History Main / StrongAsTheyNeedToBe

20th Jan '18 3:56:43 AM ImpudentInfidel
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* ''WesternAnimation/StarWarsTheCloneWars'': The skill and power of the Jedi tends to vary greatly from episode to episode. In some episodes they'll be literal [[OneManArmy One Man Armies]] who effortlessly plow through dozens of battle droids and win entire battles singlehandedly, in others, they'll struggle to beat a single BadassNormal who may not even be all that badass. Exactly how strong the characters were in relation to each other was also very inconsistent, for example, in "Revenge" Obi-Wan teams up with [[spoiler: Ventress]] to fight Savage Oppress and [[spoiler: Darth Maul]], and Obi-Wan says they're outmatched. In the very next episode, Obi-Wan fights the two again, ''by himself'', and beats them handily, wounding Oppress and force the pair to flee.

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* ''WesternAnimation/StarWarsTheCloneWars'': The skill and power of the Jedi tends to vary greatly from episode to episode. In some episodes they'll be literal [[OneManArmy One Man Armies]] who effortlessly plow through dozens of battle droids and win entire battles singlehandedly, in others, they'll struggle to beat a single BadassNormal who may not even be all that badass. Exactly how strong the characters were in relation to each other was also very inconsistent, for example, in "Revenge" Obi-Wan teams up with [[spoiler: Ventress]] to fight Savage Oppress and [[spoiler: Darth Maul]], and Obi-Wan says they're outmatched. In the very next episode, Obi-Wan fights the two again, ''by himself'', and beats them handily, wounding Oppress and force the pair to flee. Standard Battle Droids also suffer badly from this; whether they're a complete joke even with a massive numbers advantage or a legitimate threat in a fair fight varies with the episode.
16th Jan '18 2:39:15 PM DustSnitch
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* In ''Literature/TheDivineComedy'', the shadow-bodies that form around deceased souls have {{Intangibility}} and can't interact with physical objects, unless the plot requires it.
** Virgil clasps his hands around Dante's eyes in ''Inferno'' Canto Nine, keeping the mortal from dying at Medusa's gaze, when his hands really should have phased through his head.
** When a horde of demons threaten to end the protagonist's journey in Hell, Virgil is able to use his illusion of a body to pick up our hero and leap into a ditch with him.
** When the recently deceased Casella hugs his mortal friend, they pass through each other to make their respective states clear to the reader, even if it contradicts Virgil actions earlier.
* In the ''Literature/DragonridersOfPern'' book ''All the Weyrs of Pern'', a character asks one of the dragonriders how much a dragon can lift. F'lar, the Dragonrider, considers the question before answering "they can lift as much as they think they can." This turns out to be Justified a few books down the line, when it's revealed the dragons have telekinetic powers that somehow no one had noticed in over 2,500 years.
* In Literature/TheElricSaga, Stormbringer is noticeably fickle this way. It can empower Elric to slaughter his way through hundreds of human opponents or even kill ''gods'' one day and have trouble dealing with a single lesser (if generally still supernatural) foe the next, as the plot and RuleOfDrama demand. Of course, it's worth remembering that the runeblade is itself of demonic origin, alive and sentient in its own fashion, and obviously evil to the point of outright treachery at times...
* Gotrek from the ''Literature/GotrekAndFelix'' is always just strong enough to take down the current monster that he should really have no chance against. This matches the rules for slayers on the tabletop, but in his case it seems to affect his actual skill as well.
* Done well, and justified, in a fight scene from ''[[Literature/LordDarcy Too Many Magicians]]'': Lord Ashley is dueling a villain whose sword is enchanted, and keeps flickering in and out of visibility. As he's pressed hard by his foe's invisible attacks, Ashley's fear activates his own power of prescience, allowing him to intuit exactly where the blade will strike next. This turns the tables on the villain, who begins a fighting retreat ... at which point, Lord Ashley's growing confidence causes his prescient power to shut down again, as it's established that it [[PowerIncontinence only works when he's under stress]]. Luckily for him, his opponent doesn't realize that's what happened, and when Ashley hesitates, his foe seizes the opportunity to escape rather than attack.



