History Main / StockBritishPhrases

23rd Dec '17 5:58:01 PM nombretomado
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* ''{{Literature/Redwall}}'': While every species/location is some British stereotype (searats are Cockney and TalkLikeAPirate, moles are Brummie, etc.), the ones who take the cake are Salamandastron's hares (who are, to a buck, RoyalAirForce WWII-era pilots), ending every other phrase with "wot wot?".

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* ''{{Literature/Redwall}}'': While every species/location is some British stereotype (searats are Cockney and TalkLikeAPirate, moles are Brummie, etc.), the ones who take the cake are Salamandastron's hares (who are, to a buck, RoyalAirForce [[UsefulNotes/BritsWithBattleships Royal Air Force]] WWII-era pilots), ending every other phrase with "wot wot?".
4th Dec '17 9:26:02 PM FactoidCow
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* Mac Manc [=McManx=] of ''Get Fuzzy'' uses these to the point that no one can understand what he's saying.

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* Mac Manc [=McManx=] of ''Get Fuzzy'' ''ComicStrip/GetFuzzy'' uses these to the point that no one can understand what he's saying.
30th Nov '17 11:21:49 PM Chabal2
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* ''{{ComicBook/Asterix}} and the Britons'' naturally has them, even more hilarious in French since they're transcribed literally ("Goodness gracious" becomes "Bonté graçieuse", etc.). In the English translation, this was adapted to having every sentence end with ", what?"

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* ''{{ComicBook/Asterix}} and the Britons'' naturally has them, even more hilarious in French since they're transcribed literally ("Goodness gracious" becomes "Bonté graçieuse", "StiffUpperLip" becomes "Levre superieure rigide", etc.). In the English translation, this was adapted to having every sentence end with ", what?"
* The ''ComicBook/LuckyLuke'' story "The Tenderfoot" features an UnflappableEnglishman inheriting a ranch in the U.S. and spouting just about every British phrase you can think of (and even funnier in the English version where SeparatedByACommonLanguage comes into play).
* The Major in the Creator/GarthEnnis comic ''ComicBook/BloodyMary'' becomes more British with every sentence he speaks.



** In Carrot's first appearance, he uses some of the traditional copper phrases in Dwarfish, which are then [[BlindIdiotTranslation translated word-for-word]] in footnotes. ("Good day, good day, good day! What is all of this that is going on in this place?")

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** In Carrot's first appearance, he uses some of the traditional copper phrases in Dwarfish, which are then [[BlindIdiotTranslation translated word-for-word]] in footnotes. footnotes ("Good day, good day, good day! What is all of this that is going on in this place?")place?").




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** In one case, "a word in your shell-like ear" becomes even funnier as it's addressed to a mouse.



* When you are arrested in ''VideoGame/GrandTheftAuto: London 1969'', the police say "You're Nicked!" This appears on screen instead of "Busted!" When you die, it's "You're Brown Bread!" (Cockney Rhyming slang for dead)

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* When you are arrested in ''VideoGame/GrandTheftAuto: London 1969'', the police say "You're Nicked!" This appears on screen instead of "Busted!" When you die, it's "You're Brown Bread!" (Cockney Rhyming slang for dead)dead).
** ''VideoGame/GrandTheftAutoSanAndreas'' has the Clucking Bell (rhyming slang for "fucking hell").
28th Nov '17 6:25:31 PM nombretomado
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* Ta: "Thanks" (very informal). Probably derived from the Danish "Tak", and used mainly in Britain (particularly [[LondonTown London]] and [[OopNorth the North]]), though occasionally heard in Ireland and Australia as well. "Ta very much(ly)" is a common rendition. Usually taught to very young children who can't yet wrap their mouths around "thank you" or "thanks". "Say ta."

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* Ta: "Thanks" (very informal). Probably derived from the Danish "Tak", and used mainly in Britain (particularly [[LondonTown London]] UsefulNotes/{{London}} and [[OopNorth the North]]), though occasionally heard in Ireland and Australia as well. "Ta very much(ly)" is a common rendition. Usually taught to very young children who can't yet wrap their mouths around "thank you" or "thanks". "Say ta."
14th Nov '17 4:56:14 AM Kitchen90
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Notable users of StockBritishPhrases:

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Notable !!Notable users of StockBritishPhrases:
Stock British Phrases:
14th Nov '17 4:55:37 AM Kitchen90
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* Bird: Woman; compare to US English "chick". More common OopNorth, though also used in cockney slang.

