History Main / SurprisinglyEliteCannonFodder

22nd Nov '17 4:12:34 PM Jhonny
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* During the UsefulNotes/AmericanCivilWar the African American troops used by the Union played this trope every conceivable way. In several battles recently freed slaves or Free Blacks were just used as expandable cannon fodder or for some rear guard operations that freed up white men to do the fighting (in a sense that's the only use the Confederates ever put their slaves to - keep working the fields while white men fight; the Confederacy could not have fielded nearly as many soldiers as it did had it not had slaves working the fields, building trenches and railroads and so on). In one rather famous instance, however, the reluctance to be seen as doing this actually led to the Union losing a battle. During the "Battle of the Crater" outside Vicksburg, the plan called for a mine to detonate below Confederate lines and one regiment that had been specifically trained for such a task to step into the breech, establish a beachhead and push the Confederates back, possibly even push them out of Vicksburg and thus open the way to Richmond. There was only one problem: Said regiment was black. When his subordinates argued the case, UsefulNotes/UlyssesSGrant - despite being sympathetic to the plan and acknowledging in later testimony that the black soldiers really were the most qualified for the job - said that it would be bad optics to have the only black regiment in that particular military force mowed down in a frontal assault and thus ordered the plan to go forward with a different unit instead of the African Americans. Naturally said unit had not been trained on what to do, badly botched the assault (there were other issues like the problem that the troops literally had to climb out of their own trenches before reaching the enemy lines as footplanks and ladders had simply been forgotten) and ultimately the African American unit ''was'' sent in to save what could be saved, but by then it was too late and the officer who had suggested the assault (and the use of black troops) was sacked. In all however, African Americans had a lower rate of survival, received worse treatment in hospitals (as evidenced by their higher death rates) and were described frequently by comrades who had been rampant racists in 1860 as gallant and valiant and the best soldiers one could wish for while often being sent on missions as dangerous as they tended to be during the civil war, when some generals still thought in term of Napoleonic charges against WWI style trenches.

to:

* During the UsefulNotes/AmericanCivilWar the African American troops used by the Union played this trope every conceivable way. In several battles recently freed slaves or Free Blacks were just used as expandable cannon fodder or for some rear guard operations that freed up white men to do the fighting (in a sense that's the only use the Confederates ever put their slaves to - keep working the fields while white men fight; the Confederacy could not have fielded nearly as many soldiers as it did had it not had slaves working the fields, building trenches and railroads and so on). In one rather famous instance, however, the reluctance to be seen as doing this actually led to the Union losing a battle. During the "Battle of the Crater" outside Vicksburg, the plan called for a mine to detonate below Confederate lines and one regiment that had been specifically trained for such a task to step into the breech, establish a beachhead and push the Confederates back, possibly even push them out of Vicksburg and thus open the way to Richmond. There was only one problem: Said regiment was black. When his subordinates argued the case, UsefulNotes/UlyssesSGrant - despite being sympathetic to the plan and acknowledging in later testimony that the black soldiers really were the most qualified for the job - said that it would be bad optics to have the only black regiment in that particular military force mowed down in a frontal assault and thus ordered the plan to go forward with a different unit instead of the African Americans. Naturally said unit had not been trained on what to do, badly botched the assault (there were other issues like the problem that the troops literally had to climb out of their own trenches before reaching the enemy lines as footplanks and ladders had simply been forgotten) and ultimately the African American unit ''was'' sent in to save what could be saved, but by then it was too late and the officer who had suggested the assault (and the use of black troops) was sacked. In all however, African Americans had a lower rate of survival, received worse treatment in hospitals (as evidenced by their higher death rates) and were described frequently by comrades who had been rampant racists in 1860 as gallant and valiant and the best soldiers one could wish for while often being sent on missions as dangerous as they tended to be during the civil war, when some generals still thought in term terms of Napoleonic charges against WWI style trenches.
22nd Nov '17 4:11:28 PM Jhonny
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* During the UsefulNotes/AmericanCivilWar the African American troops used by the Union played this trope every conceivable way. In several battles recently freed slaves or Free Blacks were just used as expandable cannon fodder or for some rear guard operations that freed up white men to do the fighting (in a sense that's the only use the Confederates ever put their slaves to - keep working the fields while white men fight; the Confederacy could not have fielded nearly as many soldiers as it did had it not had slaves working the fields, building trenches and railroads and so on). In one rather famous instance, however, the reluctance to be seen as doing this actually led to the Union losing a battle. During the "Battle of the Crater" outside Vicksburg, the plan called for a mine to detonate below Confederate lines and one regiment that had been specifically trained for such a task to step into the breech, establish a beachhead and push the Confederates back, possibly even push them out of Vicksburg and thus open the way to Richmond. There was only one problem: Said regiment was black. When his subordinates argued the case, UsefulNotes/UllyssesSGrant - despite being sympathetic to the plan and acknowledging in later testimony that the black soldiers really were the most qualified for the job - said that it would be bad optics to have the only black regiment in that particular military force mowed down in a frontal assault and thus ordered the plan to go forward with a different unit instead of the African Americans. Naturally said unit had not been trained on what to do, badly botched the assault (there were other issues like the problem that the troops literally had to climb out of their own trenches before reaching the enemy lines as footplanks and ladders had simply been forgotten) and ultimately the African American unit ''was'' sent in to save what could be saved, but by then it was too late and the officer who had suggested the assault (and the use of black troops) was sacked. In all however, African Americans had a lower rate of survival, received worse treatment in hospitals (as evidenced by their higher death rates) and were described frequently by comrades who had been rampant racists in 1860 as gallant and valiant and the best soldiers one could wish for while often being sent on missions as dangerous as they tended to be during the civil war, when some generals still thought in term of Napoleonic charges against WWI style trenches.

