History Main / SpaceCompression

24th Apr '17 12:53:11 PM Abodos
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** While ''VideoGame/TheLegendOfZeldaBreathOfTheWild'' was heavily advertised as having the largest, most expansive ''Zelda'' world yet, it still only takes about an hour of real-life time to go from one corner to the other. The lack of large settlements is somewhat justified, however, by the story taking place AfterTheEnd, in which the [[StarfishRobots Guardians]] obliterated the capital and several other towns in Central Hyrule while the smaller and/or further away villages were spared.
15th Apr '17 5:25:32 PM LordInsane
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** ''[[VideoGame/TheElderScrollsIIDaggerfall Daggerfall]]'' also featured the provinces of High Rock and Hammerfell at their full size. Bethesda says that their physical size amounts to 188,000 square miles (or 487,000 in square kilometers) -- that's twice the size of Great Britain. There are ''15,000'' full-sized towns, cities, villages, and dungeons to explore, and more than 750,000 [=NPCs=] capable of interaction -- impressive for a game from 1996. However, most of the terrain is randomly generated, non-quest related locations are [[ProceduralGeneration procedurally generated]], and traveling by foot is as lengthy and tedious as [[WebVideo/DesertBusForHope playing Desert Bus]]. In the case of cities, most houses cannot be entered even by the most skilled thieves -- the player will be told "This house contains nothing of interest."

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** ''[[VideoGame/TheElderScrollsIIDaggerfall Daggerfall]]'' also featured part of the provinces of High Rock and Hammerfell at their full size. Bethesda says that their physical size amounts to 188,000 square miles (or 487,000 in square kilometers) -- that's twice the size of Great Britain. There are ''15,000'' full-sized towns, cities, villages, and dungeons to explore, and more than 750,000 [=NPCs=] capable of interaction -- impressive for a game from 1996. However, most of the terrain is randomly generated, non-quest related locations are [[ProceduralGeneration procedurally generated]], and traveling by foot is as lengthy and tedious as [[WebVideo/DesertBusForHope playing Desert Bus]]. In the case of cities, most houses cannot be entered even by the most skilled thieves -- the player will be told "This house contains nothing of interest."
22nd Mar '17 7:42:57 AM BeerBaron
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** The first game, ''VideoGame/TheElderScrollsArena'', was the largest and most fully-featured in terms of both square mileage and population -- you could explore the entire continent of Tamriel which was on a scale with an actual real-life continent. Mind, the people and scenery tended to get a bit repetitive...
** ''VideoGame/TheElderScrollsIIDaggerfall'' also featured the provinces of High Rock and Hammerfell at their full size. Bethesda says that their physical size amounts to 188,000 square miles (or 487,000 in square kilometers) -- that's twice the size of Great Britain. There are ''15,000'' full-sized towns, cities, villages, and dungeons to explore, and more than 750,000 [=NPCs=] capable of interaction -- impressive for a game from 1996. However, most of the terrain is randomly generated, and traveling by foot is as lengthy and tedious as [[WebVideo/DesertBusForHope playing Desert Bus]]. In the case of cities, most houses cannot be entered even by the most skilled thieves -- the player will be told "This house contains nothing of interest."
** ''VideoGame/TheElderScrollsIIIMorrowind'' was the point where things changed, and to date is the game with the tiniest explorable area. Bethesda's game director and executive producer Todd Howard has said that ''Morrowind's'' physical size is 0.01% that of ''Daggerfall'' -- only 10 square miles (or 25.9 square kilometers). Bethesda attempted to disguise this fact by using heavy fog effects (which, when removed with a patch, reveals that major cities are no more than 100 meters apart) and by requiring travelers to take winding detours through channels, bridges over gaps and around the ghostfence. This was a conscious decision by Bethesda; although the scaled down world would be incongruous with the vast explorable lands from before, they could afford to spend more time giving the fewer [=NPCs=] and locations more depth and interactivity.
** ''VideoGame/TheElderScrollsIVOblivion'' follows the same development philosophy as ''Morrowind'', but is somewhat larger as the explorable area is 16 square miles (41.4 square kilometers). Lore would have you believe that Cyrodiil is the heart of a continent-spanning empire; in-game, it's smaller than most of Europe's microstates. City Isle, which is about the size of Great Britain on the world map, is scarcely large enough to contain the Imperial City, which is as big as a large parking lot. In fact, the Imperial Province is small enough that with the visibility set to maximum and fog options turned off, a player can still see the Imperial City's central tower when climbing mountains near the border.
*** The level of vertical exaggeration applied to said mountains is fairly incredible too; the road from the Imperial City up to Bruma is almost all at a 30 degree (or more) slope. The chances of ever getting something such as a horse and cart up there don't seem good -- or wouldn't be, if the citizens ever needed to transport anything... This is partly because while ''size'' was increased compared to ''Morrowind'', so was the compression (as Morrowind's Vvardenfell represented a bit less than half of a mid-size province, while Oblivion's Cyrodiil represents almost all of the largest by far province).
** ''VideoGame/TheElderScrollsVSkyrim'' also continues to play this straight; Bethseda says the explorable area is comparable in size to ''Oblivion'', though ''Skyrim'' also uses winding pathways as was done in ''Morrowind'' to give a sense of vastness. The way the world has shrunken down stands out when comparing locations featured in ''Arena'' to ''Skyrim'', such as the town of Riverwood. In ''Arena'' it's a bustling town that contains 200 or 300 buildings, but in ''Skyrim'' it's a hamlet with seven houses.

