History Main / TheChrisCarterEffect

1st Nov '17 4:11:30 AM Sumatris
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* ''Series/UnderTheDome'' is one of the most extreme examples since the turn of the millennium. While the first season was reasonably coherent in its storytelling, the next two quickly turned into an utterly incomprehensible mess of dangling plot threads, introduced new AssPull twists in every other episode, almost never resolved anything, and even in the rare case some question was answered, the solution was usually far-fetched to the extreme while creating a whole bunch of new mysteries that never went anywhere. It's little wonder the series rapidly lost market shares and was cancelled after three seasons, although - credit where it's due - the final episodes did their damndest to resolve the story in a satisfying way. Viewers are split on how well it managed to do that, but points for trying anyway.
3rd Oct '17 3:51:50 AM Morgenthaler
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** Even worse, it's hard to ''follow'' the plot of ''ASongOfIceAndFire'': it's a vicious DeconstructorFleet and almost always breaks genre conventions. While this makes for an exciting read, it also means that nobody has any idea what the final book will be like, and only the vaguest idea of what the overall MythArc even ''is''. Add in the absolutely shameless AnyoneCanDie approach to the series, with books 1, 3 and 5 involving the deaths of major fan favorites, and Martin has a ''lot'' of DarknessInducedAudienceApathy to fight off if he wants to still have a fanbase for the seventh and (supposedly) final book.

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** Even worse, it's hard to ''follow'' the plot of ''ASongOfIceAndFire'': ''Literature/ASongOfIceAndFire'': it's a vicious DeconstructorFleet and almost always breaks genre conventions. While this makes for an exciting read, it also means that nobody has any idea what the final book will be like, and only the vaguest idea of what the overall MythArc even ''is''. Add in the absolutely shameless AnyoneCanDie approach to the series, with books 1, 3 and 5 involving the deaths of major fan favorites, and Martin has a ''lot'' of DarknessInducedAudienceApathy to fight off if he wants to still have a fanbase for the seventh and (supposedly) final book.
1st Oct '17 11:02:06 AM RedScharlach
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** When the series was given an [[UnCancelled unexpected revival]] in 2016, it didn't take this trope long to hit it again. The first episode begins with a massive RetCon that makes hash of a lot of the previous mythology, [[spoiler: aliens not having much interaction with humanity at all, and most of their supposed crimes being the work of humans using stolen alien technology--despite the numerous aliens who've been on the show before]]. Most of the season was filler, and the season finale ends on a CliffHanger, despite another season not being greenlit at that point and the principle actors not signed on for more. Fans who were hoping to finally get some closure after years of waiting were left sorely disappointed; at best, they might finally get a resolution in another few years, at worst, the show gets cancelled again and they're right back to where they started.
* Also by Chris Carter, ''Series/{{Millennium}}'' is a good example of this. The show got increasingly bizarre and difficult to follow as it went on, and the end of the third season (the last one filmed, and for good reason) provided no closure at all. Each season had a different show runner(s), each with a ''very'' different idea of what the show should be (Are Frank Black's flashes simply a visualization of his deductive skills or psychic visions? What is the Millennium group's agenda?) and [[ProtectionFromEditors no one from above willing to set boundaries]]. After the cancellation, the whole thing was put into the laps of ''The X-Files'' team. This resulted in a FullyAbsorbedFinale for ''Series/{{Millennium}}'' within ''Series/TheXFiles'' that also failed to resolve anything.

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** When the series was given an [[UnCancelled unexpected revival]] in 2016, it didn't take this trope long to hit it again. The first episode begins with a massive RetCon that makes a hash of a lot of the previous mythology, [[spoiler: aliens not having much interaction with humanity at all, and most of their supposed crimes being the work of humans using stolen alien technology--despite the numerous aliens who've been on the show before]]. Most of the season was filler, and the season finale ends on a CliffHanger, despite another season not being greenlit at that point and the principle principal actors not signed on for more. Fans who were hoping to finally get some closure after years of waiting were left sorely disappointed; at best, they might finally get a resolution in another few years, at worst, the show gets cancelled again and they're right back to where they started.
* Also by Chris Carter, ''Series/{{Millennium}}'' is a good example of this. The show got increasingly bizarre and difficult to follow as it went on, and the end of the third (and final) season (the last one filmed, and for good reason) provided no closure at all. Each season had a different show runner(s), each with a ''very'' different idea of what the show should be (Are Frank Black's flashes simply a visualization of his deductive skills or psychic visions? What is the Millennium group's agenda?) and [[ProtectionFromEditors no one from above willing to set boundaries]]. After the cancellation, the whole thing was put into the laps of ''The X-Files'' team. This resulted in a FullyAbsorbedFinale for ''Series/{{Millennium}}'' within ''Series/TheXFiles'' that also failed to resolve anything.



