History Main / TemporalMutability

24th Jan '16 8:30:46 AM Charsi
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7th Jan '16 12:54:23 AM EcliptorCalrissian
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** And then back to the StableTimeLoop in the finale, when [[spoiler: an Autobot shuttle wasn't on the records of the Ark because the protagonists used it to save the day and get home.]]

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** And then back to the StableTimeLoop in the finale, when [[spoiler: an Autobot shuttle wasn't on the records of the Ark because the protagonists used it to save the day and get home.]]]]Pa
*In ''{{Gargoyles}},'' the Phoenix Gate allows the user to travel through time, but every attempt to change things runs into YouAlreadyChangedThePast, resulting in the world as we always knew it and letting us know that ''this'' is why it was always that way. There at one point was a degree of "Enforced Immutability:" When Golaith saves a character who vanished and was thought dead and tries to allow him to return to his old life, increasingly improbable DiabolusExMachina events happen to said character to make his death a certainty. Eventually, Goliath realizes that the universe just won't let him send that character home, and brings that character to the present. And now we know why he disappeared in the first place: he was brought to the present by Goliath!



* Literature/TimeScout presents Enforced Immutability that approaches Rubber Band. You can change anything so long as it doesn't matter in any way. If it does matter, you can't change it. Something will happen. Usually to you. Things that ''can'' be changed are enforced by uptime laws. And taxed accordingly.

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* Literature/TimeScout presents Enforced Immutability that approaches Rubber Band. You can change anything so long as it doesn't matter in any way. If it does matter, you can't change it. Something will happen. Usually to you. Things that ''can'' be changed are enforced by uptime laws. And taxed accordingly. Reality seems to agree with humans on "what matters" to a degree that is almost comedic: if you tried to kill someone important to history, your gun would jam. If it's someone who never made the history books, go crazy! You would think that to the universe, to physics, it's ''all'' just atoms, but it seems reality cares a great deal about the "important" people and events in history enough to step in.


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**It tends to work this way generally. Technology used by those who frequently use time travel can insulate you (or you can get lucky and be outside the normal reality when the thing that made the change happens) and that leaves you with RippleEffectProofMemory and "not disappearing when something screws with your past" ability, the better to SetRightWhatOnceWentWrong. In the end, this culminated in the reboot movies: such a massive change to the history of ''StarTrekTheOriginalSeries'' happened and stuck that everything that happens after is up for grabs. The LeonardNimoy Spock, who made the trip with the villain who caused the change, is the only one who remembers the old reality. We are at the highest level of easy "go back, do something to change history, get back and have a new timeline but you're still you in every way" ability if you have the means to make the trip. What keeps us out of type five territory is that the changes won't ''necessarily'' be large and sweeping - it's just fine to [[StarTrekGenerations leave the Nexus a little earlier than you entered and save the crew]] or [[StarTrekIVTheVoyageHome snag two whales from the past to talk to that alien probe thingy]].
6th Jan '16 8:54:53 AM jbr
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See also [[http://www.xibalba.demon.co.uk/jbr/chrono.html this page]], for a more in-depth discussion.

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See also [[http://www.xibalba.demon.co.uk/jbr/chrono.[[http://jbr.me.uk/chrono.html this page]], for a more in-depth discussion.
18th Dec '15 9:09:47 PM Seanette
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18th Dec '15 2:30:20 PM AG1995
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19th Oct '15 6:33:01 AM Morgenthaler
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** Presumably, they're rewriting the past. Remember the watch experiment? They were able to tell time was looping inside the box because when the box was started, and then later a watch was placed inside and the box closed and reopened immediately, the time elapsed on the watch was an even multiple of the external time past. The watch was circulating through a time loop a huge number of times, each internal loop presenting a finite probability that it would be the one that was reopened, and by building a bigger box and putting people in it (who can decide to exit at the external beginning of the loop), time travel happens.
** ''Primer'' may actually fall under Temporal Chaos Theory, as the characters never travel back further than a week--not enough time for wild divergences to manifest.
19th Oct '15 6:32:35 AM Morgenthaler
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* Time travel in ''CirqueDuFreak'' seems to work this way. Anything that happens will ''still'' happen, even if the "actors" for any given role are different people. For example, the books ''explain'' that if someone went back in time to [[HitlersTimeTravelExemptionAct kill Adolf Hitler]], you could hypothetically succeed. However, someone ''else'' would rise to lead Nazi Germany, and World War II would still happen. It's just that the man known as Furher would not be Adolf Hitler. [[spoiler: The basic principle for this is the key to Darren's salvation.]]
* Changing the past is explained to work this way in Asimov's Literature/TheEndOfEternity, down to the elastic band metaphor. Permanent changes ''can'' be made, but it's very difficult.

