History Main / SolomonDivorce

14th Feb '17 9:10:09 PM karstovich2
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* While today this is uncommon (although it does occur) it historically happened much more often. In particular, in the [[UsefulNotes/TheCommonLaw English-speaking countries]], a set of presumptions arose in the 19th century dictating that in general, sons of divorced parents should be raised by their fathers, while daughters should be raised by their mothers. An exception was made for children in their "tender years" (always below seven years old, although the limit could go as high as twelve in some jurisdictions), as young children were generally considered to "naturally" belong in the care of their mothers--but as soon as the sons aged out of the "tender years," they were sent straight to Dad. Eventually, this doctrine was abolished, as the damaging effects of separating siblings was gradually accepted by the courts, and [[DontSplitUsUp keeping siblings together]] became the default rule. However, the "tender years" doctrine remained, which generally meant that ''all'' the children would stay with the mother, even if that wasn't necessarily the best thing for them. Only in the last quarter of the 20th century did the courts theoretically abandon this analysis, and it wasn't until the 1990s or 2000s that courts began to seriously regard fathers as potentially equally good caretakers for young children as mothers.

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* While today this is uncommon (although it does occur) it historically happened much more often. In particular, in the [[UsefulNotes/TheCommonLaw English-speaking countries]], a set of presumptions arose in the 19th century dictating that in general, sons of divorced parents should be raised by their fathers, while daughters should be raised by their mothers. An exception was made for children in their "tender years" (always below seven years old, although the limit could go as high as twelve in some jurisdictions), as young children were generally considered to "naturally" belong in the care of their mothers. Again, this was just a presumption--fathers could and did occasionally get custody of children in their "tender years", and sons who aged past the threshould could and did sometimes remain with their mothers--but in the vast majority of cases, as soon as the sons aged out of the "tender years," they were sent straight to Dad. Eventually, this doctrine was abolished, as the damaging effects of separating siblings was gradually accepted by the courts, and [[DontSplitUsUp keeping siblings together]] became the default rule. However, the "tender years" doctrine remained, which generally meant that ''all'' the children would stay with the mother, even if that wasn't necessarily the best thing for them. Only in the last quarter of the 20th century did the courts theoretically abandon this analysis, and it wasn't until the 1990s or 2000s that courts began to seriously regard fathers as potentially equally good caretakers for young children as mothers.
30th Dec '16 7:02:38 PM kaherbert
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* In ''Literature/AMurderisAnnounced'' Pip and Emma were separated by their parents in this manner. It has been so long that when they are both living in the same house, they don't recognize each other initially.
31st Jul '16 5:27:03 PM nombretomado
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* In the {{DCU}}, this happened in the backstory of Todd Rice, aka Obsidian. After his adoptive father lost his job and started drinking heavily, Mrs. Rice eventually got fed up and declared she and the younger son were leaving. Todd didn't want to leave his father alone and stayed; his mother walked out with little Jeremy without a second thought or a forwarding address, and was never heard from again.

