History Main / StockBritishPhrases

21st Jul '16 1:46:05 PM flootzavut
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*** Also because, while James Marsters can more or less do a British accent, David Boreanaz really can't pull off Irish and it's a complete embarrassment when he tries.



*** Also because, while James Marsters can more or less do a British accent, David Boreanaz really can't pull off Irish and it's a complete embarrassment when he tries.
21st Jul '16 10:16:31 AM flootzavut
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Added DiffLines:

*** Also because, while James Marsters can more or less do a British accent, David Boreanaz really can't pull off Irish and it's a complete embarrassment when he tries.
13th Jun '16 12:20:36 PM anonexistentuser
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* In ''WesternAnimation/ChickenRun'', when "chocks away" is yelled, the chocks are revealed to be boxes of [[TheToblerone Toblerone]] [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Toblerone chocolate]].

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* In ''WesternAnimation/ChickenRun'', when "chocks away" is yelled, the chocks are revealed to be boxes of [[TheToblerone [[SugarWiki/TheToblerone Toblerone]] [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Toblerone [[VisualPun chocolate]].
3rd Jun '16 7:54:17 AM nighttrainfm
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* The ''{{Transformers}}'' franchise, accidentally. "Slag" is their all-purpose swear word (perfect for giant robots) and it often doesn't go over well overseas when 'bots say "Slaggit!" or "[[OhCrap Oh, slag]]!" or "I'm not going out there and getting slagged!" There was even a character named Slag in ''TransformersGeneration1.'' He hasn't been used in quite some time, understandably (and the ''TransformersAnimated'' character who shares his design is called Snarl, with a LampshadeHanging when we heard his name for the first time.)

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* The ''{{Transformers}}'' ''Franchise/{{Transformers}}'' franchise, accidentally. "Slag" is their all-purpose swear word (perfect for giant robots) and it often doesn't go over well overseas when 'bots say "Slaggit!" or "[[OhCrap Oh, slag]]!" or "I'm not going out there and getting slagged!" There was even a character named Slag in ''TransformersGeneration1.'' He hasn't been used in quite some time, understandably (and the ''TransformersAnimated'' ''WesternAnimation/TransformersAnimated'' character who shares his design is called Snarl, with a LampshadeHanging when we heard his name for the first time.)
19th May '16 4:19:34 PM nombretomado
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* "Slag" is one of [[TheMightyBoosh the Hitcher's]] favorite insults.

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* "Slag" is one of [[TheMightyBoosh [[Series/TheMightyBoosh the Hitcher's]] favorite insults.
16th May '16 9:52:20 PM Dravencour
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* Aggro: Agression, trouble, etc. Used in e.g.: ''It seems there's some aggro going on!'' This one is definitely more used in Australia and South Africa.

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* Aggro: Agression, Aggression, trouble, etc. Used in e.g.: ''It seems there's some aggro going on!'' This one is definitely more used in Australia and South Africa.
9th May '16 3:10:59 AM Morgenthaler
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* ''AustinPowers'' uses a lot of these. Parodied to the hilt in the third movie, where Austin and his father start up a conversation in in entirely British jargon, which requires subtitles that eventually degrade into "[[EvenTheSubtitlerIsStumped ??????????]]" as their jargon gets thicker.
* ''TheFullMonty'' used "chuffin'" (as in "Chuffin' Nora!") instead of "naff off" to pre-empt the American ratings sensitivity over strong language.

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* ''AustinPowers'' ''Film/AustinPowers'' uses a lot of these. Parodied to the hilt in the third movie, where Austin and his father start up a conversation in in entirely British jargon, which requires subtitles that eventually degrade into "[[EvenTheSubtitlerIsStumped ??????????]]" as their jargon gets thicker.
* ''TheFullMonty'' ''Film/TheFullMonty'' used "chuffin'" (as in "Chuffin' Nora!") instead of "naff off" to pre-empt the American ratings sensitivity over strong language.



* In JoeOrton's play ''Loot'' (1965) there is a little spin on a stock phrase:

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* In JoeOrton's Creator/JoeOrton's play ''Loot'' (1965) there is a little spin on a stock phrase:



* EnidBlyton's characters use "ass" in the sense of a donkey as a synonym for "idiot" ''a lot'', [[HaveAGayOldTime much to the amusement of later generations of readers.]]

