History Main / StrategySchmategy

15th Apr '17 8:00:40 AM LaTriezieme
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

* In A Face Like Glass, a slightly more serious version of this is exploited by the Kleptomancer; he periodically wipes and alters his memories. There is a serious plan, but because he doesn't know what it is and never knows what is and isn't important, it's undetectable.
12th Apr '17 3:28:27 AM ArcaneAzmadi
Is there an issue? Send a Message


Contrast ConfusionFu (unpredictability as a strategy in itself, instead of a function of having no strategy), IndyPloy (where a character doesn't have a plan originally, but comes up with new ones on the fly), XanatosSpeedChess (adjusting a preexisting plan to accommodate a changing situation), GambitRoulette (plans which incorporate a degree of randomness), and CalvinBall (in which the entire game makes no sense, as opposed to just one of the players).

to:

Contrast ConfusionFu (unpredictability as a strategy in itself, instead of a function of having no strategy), IndyPloy (where a character doesn't have a plan originally, but comes up with new ones on the fly), XanatosSpeedChess (adjusting a preexisting plan to accommodate a changing situation), GambitRoulette (plans which incorporate a degree of randomness), and CalvinBall (in which the entire game makes no sense, as opposed to just one of the players).
players) and ButtonMashing (where someone who has no idea how to play a game attempts to batter it into submission with sheer desperate enthusiasm).
7th Apr '17 3:45:14 PM nombretomado
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* Professional {{Poker}} players can sometimes be thwarted by novices and amateurs, who make plays that no professional would be stupid enough to attempt and end up short-circuiting the professionals' expectations.
* The above comment about {{Poker}} is also is true for billiards players.

to:

* Professional {{Poker}} TabletopGame/{{Poker}} players can sometimes be thwarted by novices and amateurs, who make plays that no professional would be stupid enough to attempt and end up short-circuiting the professionals' expectations.
* The above comment about {{Poker}} TabletopGame/{{Poker}} is also is true for billiards players.
4th Mar '17 11:09:59 AM shokoshu
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

** It does work though (well, sometimes), when the master player is playing blindfold handicap: The position gets so wacky that he can't apply his chunking strategy, and a total n00b now might fare better than a beginner who already knows standard positions.
4th Mar '17 10:59:40 AM nombretomado
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* MarkTwain's ''Literature/AConnecticutYankeeInKingArthursCourt'' has this to say:

to:

* MarkTwain's Creator/MarkTwain's ''Literature/AConnecticutYankeeInKingArthursCourt'' has this to say:
22nd Dec '16 4:16:34 AM TheBigBopper
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* In ''Film/ThePhantomMenace'' [[LethalKlutz Jar Jar Binks]] found himself assigned a generalship in the Gungan military thanks to a political appointment. He proceeds to take out a surprising amount of the enemy himself, and the badly outclassed Gungan army manages to last long enough in their stated purpose--being a distraction--to see the opposing droid army decommissioned.

to:

* In ''Film/ThePhantomMenace'' [[LethalKlutz Jar Jar Binks]] Binks found himself assigned a generalship in the Gungan military thanks to a political appointment. He proceeds to take out a surprising amount number of the enemy himself, himself by being a LethalKlutz, and the badly outclassed Gungan army manages to last long enough in their stated purpose--being a distraction--to see the opposing droid army decommissioned.




* There is some truth in the comments about fencing in the Literature section. The people who run most afoul of this are beginning fencers against first-timers, since they want to play by the rules and do things properly, but don't have the technique and reaction time yet. Epeeists in particular are notorious for finding first-timers more challenging than neophytes since epee has no rules of Right of Way. Right of Way defines a dynamic where you can not score on an attack if you have not defended yourself from an opponent's attack, and the wildly flailing new fencer often runs afoul of those rules. Epee lacks those rules, and new fencers often do unpredictable, senseless things than can almost accidentally result in touches. After some practice, they end up doing worse [[CentipedesDilemma because they begin learning what they're doing]], though that's a necessary step to mastering the weapon. This is why epee is not traditionally the first weapon a fencer learns.

to:

\n* There is Here are some truth in the comments thoughts about fencing in how this applies to sword fighting:
** Mark Twain was a little off
the Literature section. The mark when he described the threat to a MasterSwordsman posed by an unpredictable dunce with no training. In styles of swordsmanship based on the principles of a martial art rather than a sport, the context for which the techniques are designed is a DuelToTheDeath with no holds barred. Preserving your own life is more important than defeating your opponent no matter what, so there should be no TakingYouWithMe. You should try to win the fight quickly, since the longer the fight goes on the more it will be affected by variables outside your control, but you should never abandon your defense in your haste to make your attack land first. Beginners tend to leave themselves wide open without even realizing it, and once in a fight tend to either go completely on the defensive so that their opponent is able to keep attacking them until they get lucky, or to attack with no sense of self-preservation so that an opponent who knows what they're doing can run them through without much hazard to themselves. In other words, SturgeonsLaw applies to all the random moves an erratic, untrained person could make. Most of them are bad, and an expert familiar with beginner weaknesses will be able to take them apart.
** In Olympic rules fencing, the
people who run most afoul of this are beginning fencers against first-timers, since they want to play by the rules and do things properly, but don't have the technique and reaction time yet. Epeeists in particular are notorious for finding first-timers more challenging than neophytes since epee has no rules of Right of Way. Right of Way defines a dynamic where you can not score on an attack if you have not defended yourself from an opponent's attack, and the wildly flailing new fencer often runs afoul of those rules. Epee lacks those rules, and new fencers often do unpredictable, senseless things than can almost accidentally result in touches. After some practice, they end up doing worse [[CentipedesDilemma because they begin learning what they're doing]], though that's a necessary step to mastering the weapon. This is why epee is not traditionally the first weapon a fencer learns.



* A martial artist often hates sparring against rank beginners, since their wild flailing is more likely to result in injury to someone than a somewhat skilled opponent's controlled movements. Likewise, a completely untrained fighter relying on instinct and athleticism is often better than a beginning martial artist or boxer. When the training takes effect, the reverse is true - becoming good means passing through a phase of drilling basic movements - and that makes a beginner highly predictable to an expert. This can be a difficult problem for an instructor. "You're really improving" sounds hollow when they did "better" their first time.
** In addition to using strategies that an expert would find unpredictable, there's also the safety issue. Martial arts vary in how much contact is acceptable, but competitors don't generally try to ''hurt'' each other. Whether a beginner will pull a punch and make light contact, miss entirely, or knock his or her opponent on the ground is hard to predict, even for the beginner himself.
** A completely untrained person relies upon natural athleticism, even if they don't know what they're doing. This grants them a fluidity and lack of hesitation that beginners have to surrender and experts relearn. Once an expert has technique and fluidity, on the other hand...

to:

* Creator/DouglasAdams coined the word "Aboyne", which he described as ''"To beat an expert at a game of skill by playing so appallingly bad that none of his clever tactics or strategies are of any use to him."''
* "Beginner's luck" may sometimes come from this -- in a game of moves, counter-moves and counter-counter-moves, sometimes the correct move against a professional is the most basic one. Until he figures out that his opponent IS a beginner and crushes them. It can also result in wasted effort. In MagicTheGathering, for instance, there are a lot of mind games which are possible, but many of them will only be picked up on by sufficiently skilled opponents, making a new player TooDumbToFool.
* In sports or martial arts, a completely untrained person relies upon natural athleticism, even if they don't know what they're doing. This grants them a fluidity and lack of hesitation that beginners have to surrender and relearn. One becomes an expert by perfecting the technique and practicing how to apply it in all kinds of situations, so that when the moment comes they will do the correct thing without hesitating.
* A martial artist often hates sparring against rank beginners, since their wild flailing is more likely to result in unintentional injury to someone than a somewhat skilled opponent's controlled movements. movements.
*
Likewise, a completely untrained fighter relying on instinct and athleticism is often better than a beginning martial artist or boxer. When the training takes effect, the reverse is true - becoming good means passing through a phase of drilling basic movements - and that makes a beginner highly predictable to an expert. This can be a difficult problem for an instructor. "You're really improving" sounds hollow when they did "better" their first time.
** In addition to using strategies that an expert would find unpredictable, there's also the safety issue. Martial arts vary in how much contact is acceptable, but competitors don't generally try to ''hurt'' each other. Whether a beginner will pull a punch and make light contact, miss entirely, or knock his or her opponent on the ground is hard to predict, even for the beginner himself.
** A completely untrained person relies upon natural athleticism, even if they don't know what they're doing. This grants them a fluidity and lack of hesitation that beginners have to surrender and experts relearn. Once an expert has technique and fluidity, on the other hand...
time.
13th Dec '16 3:15:03 AM TargetOnMyBack
Is there an issue? Send a Message



to:

* In ''Literature/TheMeaningOfLiff'', 'Aboyne' means to beat an expert by playing too appallingly for clever tactics to work.
19th Nov '16 5:00:45 PM FordPrefect
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* This doesn't work in TabletopGame/{{chess}}, where it's almost impossible to beat a player who's above your level. This is because if the neophyte makes a bizarre move during the opening it is most likely a bad move, and that alone tells the good player that he's not against a strong opponent. Also, it's said that playing against someone who's way worse than you will dull your skills, and it's highly advised to avoid doing so.

to:

* This doesn't work in TabletopGame/{{chess}}, where it's almost impossible to beat a player who's above your level. This is because if the neophyte makes a bizarre move during the opening it is most likely a bad move, and that alone tells the good player that he's not up against a strong opponent. Also, it's said that playing against someone who's way worse than you will dull your skills, and it's highly advised to avoid doing so.
4th Aug '16 10:57:09 AM Morgenthaler
Is there an issue? Send a Message


