History Main / SolomonDivorce

29th Jun '17 1:45:16 PM fruitstripegum
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* Elan and his EvilTwin Nale, from ''Webcomic/TheOrderOfTheStick'', were raised by their mother and father respectively, after they divorced over CharacterAlignment issues. Elan theorizes that they intentionally didn't tell either twin about the other, so as to [[GenreSavvy increase the dramatic tension should they ever meet as adults]]. Elan's correct about his father, at least in regards to why he didn't tell the one ''he'' raised. For their mother's part, Elan later recalls finding her from crying time to time over a lost "Nail" when he was a child. At the time, he thought she was just upset over carpentry but looking back it seems she was too heartbroken to ever explain the situation to Elan.

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* Elan and his EvilTwin Nale, from ''Webcomic/TheOrderOfTheStick'', were raised by their mother and father respectively, after they divorced over CharacterAlignment issues. Elan theorizes that they intentionally didn't tell either twin about the other, so as to [[GenreSavvy increase the dramatic tension should they ever meet as adults]]. Elan's correct about his father, at least in regards to why he didn't tell the one ''he'' raised. For their mother's part, Elan later recalls finding her from crying from time to time over a lost "Nail" when he was a child. At the time, he thought she was just upset over carpentry but looking back it seems she was too heartbroken to ever explain the situation to Elan.
21st Jun '17 7:17:39 AM fruitstripegum
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* ''Anime/FreshPrettyCure'': Miki Aoni/Cure Berry lives with just her mom, who was divorced with her DisappearedDad and taking her brother Kazuki with him. They just coincidentally attend to the same school, and then Miki took advantage that nobody noticed the trope happening in their family, to ask Kazuki to pretend that they're a couple, just so Miki doesn't get swarmed with a lot of unwanted admirers.

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* ''Anime/FreshPrettyCure'': Miki Aoni/Cure Berry lives with just her mom, who was divorced with mom, and her DisappearedDad and taking took her brother Kazuki with him. They just coincidentally attend to the same school, and then Miki took advantage of the fact that nobody noticed the trope happening in their family, knew they were related to ask Kazuki to pretend that they're they were a couple, just so Miki doesn't get swarmed with a lot of unwanted admirers.



* Elan and his EvilTwin Nale, from ''Webcomic/TheOrderOfTheStick'', were raised by their mother and father respectively, after they divorced over CharacterAlignment issues. Elan theorizes that they intentionally didn't tell either twin about the other, so as to [[GenreSavvy increase the dramatic tension should they ever meet as adults]]. Elan's correct about his father, at least in regards to why he didn't tell the one ''he'' raised. For their mother's part, Elan later recalls finding her crying time to time over a lost "Nail" when he was a child. At the time, he thought she was just upset over carpentry but looking back it seems she was too heartbroken to ever explain the situation to Elan.

to:

* Elan and his EvilTwin Nale, from ''Webcomic/TheOrderOfTheStick'', were raised by their mother and father respectively, after they divorced over CharacterAlignment issues. Elan theorizes that they intentionally didn't tell either twin about the other, so as to [[GenreSavvy increase the dramatic tension should they ever meet as adults]]. Elan's correct about his father, at least in regards to why he didn't tell the one ''he'' raised. For their mother's part, Elan later recalls finding her from crying time to time over a lost "Nail" when he was a child. At the time, he thought she was just upset over carpentry but looking back it seems she was too heartbroken to ever explain the situation to Elan.
29th May '17 8:45:34 AM sgamer82
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* ''Anime/DigimonAdventure'' had this with Yamato & Takeru. Yamato with his father, Takeru with his mother. [[AllThereInTheManual According to]] the ''Two-and-a-half Year Break'' CD drama, Yamato ultimately ended up making the decision of which kid went with which parent.
** Also in ''Anime/DigimonFrontier'' with Koji and Koichi. Koji lives with their dad, Koichi with their mom. Despite being identical twins neither twin was aware of the other, with Koichi only finding out from his grandmother on the latter's death bed.

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* ''Franchise/{{Digimon}}''
**
''Anime/DigimonAdventure'' had this with Yamato & Takeru. Yamato with his father, Takeru with his mother. [[AllThereInTheManual According to]] the ''Two-and-a-half Year Break'' CD drama, Yamato ultimately ended up making the decision of which kid went with which parent.
** Also Occurs in ''Anime/DigimonFrontier'' with Koji and Koichi. Koji lives with their dad, Koichi with their mom. Despite being identical twins neither twin was aware of the other, with Koichi only finding out from his grandmother on the latter's death bed.
29th May '17 8:44:39 AM sgamer82
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* ''LottieAndLisa'' by Erich Kästner is the original novel from which ''TheParentTrap'' was adapted.

