History Main / SocialServicesDoesNotExist

26th May '16 10:22:44 AM mynameisntslick
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* In XMenFirstClass series [[http://archiveofourown.org/series/82162 Stars from Home]] Charles is trying to legally adopt Scott and they both meet with a social worker, averting the trope; played straight when Scott thinks about the years in [[OrphanageOfFear a foundlings' home in Omaha]] when he genuinely needed someone to protect him.
26th May '16 5:34:57 AM AgentTasmania
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* Mako's and Bolin's BackStory in ''WesternAnimation/TheLegendOfKorra'' implies there is no Social Services in Republic City, as "death of parents" = "orphans out on the street."

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* Mako's and Bolin's BackStory in ''WesternAnimation/TheLegendOfKorra'' implies there is no Social Services in Republic City, as "death of parents" = "orphans out on the street."" The era being emulated does predate such institutions.
17th May '16 9:21:33 AM Defbye
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* Azusa's entire living situation in ''Manga/GakuenOuji'' is just downright absurd. He's basically a MinorLivingAlone in an extremely run-down apartment. And he's so poor he has to sell himself for food, and has been doing so ''for years''. Several people know about this, and still does nothing about it. Of course, AdultsAreUseless in this manga.
5th May '16 5:34:03 PM Pegase
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* Homer Simpson of ''TheSimpsons'' is a close second for king of this trope, although to his credit he finally cleans up his act in TheMovie.
** This was poked fun at in a [[AnimatedActors behind the scenes]] style episode, where the RunningGag of an angry Homer choking was a left-in ad lib casually described as a surprisingly amusing act of child abuse.
** In another episode, this trope was evoked even when the law was involved. A judge emancipated Bart because Homer was such a bad father, saying she had no choices besides that and letting Homer keep custody of Bart.

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* Homer Simpson of ''TheSimpsons'' is a close second for king of this trope, although to his credit he finally cleans up his act Mindy's mother in TheMovie.
** This was poked fun at
''WesternAnimation/{{Animaniacs}}'' leaves her toddler in a [[AnimatedActors behind harness attached to a tree and expects her dog, Buttons, to watch over her time and time again; she's otherwise unsupervised. Naturally, [[BadlyBatteredBabysitter Buttons]] is the scenes]] style episode, where the RunningGag of an angry Homer choking was a left-in ad lib casually described as a surprisingly amusing act of child abuse.
** In another episode, this trope was evoked even
primary reason Mindy remains ''alive''. Lampshaded when Mindy's mother leaves Mindy alone to go to a "better parenting conference".
* Just how
the law was involved. A judge emancipated Bart because Homer was such hell did Mr. and Mrs. Turner in ''WesternAnimation/TheFairlyOddParents'' leave their son in the hands of a bad father, saying she had no choices besides sadistically evil babysitter and be oblivious to the fact that and letting Homer keep custody of Bart.she's, well, evil? And they still neglect him when home.
** Granted, Timmy's misery is the reason that he gets [[TheOmnipotent Fairly Oddparents]] but it's not like his parents know that. And what about the other kids Vicky babysits? And her poor little sister...



* The parents in ''WesternAnimation/{{Rugrats}}'' should not be allowed to keep their children, given all the unsupervised antics the ''baby'' protagonists get into. For example, they always leave Tommy, Chuckie, Phil, Lil, Dil, and Kimi in a crib or playpen; they should've figured out that Tommy can break out of most playpens or cribs with his screwdriver quite easily ''ages'' ago. The only supervision they use 90 percent of the time is Grandpa Lou, a borderline narcoleptic (he falls asleep at the drop of a hat). Often, when they're in a store, they'll put the babies down on the floor (again, with no one to watch them), and walk off ''in the opposite direction''. One of the worst examples is when Stu and Grandpa Lou took Tommy to a baseball game in ''Baseball'' - he ended up ''part'' of the game, and could've easily been killed if he didn't fall into the player's mitt, all because the two were too engrossed in their game, and it was caught on camera and live TV to boot! And when they took the babies to the musical in ''Reptar on Ice'', the kids managed to sneak onto the ice itself (and Tommy is ''barefoot'', no pants or shoes for the freezing ice), because Stu and Didi fell asleep during the show and Lou was too engrossed in it. To make a long story short, if they weren't in a cartoon all four/six of them would be ''[[TooDumbToLive DEAD]]'' due to the neglect their parents give them.
* Sari Sumdac of ''WesternAnimation/TransformersAnimated''. Despite being the daughter of a very prominent businessman, no one in the bureaucracy has ever picked up on the fact that she ''legally doesn't exist''. Moreover, when her father goes missing, not only is there no attempt to provide her with an adult guardian, but she's ''thrown out of her home'' by the business's new CEO. It's okay, though, because she moves in with a bunch of giant alien robots with no legal status on Earth. Yeaaaah.
* Just how the hell did Mr. and Mrs. Turner in ''WesternAnimation/TheFairlyOddParents'' leave their son in the hands of a sadistically evil babysitter and be oblivious to the fact that she's, well, evil? And they still neglect him when home.
** Granted, Timmy's misery is the reason that he gets [[TheOmnipotent Fairly Oddparents]] but it's not like his parents know that. And what about the other kids Vicky babysits? And her poor little sister...