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* Time travel in ''CirqueDuFreak'' ''Literature/CirqueDuFreak'' seems to work this way. Anything that happens will ''still'' happen, even if the "actors" for any given role are different people. For example, the books ''explain'' that if someone went back in time to [[HitlersTimeTravelExemptionAct kill Adolf Hitler]], you could hypothetically succeed. However, someone ''else'' would rise to lead Nazi Germany, and World War II would still happen. It's just that the man known as Furher would not be Adolf Hitler. [[spoiler: The basic principle for this is the key to Darren's salvation.]]
* Changing the past is explained to work this way in Asimov's Literature/TheEndOfEternity, ''Literature/TheEndOfEternity'', down to the elastic band metaphor. Permanent changes ''can'' be made, but it's very difficult.
24th Aug '15 6:04:21 PM wille179
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[[folder:Fan Fiction]]
* ''FanFic/SplitSecond'' has this, although the gods are the exception. For them, any changes overwrite their own pasts.
** In ''An Eternity Divided,'' the sequel, Death uses his time magic to overwrite the past. Death becomes a mare with no memory of ever having been a stallion. And, to top it off, the author went back and edited every chapter that even a reference to Death appeared in to switch Death's gender.
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21st Aug '15 12:19:57 PM ScroogeMacDuck
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!!!Two or more examples in the same series
[[folder:Comics]]
* In Disney Duck Comics, the fact that there are various authors with different opinions and nobody to control, if you search long enough, you'll most certainly find examples of all the sub-tropes, ''and'' a few original ideas.
11th May '15 10:18:14 AM ChronoLegion
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** The author also invokes the TimeTravelersDilemma, given this version of the trope, as altering the timeline means, effectively, killing billions of humans, reasonably pointing out that the only way this can be acceptable is if the GodzillaThreshold has been reached.


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[[folder:Live Action TV]]
* This appears to be the case in ''Series/TheFlash2014''. It's eventually revealed that the show's timeline is not the original one, as [[spoiler:Eobard Thawne]] (AKA the Reverse-Flash) has traveled back in time to try to kill Barry Allen (AKA the Flash) when Barry was little. He fails, as Young!Barry is saved by his future self from the same timeline as the Reverse-Flash. Barry's mother dies instead, his father goes to prison, and Barry is raised by Detective Joe West instead of the Allens. Despite this, he still becomes a forensic scientist but with an interest in anything "weird", given his experiences on the night of his mother's death. In the original timeline, Barry's transformation into the Flash may have indeed been a random accident. In the new version of events, [[spoiler:Dr. Harrison Wells, AKA Eobard Thawne]] deliberately engineers Barry's transformation several years ahead of "schedule", which also results in dozens of other "meta-humans" now roaming the city. When Barry finds out that there is evidence of his future self traveling back in time to that night, he is both excited and dejected, as the fact appears to indicate that he's destined to fail. However, other episodes appear to indicate that time is indeed infinitely mutable, especially when Wells warns Barry to let the events play out exactly as they had after Barry accidentally travels back in time by one day, claiming that averting one disaster will likely cause an even greater one to strike.
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