to:

* During the UsefulNotes/AmericanCivilWar the African American troops used by the Union played this trope every conceivable way. In several battles recently freed slaves or Free Blacks were just used as expandable cannon fodder or for some rear guard operations that freed up white men to do the fighting (in a sense that's the only use the Confederates ever put their slaves to - keep working the fields while white men fight; the Confederacy could not have fielded nearly as many soldiers as it did had it not had slaves working the fields, building trenches and railroads and so on). In one rather famous instance, however, the reluctance to be seen as doing this actually led to the Union losing a battle. During the "Battle of the Crater" outside Vicksburg, the plan called for a mine to detonate below Confederate lines and one regiment that had been specifically trained for such a task to step into the breech, establish a beachhead and push the Confederates back, possibly even push them out of Vicksburg and thus open the way to Richmond. There was only one problem: Said regiment was black. When his subordinates argued the case, UsefulNotes/UllyssesSGrant UsefulNotes/UlyssesSGrant - despite being sympathetic to the plan and acknowledging in later testimony that the black soldiers really were the most qualified for the job - said that it would be bad optics to have the only black regiment in that particular military force mowed down in a frontal assault and thus ordered the plan to go forward with a different unit instead of the African Americans. Naturally said unit had not been trained on what to do, badly botched the assault (there were other issues like the problem that the troops literally had to climb out of their own trenches before reaching the enemy lines as footplanks and ladders had simply been forgotten) and ultimately the African American unit ''was'' sent in to save what could be saved, but by then it was too late and the officer who had suggested the assault (and the use of black troops) was sacked. In all however, African Americans had a lower rate of survival, received worse treatment in hospitals (as evidenced by their higher death rates) and were described frequently by comrades who had been rampant racists in 1860 as gallant and valiant and the best soldiers one could wish for while often being sent on missions as dangerous as they tended to be during the civil war, when some generals still thought in term of Napoleonic charges against WWI style trenches.
22nd Nov '17 4:10:21 PM Jhonny
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* During the UsefulNotes/AmericanCivilWar the African American troops used by the Union played this trope every conceivable way. In several battles recently freed slaves or Free Blacks were just used as expandable cannon fodder or for some rear guard operations that freed up white men to do the fighting (in a sense that's the only use the Confederates ever put their slaves to - keep working the fields while white men fight; the Confederacy could not have fielded nearly as many soldiers as it did had it not had slaves working the fields, building trenches and railroads and so on). In one rather famous instance, however, the reluctance to be seen as doing this actually led to the Union losing a battle. During the "Battle of the Crater" outside Vicksburg, the plan called for a mine to detonate below Confederate lines and one regiment that had been specifically trained for such a task to step into the breech, establish a beachhead and push the Confederates back, possibly even push them out of Vicksburg and thus open the way to Richmond. There was only one problem: Said regiment was black. When his subordinates argued the case, UsefulNotes/UllysseesSGrant - despite being sympathetic to the plan and acknowledging in later testimony that the black soldiers really were the most qualified for the job - said that it would be bad optics to have the only black regiment in that particular military force mowed down in a frontal assault and thus ordered the plan to go forward with a different unit instead of the African Americans. Naturally said unit had not been trained on what to do, badly botched the assault (there were other issues like the problem that the troops literally had to climb out of their own trenches before reaching the enemy lines as footplanks and ladders had simply been forgotten) and ultimately the African American unit ''was'' sent in to save what could be saved, but by then it was too late and the officer who had suggested the assault (and the use of black troops) was sacked. In all however, African Americans had a lower rate of survival, received worse treatment in hospitals (as evidenced by their higher death rates) and were described frequently by comrades who had been rampant racists in 1860 as gallant and valiant and the best soldiers one could wish for while often being sent on missions as dangerous as they tended to be during the civil war, when some generals still thought in term of Napoleonic charges against WWI style trenches.