* This is an explicit rule in Diane Duane's Literature/YoungWizards series. The PowersThatBe ensure that every wizard has enough power to deal with whatever the current crisis is. Luckily, drama is preserved by making failure a real option; just because you're ''strong'' enough to solve the problem doesn't mean you'll figure out the solution, or want to pay the price.
** This is also why older wizards tend to be weaker than their younger counterparts. Their skill with magic is such that they don't ''need'' as much power.
* Done well, and justified, in a fight scene from ''[[Literature/LordDarcy Too Many Magicians]]'': Lord Ashley is dueling a villain whose sword is enchanted, and keeps flickering in and out of visibility. As he's pressed hard by his foe's invisible attacks, Ashley's fear activates his own power of prescience, allowing him to intuit exactly where the blade will strike next. This turns the tables on the villain, who begins a fighting retreat ... at which point, Lord Ashley's growing confidence causes his prescient power to shut down again, as it's established that it [[PowerIncontinence only works when he's under stress]]. Luckily for him, his opponent doesn't realize that's what happened, and when Ashley hesitates, his foe seizes the opportunity to escape rather than attack.
* In the ''Literature/DragonridersOfPern'' book ''All the Weyrs of Pern'', a character asks one of the dragonriders how much a dragon can lift. F'lar, the Dragonrider, considers the question before answering "they can lift as much as they think they can." This turns out to be Justified a few books down the line, when it's revealed the dragons have telekinetic powers that somehow no one had noticed in over 2,500 years.
* In Literature/TheElricSaga, Stormbringer is noticeably fickle this way. It can empower Elric to slaughter his way through hundreds of human opponents or even kill ''gods'' one day and have trouble dealing with a single lesser (if generally still supernatural) foe the next, as the plot and RuleOfDrama demand. Of course, it's worth remembering that the runeblade is itself of demonic origin, alive and sentient in its own fashion, and obviously evil to the point of outright treachery at times...



* Gotrek from the ''Literature/GotrekAndFelix'' is always just strong enough to take down the current monster that he should really have no chance against. This matches the rules for slayers on the tabletop, but in his case it seems to affect his actual skill as well.

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* Gotrek from the ''Literature/GotrekAndFelix'' This is always just strong an explicit rule in Diane Duane's Literature/YoungWizards series. The PowersThatBe ensure that every wizard has enough power to take down deal with whatever the current monster that he should really have no chance against. crisis is. Luckily, drama is preserved by making failure a real option; just because you're ''strong'' enough to solve the problem doesn't mean you'll figure out the solution, or want to pay the price. This matches the rules for slayers on the tabletop, but in his case it seems is also why older wizards tend to affect his actual be weaker than their younger counterparts. Their skill with magic is such that they don't ''need'' as well.much power.
11th Jan '18 5:40:38 AM BoukenDutch
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* ''WesternAnimation/PJMasks'' is frequently guilty of this, most notably with Gekko's SuperStrength (one moment he easily lifts heavy objects over his head, another moment a villain easily restrains him) and Catboy's SuperSpeed (sometimes he can perform feats that rival The Flash, other times he's certainly fast but still slow enough for a villain to intercept or dodge him).
28th Dec '17 10:59:40 PM ThorfinnRowle
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*** Mammoth is an interesting case. Oftentimes he's able to top Cyborg or Starfire in Brute strength, but at least once Cyborg was able to overpower him in a shoving match.


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** Nelson is another example. Sometimes he's the toughest kid in school to the point where he's unfazed when Jimbo, Kearney, and Dolph or (unsurprisingly) Bart try to beat him up. Other times he's able to be beaten up by the other bullies.
17th Dec '17 8:16:13 PM merotoker
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For the phenomenon of "As Big As They Need To Be", see ArtistsAreNotArchitects, YourSizeMayVary, and TelescopingRobot.

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For the phenomenon of "As Big As They Need To Be", see ArtistsAreNotArchitects, NotDrawnToScale, YourSizeMayVary, and TelescopingRobot.



