History Main / TheCoverChangesTheMeaning

2nd Apr '17 3:59:32 PM nombretomado
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** The PetShopBoys' cover completely changed the meaning of the song by ending it with the line "Maybe I didn't love you".

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** The PetShopBoys' Music/PetShopBoys' cover completely changed the meaning of the song by ending it with the line "Maybe I didn't love you".



* "Go West" by Music/VillagePeople: The PetShopBoys' cover turned an idealistic song about San Francisco as a utopia for the gay rights movement into a somewhat sad and nostalgic song about the hopeless optimism of the movement in the aftermath of AIDS. The orchestral instrumentation, allegedly not intentionally based on the Soviet anthem, and the music video also give a nod to an entirely different context: former Soviet citizens having the ability to literally "go West" to freedom after the fall of Communism. This context also has a layer of hopeless optimism.

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* "Go West" by Music/VillagePeople: The PetShopBoys' Music/PetShopBoys' cover turned an idealistic song about San Francisco as a utopia for the gay rights movement into a somewhat sad and nostalgic song about the hopeless optimism of the movement in the aftermath of AIDS. The orchestral instrumentation, allegedly not intentionally based on the Soviet anthem, and the music video also give a nod to an entirely different context: former Soviet citizens having the ability to literally "go West" to freedom after the fall of Communism. This context also has a layer of hopeless optimism.
1st Apr '17 9:00:51 PM DustSnitch
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* ''The Passion Live'' (2016), a JukeboxMusical by Creator/{{Fox}}, changes the meaning of all the songs featured to suit the Passion of {{Jesus}}. Examples include:

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* ''The Passion Live'' (2016), a JukeboxMusical by Creator/{{Fox}}, changes the meaning of all the songs featured to suit the Passion of {{Jesus}}.UsefulNotes/{{Jesus}}. Examples include:
31st Mar '17 12:37:27 AM Luc
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* "Boys of Summer", originally by Don Henley (male) and covered many, many times (most famously by pop-punk band the Ataris) changes the perspective depending on the gender singing, i.e. the female version by DJ Sammy. It's either the male singing he'll still be waiting for the woman after her summer relationships are over or the woman singing she'll return to him once her summer boyfriends leave. All without changing a single word, just the gender of the singer.[[note]]Although, interestingly enough, most covers do change one lyric: "I saw a Deadhead sticker on a Cadillac" gets changed to "A Black Flag sticker on a Cadillac", which amusingly doesn't change the [[SellOut intended meaning]] of the lyric one bit[[/note]]

to:

* "Boys of Summer", originally by Don Henley (male) and covered many, many times (most famously by pop-punk band the Ataris) changes the perspective depending on the gender singing, i.e. the female version by DJ Sammy. It's either the male singing he'll still be waiting for the woman after her summer relationships are over or the woman singing she'll return to him once her summer boyfriends leave. All without changing a single word, just the gender of the singer.[[note]]Although, interestingly enough, most some covers do change one lyric: "I saw a Deadhead sticker on a Cadillac" gets changed to "A Black Flag sticker on a Cadillac", Cadillac" (or some other anti-establishment band), which amusingly doesn't change the [[SellOut intended meaning]] of the lyric one bit[[/note]]
28th Mar '17 11:48:34 AM Ulathon1
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Added DiffLines:

* "25 minutes to go" by Shel Silverstein became a signature song for the Danish singer Poul Dissing in the Sixties. The Danish lyrics are also about the last minutes of a condemned man, however while he was an unrepentant murderer in the original version, a change of two-three verses turned him into a political singer who had run afoul of a Dictator.
15th Mar '17 2:06:23 AM Luc
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** Interestingly, the original version is easily read as treading a middle ground between the two interpretations; the original inspiration is Priscilla Prestley's book "[[Music/ElvisPrestley Elvis And Me]]", which lead the lead singer to believe that Ms. Prestley, in her mind, made Elvis into the equivalent of her own personal version of Jesus Christ. As soon as that context is explained, the disdain in the original is easily viewed as being towards somebody who puts too much faith in somebody who could very well be the wrong person.

to:

** Interestingly, the original version is easily read as treading a middle ground between the two interpretations; the original inspiration is Priscilla Prestley's Presley's book "[[Music/ElvisPrestley "[[Music/ElvisPresley Elvis And Me]]", which lead the lead singer to believe that Ms. Prestley, in her mind, made Elvis into the equivalent of her own personal version of Jesus Christ. As soon as that context is explained, the disdain in the original is easily viewed as being towards somebody who puts too much faith in somebody who could very well be the wrong person.
14th Mar '17 8:36:13 PM Luc
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* "Boys of Summer", originally by Don Henley (male) and covered many, many times (most famously by pop-punk band the Ataris) changes the perspective depending on the gender singing, i.e. the female version by DJ Sammy. It's either the male singing he'll still be waiting for the woman after her summer relationships are over or the woman singing she'll return to him once her summer boyfriends leave. All without changing a single word, just the gender of the singer.

to:

* "Boys of Summer", originally by Don Henley (male) and covered many, many times (most famously by pop-punk band the Ataris) changes the perspective depending on the gender singing, i.e. the female version by DJ Sammy. It's either the male singing he'll still be waiting for the woman after her summer relationships are over or the woman singing she'll return to him once her summer boyfriends leave. All without changing a single word, just the gender of the singer.[[note]]Although, interestingly enough, most covers do change one lyric: "I saw a Deadhead sticker on a Cadillac" gets changed to "A Black Flag sticker on a Cadillac", which amusingly doesn't change the [[SellOut intended meaning]] of the lyric one bit[[/note]]
14th Mar '17 8:29:12 PM Luc
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* "Personal Jesus" by Music/DepecheMode. It was originally inspired by Elvis Presley and sounding like a mocking of religious faith.
** Music/JohnnyCash turned the cynical blast against organised religion into a spiritual song about the power of Christ.

to:

* "Personal Jesus" by Music/DepecheMode. It was originally inspired by Elvis Presley and sounding like Music/DepecheMode.
** Music/{{Marilyn Manson}}'s version is played as
a mocking of religious faith.
straight blast against organized religion.
** Music/JohnnyCash turned the cynical blast against organised religion it into a spiritual song about the power of Christ.