to:

* During the UsefulNotes/AmericanCivilWar the African American troops used by the Union played this trope every conceivable way. In several battles recently freed slaves or Free Blacks were just used as expandable cannon fodder or for some rear guard operations that freed up white men to do the fighting (in a sense that's the only use the Confederates ever put their slaves to - keep working the fields while white men fight; the Confederacy could not have fielded nearly as many soldiers as it did had it not had slaves working the fields, building trenches and railroads and so on). In one rather famous instance, however, the reluctance to be seen as doing this actually led to the Union losing a battle. During the "Battle of the Crater" outside Vicksburg, the plan called for a mine to detonate below Confederate lines and one regiment that had been specifically trained for such a task to step into the breech, establish a beachhead and push the Confederates back, possibly even push them out of Vicksburg and thus open the way to Richmond. There was only one problem: Said regiment was black. When his subordinates argued the case, UsefulNotes/UllysseesSGrant UsefulNotes/UllyssesSGrant - despite being sympathetic to the plan and acknowledging in later testimony that the black soldiers really were the most qualified for the job - said that it would be bad optics to have the only black regiment in that particular military force mowed down in a frontal assault and thus ordered the plan to go forward with a different unit instead of the African Americans. Naturally said unit had not been trained on what to do, badly botched the assault (there were other issues like the problem that the troops literally had to climb out of their own trenches before reaching the enemy lines as footplanks and ladders had simply been forgotten) and ultimately the African American unit ''was'' sent in to save what could be saved, but by then it was too late and the officer who had suggested the assault (and the use of black troops) was sacked. In all however, African Americans had a lower rate of survival, received worse treatment in hospitals (as evidenced by their higher death rates) and were described frequently by comrades who had been rampant racists in 1860 as gallant and valiant and the best soldiers one could wish for while often being sent on missions as dangerous as they tended to be during the civil war, when some generals still thought in term of Napoleonic charges against WWI style trenches.
22nd Nov '17 4:10:02 PM Jhonny
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* During the UsefulNotes/AmericanCivilWar the African American troops used by the Union played this trope every conceivable way. In several battles recently freed slaves or Free Blacks were just used as expandable cannon fodder or for some rear guard operations that freed up white men to do the fighting (in a sense that's the only use the Confederates ever put their slaves to - keep working the fields while white men fight; the Confederacy could not have fielded nearly as many soldiers as it did had it not had slaves working the fields, building trenches and railroads and so on). In one rather famous instance, however, the reluctance to be seen as doing this actually led to the Union losing a battle. During the "Battle of the Crater" outside Vicksburg, the plan called for a mine to detonate below Confederate lines and one regiment that had been specifically trained for such a task to step into the breech, establish a beachhead and push the Confederates back, possibly even push them out of Vicksburg and thus open the way to Richmond. There was only one problem: Said regiment was black. When his subordinates argued the case, Grant despite being sympathetic to the plan and acknowledging in later testimony that the black soldiers really were the most qualified for the job said that it would be bad optics to have the only black regiment in that particular military force mowed down in a frontal assault and thus ordered the plan to go forward with a different unit instead of the African Americans. Naturally said unit had not been trained on what to do, badly botched the assault (there were other issues like the problem that the troops literally had to climb out of their own trenches before reaching the enemy lines as footplanks and ladders had simply been forgotten) and ultimately the African American unit ''was'' sent in to save what could be saved, but by then it was too late and the officer who had suggested the assault (and the use of black troops) was sacked. In all however, African Americans had a lower rate of survival, received worse treatment in hospitals (as evidenced by their higher death rates) and were described frequently by comrades who had been rampant racists in 1860 as gallant and valiant and the best soldiers one could wish for while often being sent on missions as dangerous as they tended to be during the civil war, when some generals still thought in term of Napoleonic charges against WWI style trenches.