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* In the {{DCU}}, Franchise/TheDCU, this happened in the backstory of Todd Rice, aka Obsidian. After his adoptive father lost his job and started drinking heavily, Mrs. Rice eventually got fed up and declared she and the younger son were leaving. Todd didn't want to leave his father alone and stayed; his mother walked out with little Jeremy without a second thought or a forwarding address, and was never heard from again.
16th Jul '16 5:04:33 PM Duffan
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[[folder:Live-ActionTV]]
* Briefly mentioned in an episode of ''Series/{{NCIS}}''. A pair of brothers was split up when their parents divorced; the mother was "only able to save one," while the other was raised by the father in a town with a brewing feud. The "saved" brother wound up becoming a marine, thus dragging NCIS into it when he went back to help his brother with said feud.
* The motivation behind a pair of unsubs in one episode of ''Series/CriminalMinds'' to kidnap a bus full of high schoolers. Their parents' divorce sent them to opposite ends of the country. It's actually how the team was able to identify them. Their major form of contact was online gaming with each other, and Garcia was befuddled by the fact that they'd originally been logging in from the same location them suddenly started logging on from so far apart. When Reid suggests it's because their parents divorced, it's treated as the obvious answer, suggesting this is the standard.
[[/folder]]
19th Apr '16 8:32:20 PM karstovich2
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* While today this is uncommon (although it does occur) it historically happened much more often. In particular, in the [[UsefulNotes/TheCommonLaw English-speaking countries]], a set of presumptions arose in the 19th century dictating that in general, sons of divorced parents should be raised by their fathers, while daughters should be raised by their mothers. An exception was made for children in their "tender years" (always below seven years old, although the limit could go as high as twelve in some jurisdictions), as young children were generally considered to "naturally" belong in the care of their mothers. Eventually, this doctrine was abolished, as the damaging effects of separating siblings was gradually accepted by the courts, and [[DontSplitUsUp keeping siblings together]] became the default rule. However, the "tender years" doctrine remained, which generally meant that ''all'' the children would stay with mom, even if that wasn't necessarily the best thing for them. Only in the last quarter of the 20th century did the courts theoretically abandon this analysis, and it wasn't until the 1990s or 2000s that courts began to seriously regard fathers as potentially equally good caretakers for young children as mothers.

to:

* While today this is uncommon (although it does occur) it historically happened much more often. In particular, in the [[UsefulNotes/TheCommonLaw English-speaking countries]], a set of presumptions arose in the 19th century dictating that in general, sons of divorced parents should be raised by their fathers, while daughters should be raised by their mothers. An exception was made for children in their "tender years" (always below seven years old, although the limit could go as high as twelve in some jurisdictions), as young children were generally considered to "naturally" belong in the care of their mothers.mothers--but as soon as the sons aged out of the "tender years," they were sent straight to Dad. Eventually, this doctrine was abolished, as the damaging effects of separating siblings was gradually accepted by the courts, and [[DontSplitUsUp keeping siblings together]] became the default rule. However, the "tender years" doctrine remained, which generally meant that ''all'' the children would stay with mom, the mother, even if that wasn't necessarily the best thing for them. Only in the last quarter of the 20th century did the courts theoretically abandon this analysis, and it wasn't until the 1990s or 2000s that courts began to seriously regard fathers as potentially equally good caretakers for young children as mothers.
19th Apr '16 8:30:22 PM karstovich2
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* While today this is uncommon (although it does occur) it was historically happened much more often. In particular, in the [[UsefulNotes/TheCommonLaw English-speaking countries]], a set of presumptions arose in the 19th century dictating that in general, sons of divorced parents should be raised by their fathers, while daughters should be raised by their mothers. An exception was made for children in their "tender years" (always below seven years old, although the limit could go as high as twelve in some jurisdictions), as young children were generally considered to "naturally" belong in the care of their mothers. Eventually, this doctrine was abolished, as the damaging effects of separating siblings was gradually accepted by the courts, and [[DontSplitUsUp keeping siblings together]] became the default rule. However, the "tender years" doctrine remained, which generally meant that ''all'' the children would stay with mom, even if that wasn't necessarily the best thing for them. Only in the last quarter of the 20th century did the courts theoretically abandon this analysis, and it wasn't until the 1990s or 2000s that courts began to seriously regard fathers as potentially equally good caretakers for young children as mothers.

to:

* While today this is uncommon (although it does occur) it was historically happened much more often. In particular, in the [[UsefulNotes/TheCommonLaw English-speaking countries]], a set of presumptions arose in the 19th century dictating that in general, sons of divorced parents should be raised by their fathers, while daughters should be raised by their mothers. An exception was made for children in their "tender years" (always below seven years old, although the limit could go as high as twelve in some jurisdictions), as young children were generally considered to "naturally" belong in the care of their mothers. Eventually, this doctrine was abolished, as the damaging effects of separating siblings was gradually accepted by the courts, and [[DontSplitUsUp keeping siblings together]] became the default rule. However, the "tender years" doctrine remained, which generally meant that ''all'' the children would stay with mom, even if that wasn't necessarily the best thing for them. Only in the last quarter of the 20th century did the courts theoretically abandon this analysis, and it wasn't until the 1990s or 2000s that courts began to seriously regard fathers as potentially equally good caretakers for young children as mothers.
19th Apr '16 8:29:29 PM karstovich2
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The trope is a lot more common in fiction than reality. Children are (almost) never split up in a divorce with the possible exception of half- or step-siblings.