* ''Manga/DragonBall''

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* ''Manga/DragonBall''''Manga/DragonBall'':



** It seems that every arc gives a separate explanation for why Ichigo's power is inconsistent. Originally, it was said that he couldn't control his power because he hadn't been properly trained. Later on, it's said that his power levels are linked to his resolve to win. Once he had better learned to control his power, villains learned to exploit his fluctuating resolve by beating down his self-confidence by demonstrating their greater power or revealing a few carefully chosen truths about his friends or family that he didn't know. Eventually, he caught on to this tactic and verbally chewed out the next villain who tried it. Then in the "Lost Substitute" arc, it's revealed [[spoiler:his substitute badge was suppressing his reiatsu, because the high brass of the Shinigami were worried that they couldn't fully trust him, and that the previous substitute would turn him against the Soul Society]].. And finally, [[spoiler:the final arc claims that the real reason his power fluctuated so much is because his "Shinigami" power, known as [[TalkingWeapon Old Man Zangetsu]], was actually his Quincy power secretly masquerading as his Shinigami power and only permitting him to access just enough to survive. When he and Zangetsu confronted each other about it, Ichigo learned that his true Shinigami power was the Inner Hollow that had [[BattleInTheCenterOfTheMind trained him in an antagonistic way]]. Once he had accepted both spirits as his weapon, his power levels stabilised for the final BigBad of the story.]]

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** It seems that every arc gives a separate explanation for why Ichigo's power is inconsistent. Originally, it was said that he couldn't control his power because he hadn't been properly trained. Later on, it's said that his power levels are linked to his resolve to win. Once he had better learned to control his power, villains learned to exploit his fluctuating resolve by beating down his self-confidence by demonstrating their greater power or revealing a few carefully chosen truths about his friends or family that he didn't know. Eventually, he caught on to this tactic and verbally chewed out the next villain who tried it. Then in the "Lost Substitute" arc, it's revealed [[spoiler:his substitute badge was suppressing his reiatsu, because the high brass of the Shinigami were worried that they couldn't fully trust him, and that the previous substitute would turn him against the Soul Society]].. And finally, [[spoiler:the final arc claims that the real reason his power fluctuated so much is because his "Shinigami" power, known as [[TalkingWeapon Old Man Zangetsu]], was actually his Quincy power secretly masquerading as his Shinigami power and only permitting him to access just enough to survive. When he and Zangetsu confronted each other about it, Ichigo learned that his true Shinigami power was the Inner Hollow that had [[BattleInTheCenterOfTheMind trained him in an antagonistic way]]. Once he had accepted both spirits as his weapon, his power levels stabilised for the final BigBad of the story.]]story]].



** [[GoldfishPoopGang Team Rocket]] are just as glaring. They lose so often that their rare success [[TropeNamer named]] a [[TeamRocketWins trope]]. But occasionally, they prove to be '''[[NotSoHarmlessVillain scarily competent]]'''...before going back to [[VillainDecay being jokes]]. Case in point. In a recent Pokemon Sun and Moon episode, they more or less ''BEAT'' Ash and all his Pokemon in a fair battle, and the only thing that stopped them from taking Pikachu was [[DeusExMachina Bewear whisking them away again]]. Fast forward a few episodes and they then get wrecked by a newly hatched Vulpix...

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** [[GoldfishPoopGang Team Rocket]] are just as glaring. They lose so often that their rare success [[TropeNamer [[TropeNamers named]] a [[TeamRocketWins trope]]. But occasionally, they prove to be '''[[NotSoHarmlessVillain scarily competent]]'''...before going back to [[VillainDecay being jokes]]. Case in point. In a recent Pokemon Sun and Moon episode, they more or less ''BEAT'' Ash and all his Pokemon in a fair battle, and the only thing that stopped them from taking Pikachu was [[DeusExMachina Bewear whisking them away again]]. Fast forward a few episodes and they then get wrecked by a newly hatched Vulpix...



* ''LightNovel/Campione!'': The Bull Authority has this is as an explicit rule of its use; it can only be used if the opponent also has SuperStrength, and only grants strength equal to the the threat.

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* ''LightNovel/Campione!'': ''LightNovel/{{Campione}}'': The Bull Authority has this is as an explicit rule of its use; it can only be used if the opponent also has SuperStrength, and only grants strength equal to the the threat.



* The ComicBook/IncredibleHulk's level of physical might and durability varies tremendously. This one, however, has a built-in explanation: Hulk's physical might--and in [[Film/{{Hulk}} the 2003 movie]], his physical mass and size--is directly related to how angry he gets. Hence the CatchPhrase "The madder Hulk gets, the stronger Hulk gets." For example, Comicbook/{{Wolverine}} has fought him several times--most of the time to a standstill until he manages to get one good cut in and piss the Hulk off enough that his anger really flares up. At the same time, during the ComicBook/{{Onslaught}} [[CrisisCrossover event]], in the last battle with the titular villain, Comicbook/JeanGrey mentally removed any blocks Banner may have had to restrain himself, and he beat the hell out of the physical form of a being that could [[RealityWarper alter reality with a thought]]. In short: hope your first punch knocks him out. Similarly to Darwin below, in one story Hulk developed the ability to breathe in space by getting angry enough.