to:

* During the UsefulNotes/AmericanCivilWar the African American troops used by the Union played this trope every conceivable way. In several battles recently freed slaves or Free Blacks were just used as expandable cannon fodder or for some rear guard operations that freed up white men to do the fighting (in a sense that's the only use the Confederates ever put their slaves to - keep working the fields while white men fight; the Confederacy could not have fielded nearly as many soldiers as it did had it not had slaves working the fields, building trenches and railroads and so on). In one rather famous instance, however, the reluctance to be seen as doing this actually led to the Union losing a battle. During the "Battle of the Crater" outside Vicksburg, the plan called for a mine to detonate below Confederate lines and one regiment that had been specifically trained for such a task to step into the breech, establish a beachhead and push the Confederates back, possibly even push them out of Vicksburg and thus open the way to Richmond. There was only one problem: Said regiment was black. When his subordinates argued the case, Grant UsefulNotes/UllysseesSGrant - despite being sympathetic to the plan and acknowledging in later testimony that the black soldiers really were the most qualified for the job - said that it would be bad optics to have the only black regiment in that particular military force mowed down in a frontal assault and thus ordered the plan to go forward with a different unit instead of the African Americans. Naturally said unit had not been trained on what to do, badly botched the assault (there were other issues like the problem that the troops literally had to climb out of their own trenches before reaching the enemy lines as footplanks and ladders had simply been forgotten) and ultimately the African American unit ''was'' sent in to save what could be saved, but by then it was too late and the officer who had suggested the assault (and the use of black troops) was sacked. In all however, African Americans had a lower rate of survival, received worse treatment in hospitals (as evidenced by their higher death rates) and were described frequently by comrades who had been rampant racists in 1860 as gallant and valiant and the best soldiers one could wish for while often being sent on missions as dangerous as they tended to be during the civil war, when some generals still thought in term of Napoleonic charges against WWI style trenches.
22nd Nov '17 4:08:13 PM Jhonny
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Added DiffLines:

* During the UsefulNotes/AmericanCivilWar the African American troops used by the Union played this trope every conceivable way. In several battles recently freed slaves or Free Blacks were just used as expandable cannon fodder or for some rear guard operations that freed up white men to do the fighting (in a sense that's the only use the Confederates ever put their slaves to - keep working the fields while white men fight; the Confederacy could not have fielded nearly as many soldiers as it did had it not had slaves working the fields, building trenches and railroads and so on). In one rather famous instance, however, the reluctance to be seen as doing this actually led to the Union losing a battle. During the "Battle of the Crater" outside Vicksburg, the plan called for a mine to detonate below Confederate lines and one regiment that had been specifically trained for such a task to step into the breech, establish a beachhead and push the Confederates back, possibly even push them out of Vicksburg and thus open the way to Richmond. There was only one problem: Said regiment was black. When his subordinates argued the case, Grant despite being sympathetic to the plan and acknowledging in later testimony that the black soldiers really were the most qualified for the job said that it would be bad optics to have the only black regiment in that particular military force mowed down in a frontal assault and thus ordered the plan to go forward with a different unit instead of the African Americans. Naturally said unit had not been trained on what to do, badly botched the assault (there were other issues like the problem that the troops literally had to climb out of their own trenches before reaching the enemy lines as footplanks and ladders had simply been forgotten) and ultimately the African American unit ''was'' sent in to save what could be saved, but by then it was too late and the officer who had suggested the assault (and the use of black troops) was sacked. In all however, African Americans had a lower rate of survival, received worse treatment in hospitals (as evidenced by their higher death rates) and were described frequently by comrades who had been rampant racists in 1860 as gallant and valiant and the best soldiers one could wish for while often being sent on missions as dangerous as they tended to be during the civil war, when some generals still thought in term of Napoleonic charges against WWI style trenches.
22nd Nov '17 3:56:53 PM Jhonny
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** Napoleon created the Grand Duchy of Poland and fostered Polish nationalism to recruit the (west Slavic) Poles as allies against the Germanic Prussian kingdom, east Slavic Russian kingdom, and Germanic/south-Slavic Austrian empire. Napoleon's "Polish Legions" acquitted themselves well in several campaigns, most famously at the Battle of Somosierra. As a reward for their service he...sent them to quell slave uprisings on Haiti. Few ever returned.

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** Napoleon created the Grand Duchy of Poland and fostered Polish nationalism to recruit the (west Slavic) Poles as allies against the Germanic Prussian kingdom, east Slavic Russian kingdom, and Germanic/south-Slavic Austrian empire. Napoleon's "Polish Legions" acquitted themselves well in several campaigns, most famously at the Battle of Somosierra. As a reward for their service he...sent them to quell slave uprisings on Haiti. Few ever returned. In fact, some ''voluntarily stayed'' in Haiti because seeing the plight of the Haitians, they saw who obviously had the more ńoble cause and switched sides.
28th Sep '17 4:00:14 PM GMon
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However, rather than get worried for their jobs, the superiors are actually quite pleased. Now they've got CannonFodder who are actually likely to get the job done, but whom no one is going to miss if they don't come back! Often the mark of very cunning superiors. See WeDoTheImpossible for the SuperTrope.

Contrast EliteMooks, who are actually intended to be elite, as well as OneRiotOneRanger where the superiors send out someone who is meant to be elite from the start.

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However, rather than get worried for their jobs, the superiors are actually quite pleased. Now they've got CannonFodder who are actually likely to get the job done, but whom no one is going to miss if they don't come back! Often the mark of very cunning superiors. See WeDoTheImpossible for the SuperTrope.

superiors.

SubTrope of WeDoTheImpossible.
Contrast EliteMooks, who are actually intended to be elite, as well as OneRiotOneRanger OneRiotOneRanger, where the superiors send out someone who is meant to be elite from the start.