* ''Series/PrettyLittleLiars'' used this to sustain itself. Every time someone looked like the stalker of the girls - known only as A - they inevitably turned out not to be and old characters were brought back to deepen the web. By the fifth season, fans were growing tired that A was still running rings around the main characters and progression was made in the sixth season.

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* ''Series/PrettyLittleLiars'' used this to sustain itself. Every time someone looked like they might be the stalker of the girls - known only as A - they inevitably turned out not to be and old characters were brought back to deepen the web. By the fifth season, fans were growing tired that A was still running rings around the main characters and progression was made in the sixth season.



** Of course, since ''Smallville'' is a prequel to the Superman mythos, they actually knew ''exactly'' where all the key plotlines were going- it's just, since it took ''ten whole seasons'' to get there, they ended up coming up with any number of sub-plots to fill up the space; in that regard, it's actually an inversion. At the end of season 4 onwards- likely, longer than they expected the show to go on-, they changed tack and began bringing in supporting characters and villains that Clark would normally only have met ''after'' he left Smallville, such as ComicBook/{{Brainiac}} and Lois Lane (ComicBook/LexLuthor, in some versions, really did live in Smallville and was friends with Clark, so he made sense). By the end of the show he's met most of his major allies and villains ''and'' started the Franchise/{{Justice League|of America}}, all before he even puts on the cape!

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** Of course, since ''Smallville'' is a prequel to the Superman mythos, they actually knew ''exactly'' where all the key plotlines were going- it's going--it's just, since it took ''ten whole seasons'' to get there, they ended up coming up with any number of sub-plots to fill up the space; in that regard, it's actually an inversion. At the end of season 4 onwards- likely, onwards--likely, longer than they expected the show to go on-, they last--they changed tack and began bringing in supporting characters and villains that Clark would normally only have met ''after'' he left Smallville, such as ComicBook/{{Brainiac}} and Lois Lane (ComicBook/LexLuthor, in some versions, really did live in Smallville and was friends with Clark, so he made sense). By the end of the show he's met most of his major allies and villains ''and'' started the Franchise/{{Justice League|of America}}, all before he even puts on the cape!



** A WordOfGod post in the comments section declared that each pages's plot is basically made up as it's being assembled.

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** A WordOfGod post in the comments section declared that each pages's page's plot is basically made up as it's being assembled.



* WebVideo/MarbleHornets is a found-footage format series that's driving force were the events behind the titular student film. However, even after the initial fourteen entries that establish the initial mystery, things don't let down from there and Jay's own investigations end up adding mystery after mystery. Parts of the larger MythArc included the Masked Men, Jay's enigmatic stalker totheark, the whereabouts of the mysterious girl Jessica whom Jay meets in season two, and of course [[Franchise/TheSlenderManMythos the Operator]] itself. By the end of the series, many of these are left unexplained or open to interpretation. Much like ''Lost'', how effective this was depends on whether you prefer the show being left open to interpretation or having these answers explained.

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* WebVideo/MarbleHornets is a found-footage format series that's whose driving force were was the events behind the titular student film. However, even after the initial fourteen entries that establish the initial mystery, things don't let down up from there and Jay's own investigations end up adding mystery after mystery. Parts of the larger MythArc included the Masked Men, Jay's enigmatic stalker totheark, the whereabouts of the mysterious girl Jessica whom Jay meets in season two, and of course [[Franchise/TheSlenderManMythos the Operator]] itself. By the end of the series, many of these are left unexplained or open to interpretation. Much like ''Lost'', how effective this was depends on whether you prefer the show being left open to interpretation or having these answers explained.
20th Sep '17 8:30:28 PM AndyLA
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* ''Manga/HunterXHunter'' suffers from extreme Schedule Slip, and hasn't come close to resolving many plots as a result, such as the Phantom Troupe and the Dark Continent arc. The series began to inch forward in stunted segments due to constant {{Hiatus}}, making little gains until 2016 finally saw the ball rolling with several [[WhamEpisode bang-up chapters]] before another long drought. In 2017, despite another hiatus, the story finally gets down to business, because this is the first time in a ''long'' time that the mangaka has taken a hiatus and promised to '''come back''' at a set return date and has found a nervous rhythm that is giving the story momentum.

