History Main / TheCoverChangesTheMeaning

19th Jun '17 7:30:50 PM jormis29
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* "Waterfalls" by Music/{{TLC}} is an upbeat 90's chillout tune about how DrugsAreBad. Bette Midler's cover is a slow, bittersweet ballad where the lyrics are emphasized a lot more.

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* "Waterfalls" by Music/{{TLC}} is an upbeat 90's chillout tune about how DrugsAreBad. Bette Midler's Music/BetteMidler's cover is a slow, bittersweet ballad where the lyrics are emphasized a lot more.
28th May '17 8:48:37 PM Luc
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* "99 Problems" by Jay Z: The original rap song enumerates the many problems Jay experienced as a young, successful black rap artist from Brooklyn. Hugo's reinterpretation turned it into a more existential bluegrass piece about reclaiming one's soul and finding meaning in life.

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* "99 Problems" by Problems": The Jay Z: The original Z rap song enumerates the many problems Jay experienced as a young, successful black rap artist from Brooklyn. Hugo's reinterpretation turned it into a more existential bluegrass piece about reclaiming one's soul and finding meaning in life.
** Jay Z's version also provides an example: In Ice-T's original "99 Problems", from which Jay Z's song takes its chorus, "I got 99 Problems / but a b*tch ain't one", referring to (presumably human) prostitutes. In Jay Z's version, the same chorus refers to a literal female dog; specifically a drug sniffing dog.
22nd May '17 7:14:15 AM CaptainTedium
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* "The Monster Mash" by Bobby "Boris" Pickett is a well-known and lighthearted novelty song for Halloween, but Creator/VincentPrice did a cover of the song in 1977 that sounds more sinister and creepy, complete with the sound of a woman screaming near the end.
21st May '17 11:03:04 PM jtierney50
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** Actually subverted for many of their songs, which are quite different musically but retain the original meaning. Take, for example, their version of [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yvEWNlcefAw Talk Dirty]], which still is about travelling around the world and partying (and having sex with) many different women - despite being a ''[[LyricalDissonance Jewish klezmer]]''.
21st May '17 10:55:49 PM jtierney50
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* "Sunglasses At Night" by Corey Hart is an energetic but mournful tune about a man turning a blind eye to being cuckolded by his out-of-his league girlfriend. [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2jT-Bb-Nkv0&feature=kp In this cover]] by TheMegas, the singer is much more competitive and determined to win her affections, and seems self-assured enough to actually wear SunglassesAtNight.

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* "Sunglasses At Night" by Corey Hart is an energetic but mournful tune about a man turning a blind eye to being cuckolded spooked by his out-of-his league girlfriend. [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2jT-Bb-Nkv0&feature=kp In this cover]] by TheMegas, the singer is much more competitive and determined to win her affections, and seems self-assured enough to actually wear SunglassesAtNight.


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* ''The Hamilton Mixtape'' featured reimaginings of several of the songs from ''Theatre/{{Hamilton}}''. While most aren't straight covers, and some only take a single line or two and remix it, they tend to use similar music in vastly different arrangements, so they still (somewhat) count:
** "My Shot" is a cover of the song from the show of the same name. The meaning is largely the same, but has removed any references to the American Revolution (although it does mention Hamilton and Hercules Mulligan by name) and makes it a generic political anthem.
** "Wrote My Way Out" is a cover of "Hurricane" from the show, and turns a song about Hamilton trying to figure out what to do in the midst of a crisis in his life into a song about being a "smart" kid in the hood.
** "Immigrants (We Get the Job Done)" is a cover of "Yorktown (the World Turned Upside Down)" from the show, and is probably the most changed song in the mixtape, going from a fairly straightforward retelling of the Battle of Yorktown into an anthem about the difficulties of Hispanic and Latino immigrants living in America.
** "Say Yes To This" is a cover of "Say No To This" and tells the story of a woman trying to convince her man to commit to her. It's presumably from the perspective of Maria Reynolds (who seduces Hamilton in the song "Say Yes To This" is covering), but it's left ambiguous.
** "Washingtons By Your Side" is a cover of "Washington on Your Side" and changes the meaning from complaining about George Washington's obvious favoritism of Hamilton to a song about how lonely it is on the top.
** "Who Tells Your Story" is a cover of "Who lives, Who Dies, Who Tells Your Story" and removes the specificity of the original, instead making it a generic song about legacy as opposed to directly about Hamilton.
15th May '17 7:25:15 PM nombretomado
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** At one point during the [[TheTroubles Troubles in Northern Ireland]], "Cats in the Cradle" was used in a TV anti-terrorism ad, with the lyrics kept the same but the video showing that the reason the singer wasn't around for his son was because he was in prison - by the time he gets out and tries to reconnect with his grown up son, it's too late, his son's followed in his footsteps (gunning down an unarmed man in front of the man's child).