* In ''{{Madeline}}: Lost in Paris'', the antagonist had apparently been lying to the courts for awhile to keep the other girls locked up in the lace factory. Kinda surprising considering that, you know, it's ''FRANCE''....
* Pretty much every adult in ''WesternAnimation/SouthPark'' is an idiot who barely supervise their kids at all. Well, except for Butters' family, who are just ''[[{{Jerkass}} completely]] [[AbusiveParents abusive]] assholes'' who have viciously beat him on at least one occasion.
* Mindy's mother in ''WesternAnimation/{{Animaniacs}}'' leaves her toddler in a harness attached to a tree and expects her dog, Buttons, to watch over her time and time again; she's otherwise unsupervised. Naturally, [[BadlyBatteredBabysitter Buttons]] is the primary reason Mindy remains ''alive''. Lampshaded when Mindy's mother leaves Mindy alone to go to a "better parenting conference".

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* In ''{{Madeline}}: Lost in Paris'', ''WesternAnimation/GravityFalls'' as a couple of examples, which are mostly explainable by the antagonist had apparently been lying to fact that the courts for awhile to keep the Gravity Falls police department is staggeringly incompetent:
** At least every
other girls locked up in episode, Stan does something that would get the lace factory. Kinda surprising considering that, you know, twins sent right back home to their parents if the cops with the least bit capable at their jobs. At best, he tends to turn a blind eye to all the potentially dangerous shenanigans that Dipper and Mabel it up to, and at worst... it's ''FRANCE''....
* Pretty much every adult in ''WesternAnimation/SouthPark'' is an idiot who barely supervise their kids at all. Well, except for Butters' family, who are just ''[[{{Jerkass}} completely]] [[AbusiveParents abusive]] assholes'' who
outright stated that the three of them have viciously beat him on spent at least one occasion.
* Mindy's mother
night in ''WesternAnimation/{{Animaniacs}}'' leaves jail.
** Pacifica's parents are ''very'' emotionally abusive, to the point that Pacifica is straight up scared of displeasing them. Not to mention the fact that they basically trained
her toddler in a harness attached to respond with contrition whenever they ring a tree and expects her dog, Buttons, to watch over her time and time again; she's otherwise unsupervised. Naturally, [[BadlyBatteredBabysitter Buttons]] is the primary reason Mindy remains ''alive''. Lampshaded when Mindy's mother leaves Mindy alone to go to a "better parenting conference".bell...






* ''WesternAnimation/TeenTitans'': Five teens, the oldest of which is about 17 and the youngest about 15, living together in a T-shaped tower playing video games all day, never going to school, and putting their lives in danger on an almost daily basis, all without any sort of adult supervision. Scratch that, they had a "mother" in one episode, but she turned out to be a three-eyed monster that was brainwashing them using demonic pie.

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* ''WesternAnimation/TeenTitans'': Five teens, In ''{{Madeline}}: Lost in Paris'', the oldest of which is about 17 and antagonist had apparently been lying to the youngest about 15, living together courts for awhile to keep the other girls locked up in a T-shaped tower playing video games all day, never going to school, and putting their lives in danger on an almost daily basis, all without any sort of adult supervision. Scratch the lace factory. Kinda surprising considering that, they had a "mother" in one episode, but she turned out to be a three-eyed monster that was brainwashing them using demonic pie.you know, it's ''FRANCE''....