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** The first game, ''VideoGame/TheElderScrollsArena'', ''[[VideoGame/TheElderScrollsArena Arena]]'', was the largest and most fully-featured in terms of both square mileage and population -- you could explore the entire continent of Tamriel which was on a scale with an actual real-life continent. Mind, due to the people game using RandomlyGeneratedLevels, every place and scenery tended to get a bit repetitive...
NPC not associated with the main quest was rather lacking in uniqueness...
** ''VideoGame/TheElderScrollsIIDaggerfall'' ''[[VideoGame/TheElderScrollsIIDaggerfall Daggerfall]]'' also featured the provinces of High Rock and Hammerfell at their full size. Bethesda says that their physical size amounts to 188,000 square miles (or 487,000 in square kilometers) -- that's twice the size of Great Britain. There are ''15,000'' full-sized towns, cities, villages, and dungeons to explore, and more than 750,000 [=NPCs=] capable of interaction -- impressive for a game from 1996. However, most of the terrain is randomly generated, non-quest related locations are [[ProceduralGeneration procedurally generated]], and traveling by foot is as lengthy and tedious as [[WebVideo/DesertBusForHope playing Desert Bus]]. In the case of cities, most houses cannot be entered even by the most skilled thieves -- the player will be told "This house contains nothing of interest."
** ''VideoGame/TheElderScrollsIIIMorrowind'' ''[[VideoGame/TheElderScrollsIIIMorrowind Morrowind]]'' was the point where things changed, and to date is the game with the tiniest explorable area. Bethesda's game director and executive producer Todd Howard has said that ''Morrowind's'' physical size is 0.01% that of ''Daggerfall'' -- only 10 square miles (or 25.9 square kilometers). Bethesda attempted to disguise this fact by using heavy fog effects (which, when removed with a patch, reveals that major Stated-to-be-massive cities are no more than 100 meters apart) contain only a few dozen [=NPCs=] at most, while many of the smaller settlements have populations in the low teens. [[TropesAreNotBad However]], it traded away the massive size of ''Arena'' and by requiring travelers to take winding detours through channels, bridges over gaps and around the ghostfence. This was ''Daggerfall'' for a conscious decision by Bethesda; although the scaled down world would be incongruous far greater content density, with the vast explorable lands from before, they could afford entire world being hand-build as opposed to spend more time giving relying on [[ProceduralGeneration procedural]] or [[RandomlyGeneratedLevels random]] generation like the fewer [=NPCs=] previous games. There is also an in-universe justification: you only visit a ''district'' of Morrowind called Vvardenfell, which was only recently settled by the rest of Tamriel, and locations more depth most of the population was sparse and interactivity.
consisted of the native Ashlanders and the worshippers of the Tribunal and Great Houses.
** ''VideoGame/TheElderScrollsIVOblivion'' ''[[VideoGame/TheElderScrollsIVOblivion Oblivion]]'' follows the same development philosophy as ''Morrowind'', but is somewhat larger as the explorable area is 16 square miles (41.4 square kilometers). Lore would have you believe that Cyrodiil is the heart of a continent-spanning empire; in-game, it's smaller than most of Europe's microstates. City Isle, which is about the size of Great Britain on the world map, is scarcely large enough to contain the Imperial City, which is as big as a large parking lot. In fact, the Imperial Province is small enough that with the visibility set to maximum and fog options turned off, a player can still see the Imperial City's central tower when climbing mountains near the border.
***
border. The level of vertical exaggeration applied to said mountains is fairly incredible too; the road from the Imperial City up to Bruma is almost all at a 30 degree (or more) slope. The chances of ever getting something such as a horse and cart up there don't seem good -- or wouldn't be, if the citizens ever needed to transport anything... This is partly because while ''size'' was increased compared to ''Morrowind'', so was the compression (as Morrowind's Vvardenfell represented a bit less than half of a mid-size province, while Oblivion's Cyrodiil represents almost all of the largest by far province).
** ''VideoGame/TheElderScrollsVSkyrim'' ''[[VideoGame/TheElderScrollsVSkyrim Skyrim]]'' also continues to play this straight; Bethseda says the explorable area is comparable in size to ''Oblivion'', though ''Skyrim'' also uses winding pathways as was done in ''Morrowind'' to give a greater sense of vastness. The way the world has shrunken down stands out when comparing locations featured in ''Arena'' to ''Skyrim'', such as the town of Riverwood. In ''Arena'' it's a bustling town that contains 200 or 300 buildings, but in ''Skyrim'' it's a hamlet with seven houses.
14th Feb '17 3:09:06 PM Gosicrystal
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* ''Franchise/{{Pokemon}}'''s towns and cities are remarkably close together; even taking into account all the RandomEncounters, once all the {{Broken Bridge}}s are fixed, it takes ''maybe'' an hour to circuit the Kanto region. Even the largest cities have a few dozen buildings, and maybe eight you can actually enter.
** Not to mention that in ''[[VideoGame/PokemonGoldAndSilver HeartGold and SoulSilver]]'', the Pokemon following you usually takes up one square, regardless of how big the 'Dex says they should be.
** ''[[VideoGame/PokemonRubyAndSapphire Omega Ruby and Alpha Sapphire]]'' are especially bad, making the claim that it would take a swimmer three days to lap the volcanic cone encircling Sootopolis City. Not counting random encounters, it takes the player about 15 seconds to travel that same distance.