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* EnidBlyton's Creator/EnidBlyton's characters use "ass" in the sense of a donkey as a synonym for "idiot" ''a lot'', [[HaveAGayOldTime much to the amusement of later generations of readers.]]



* In ''{{Porridge}}'' (which is slang for doing time, itself), a classic 1970s sitcom, Ronnie Barker popularised the term "nerk," used as a substitute for "berk" to keep the censors happy (as back then it was a far stronger curse than it is now).

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* In ''{{Porridge}}'' ''Series/{{Porridge}}'' (which is slang for doing time, itself), a classic 1970s sitcom, Ronnie Barker popularised the term "nerk," used as a substitute for "berk" to keep the censors happy (as back then it was a far stronger curse than it is now).



* A humorous variation of "Bob's your uncle" from ''TheYoungOnes'' is "Bob's your auntie's live-in lover".

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* A humorous variation of "Bob's your uncle" from ''TheYoungOnes'' ''Series/TheYoungOnes'' is "Bob's your auntie's live-in lover".



* TheTwoRonnies were extremely fond of stock phrases, as a lot of their sketches hinged on word play and double meanings.

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* TheTwoRonnies ''Series/TheTwoRonnies'' were extremely fond of stock phrases, as a lot of their sketches hinged on word play and double meanings.
3rd May '16 2:28:04 AM Chabal2
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* ''{{ComicBook/Asterix}} and the Britons'' naturally has them, even more hilarious in French since they're transcribed literally ("Goodness gracious" becomes "Bonté graçieuse", etc.). In the English translation, this was adapted to having every sentence end with ", what?"




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* ''{{Literature/Redwall}}'': While every species/location is some British stereotype (searats are Cockney and TalkLikeAPirate, moles are Brummie, etc.), the ones who take the cake are Salamandastron's hares (who are, to a buck, RoyalAirForce WWII-era pilots), ending every other phrase with "wot wot?".



[[AC:TabletopGames]]
* ''TabletopGames/Warhammer40K'', being a British game, occasionally features some.
** Even 40 millenia from now, [[Literature/CiaphasCain fighter pilots still use "tally-ho".]]
** The orks, being a OneGenderRace of FootballHooligans InSpace, use a lot of human loanwords ("'ere we go!", sod) or use their own (zog).



** Yugi [[OohMeAccentsSlipping randomly started speaking with a British accent]] in the flashback to episode 6:

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** Yugi [[OohMeAccentsSlipping randomly started speaking with a British accent]] in the flashback to episode 6:6 (in which episode, his voice slipped back to British from the stress of having a harpoon thrown at him):
7th Apr '16 5:16:23 AM unokkun
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* Wank(er): "To wank" (verb) is "[[ADateWithRosiePalms to masturbate]]". The meaning of "wanker" is left as an exercise for the reader. Given that this is a reasonably strong swear word in the UK (not being used before the watershed as a rule), it is particularly entertaining to hear it used casually in US shows, with a similar level of severity as say "sillyhead" or "twit". Example - ''TheSimpsons'' episode "Trash of the Titans" features two uses of the word and was broadcast at its usual 6pm slot in the UK, causing a rash of complaints and also much falling about with laughter.

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* Wank(er): "To wank" (verb) is "[[ADateWithRosiePalms to masturbate]]". The meaning of "wanker" is and its comparison to American "jerkoff" are left as an exercise for the reader. Given that this is a reasonably strong swear word in the UK (not being used before the watershed as a rule), it is particularly entertaining to hear it used casually in US shows, with a similar level of severity as say "sillyhead" or "twit". Example - ''TheSimpsons'' episode "Trash of the Titans" features two uses of the word and was broadcast at its usual 6pm slot in the UK, causing a rash of complaints and also much falling about with laughter.
10th Mar '16 1:01:37 PM GrammarNavi
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* Bar: The counter of a [[BritishPubs pub]]. Often given as "I'm off to the bar" to denote going to the counter to order drinks.

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* Bar: The counter of a [[BritishPubs [[UsefulNotes/BritishPubs pub]]. Often given as "I'm off to the bar" to denote going to the counter to order drinks.
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