[[AC:{{Anime}} and {{Manga}}]]

to:

[[AC:{{Anime}} [[foldercontrol]]

[[folder: Anime
and {{Manga}}]]Manga ]]



[[AC:FanFiction]]

to:

[[AC:FanFiction]][[/folder]]

[[folder: Fan Fiction ]]



[[AC:{{Film}}]]

to:

[[AC:{{Film}}]][[/folder]]

[[folder: Film ]]



[[AC:{{Literature}}]]

to:

[[AC:{{Literature}}]][[/folder]]

[[folder: Literature ]]



[[AC:LiveActionTV]]

to:

[[AC:LiveActionTV]][[/folder]]

[[folder: Live Action TV ]]



[[AC:TabletopGames]]

to:

[[AC:TabletopGames]][[/folder]]

[[folder: Tabletop Games ]]



[[AC:VideoGames]]
* In ''VideoGame/DynastyWarriors'', [[TheBerserker Lu Bu]] is usually portrayed as being like this and scoffing at any sort of strategy. His raw brute power simply makes it unnecessary, and many of his enemies are taken by surprise at how completely lacking in thought his attacks can be. Likewise, [[UpperClassTwit Yuan Shao's]] massive armies and [[InfiniteSupplies vast resources]] have him dismiss the idea that strategy is even necessary, since he can simply [[ZergRush steam]][[WeHaveReserves roll]] over his enemies.
** It should be pointed out that while both Lu Bu and Yuan Shao are major threats, once they go up against someone who actually knows what he's doing and is aware of their weaknesses (like, say, [[MagnificentBastard Cao Cao]]), the strategies they dismiss wind up causing their downfall. To be exact, Cao Cao starves Lu Bu's forces into submission ([[WizardNeedsFoodBadly because even the mightiest warrior needs to eat]]) before executing Lu Bu himself, and devastates Yuan Shao's massive army with surgical strikes before destroying their main supply depot and sending the Yuan army reeling in defeat.

to:

[[AC:VideoGames]]
[[/folder]]

[[folder: Video Games ]]

* In ''VideoGame/DynastyWarriors'', [[TheBerserker Lu Bu]] is usually portrayed as being like this and scoffing at any sort of strategy. His raw brute power simply makes it unnecessary, and many of his enemies are taken by surprise at how completely lacking in thought his attacks can be. Likewise, [[UpperClassTwit Yuan Shao's]] massive armies and [[InfiniteSupplies vast resources]] have him dismiss the idea that strategy is even necessary, since he can simply [[ZergRush steam]][[WeHaveReserves roll]] over his enemies.
enemies.
** It should be pointed out that while both Lu Bu and Yuan Shao are major threats, once they go up against someone who actually knows what he's doing and is aware of their weaknesses (like, say, [[MagnificentBastard Cao Cao]]), the strategies they dismiss wind up causing their downfall. To be exact, Cao Cao starves Lu Bu's forces into submission ([[WizardNeedsFoodBadly because even the mightiest warrior needs to eat]]) before executing Lu Bu himself, and devastates Yuan Shao's massive army with surgical strikes before destroying their main supply depot and sending the Yuan army reeling in defeat.



[[AC:WebComics]]

to:

[[AC:WebComics]][[/folder]]

[[folder: Web Comics ]]



[[AC:WesternAnimation]]

to:

[[AC:WesternAnimation]][[/folder]]

[[folder: Western Animation ]]



[[AC: RealLife]]

to:

[[AC: RealLife]][[/folder]]

[[folder: Real Life ]]


Added DiffLines:

[[/folder]]
15th Jul '16 12:14:03 AM harharhar
Is there an issue? Send a Message


** Some cards have randomness determining their effects (most often coin flips) which can really mess up the enemy or even the player who played it. [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=44656 Goblin assassin]] has a 50% chance of forcing EITHER player to sacrifice a creature any time it or another goblin is played.



* In {{Fighting Game}}s a novice player who resorts to random ButtonMashing can sometimes score wins against more experienced players.

to:

* In {{Fighting Game}}s a novice player who resorts to random ButtonMashing can sometimes score wins against more It's this basic principle that occasionally lets inexperienced {{button mash|ing}}ers beat experienced players.players in fighting games (and other games) at least a few times. Skilled players and the AI are generally predictable, but it can be tricky fighting a flailing foe whose moves are often the ''worst'' in a normal situation.



** There are also the modern pentathaletes. Fencing matches are generally to 5 or 10 hits whereas fencing in the modern pentathalon uses one-hit. Even if predictable in the long run, as long as they are unorthodox enough to get the first hit, they win.




to:

* [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Maurice_Richard Maurice "Rocket" Richard]] was once asked in an interview how he planned his shots on goal. He answered along the lines of "If ''I'' don't know what shot I'm going to make, how will the goalie?"
This list shows the last 10 events of 108. Show all.
http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Main.StrategySchmategy