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The trope is a lot more common in fiction than reality. Children are (almost) never split up in a divorce with the possible exception of half- or step-siblings.
step-siblings. That said, this ''does'' occur in certain circumstances; in the legal terminology, this is usually called a "split parenting situation."


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[[folder:Real Life]]
* While today this is uncommon (although it does occur) it was historically happened much more often. In particular, in the [[UsefulNotes/TheCommonLaw English-speaking countries]], a set of presumptions arose in the 19th century dictating that in general, sons of divorced parents should be raised by their fathers, while daughters should be raised by their mothers. An exception was made for children in their "tender years" (always below seven years old, although the limit could go as high as twelve in some jurisdictions), as young children were generally considered to "naturally" belong in the care of their mothers. Eventually, this doctrine was abolished, as the damaging effects of separating siblings was gradually accepted by the courts, and [[DontSplitUsUp keeping siblings together]] became the default rule. However, the "tender years" doctrine remained, which generally meant that ''all'' the children would stay with mom, even if that wasn't necessarily the best thing for them. Only in the last quarter of the 20th century did the courts theoretically abandon this analysis, and it wasn't until the 1990s or 2000s that courts began to seriously regard fathers as potentially equally good caretakers for young children as mothers.
[[/folder]]
14th Apr '16 10:53:42 PM starjammer05
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Named after the JudgmentOfSolomon, except in ''that'' case there was only ''one'' child. Can easily be seen as ValuesDissonance or MoralDissonance, since within the setting this is almost never looked upon as all that unusual. Compare SeparatedAtBirth for examples of when these siblings were separated by other factors.

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Named after the JudgmentOfSolomon, except in ''that'' case there was only ''one'' child.child and the whole thing was a ruse in any case. Can easily be seen as ValuesDissonance or MoralDissonance, since within the setting this is almost never looked upon as all that unusual. Compare SeparatedAtBirth for examples of when these siblings were separated by other factors.
12th Jan '16 1:16:41 PM eroock
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->'''''Sharon:''' They must've quarreled and parted; and just sort of ... bisected us, each taking one of us.''
-->-- ''Film/TheParentTrap'' (Original Hayley Mills Version)

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->'''''Sharon:''' They ->''"They must've quarreled and parted; and just sort of ... bisected us, each taking one of us.''
"''
-->-- '''Sharon''', ''Film/TheParentTrap'' (Original (original Hayley Mills Version)
version)
30th Nov '15 2:53:24 AM K
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* In ''Literature/TheBabysittersClub'', Dawn's brother Jeff moved back to California because he missed his father after being separated from him after their parents' divorce. Dawn temporarily did this as well, but ultimately decided to stay in Stoneybrook with their mother.

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* In ''Literature/TheBabysittersClub'', Dawn's brother Jeff moved mother initially received full custody of her and her younger brother, Jeff. She abruptly decided to move them back to California her hometown in Stoneybrook, Connecticut while her ex-husband stayed in California. Jeff started acting out after a while, because he missed both his father after being separated from him after their parents' divorce. Dawn temporarily did this as well, but ultimately decided to stay and his hometown, and eventually moved back in Stoneybrook with their mother.him. Dawn, meanwhile, had an easier time sticking it out because she'd made more friends initially, but her own homesickness led to her spending first a semester with her father, before eventually moving back in with him full-time as well.
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Main.SolomonDivorce