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** At one point during the [[TheTroubles [[UsefulNotes/TheTroubles Troubles in Northern Ireland]], "Cats in the Cradle" was used in a TV anti-terrorism ad, with the lyrics kept the same but the video showing that the reason the singer wasn't around for his son was because he was in prison - by the time he gets out and tries to reconnect with his grown up son, it's too late, his son's followed in his footsteps (gunning down an unarmed man in front of the man's child).
5th May '17 6:38:52 AM CaptainTedium
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* "You Don't Own Me" by Lesley Gore: The original song was about a woman voicing her contempt towards a possessive lover. Klaus Nomi's cover reinterprets the song as being about a gay man proudly admitting to being happy with his sexuality and expressing his disdain towards those who won't accept him.

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* "You Don't Own Me" by Lesley Gore: The original song was about a woman voicing her contempt towards a possessive lover. Klaus Nomi's cover reinterprets the song as being about a gay man proudly admitting to being happy with embracing his sexuality and expressing his disdain towards those who won't accept him.
1st May '17 12:10:25 AM Golondrina
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* "Everybody Knows" by Leonard Cohen: RufusWainwright's cover changes...well, suddenly it sounds like its set amidst a casino underworld that's about to crumble and is having one last revel in its own shallowness and debauchery. [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=J26UlYXPi7o Worth a listen]]

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* "Everybody Knows" by Leonard Cohen: RufusWainwright's Music/RufusWainwright's cover changes...well, suddenly it sounds like its set amidst a casino underworld that's about to crumble and is having one last revel in its own shallowness and debauchery. [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=J26UlYXPi7o Worth a listen]]
2nd Apr '17 3:59:32 PM nombretomado
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** The PetShopBoys' cover completely changed the meaning of the song by ending it with the line "Maybe I didn't love you".

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** The PetShopBoys' Music/PetShopBoys' cover completely changed the meaning of the song by ending it with the line "Maybe I didn't love you".



* "Go West" by Music/VillagePeople: The PetShopBoys' cover turned an idealistic song about San Francisco as a utopia for the gay rights movement into a somewhat sad and nostalgic song about the hopeless optimism of the movement in the aftermath of AIDS. The orchestral instrumentation, allegedly not intentionally based on the Soviet anthem, and the music video also give a nod to an entirely different context: former Soviet citizens having the ability to literally "go West" to freedom after the fall of Communism. This context also has a layer of hopeless optimism.

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* "Go West" by Music/VillagePeople: The PetShopBoys' Music/PetShopBoys' cover turned an idealistic song about San Francisco as a utopia for the gay rights movement into a somewhat sad and nostalgic song about the hopeless optimism of the movement in the aftermath of AIDS. The orchestral instrumentation, allegedly not intentionally based on the Soviet anthem, and the music video also give a nod to an entirely different context: former Soviet citizens having the ability to literally "go West" to freedom after the fall of Communism. This context also has a layer of hopeless optimism.
1st Apr '17 9:00:51 PM DustSnitch
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* ''The Passion Live'' (2016), a JukeboxMusical by Creator/{{Fox}}, changes the meaning of all the songs featured to suit the Passion of {{Jesus}}. Examples include:

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* ''The Passion Live'' (2016), a JukeboxMusical by Creator/{{Fox}}, changes the meaning of all the songs featured to suit the Passion of {{Jesus}}.UsefulNotes/{{Jesus}}. Examples include:
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