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* ''Manga/HunterXHunter'' suffers from extreme Schedule Slip, and hasn't come close to resolving many plots as a result, such as the Phantom Troupe and the Dark Continent arc. The series began to inch forward in stunted segments due to constant {{Hiatus}}, making little gains until 2016 finally saw the ball rolling with several [[WhamEpisode bang-up chapters]] before another long drought. In 2017, despite another hiatus, the story finally gets down to business, because this is the first time in a ''long'' time that the mangaka Yoshihiro Togashi has taken a hiatus and promised to '''come back''' at a set return date and has found a nervous rhythm that is giving the story momentum.



* ''Manga/{{Nana}}'' was going on at a steady pace, until Ai Yazawa's leave due to disease, which put the series in hiatus. That was in 2009. She recovered the following year, but seven years later, she's yet to pick up the story and resolve details such as, who is really the father of Hachi's daughter, whether she will stay with Takumi or break up with him[[note]]about this, the only thing that is known is that, while not divorced (yet), Hachi and Takumi are estranged[[/note]], whether someone will find Nana O. in Europe or she will get in touch with her friends first, and so on.



** A degree of resolution was achieved in the ComicBook/SpiderVerse storyline, which explained the origins of the Inheritors, and had Spider Man and his allies defeat them.

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** A degree of resolution was achieved in the ComicBook/SpiderVerse storyline, which explained the origins of the Inheritors, and had Spider Man Spider-Man and his allies defeat them.
12th Sep '17 7:00:22 PM crashkey
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* ''Webcomic/{{Homestuck}}'' has had no less than 25 mysteries and unresolved plot threads at any given point since the end of its second act.
** Now, after 2 years, it has so many plots and mysteries both resolved and unresolved, that people need to read the MSPA wiki just to understand the NEWEST plot!
** It's sort of a joke in the fandom about Act 5 in that the story will focus long enough to resolve one plot thread... and then make you realize that it introduced three others to do it.
** This is likely part of the reason why the plot became a literal ScrapbookStory near the end of Act 5. It conveniently separates the loose ends and advances them more or less simultaneously, while allowing the reader to see the connections between them.

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* ''Webcomic/{{Homestuck}}'' has had no less than 25 mysteries and unresolved plot threads at any given point ''Webcomic/{{Homestuck}}'', ever since about the end of its second act.
** Now, after 2 years, it has so many plots and mysteries both resolved and unresolved, that people need to read the MSPA wiki just to understand the NEWEST plot!
** It's sort of a joke
Act 2, very early on in the comic's story, and continuing all the way to the very end. Around the time of Act 5, a common fandom about Act 5 in joke was that the story will focus long enough to resolve one plot thread... and then make you realize that it introduced three others to do it.
** This is likely part of the reason why the plot became a literal ScrapbookStory near the end of Act 5. It conveniently separates the loose ends and advances them more or less simultaneously, while allowing the reader to see the connections between them.
it.
12th Sep '17 6:55:42 PM crashkey
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* Demonstrated failure of ''Series/TwinPeaks''. But really, what did they expect from Creator/DavidLynch? Writer and committed Lynch fan David Foster Wallace opined in an essay that Season 2 was some of the best television he'd ever watched, in that it was some of the ''worst'' television he'd ever watched. If you watch it all in a row, it's pretty clear that it's one long nervous breakdown on the part of Lynch as he never intended the mystery of Laura Palmer's murder to be solved, with the series intended to be more of an exploration of the characters. ExecutiveMeddling forced him to solve the mystery by the end of Season 1, which left him with literally no idea where to go from there and hence he opted to work on other projects.
** As a result, Lynch was hardly involved with Season 2 he didn't write or direct any of the next 14 episodes and returned only to direct the finale. There's a consensus among ''Twin Peaks'' fans that the episodes directed by Lynch are the best of the series.