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* The ComicBook/IncredibleHulk's level of physical might and durability varies tremendously. This one, however, has a built-in explanation: Hulk's physical might--and in [[Film/{{Hulk}} the 2003 movie]], his physical mass and size--is directly related to how angry he gets. Hence the CatchPhrase "The madder Hulk gets, the stronger Hulk gets." For example, Comicbook/{{Wolverine}} Franchise/{{Wolverine}} has fought him several times--most of the time to a standstill until he manages to get one good cut in and piss the Hulk off enough that his anger really flares up. At the same time, during the ComicBook/{{Onslaught}} [[CrisisCrossover event]], in the last battle with the titular villain, Comicbook/JeanGrey mentally removed any blocks Banner may have had to restrain himself, and he beat the hell out of the physical form of a being that could [[RealityWarper alter reality with a thought]]. In short: hope your first punch knocks him out. Similarly to Darwin below, in one story Hulk developed the ability to breathe in space by getting angry enough.



** ComicBook/{{Wolverine}}'s HealingFactor is a prime example of this. It ranges in effectiveness from merely a slightly accelerated form of ordinary healing (needing days to heal from relatively minor injuries) to full FromASingleCell level (being able to regenerate himself from just a bit of brain marrow or a blood smear).

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** ComicBook/{{Wolverine}}'s Franchise/{{Wolverine}}'s HealingFactor is a prime example of this. It ranges in effectiveness from merely a slightly accelerated form of ordinary healing (needing days to heal from relatively minor injuries) to full FromASingleCell level (being able to regenerate himself from just a bit of brain marrow or a blood smear).






* Comicbook/{{Wolverine}} pulls this off in ''Film/XMenTheLastStand'' when he faces down Dark Phoenix in the climactic scene of the movie. His healing powers are inexplicably multiplied to the point where he can walk up to Phoenix (who by this point had already atomized several main characters and the entirety of Alcatraz island), taking multiple psychic blasts which flay the muscles from his bones only to fully regenerate in less than a second. Keep in mind that this version of Wolverine took some time to heal from a single gunshot or being hit by a log. This was so egregious that it got a WordOfGod {{Retcon}}, stating that Phoenix's out-of-control abilities also amplified the powers of nearby mutants. It's also been surmised that Jean was FightingFromTheInside, not letting her full power (which could ''easily'' turn Wolverine, adamantium skeleton and all, to vapor) be brought to bear.

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* Comicbook/{{Wolverine}} Franchise/{{Wolverine}} pulls this off in ''Film/XMenTheLastStand'' when he faces down Dark Phoenix in the climactic scene of the movie. His healing powers are inexplicably multiplied to the point where he can walk up to Phoenix (who by this point had already atomized several main characters and the entirety of Alcatraz island), taking multiple psychic blasts which flay the muscles from his bones only to fully regenerate in less than a second. Keep in mind that this version of Wolverine took some time to heal from a single gunshot or being hit by a log. This was so egregious that it got a WordOfGod {{Retcon}}, stating that Phoenix's out-of-control abilities also amplified the powers of nearby mutants. It's also been surmised that Jean was FightingFromTheInside, not letting her full power (which could ''easily'' turn Wolverine, adamantium skeleton and all, to vapor) be brought to bear.



* Pro wrestling loves this trope. The good guy will consistently get beaten and be depicted as brutalized and exhausted, until they suddenly bounce back for a victory.
** Wrestling/JohnCena is a particular offender. He needs to be able to lift his opponent onto his shoulders in order to perform his finisher but against gigantic opponents he is often unable to do so (despite him having lifted the likes of Wrestling/TheBigShow and The Great Khali in the past). Whether he eventually manages depends on whether he is booked to win that night or not.

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* Pro wrestling loves this trope. The good guy will consistently get beaten and be depicted as brutalized and exhausted, until they suddenly bounce back for a victory.
**
victory. Wrestling/JohnCena is a particular offender. He needs to be able to lift his opponent onto his shoulders in order to perform his finisher but against gigantic opponents he is often unable to do so (despite him having lifted the likes of Wrestling/TheBigShow and The Great Khali in the past). Whether he eventually manages depends on whether he is booked to win that night or not.