* The parents in ''WesternAnimation/{{Rugrats}}'' should not be allowed to keep their children, given all the unsupervised antics the ''baby'' protagonists get into. For example, they always leave Tommy, Chuckie, Phil, Lil, Dil, and Kimi in a crib or playpen; they should've figured out that Tommy can break out of most playpens or cribs with his screwdriver quite easily ''ages'' ago. The only supervision they use 90 percent of the time is Grandpa Lou, a borderline narcoleptic (he falls asleep at the drop of a hat). Often, when they're in a store, they'll put the babies down on the floor (again, with no one to watch them), and walk off ''in the opposite direction''. One of the worst examples is when Stu and Grandpa Lou took Tommy to a baseball game in ''Baseball'' - he ended up ''part'' of the game, and could've easily been killed if he didn't fall into the player's mitt, all because the two were too engrossed in their game, and it was caught on camera and live TV to boot! And when they took the babies to the musical in ''Reptar on Ice'', the kids managed to sneak onto the ice itself (and Tommy is ''barefoot'', no pants or shoes for the freezing ice), because Stu and Didi fell asleep during the show and Lou was too engrossed in it. To make a long story short, if they weren't in a cartoon all four/six of them would be ''[[TooDumbToLive DEAD]]'' due to the neglect their parents give them.
* Homer Simpson of ''TheSimpsons'' is a close second for king of this trope, although to his credit he finally cleans up his act in TheMovie.
** This was poked fun at in a [[AnimatedActors behind the scenes]] style episode, where the RunningGag of an angry Homer choking was a left-in ad lib casually described as a surprisingly amusing act of child abuse.
** In another episode, this trope was evoked even when the law was involved. A judge emancipated Bart because Homer was such a bad father, saying she had no choices besides that and letting Homer keep custody of Bart.
* Pretty much every adult in ''WesternAnimation/SouthPark'' is an idiot who barely supervise their kids at all. Well, except for Butters' family, who are just ''[[{{Jerkass}} completely]] [[AbusiveParents abusive]] assholes'' who have viciously beat him on at least one occasion.



* ''WesternAnimation/GravityFalls'' as a couple of examples, which are mostly explainable by the fact that the Gravity Falls police department is staggeringly incompetent:
** At least every other episode, Stan does something that would get the twins sent right back home to their parents if the cops with the least bit capable at their jobs. At best, he tends to turn a blind eye to all the potentially dangerous shenanigans that Dipper and Mabel it up to, and at worst... it's outright stated that the three of them have spent at least one night in jail.
** Pacifica's parents are ''very'' emotionally abusive, to the point that Pacifica is straight up scared of displeasing them. Not to mention the fact that they basically trained her to respond with contrition whenever they ring a bell...

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* ''WesternAnimation/GravityFalls'' as a couple ''WesternAnimation/TeenTitans'': Five teens, the oldest of examples, which are mostly explainable by is about 17 and the youngest about 15, living together in a T-shaped tower playing video games all day, never going to school, and putting their lives in danger on an almost daily basis, all without any sort of adult supervision. Scratch that, they had a "mother" in one episode, but she turned out to be a three-eyed monster that was brainwashing them using demonic pie.
* Sari Sumdac of ''WesternAnimation/TransformersAnimated''. Despite being the daughter of a very prominent businessman, no one in the bureaucracy has ever picked up on
the fact that the Gravity Falls police department she ''legally doesn't exist''. Moreover, when her father goes missing, not only is staggeringly incompetent:
** At least every other episode, Stan does something that would get the twins sent right back home
there no attempt to their parents if the cops provide her with an adult guardian, but she's ''thrown out of her home'' by the least bit capable at their jobs. At best, he tends to turn a blind eye to all the potentially dangerous shenanigans that Dipper and Mabel it up to, and at worst... it's outright stated that the three of them have spent at least one night business's new CEO. It's okay, though, because she moves in jail.
** Pacifica's parents are ''very'' emotionally abusive, to the point that Pacifica is straight up scared of displeasing them. Not to mention the fact that they basically trained her to respond
with contrition whenever they ring a bell...bunch of giant alien robots with no legal status on Earth. Yeaaaah.
5th May '16 5:25:23 PM Pegase
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**Granted, Timmy's misery is the reason that he gets [[TheOmnipotent Fairly Oddparents]] but it's not like his parents know that. And what about the other kids Vicky babysits? And her poor little sister...
17th Apr '16 10:15:08 AM Morgenthaler
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** Averted at least once when a social worker came to Wayne Manor to ask questions about Jason Todd's death and left vowing to save the other children (Tim and Cassie) living there. Then played straight when nothing came of it (because it's ''[[{{Fiction500}} Bruce Wayne]]'').
** Also averted Pre-Crisis when Jason was taken by Child Services because Bruce wasn't his legal guardian. The papers were signed, but they weren't approved.