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* ''Franchise/{{Pokemon}}'''s towns and cities are remarkably close together; even taking into account all the RandomEncounters, once all the {{Broken Bridge}}s are fixed, it takes ''maybe'' an hour to circuit the Kanto region. Even the largest cities have a few dozen buildings, and maybe eight you can actually enter.
** Not to mention that in ''[[VideoGame/PokemonGoldAndSilver HeartGold and SoulSilver]]'', the Pokemon following you usually takes up one square, regardless of how big the 'Dex says they should be.
**
enter. ''[[VideoGame/PokemonRubyAndSapphire Omega Ruby and Alpha Sapphire]]'' are especially bad, making the claim that it would take a swimmer three days to lap the volcanic cone encircling Sootopolis City. Not counting random encounters, it takes the player about 15 seconds to travel that same distance.
5th Nov '16 9:24:02 PM GorcAndPic
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** Perhaps the best example of the compression of Middle-earth is the distance from the Brandywine Bridge to the Bucklebury Ferry. In the books, the ferry is stated to be twenty miles south of the bridge. In the game, the bridge is clearly visible from the ferry.
17th Sep '16 6:38:25 AM BreadBull
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* In ''VideoGame/{{Minecraft}}'', while the actual area of a game world, not counting the glitchy [[EldritchLocation "far lands"]] is over 140 million square kilometers (~50 million square miles), biomes are at most a few hundred meters across. The seemingly lightning-fast powered minecarts are actually going at around 40 km/h (~25 mph).

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* In ''VideoGame/{{Minecraft}}'', while the actual area of a game world, not counting the glitchy [[EldritchLocation "far lands"]] is over 140 million square kilometers (~50 million square miles), biomes are at most a few hundred meters across. (In a few versions it was even possible to see the edge of a biome when standing in the center of it.) The seemingly lightning-fast powered minecarts are actually going at around 40 km/h (~25 mph).
10th Jul '16 12:44:58 PM Discar
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-->--'''VideoGame/KnightsOfTheOldRepublic'''

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-->--'''VideoGame/KnightsOfTheOldRepublic'''
-->-- ''VideoGame/KnightsOfTheOldRepublic''
25th Jun '16 12:25:54 PM Chromatix
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** Actually ''inverted'', as the game world is cylindrical instead of spheroidal, so many distances are noticeably longer than they should be. At 60N latitude (roughly Scapa Flow / Baltic Sea), one degree of longitude should be about 60km, but it is nearer 120km in-game.
7th Jun '16 7:27:56 AM TimeTravelerEon
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* The world of ''VideoGame/{{Elsword}}'' is large enough to be broken up into two continents, with multiple countries within. The map is quite large as well, as seen [[http://elwiki.net/wiki/images/d/df/MappaElios.png here]]. Unfortunately it's entirely possible to cross from the very first village on the map to the last in about five minutes, due to the linearity of the game.
5th Mar '16 12:07:17 PM Odacon_Spy
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* ''VideoGame/JustCause'' and its sequel are set on fictional island archipeligos, which, whilst immense by videogame standards (''Just Cause 2'''s map is around 40 square kilometers), contain massive compression by real world standards: In JC2, you can see a snow-covered mountain range, which is just above a steamy jungle, and across a small bay from an arid desert plateau.

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* ''VideoGame/JustCause'' and its sequel sequels are set on fictional island archipeligos, archipelagos, which, whilst immense by videogame standards (''Just Cause 2'''s map is around 40 square kilometers), contain massive compression by real world standards: In JC2, you can see a snow-covered mountain range, which is just above a steamy jungle, and across a small bay from an arid desert plateau.
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Main.SpaceCompression