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* Bird: Woman; compare to US English "chick". More common OopNorth, though also used in cockney Cockney slang.



** Has been explained as Cockney rhyming slang 'cobbler's awls'='balls', with 'balls' meaning 'nonsense' or 'I state you are incorrect/speaking nonsense'.

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** Has been explained as Cockney UsefulNotes/{{Cockney rhyming slang slang}} 'cobbler's awls'='balls', with 'balls' meaning 'nonsense' or 'I state you are incorrect/speaking nonsense'.



* Muppet: Idiot. Often used in tandem with ''Shut it, you slag!'', when parodying cockneys. The OED traces the colloquial usage to 1989, with no mention before the introduction of [[Series/TheMuppetShow the proper Muppets]] around 1957.

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* Muppet: Idiot. Often used in tandem with ''Shut it, you slag!'', when parodying cockneys.Cockneys. The OED traces the colloquial usage to 1989, with no mention before the introduction of [[Series/TheMuppetShow the proper Muppets]] around 1957.



* Wang: Slang for penis and a common chinese surname. Also means 'to throw/put' e.g. 'Wang the kettle on.'

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* Wang: Slang for penis and a common chinese Chinese surname. Also means 'to throw/put' e.g. 'Wang the kettle on.'



* Wangle: An archaic phrase referring to getting someting done through manipulation and deceiving such as wangling your way out of a sticky situation.

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* Wangle: An archaic phrase referring to getting someting something done through manipulation and deceiving such as wangling your way out of a sticky situation.



* Creator/SidneyJames, who was born in South Africa, adopted a Cockney accent when he was acting in the UK and had several Cockney slang terms in the ''Film/{{Carry On|Series}}'' films, such as "Knickers!", and "Cor, blimey."



* "Sod a dog," indicating admission of a mistake, is used by Hugh Grant in the film ''Notting Hill''; censored in the American television version. It might be just a bit of silly faux English just for that film.

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* "Sod a dog," indicating an admission of a mistake, is used by Hugh Grant in the film ''Notting Hill''; censored in the American television version. It might be just a bit of silly faux English just for that film.



* ''Film/AustinPowers'' uses a lot of these. Parodied to the hilt in the third movie, where Austin and his father start up a conversation in in entirely British jargon, which requires subtitles that eventually degrade into "[[EvenTheSubtitlerIsStumped ??????????]]" as their jargon gets thicker.

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* ''Film/AustinPowers'' uses a lot of these. Parodied to the hilt in the third movie, where Austin and his father start up a conversation in in entirely British jargon, which requires subtitles that eventually degrade into "[[EvenTheSubtitlerIsStumped ??????????]]" as their jargon gets thicker.
15th Oct '17 2:42:42 PM nombretomado
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* What's all this then?: What a [[BritishCoppers bobby]] (patrol officer) says upon arriving at the scene of [[HilarityEnsues whatever mayhem is occuring]]. Usually preceded by "All right, all right", "'Ello, 'ello, 'ello" or "Now then, now then."

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* What's all this then?: What a [[BritishCoppers [[UsefulNotes/BritishCoppers bobby]] (patrol officer) says upon arriving at the scene of [[HilarityEnsues whatever mayhem is occuring]].occurring]]. Usually preceded by "All right, all right", "'Ello, 'ello, 'ello" or "Now then, now then."
1st Sep '17 4:19:44 PM nombretomado
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* Lush: Stunning, or totally awesome. Most often used in Wales ("These chips are right lush!"), but its use has spread as a result of the popularity of GavinAndStacey.

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* Lush: Stunning, or totally awesome. Most often used in Wales ("These chips are right lush!"), but its use has spread as a result of the popularity of GavinAndStacey.''Series/GavinAndStacey''.
27th Aug '17 6:02:33 PM LukeLynch
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Added DiffLines:

** ''Film/MontyPythonMostlyLiveOneDownFiveToGo'' has the word "bugger" all over the place, most notably qualifying for this with "Galaxy Song":
--> And hope that there's intelligent life somewhere out in space\\
[[spoiler:'Cos there's '''bugger all''' down here on Earth!]]
21st Jun '17 5:54:19 PM Jgorgon
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** To up the offensiveness of the line, "[[CountryMatters you cyyyant!]]" may be substituted; the word is apparently considerably less offensive in British English (although still top of the list).
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