** In ''God of War 2'', his insane strength might be justified that in the beginning Kratos still has all the powers a full-fledged god can brag about, he doesn't brag "Fear the new god of war" while beating the first mooks for nothing, still the trope applies for the rest of the second game and the sequel as well, in ''God of War 3'' Kratos stripped of all his powers he gained on the previous game, can take the pressure of Cronos -- a being who dwarfs the Colossus of Rhodes -- trying to squash him and push him away, after this display of strength it makes one wonder why Kratos needs to face through all the puzzles and locked doors at all.

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** In ''God of War 2'', ''VideoGame/GodOfWarII'', his insane strength might be justified that in the beginning Kratos still has all the powers a full-fledged god can brag about, he doesn't brag "Fear the new god of war" while beating the first mooks for nothing, still the trope applies for the rest of the second game and the sequel as well, in ''God of War 3'' ''VideoGame/GodOfWarIII'' Kratos stripped of all his powers he gained on the previous game, can take the pressure of Cronos -- a being who dwarfs the Colossus of Rhodes -- trying to squash him and push him away, after this display of strength it makes one wonder why Kratos needs to face through all the puzzles and locked doors at all.



* The supervillain Lung, from ''Literature/{{Worm}}''. has this as an explicit power. The longer he fights the stronger he becomes, slowly morphing from a man into an enormous unstoppable dragon. Ironically he is taken out by the Hero in the first arc and serves as a StarterVillain, despite the fact that he in the past went toe to toe with the literal bringers of the apocalypse. beings that can sink continents and burn cities from the face of the earth.

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* The supervillain Lung, from ''Literature/{{Worm}}''. ''Literature/{{Worm}}'' has this as an explicit power. The longer he fights the stronger he becomes, slowly morphing from a man into an enormous unstoppable dragon. Ironically he is taken out by the Hero in the first arc and serves as a StarterVillain, despite the fact that he in the past went toe to toe with the literal bringers of the apocalypse. beings that can sink continents and burn cities from the face of the earth.



* ''WesternAnimation/TeenTitans''

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* ''WesternAnimation/TeenTitans''''WesternAnimation/TeenTitans'':



** Comicbook/{{Starfire}} is pretty bad about this trope. She can survive extreme environments when the plot calls for it, and be totally helpless when it doesn't. In one episode, Starfire winds up wandering around frozen tundra, apparently in danger of freezing to death. Given her super speed and flight abilities, there was nothing in that episode stopping her from flying out of the area, or back to Titans Tower to get proper equipment if things get too hairy. The weirdest part is that Starfire has been shown to be able to comfortably survive in the vacuum of space several times. Then too there might be an explanation for both her (and Raven's) powers in that they're emotion based, which means that theoretically, a villain could defeat Starfire by getting her depressed enough. But the strangest would have to be in 'Haunted' where Robin(HUMAN!) manages to "hurt" her just by grabbing her arms?! Granted at that moment she is really shocked and confused at the way Robin was acting. But this is an alien that took a blast to her face in 'Troq' where she was also visibly upset at being discriminated by Val-Yor.

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** Comicbook/{{Starfire}} is pretty bad about this trope. She can survive extreme environments when the plot calls for it, and be totally helpless when it doesn't. In one episode, Starfire winds up wandering around frozen tundra, apparently in danger of freezing to death. Given her super speed and flight abilities, there was nothing in that episode stopping her from flying out of the area, or back to Titans Tower to get proper equipment if things get too hairy. The weirdest part is that Starfire has been shown to be able to comfortably survive in the vacuum of space several times. Then too there might be an explanation for both her (and Raven's) powers in that they're emotion based, which means that theoretically, a villain could defeat Starfire by getting her depressed enough. But the strangest would have to be in 'Haunted' where Robin(HUMAN!) Robin (HUMAN!) manages to "hurt" her just by grabbing her arms?! Granted at that moment she is really shocked and confused at the way Robin was acting. But this is an alien that took a blast to her face in 'Troq' where she was also visibly upset at being discriminated by Val-Yor.