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* Demonstrated failure of ''Series/TwinPeaks''. But really, what did they expect from Creator/DavidLynch? Writer and committed Lynch fan David Foster Wallace opined in an essay that Season 2 was some of the best television he'd ever watched, in that it was some of the ''worst'' television he'd ever watched. If you watch it all in a row, it's pretty clear that it's one long nervous breakdown on the part of Lynch as he never intended the mystery of Laura Palmer's murder to be solved, with the series intended to be more of an exploration of the characters. ExecutiveMeddling forced him to solve the mystery by the end of Season 1, mid-Season 2, which left him with literally no idea where to go from there and hence he opted to work on other projects.
** As a result, Lynch was hardly involved with the rest of Season 2 he didn't write or direct any of the next 14 episodes and returned only to direct the finale. There's a consensus among ''Twin Peaks'' fans that the episodes directed by Lynch are the best of the series.



** It should be noted that there is a planned third season that will be released sometime in 2016, with both Lynch and the series' other creator, Mark Frost, writing and directing the entire season. At the moment, fans are tentatively excited that this final season will give the series the ending it deserves.
** Something of particular interest is that one line of the last episode of season two is "I'll see you in twenty-five years," and the third season will both air and take place exactly twenty-five years post series cancellation, making this possibly the largest instance of ArcWelding shown in recent history.

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** It should be noted that there is The series did eventually get a planned third concluding season that will be released sometime in 2016, ''25 years'' later with both Lynch and the series' other creator, Mark Frost, writing and directing the entire season. At the moment, fans are tentatively excited that this final season will give the series the ending it deserves.
** Something
a set number of particular interest is that one line of the last episode of season two is "I'll see you in twenty-five years," and the third season will both air and take place exactly twenty-five years post series cancellation, making this possibly the largest instance of ArcWelding shown in recent history.episodes.
11th Sep '17 11:14:06 AM AnotherStatsGuy
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It has nothing to do the former Minnesota Vikings Wide Receiver, Kris Karter.
9th Sep '17 1:29:40 AM SeptimusHeap
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* Many of the plot elements related to the Spider-Totem introduced by Creator/JMichaelStraczynski during his run on ''{{ComicBook/Spider-Man}}'' from 2001 to 2007 gave readers a lot of doubletalk and mystical mumbo-jumbo, but very little in the way of concrete resolution, like exactly why Peter had to "evolve", why one cosmic entity wanted to bring him back from the dead while another thought he should stay deceased, the mysterious entities that resurrected Mysterio and Miss Arrow and what they wanted with Peter, etc. None of this was ever really explained.

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* Many of the plot elements related to the Spider-Totem introduced by Creator/JMichaelStraczynski during his run on ''{{ComicBook/Spider-Man}}'' ''{{ComicBook/SpiderMan}}'' from 2001 to 2007 gave readers a lot of doubletalk and mystical mumbo-jumbo, but very little in the way of concrete resolution, like exactly why Peter had to "evolve", why one cosmic entity wanted to bring him back from the dead while another thought he should stay deceased, the mysterious entities that resurrected Mysterio and Miss Arrow and what they wanted with Peter, etc. None of this was ever really explained.
6th Sep '17 10:05:03 PM Maddoxsort
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** Any MacGuffin that Ash obtains that compels him to travel to a particular region, if it's not in a movie, will become a case of WhatHappenedToTheMouse as Ash and his companions get caught up in something else, and they'll eventually leave it with someone never to be seen again (such as the GS Ball) or it's completely wiped from existence or anyone's memory (Misty's bicycle). With the GS Ball, however, there was WordOfGod on it: The GS Ball originally was supposed to contain Celebi, but that plotline was reappropriated into one of the movies, so the producer decided to quietly remove the GS Ball from the story in hopes everyone would forget about it. And as for Misty's bike, right before Misty leaves the company of Ash and Brock in Johto, we ''finally'' get closure for her bike when the Nurse Joy from the Pokemon Center Ash went to in the second episode of the Kanto saga reveals she restored it to mint condition in the time Misty has been gone.

