounds like a FamilyUnfriendlyAesop, it ought to be mentioned that the prince and the princess follow the standard cycle of an abusive relationship.
8th Sep '16 5:37:10 PM Kalaong
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* ''[[http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=The_Scorpion_and_the_Frog&oldid=435133677 The Scorpion and the Frog]]'', an ancient African & European fable commonly [[InTheOriginalKlingon misattributed to Aesop]] is equally [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Scorpion_and_the_Frog#Use_in_pop_culture if not more popular]] than the trope namer, but also deals in how evil is ultimately [[BeingEvilSucks unconsciously self-destructive]]. Sometimes the moral is the slightly more digestible.

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* ''[[http://en.''[[https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=The_Scorpion_and_the_Frog&oldid=435133677 org/wiki/The_Scorpion_and_the_Frog The Scorpion and the Frog]]'', an ancient African & European fable commonly [[InTheOriginalKlingon misattributed to Aesop]] is equally [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Scorpion_and_the_Frog#Use_in_pop_culture if not more popular]] than the trope namer, but also deals in how evil is ultimately [[BeingEvilSucks unconsciously self-destructive]]. Sometimes the moral is the slightly more digestible.
30th Aug '16 9:45:47 PM JMQwilleran
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* In ''Ava [=XOX=]'', a children's book targeted towards middle-grade audiences, the main character Ava often reads Aesop's fables and is disturbed by this one, noting that its moral, which seems to be that "no good deed goes unpunished," is actually the opposite of another Aesop's fable, ''The Lion and the Mouse''.
29th Aug '16 10:46:10 AM Nintendoman01
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* It's revealed in ''Literature/{{Animorphs}}'' that a case of this is what turned the Yeerks into the {{Galactic Conqueror}}s they are. On an expedition to the Yeerk homeworld, the Andalite Prince Seerow felt sorry for the Yeerks, who were fully sentient, but limited by the need for their hosts and Kandrona rays. Thus, he gave them access to Andalite technology and taught them writing, science, astronomy, and even how to build their own portable Kandrona generators. The Yeerks thanked Seerow by betraying him, escaping into space, and enslaving multiple races and civilizations to use as host bodies. It's because of this that the Andalites created a law, aptly titled "Seerow's Kindness," that expressly forbade any Andalite from sharing their technology and secrets with non-Andalites.
10th Aug '16 7:14:18 PM themisterfree
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* Somewhat of a literal case in the first episode of ''SwatKats''- a hapless farmer gets devoured by [[BlobMonster the giant bacteria monster]] created by [[MadScientist Dr. Viper]]. In this case, though the death only occurred in shadow, the Creator/{{TBS}} censors found it so horrific they had it cut, leaving an awkward hole in the scene ([[WhatHappenedToTheMouse and raising questions of what happened to the farmer]]) until the 2012 series DVD release when it was restored. (And yet, they didn't do anything to the scene where another bacteria monster devoured an ''entire subway car'' presumably full of hapless commuters.)
8th Aug '16 11:46:35 PM Eagal
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* In addition to the TropeNamer, Creator/{{Aesop}} also told a fabke in which a wolf starts hanging around a shepherd's flock but doesn't seem to be causing any trouble and in fact helps manage the flock. The shepherd then makes the mistake of leaving the flock in the wolf's care, and you can guess how that works out. This is where we get the phrase "once a wolf, always a wolf."

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* In addition to the TropeNamer, Creator/{{Aesop}} also told a fabke fable in which a wolf starts hanging around a shepherd's flock but doesn't seem to be causing any trouble and in fact helps manage the flock. The shepherd then makes the mistake of leaving the flock in the wolf's care, and you can guess how that works out. This is where we get the phrase "once a wolf, always a wolf."
6th Aug '16 9:55:43 AM Fluid
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* In ''Manga/FistOfTheNorthStar'', Jagi's backstory has him almost being killed by Kenshiro, who changes his mind at the last second and spares him. Instead of repenting, it just made Jagi even worse, and he receives no mercy the next time they meet.
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Main.TheFarmerAndTheViper