History Main / StatuteOfLimitations

13th Feb '17 11:33:40 AM Gosicrystal
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* ''VideoGame/SaintsRowII'': When you first meet him, Johnny Gat is on trial for 387 counts of murder and one count of attempted murder. Gat tries to argue that with statutes of limitations being what they are, it should be closer to 250, only to be told by an irate judge that there is no statute of limitations on murder.
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[[folder:Visual Novels]]



** Similarly, worries that [[spoiler: SL-9]] will never be solved before the statute runs out prompts [[spoiler:Marshall to approach Goodman, the head detective, for help. Goodman initially refuses. When the time comes to transfer the evidence, though, he asks to reopen the case and give the evidence to Marshall]], but [[spoiler: Gant murders him and orders Lana to take the fall]].
** The statute of limitations is made an even more important point in ''Gyakuten Kenji 2'', in the [[spoiler:IS-7]] incident, the [[spoiler:precursor to DL-6]]. It happened a year before [[spoiler:DL-6 in December of 2000, and even though someone was convicted as an accomplice to murder after a lengthy year long trial (this was before the 3 day trial system was implemented into the Ace Attorney universe), the culprit himself was never found, until around 18 years later in 2019. The real killer, after some persuasion, confessed, confident in the fact he can't be charged or convicted due to statues of limitations having expired 3 years and 4 months prior. However, Edgeworth uses some legal details and holes to show that, in actual fact, the limitations aren't yet over [The fact that if a suspect flees the country, the limitations are put on hold until they return, and that if any possible accomplices are put on trial, then the limitations are frozen until a verdict is reached, both of which combined put the limitations period at 19 years, which they were just within], allowing the bad guy to get his just-desserts]].
*** Although, there's a "loop-hole" within how the limitation extensions work. The period of extension in which is caused by an accomplishes trial period relies on the successful outcome of said trial. Therefore, should the accomplice be found guilty, the extension of the limitians, relies on the accomplices guilt. The IS-7 Incident came upon this problem when[[spoiler:, as explained above, one of extensions caused by the falsely convicted defendant's trial caused the limitations to reach past the 4 months that it was otherwise just short off reaching. The guilt of the real killer made it clear that the accomplice was falsely charged under a faulty trial, however if the "accomplices" is retried and found innocent, then the extension caused by the initial trial 18 years prior becomes void, causing the limitations to once short by 4 months]]. AKA: The killer's guilt relies on the defendant's guilt as an accomplice, but the defendant's guilt now becomes proven false due to the killer's guilt. The legal version of Catch-22.
* ''VideoGame/SaintsRowII'': When you first meet him, Johnny Gat is on trial for 387 counts of murder and one count of attempted murder. Gat tries to argue that with statutes of limitations being what they are, it should be closer to 250, only to be told by an irate judge that there is no statute of limitations on murder.

to:

** Similarly, worries Worries that [[spoiler: SL-9]] the [[spoiler:SL-9]] incident will never be truly[[note]]There was a conviction, but Jake Marshall thinks they executed the wrong man[[/note]] solved before the two-year statute runs out prompts [[spoiler:Marshall to approach Goodman, the head detective, for help. Goodman initially refuses. When the time comes to transfer the evidence, though, he asks to reopen the case and give the evidence to Marshall]], but [[spoiler: Gant murders him and orders Lana to take the fall]].
** The statute of limitations is made an even more important point plays a huge role in ''Gyakuten Kenji 2'', in the [[spoiler:IS-7]] incident, the [[spoiler:precursor to DL-6]]. It happened a year before [[spoiler:DL-6 in December of 2000, and even though someone was convicted as an accomplice to murder after a lengthy year long year-long trial (this was before the 3 day 3-day trial system was implemented into the Ace Attorney ''Ace Attorney'' universe), the culprit himself was never found, found until around 18 years later in 2019. The real killer, after some persuasion, confessed, confident in the fact he can't be charged or convicted due to statues of limitations having expired 3 years and 4 months prior. However, Edgeworth uses some legal details and holes to show that, in actual fact, the limitations aren't yet over [The (the fact that if a suspect flees the country, the limitations are put on hold until they return, and that if any possible accomplices are put on trial, then the limitations are frozen until a verdict is reached, both of which combined put the limitations period at 19 years, which they were just within], within), allowing the bad guy to get his just-desserts]].
***
just-desserts]].\\\
Although, there's a "loop-hole" within how the limitation extensions work. The period of extension in which that is caused by an accomplishes accomplice's trial period duration relies on the successful outcome of said trial. Therefore, should the accomplice be found guilty, the extension of the limitians, limitations relies on the accomplices accomplice's guilt. The IS-7 Incident came upon this problem when[[spoiler:, when, as explained above, one [[spoiler:one of the extensions caused by the falsely convicted defendant's trial caused the limitations to reach past the 4 months that it was otherwise just short off of reaching. The guilt of the real killer made it clear that the accomplice was falsely charged under a faulty trial, however trial. However, if the "accomplices" "accomplice" is retried and found innocent, then the extension caused by the initial trial 18 years prior becomes void, causing the limitations to once again be short by 4 months]]. AKA: The killer's guilt relies on the defendant's guilt as an accomplice, but the defendant's guilt is now becomes proven false due to the killer's guilt. The legal version of Catch-22.
* ''VideoGame/SaintsRowII'': When you first meet him, Johnny Gat is on trial for 387 counts of murder and one count of attempted murder. Gat tries to argue that with statutes of limitations being what they are, it should be closer to 250, only to be told by an irate judge that there is no statute of limitations on murder.
the Catch22Dilemma.
6th Feb '17 2:17:52 PM nielas
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* On ''Series/{{Elementary}}'' a man appears to escape justice because the statute of limitations on a vicious assault expires an hour before the police identify him and are able to get an arrest warrant. However, Sherlock is able to prove that the man left the country for a day to go see a hockey game in Canada. If the perpetrator of a crime leaves the country, the principle of "tolling" can be applied and the statute of limitations is extended by the duration of the absence. This prevents criminals from fleeing the country and waiting out the statute of limitations in another country. In this case it means that the police have another day to file charges.
22nd Oct '16 10:07:36 AM KingLyger
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** The statute of limitations running out on [[spoiler:DL-6]] is what kicks off the events surrounding case 1-4.

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** The statute of limitations running out on [[spoiler:DL-6]] a murder trial is what kicks off the events surrounding case 1-4.1-4. The trial ends up taking place on the last day before the statute of limitations runs out, and Phoenix has to take down an AmoralAttorney [[DefeatingTheUndefeatable that has never lost]].
16th Sep '16 6:23:37 PM karstovich2
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This is highly variable by jurisdiction and the nature of the crime/cause of action, but the basic principle is that if a suspect is not brought to trial within a reasonable amount of time, the law cannot keep pursuing them. Some jurisdictions "start the clock" when the crime/tort is committed, others when a crime/tort is discovered--this one is particularly common on the civil tort side, where product-liability (like drugs later found to be unsafe) and toxic torts (companies dumping chemicals into the water/air/whatever) typically only cause damage years down the road (e.g. by causing cancer)--and there may be circumstances that extend the allowable time. Of course the big exception is the crime of murder, having no statute of limitations in most jurisdictions. Note however that its civil equivalent, the tort of wrongful death, usually does have a statute of limitations, and when it doesn't, the equitable doctrine of [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Laches_(equity) laches]] applies. Other "higher criminal order" crimes such as rape or treason may have statutes of limitations depending on the jurisdictions.