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** Any MacGuffin that Ash obtains that compels him to travel to a particular region, if it's not in a movie, will become a case of WhatHappenedToTheMouse as Ash and his companions get caught up in something else, and they'll eventually leave it with someone never to be seen again (such as the GS Ball) or it's completely wiped from existence or anyone's memory (Misty's bicycle). With the GS Ball, however, there was WordOfGod on it: The GS Ball originally was supposed to contain Celebi, but that plotline was reappropriated into one of the movies, so the producer decided to quietly remove the GS Ball from the story in hopes everyone would forget about it. And as for Misty's bike, right before Misty leaves the company of Ash and Brock in Johto, we ''finally'' get closure for her bike regarding it when the Nurse Joy from the Pokemon Center Ash went to in the second episode of the Kanto saga (where Misty cornered him and chewed him out for Pikachu frying her bike and it was actually pivotal to the episode as a ChekovsGun) [[ThrowTheDogABone reveals she restored it to mint condition in the time Misty has been gone.gone]] (because Misty abandoned it there in the Pokemon Center knowing it was no use to her anymore).
6th Sep '17 9:59:03 PM Maddoxsort
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** This has almost become an enforced trope in regards to Ash and his Pokemon. After Hoenn he almost never even mentions any Pokemon from prior regions besides Pikachu, meaning if any of those Pokemon or even most trainers from those regions had outstanding plots, they will never be resolved. Also, Ash will never win any Pokemon League, thus making an endgame for the series genuinely impossible. His best achievements in that area were the Battle Frontier which was, again, in the Hoenn series, and the Orange Islands, which was filler.
** Any MacGuffin that Ash obtains that compels him to travel to a particular region, if it's not in a movie, will become a case of WhatHappenedToTheMouse as Ash and his companions get caught up in something else, and they'll eventually leave it with someone never to be seen again (such as the GS Ball) or it's completely wiped from existence or anyone's memory (Misty's bicycle). With the GS Ball, however, there was WordOfGod on it: The GS Ball originally was supposed to contain Celebi, but that plotline was reappropriated into one of the movies, so the producer decided to quietly remove the GS Ball from the story in hopes everyone would forget about it.

to:

** This has almost become an enforced trope in regards to Ash and his Pokemon. After Hoenn he almost never even mentions any Pokemon from prior regions besides Pikachu, meaning if any of those Pokemon or even most trainers from those regions had outstanding plots, they will never be resolved. Also, Ash will never win any Pokemon League, thus making an endgame for the series genuinely impossible. His best achievements in that area were the Battle Frontier which was, again, in the Hoenn series, and the Orange Islands, which was filler.
filler. The only way this can come to an end is if someone among the upper echelons who has control of the show gets everyone to abandon the status quo (''The First Movie'' was originally planned to be the finale for Ash and company, if that means anything).
** Any MacGuffin that Ash obtains that compels him to travel to a particular region, if it's not in a movie, will become a case of WhatHappenedToTheMouse as Ash and his companions get caught up in something else, and they'll eventually leave it with someone never to be seen again (such as the GS Ball) or it's completely wiped from existence or anyone's memory (Misty's bicycle). With the GS Ball, however, there was WordOfGod on it: The GS Ball originally was supposed to contain Celebi, but that plotline was reappropriated into one of the movies, so the producer decided to quietly remove the GS Ball from the story in hopes everyone would forget about it. And as for Misty's bike, right before Misty leaves the company of Ash and Brock in Johto, we ''finally'' get closure for her bike when the Nurse Joy from the Pokemon Center Ash went to in the second episode of the Kanto saga reveals she restored it to mint condition in the time Misty has been gone.



* ''Manga/{{X1999}}'' remains on hold since 2003 with 18 volumes out of a planned 21 with a few chapters which is supposed to be for the 19th volume. Nanase Ohkawa, the lead writer of CLAMP, mentioned that they're still looking for a magazine willing to publish the remaining chapters. However, a decade had already passed and CLAMP put [[Manga/{{Gate7}} two]] [[Manga/LegalDrug more]] works on hold to work on ''Tsubasa World Chronicle'' and ''xxxHolic: Rei''. Fans of ''X/1999'' are not pleased with this and doubt that the manga will ever continue at this point. It doesn't help that several plot points have been left hanging for a decade such as Kamui's "true" wish and most importantly, who wins between the Dragons of Heaven and the Dragons of Earth.

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* ''Manga/{{X1999}}'' remains on hold hmold since 2003 with 18 volumes out of a planned 21 with a few chapters which is supposed to be for the 19th volume. Nanase Ohkawa, the lead writer of CLAMP, mentioned that they're still looking for a magazine willing to publish the remaining chapters. However, a decade had already passed and CLAMP put [[Manga/{{Gate7}} two]] [[Manga/LegalDrug more]] works on hold to work on ''Tsubasa World Chronicle'' and ''xxxHolic: Rei''. Fans of ''X/1999'' are not pleased with this and doubt that the manga will ever continue at this point. It doesn't help that several plot points have been left hanging for a decade such as Kamui's "true" wish and most importantly, who wins between the Dragons of Heaven and the Dragons of Earth.
This list shows the last 10 events of 252. Show all.
http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Main.TheChrisCarterEffect