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* ''LottieAndLisa'' ''Literature/LottieAndLisa'' by Erich Kästner is the original novel from which ''TheParentTrap'' was adapted.adapted. It follows the same plot of two girls meeting, realizing they're identical twins, and proceeding to do a TwinSwitch to get to know their other parent.



* Elan and his EvilTwin Nale, from ''Webcomic/TheOrderOfTheStick'', were raised by their mother and father respectively, after they divorced over CharacterAlignment issues.
** And they intentionally didn't tell either twin about the other, so as to [[GenreSavvy increase the dramatic tension should they ever meet as adults]]. At least, that's Elan's theory.
*** Confirmed by their father, at least in regards to why he didn't tell the one ''he'' raised. For their mother's part, Elan later recalls finding her crying time to time over a lost "Nail" when he was a child. At the time, he thought she was just upset over carpentry but looking back it seems she was too heartbroken to ever explain the situation to Elan.

to:

* Elan and his EvilTwin Nale, from ''Webcomic/TheOrderOfTheStick'', were raised by their mother and father respectively, after they divorced over CharacterAlignment issues.
** And
issues. Elan theorizes that they intentionally didn't tell either twin about the other, so as to [[GenreSavvy increase the dramatic tension should they ever meet as adults]]. At least, that's Elan's theory.
*** Confirmed by their
correct about his father, at least in regards to why he didn't tell the one ''he'' raised. For their mother's part, Elan later recalls finding her crying time to time over a lost "Nail" when he was a child. At the time, he thought she was just upset over carpentry but looking back it seems she was too heartbroken to ever explain the situation to Elan.
28th May '17 8:30:54 AM CurledUpWithDakka
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* In ''Literature/AMurderisAnnounced'' Pip and Emma were separated by their parents in this manner. It has been so long that when they are both living in the same house, they don't recognize each other initially.

to:

* In ''Literature/AMurderisAnnounced'' ''Literature/AMurderIsAnnounced'' Pip and Emma were separated by their parents in this manner. It has been so long that when they are both living in the same house, they don't recognize each other initially.
14th Feb '17 9:10:09 PM karstovich2
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* While today this is uncommon (although it does occur) it historically happened much more often. In particular, in the [[UsefulNotes/TheCommonLaw English-speaking countries]], a set of presumptions arose in the 19th century dictating that in general, sons of divorced parents should be raised by their fathers, while daughters should be raised by their mothers. An exception was made for children in their "tender years" (always below seven years old, although the limit could go as high as twelve in some jurisdictions), as young children were generally considered to "naturally" belong in the care of their mothers--but as soon as the sons aged out of the "tender years," they were sent straight to Dad. Eventually, this doctrine was abolished, as the damaging effects of separating siblings was gradually accepted by the courts, and [[DontSplitUsUp keeping siblings together]] became the default rule. However, the "tender years" doctrine remained, which generally meant that ''all'' the children would stay with the mother, even if that wasn't necessarily the best thing for them. Only in the last quarter of the 20th century did the courts theoretically abandon this analysis, and it wasn't until the 1990s or 2000s that courts began to seriously regard fathers as potentially equally good caretakers for young children as mothers.

to:

* While today this is uncommon (although it does occur) it historically happened much more often. In particular, in the [[UsefulNotes/TheCommonLaw English-speaking countries]], a set of presumptions arose in the 19th century dictating that in general, sons of divorced parents should be raised by their fathers, while daughters should be raised by their mothers. An exception was made for children in their "tender years" (always below seven years old, although the limit could go as high as twelve in some jurisdictions), as young children were generally considered to "naturally" belong in the care of their mothers. Again, this was just a presumption--fathers could and did occasionally get custody of children in their "tender years", and sons who aged past the threshould could and did sometimes remain with their mothers--but in the vast majority of cases, as soon as the sons aged out of the "tender years," they were sent straight to Dad. Eventually, this doctrine was abolished, as the damaging effects of separating siblings was gradually accepted by the courts, and [[DontSplitUsUp keeping siblings together]] became the default rule. However, the "tender years" doctrine remained, which generally meant that ''all'' the children would stay with the mother, even if that wasn't necessarily the best thing for them. Only in the last quarter of the 20th century did the courts theoretically abandon this analysis, and it wasn't until the 1990s or 2000s that courts began to seriously regard fathers as potentially equally good caretakers for young children as mothers.
30th Dec '16 7:02:38 PM kaherbert
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Added DiffLines:

* In ''Literature/AMurderisAnnounced'' Pip and Emma were separated by their parents in this manner. It has been so long that when they are both living in the same house, they don't recognize each other initially.
31st Jul '16 5:27:03 PM nombretomado
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* In the {{DCU}}, this happened in the backstory of Todd Rice, aka Obsidian. After his adoptive father lost his job and started drinking heavily, Mrs. Rice eventually got fed up and declared she and the younger son were leaving. Todd didn't want to leave his father alone and stayed; his mother walked out with little Jeremy without a second thought or a forwarding address, and was never heard from again.

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* In the {{DCU}}, Franchise/TheDCU, this happened in the backstory of Todd Rice, aka Obsidian. After his adoptive father lost his job and started drinking heavily, Mrs. Rice eventually got fed up and declared she and the younger son were leaving. Todd didn't want to leave his father alone and stayed; his mother walked out with little Jeremy without a second thought or a forwarding address, and was never heard from again.
16th Jul '16 5:04:33 PM Duffan
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Added DiffLines:

[[folder:Live-ActionTV]]
* Briefly mentioned in an episode of ''Series/{{NCIS}}''. A pair of brothers was split up when their parents divorced; the mother was "only able to save one," while the other was raised by the father in a town with a brewing feud. The "saved" brother wound up becoming a marine, thus dragging NCIS into it when he went back to help his brother with said feud.
* The motivation behind a pair of unsubs in one episode of ''Series/CriminalMinds'' to kidnap a bus full of high schoolers. Their parents' divorce sent them to opposite ends of the country. It's actually how the team was able to identify them. Their major form of contact was online gaming with each other, and Garcia was befuddled by the fact that they'd originally been logging in from the same location them suddenly started logging on from so far apart. When Reid suggests it's because their parents divorced, it's treated as the obvious answer, suggesting this is the standard.
[[/folder]]
19th Apr '16 8:32:20 PM karstovich2
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* While today this is uncommon (although it does occur) it historically happened much more often. In particular, in the [[UsefulNotes/TheCommonLaw English-speaking countries]], a set of presumptions arose in the 19th century dictating that in general, sons of divorced parents should be raised by their fathers, while daughters should be raised by their mothers. An exception was made for children in their "tender years" (always below seven years old, although the limit could go as high as twelve in some jurisdictions), as young children were generally considered to "naturally" belong in the care of their mothers. Eventually, this doctrine was abolished, as the damaging effects of separating siblings was gradually accepted by the courts, and [[DontSplitUsUp keeping siblings together]] became the default rule. However, the "tender years" doctrine remained, which generally meant that ''all'' the children would stay with mom, even if that wasn't necessarily the best thing for them. Only in the last quarter of the 20th century did the courts theoretically abandon this analysis, and it wasn't until the 1990s or 2000s that courts began to seriously regard fathers as potentially equally good caretakers for young children as mothers.

to:

* While today this is uncommon (although it does occur) it historically happened much more often. In particular, in the [[UsefulNotes/TheCommonLaw English-speaking countries]], a set of presumptions arose in the 19th century dictating that in general, sons of divorced parents should be raised by their fathers, while daughters should be raised by their mothers. An exception was made for children in their "tender years" (always below seven years old, although the limit could go as high as twelve in some jurisdictions), as young children were generally considered to "naturally" belong in the care of their mothers.mothers--but as soon as the sons aged out of the "tender years," they were sent straight to Dad. Eventually, this doctrine was abolished, as the damaging effects of separating siblings was gradually accepted by the courts, and [[DontSplitUsUp keeping siblings together]] became the default rule. However, the "tender years" doctrine remained, which generally meant that ''all'' the children would stay with mom, the mother, even if that wasn't necessarily the best thing for them. Only in the last quarter of the 20th century did the courts theoretically abandon this analysis, and it wasn't until the 1990s or 2000s that courts began to seriously regard fathers as potentially equally good caretakers for young children as mothers.
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