* Odd example in ''Literature/CiaphasCain'' in that the superiors may be completely innocent, but Colonel Mostrue often seems a bit too quick to call in artillery strikes close to where Cain is stationed during Cain's time with the artillery unit, and also frequently gets Cain sent off into dangerous situations. Cain suspects that Mostrue is aware of the fact that his first great triumph was really just a desperate attempt to get to safety and abandon the battery to its fate, but whatever Mostrue's intentions, Cain's repeated survival of adverse circumstances only adds to the double-edged sword which is his reputation.
* Played completely straight in the ''Literature/GauntsGhosts'' novels, however. Colonel-Commissar Gaunt has made his fair share of enemies in the higher echelons of Imperial command, and many go out of their way to find ways to kill him and his Ghosts off.
* This is the entire point of the [[TabletopGame/{{Warhammer 40000}} 13th Penal Legion]]. In the first book, Colonel Schaefer starts with a legion of four-thousand troopers, the scum of the Imperial Guard. Two years later, he's got a 'legion' of 8 soldiers and they can do things even a Space Marine cannot.
* One last ''Warhammer 40000'' example: subverted horribly in ''Fire Caste''. The Arkhan Confederates succeed where countless other Guard battalions have failed, routing legions of turncoats and aliens, eventually pushing the Tau back to their base of operations, "The Diadem". [[spoiler:This is the exact opposite of what the [[DefectorFromDecadence Sky Marshal]] wanted; the Arkhans turning out to be Surprisingly Elite Cannon Fodder does not benefit the Marshal at ''all''.]]

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* Some examples from the ''TabletopGame/{{Warhammer 40000}}'' ExpandedUniverse:
**
Odd example in ''Literature/CiaphasCain'' in that the superiors may be completely innocent, but Colonel Mostrue often seems a bit too quick to call in artillery strikes close to where Cain is stationed during Cain's time with the artillery unit, and also frequently gets Cain sent off into dangerous situations. Cain suspects that Mostrue is aware of the fact that his first great triumph was really just a desperate attempt to get to safety and abandon the battery to its fate, but whatever Mostrue's intentions, Cain's repeated survival of adverse circumstances only adds to the double-edged sword which is his reputation.
* ** Played completely straight in the ''Literature/GauntsGhosts'' novels, however. Colonel-Commissar Gaunt has made his fair share of enemies in the higher echelons of Imperial command, and many go out of their way to find ways to kill him and his Ghosts off.
* ** This is the entire point of the [[TabletopGame/{{Warhammer 40000}} 13th Penal Legion]].Legion. In the first book, Colonel Schaefer starts with a legion of four-thousand troopers, the scum of the Imperial Guard. Two years later, he's got a 'legion' of 8 soldiers and they can do things even a Space Marine cannot.
* One last ''Warhammer 40000'' example: subverted ** {{Subverted|Trope}} horribly in ''Fire Caste''. The Arkhan Confederates succeed where countless other Guard battalions have failed, routing legions of turncoats and aliens, eventually pushing the Tau back to their base of operations, "The Diadem". [[spoiler:This is the exact opposite of what the [[DefectorFromDecadence Sky Marshal]] wanted; the Arkhans turning out to be Surprisingly Elite Cannon Fodder does not benefit the Marshal at ''all''.]]



** The unit participated in some of World War II's most notorious campaigns of terror in the east. During the organization's time in Russia, Dirlewanger burned women and children alive and let starved packs of dogs feed on them. He was known to hold large formations with the sole purpose of injecting Jews with strychnine. Dirlewanger's unit took part in the occupation of Belarus, where it carved out a reputation within the Waffen-SS as an atrocious unit. Numerous Heer and SS commanders attempted to remove Dirlewanger from the SS and disband the unit, although he had patrons within the Nazi apparatus who intervened on his behalf. His unit was most notably credited with the destruction of Warsaw, and the massacre of ~100,000 of the city's population during the Warsaw Uprising; and participating in the brutal suppression of the Slovak National Uprising in 1944. Dirlewanger's Division of the Waffen SS generated fear throughout Waffen-SS Organizations including the SS-Führungshauptamt (SS Command Headquarters) and earned the notoriety as the most criminal and heinous SS unit in Hitler's war machine.

to:

** The unit participated in some of World War II's most notorious campaigns of terror in the east. During the organization's time in Russia, Dirlewanger burned women and children alive and let starved packs of dogs feed on them. He was known to hold large formations with the sole purpose of injecting Jews with strychnine. Dirlewanger's unit took part in the occupation of Belarus, where it carved out a reputation within the Waffen-SS as an atrocious unit. Numerous Heer and SS commanders attempted to remove Dirlewanger from the SS and disband the unit, although he had patrons within the Nazi apparatus who intervened on his behalf. His unit was most notably credited with the destruction of Warsaw, and the massacre of ~100,000 of the city's population during the Warsaw Uprising; and participating in the brutal suppression of the Slovak National Uprising in 1944. Dirlewanger's Division of the Waffen SS generated fear throughout Waffen-SS Organizations including the SS-Führungshauptamt (SS Command Headquarters) and earned the notoriety as the most criminal and heinous SS unit in Hitler's war machine.



20th Sep '17 5:52:51 AM Doug86
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* The basic set-up for "Hunter's Hellcts" in ''Our Fighting Forces'' from Creator/DCComics. The Hellcats were a group of convicted felons sent on dangerous missions behind enemy lines during WWII.

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* The basic set-up for "Hunter's Hellcts" Hellcats" in ''Our Fighting Forces'' from Creator/DCComics. The Hellcats were a group of convicted felons sent on dangerous missions behind enemy lines during WWII.
26th Aug '17 12:07:09 PM rmctagg09
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* An episode of Gundam Wing had a disillusioned [[CharClone Zechs]] pair up with a pair of asshole soldiers to take out a few of the remaining Earth Sphere Alliance strongholds. The pair assign Zechs to make a very visible attack on the base's main defense (a large beam cannon), figuring that Zechs's conspicuous new mobile suit and high-profile reputation will make him a ripe target. Meanwhile they'll be free to sneak in unnoticed and take out the base themselves. Unfortunately, they greatly underestimated Zechs skills, and failed to realize that the "conspicuous new mobile suit" was [[SuperPrototype The Tallgeese]]. Zechs not only survived the encounter but is in perfect shape to fight when he cases his partners killing soldiers who have already surrendered, and proceeds to [[CurbStompBattle deal with the situation accordingly.]]

to:

* An episode of Gundam Wing ''Anime/GundamWing'' had a disillusioned [[CharClone Zechs]] pair up with a pair of asshole soldiers to take out a few of the remaining Earth Sphere Alliance strongholds. The pair assign Zechs to make a very visible attack on the base's main defense (a large beam cannon), figuring that Zechs's conspicuous new mobile suit and high-profile reputation will make him a ripe target. Meanwhile they'll be free to sneak in unnoticed and take out the base themselves. Unfortunately, they greatly underestimated Zechs skills, and failed to realize that the "conspicuous new mobile suit" was [[SuperPrototype The Tallgeese]]. Zechs not only survived the encounter but is in perfect shape to fight when he cases his partners killing soldiers who have already surrendered, and proceeds to [[CurbStompBattle deal with the situation accordingly.]]
23rd Jul '17 8:28:45 PM AdamC
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Added DiffLines:

* An episode of Gundam Wing had a disillusioned [[CharClone Zechs]] pair up with a pair of asshole soldiers to take out a few of the remaining Earth Sphere Alliance strongholds. The pair assign Zechs to make a very visible attack on the base's main defense (a large beam cannon), figuring that Zechs's conspicuous new mobile suit and high-profile reputation will make him a ripe target. Meanwhile they'll be free to sneak in unnoticed and take out the base themselves. Unfortunately, they greatly underestimated Zechs skills, and failed to realize that the "conspicuous new mobile suit" was [[SuperPrototype The Tallgeese]]. Zechs not only survived the encounter but is in perfect shape to fight when he cases his partners killing soldiers who have already surrendered, and proceeds to [[CurbStompBattle deal with the situation accordingly.]]
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