Added DiffLines:

** Interestingly, the original version is easily read as treading a middle ground between the two interpretations; the original inspiration is Priscilla Prestley's book "[[Music/ElvisPrestley Elvis And Me]]", which lead the lead singer to believe that Ms. Prestley, in her mind, made Elvis into the equivalent of her own personal version of Jesus Christ. As soon as that context is explained, the disdain in the original is easily viewed as being towards somebody who puts too much faith in somebody who could very well be the wrong person.
9th Mar '17 5:28:15 PM Pichu-kun
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Added DiffLines:

* "Come Little Children" from ''Film/HocusPocus'' is sung by a witch who is trying to lure children in order to suck their life-forces. A popular [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jW5n3k2VgZE fan-animation]] for ''WesternAnimation/MyLittlePonyFriendshipIsMagic'', ''Children of the Night'', instead changes the meaning so that it's about Princess Luna taking away orphaned foals to a better place in the night, similarly to ''Literature/{{The Pied Piper|OfHamelin}}''.
8th Mar '17 10:37:23 AM AdamC
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* "God Only Knows" by Music/TheBeachBoys was a pretty, lilting song about the singer loving someone else fondly. The cover featured in ''VideoGame/BioshockInfinite'' switches it to a Barbershop Quartet, but retains precisely the same lyrics and for the most part the same mood. However, as the song goes on the tempo gets slower and slower, and the quartet sounds more and more solemn. By the end, where the singers are repeating a drawn out "Without youuuuu," you realize this isn't just about how much you love someone, but how difficult it is to move on when that special person is no longer in your life. [[spoiler: The game plays this over the ending credits, reflecting Elizabeth's sadness over Booker's death.]]

to:

* ** "God Only Knows" by Music/TheBeachBoys was a pretty, lilting song about the singer loving someone else fondly. The cover featured in ''VideoGame/BioshockInfinite'' switches it to a Barbershop Quartet, but retains precisely the same lyrics and for the most part the same mood. However, as the song goes on the tempo gets slower and slower, and the quartet sounds more and more solemn. By the end, where the singers are repeating a drawn out "Without youuuuu," you realize this isn't just about how much you love someone, but how difficult it is to move on when that special person is no longer in your life. [[spoiler: The game plays this over the ending credits, reflecting Elizabeth's sadness over Booker's death.]]
8th Mar '17 10:36:55 AM AdamC
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* "God Only Knows" by Music/TheBeachBoys was a pretty, lilting song about the singer loving someone else fondly. The cover featured in ''VideoGame/BioshockInfinite'' switches it to a Barbershop Quartet, but retains precisely the same lyrics and for the most part the same mood. However, as the song goes on the tempo gets slower and slower, and the quartet sounds more and more solemn. By the end, where the singers are repeating a drawn out "Without youuuuu," you realize this is the kind of music you'd hear at a funeral.


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* The game ''VideoGame/BioshockInfinite'' is set in 1912, but features many songs written much later in history. This is explained a songwriter from Columbia using Tear technology to hear songs being played in other worlds and timelines, which he then plagiarizes. Some of these are just straight covers of the originals, just shifted to the genres and musical styles popular in 1912 (such as a jazzy, cotton-club-style cover of "Tainted Love"), but others actually do change the meanings too, often to reflect Columbia's bizarre culture.
** The song "Everybody Wants To Rule The World" by Music/TearsForFears was about popularity and doing whatever it takes to reach the top. The Bioshock cover makes it softer, cozy and romantic. Rather than being cynical and vibrant, it sounds more satisfied with one's lot in life, and calmly watching the struggles of other people, perhaps reflecting Columbia's isolationist stance with the rest of the planet.
** "Goodnight, Irene" is a classic folk song about losing a beloved wife and coping with misery and suicidal thoughts. When you hear it in Bioshock, it's being happily sung by a large crowd swaying in a festival and sounds more like a drinking song. The actual meaning of the song doesn't seem any different, but it seems to have been hit hard by LyricalDissonance in being brought to Columbia.
** Music/CreedenceClearwaterRevival's "Fortunate Son" was an anti-war protest song about the hypocrisy of the upper class during the Vietnam war. The Bioshock version is an acapella rendition sung by a single woman who sounds worn out and exhausted. Columbia still legalizes slavery, allows robber barons, and has a downtrodden lower class living under its glittery surface; the cover is less about rebelling against the upper class and more a tragic send-up of being trapped at the bottom.
* "God Only Knows" by Music/TheBeachBoys was a pretty, lilting song about the singer loving someone else fondly. The cover featured in ''VideoGame/BioshockInfinite'' switches it to a Barbershop Quartet, but retains precisely the same lyrics and for the most part the same mood. However, as the song goes on the tempo gets slower and slower, and the quartet sounds more and more solemn. By the end, where the singers are repeating a drawn out "Without youuuuu," you realize this isn't just about how much you love someone, but how difficult it is to move on when that special person is no longer in your life. [[spoiler: The game plays this over the ending credits, reflecting Elizabeth's sadness over Booker's death.]]
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