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This is highly variable by jurisdiction and the nature of the crime/cause of action, but the basic principle is that if a suspect legal action is not brought to trial initiated against someone who violated the law within a reasonable particular amount of time, the law cannot keep pursuing them. Some jurisdictions "start the clock" when the crime/tort is committed, others when a crime/tort is discovered--this one is particularly common on the civil tort side, where product-liability (like drugs later found to be unsafe) and toxic torts (companies dumping chemicals into the water/air/whatever) typically only cause damage years down the road (e.g. by causing cancer)--and there may be circumstances that extend the allowable time. Of course the big exception is the crime of murder, having no statute of limitations in most jurisdictions. Note however that its civil equivalent, the tort of wrongful death, usually does have a statute of limitations, and when it doesn't, the equitable doctrine of [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Laches_(equity) laches]] applies. Other "higher criminal order" crimes such as rape or treason may have statutes of limitations depending on the jurisdictions.
16th Sep '16 6:20:15 PM karstovich2
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This is highly variable by jurisdiction and the kind of crime, but the basic principle is that if a suspect is not brought to trial within a reasonable amount of time, the law cannot keep pursuing them. Some jurisdictions "start the clock" when the crime/tort is committed, others when a crime/tort is discovered--this one is particularly common on the civil tort side, where product-liability (like drugs later found to be unsafe) and toxic torts (companies dumping chemicals into the water/air/whatever) typically only cause damage years down the road (e.g. by causing cancer)--and there may be circumstances that extend the allowable time. Of course the big exception is the crime of murder, having no statute of limitations in most jurisdictions. Note however that its civil equivalent, the tort of wrongful death, usually does have a statute of limitations, and when it doesn't, the equitable doctrine of [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Laches_(equity) laches]] applies. Other "higher criminal order" crimes such as rape or treason may have statutes of limitations depending on the jurisdictions.

to:

This is highly variable by jurisdiction and the kind nature of crime, the crime/cause of action, but the basic principle is that if a suspect is not brought to trial within a reasonable amount of time, the law cannot keep pursuing them. Some jurisdictions "start the clock" when the crime/tort is committed, others when a crime/tort is discovered--this one is particularly common on the civil tort side, where product-liability (like drugs later found to be unsafe) and toxic torts (companies dumping chemicals into the water/air/whatever) typically only cause damage years down the road (e.g. by causing cancer)--and there may be circumstances that extend the allowable time. Of course the big exception is the crime of murder, having no statute of limitations in most jurisdictions. Note however that its civil equivalent, the tort of wrongful death, usually does have a statute of limitations, and when it doesn't, the equitable doctrine of [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Laches_(equity) laches]] applies. Other "higher criminal order" crimes such as rape or treason may have statutes of limitations depending on the jurisdictions.
6th Sep '16 3:10:08 PM faunas
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Known as a ''(period of) prescription'' in Civil Law countries.
27th Jun '16 7:27:32 PM jormis29
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* Discussed in ''Series/{{OrangeIsTheNewBlack}}''. Piper's crime was committed ten years prior to her conviction. The statute of limitations for her crime is twelve years.

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* Discussed in ''Series/{{OrangeIsTheNewBlack}}''.''Series/OrangeIsTheNewBlack''. Piper's crime was committed ten years prior to her conviction. The statute of limitations for her crime is twelve years.
17th Jun '16 1:35:29 AM Divra
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* ''VideoGame/SaintsRowII'': When you first meet him, Johnny Gat is on trial for 387 counts of murder and one count of attempted murder. Gat tries to argue that with statutes of limitations being what they are, it should be closer to 200, only to be told by an irate judge that there is no statute of limitations on murder.

to:

* ''VideoGame/SaintsRowII'': When you first meet him, Johnny Gat is on trial for 387 counts of murder and one count of attempted murder. Gat tries to argue that with statutes of limitations being what they are, it should be closer to 200, 250, only to be told by an irate judge that there is no statute of limitations on murder.
16th Jun '16 11:57:13 AM Divra
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* ''VideoGame/SaintsRowTheThird'': When you first meet him, Johnny Gat is on trial for 300 counts of murder. Gat tries to argue that with statutes of limitations being what they are, it should be closer to 200, only to be told by an irate judge that there is no statute of limitations on murder.

to:

* ''VideoGame/SaintsRowTheThird'': ''VideoGame/SaintsRowII'': When you first meet him, Johnny Gat is on trial for 300 387 counts of murder and one count of attempted murder. Gat tries to argue that with statutes of limitations being what they are, it should be closer to 200, only to be told by an irate judge that there is no statute of limitations on murder.
14th Jun '16 2:55:12 PM Divra
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* ''VideoGame/SaintsRowTheThird'': When you first meet him, Johnny Gat is on trial for 300 counts of murder. Gat tries to argue that with statutes of limitations being what they are, it should be closer to 200, only to be told by an irate judge that there is no statute of limitations on murder.
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Main.StatuteOfLimitations