* ''Franchise/MastersOfTheUniverse''

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* ''Franchise/MastersOfTheUniverse''''Franchise/MastersOfTheUniverse'':
14th Dec '17 7:11:51 AM hubakon1368
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* ''Fanfic/MyBravePonyStarfleetMagic'': '''''[[UpToEleven Damn near EVERYONE]]''''', especially the [[MasterRace Space Ponies]]: They can either be incredibly powerful, or not enough, depending on what the narrative wants at that time. Nine times out of ten, in a fight they'll start out as not strong enough to handle the enemy, only to suddenly become capable of handling the bad guys when they're on the verge of losing.
14th Dec '17 7:03:01 AM MyManHerc
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* ''LightNovel/Campione!'': The Bull Authority has this is as an explicit rule of its use; it can only be used if the opponent also has SuperStrength, and only grants strength equal to the the threat.
13th Dec '17 2:19:51 AM arrgh
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-->-- ''WebVideo/DragonBallZAbridged''

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-->-- ''WebVideo/DragonBallZAbridged''
''WebVideo/DragonBallZAbridged''[[note]]Played with, as this case is actually justified; 'The Namekian' had been training for months between his fights with Nappa and Frieza, and fused with a fellow warrior Namekian said to be the strongest of their kind (possibly excluding him).[[/note]]
3rd Dec '17 3:34:40 PM DVB
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** Depending on what the plot calls for, Pikachu can be good enough to take out legendaries and psuedo-legendaries such as Dragonite and Regice, or weak enough to be taken out by a first day trainer with a snivy.

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** Depending on what the plot calls for, Pikachu can be good enough to take out legendaries and psuedo-legendaries such as Dragonite and Regice, or weak enough to be taken out by a first day trainer with a snivy.Snivy, though in Pikachu's case, it has less to do with strength and more with defense, being a GlassCannon.
27th Nov '17 3:52:05 PM MarqFJA
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** It seems that every arc gives a separate explanation for why Ichigo's power is inconsistent. Originally, it was said that he couldn't control his power because he hadn't been properly trained. Later on, it's said that his power levels are linked to his resolve to win. Once he had better learned to control his power, villains learned to exploit his fluctuating resolve by beating down his self-confidence by demonstrating their greater power or revealing a few carefully chosen truths about his friends or family that he didn't know. Eventually, he caught on to this tactic and verbally chewed out the next villain who tried it. Then in the "Lost Substitute" arc, [[spoiler: it's revealed his substitute badge was suppressing his reiatsu, because the high brass of the Shinigami were worried that they couldn't fully trust him, and that the previous substitute would turn him against the Soul Society.]. And finally, [[spoiler: the final arc claims that the real reason his power fluctuated so much is because his "Shinigami" power, known as [[TalkingWeapon Old Man Zangetsu]], was actually his Quincy power secretly masquerading as his Shinigami power and only permitting him to access just enough to survive. When he and Zangetsu confronted each other about it, Ichigo learned that his true Shinigami power was the Inner Hollow that had [[BattleInTheCenterOfTheMind trained him in an antagonistic way]]. Once he had accepted both spirits as his weapon, his power levels stabilised for the final BigBad of the story.]]

to:

** It seems that every arc gives a separate explanation for why Ichigo's power is inconsistent. Originally, it was said that he couldn't control his power because he hadn't been properly trained. Later on, it's said that his power levels are linked to his resolve to win. Once he had better learned to control his power, villains learned to exploit his fluctuating resolve by beating down his self-confidence by demonstrating their greater power or revealing a few carefully chosen truths about his friends or family that he didn't know. Eventually, he caught on to this tactic and verbally chewed out the next villain who tried it. Then in the "Lost Substitute" arc, [[spoiler: it's revealed his [[spoiler:his substitute badge was suppressing his reiatsu, because the high brass of the Shinigami were worried that they couldn't fully trust him, and that the previous substitute would turn him against the Soul Society.]. Society]].. And finally, [[spoiler: the [[spoiler:the final arc claims that the real reason his power fluctuated so much is because his "Shinigami" power, known as [[TalkingWeapon Old Man Zangetsu]], was actually his Quincy power secretly masquerading as his Shinigami power and only permitting him to access just enough to survive. When he and Zangetsu confronted each other about it, Ichigo learned that his true Shinigami power was the Inner Hollow that had [[BattleInTheCenterOfTheMind trained him in an antagonistic way]]. Once he had accepted both spirits as his weapon, his power levels stabilised for the final BigBad of the story.]]
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