* Deliberately averted in Creator/StanLee's work for MarvelComics: he disliked the idea of superheroes having juvenile {{sidekick}}s, saying that in the real world they'd be hauled before a judge for imperiling the safety of a minor. It didn't stop him from creating [[ComicBook/FantasticFour Johnny Storm]].



* Averted in the [[WesternAnimation/MyLittlePonyFriendshipIsMagic MLP:FiM]] fan fiction ''Fanfic/OurTrueColors'', Scootaloo and [[spoiler: Pinkie Pie]] only wind up living homeless on the streets of Ponyville because they ran away from the officials who wanted to put them in an orphanage. By the story's end they've both been successfully placed in good foster homes.

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* Averted in the [[WesternAnimation/MyLittlePonyFriendshipIsMagic MLP:FiM]] fan fiction ''Fanfic/OurTrueColors'', Scootaloo and [[spoiler: Pinkie Pie]] only wind up living homeless on the streets of Ponyville because they ran away from the officials who wanted to put them in an orphanage. By the story's end they've both been successfully placed in good foster homes.fiction:



* Averted in ''Disney/LiloAndStitch'', in which Nani has to keep a job and provide a suitable home environment to keep Social Services agent [[ScaryBlackMan Cobra Bubbles]] from taking Lilo away, and he even does at one point. But he's not treated as a villain for this, instead shown to be a man doing his job to give Lilo a proper home.



** Very much averted in the sequel, ''Film/TheRageCarrie2''. Not only do social services put Rachel in foster care in order to save her from her mother, but the mother herself gets sent to a mental hospital for being AxCrazy.



* Averted in ''Literature/ThePaleKing''. [[spoiler: Toni]] and her mother simply avoid them by drifting around the country. This lasts until [[spoiler: the mother is murdered by her boyfriend.]]
* ''Literature/InDeath'': The good news is that this trope is averted in this series. The bad news is that the DepartmentOfChildDisservices trope is played straight instead, as Eve Dallas had to discover for herself as a child.



* Averted in ''Literature/PippiLongstocking''. Despite that she's quite capable of taking care of herself, several adults do find it rather odd that Pippi is living by herself with only a few pets for company. Well-meaning but utterly clueless Mrs. Prysselius tries to get her into foster care, but fails.



* Very averted in ''Series/InTheHeatOfTheNight'', as Althea Tibbs, wife of protagonist Virgil Tibbs, is a social worker. Many episodes involve her helping the police with talking to the family members of victims, helping the kids at Sparta High, and random people in the community. Social Services is called in (from the big city of Jackson) as the plot requires, usually in the case of abandoned children.



** Slightly averted in one episode where Social Services takes the kids away. However reason Social Services takes them away is because of several misunderstandings that were not the parent's fault, rather than the countless horrible things that the family actually have done.



** An averted case is when Lois was hospitalized by Peter when he drenched her in hot cooking oil, when he was abusing his mentally retarded status. A child service man comes in to take the kids away from Peter, because he is mentally retarded.
** There was also the time Meg pretended to be an unwed teen mother and claimed Stewie was her crack baby in order to get more tips. Stewie promptly gets taken away by social services into a foster home.



* On ''WesternAnimation/GoofTroop'', Pete gets away with such things as tricking his preteen child into taking over his job for a day, pressuring him into skydiving, threatening him in front of a public official, and admitting (or all but admitting) to being a bad parent in a courtroom and a hospital without even being monitored, notwithstanding all the health-detrimental forced labor that could have been caught if he were. PJ doesn't even hide the fact he's miserable at home, and on some occasions it's obvious he desperately wants to leave. It's too bad that the ''one'' episode that averts this trope instead uses DepartmentOfChildDisservices.

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* On ''WesternAnimation/GoofTroop'', Pete gets away with such things as tricking his preteen child into taking over his job for a day, pressuring him into skydiving, threatening him in front of a public official, and admitting (or all but admitting) to being a bad parent in a courtroom and a hospital without even being monitored, notwithstanding all the health-detrimental forced labor that could have been caught if he were. PJ doesn't even hide the fact he's miserable at home, and on some occasions it's obvious he desperately wants to leave. It's too bad that the ''one'' episode that averts this trope instead uses DepartmentOfChildDisservices.



** Averted in a Slappy Squirrel cartoon where Slappy has gone insane and Skippy is removed from her custody.
14th Apr '16 7:24:07 PM Pichu-kun
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* Likewise, social services might as well be non-existent in ''Manga/FruitsBasket''. The Sohma family is large and powerful and probably capable of bribing the authorities to ignore all the kids they've traumatized, the number of which could start their own national baseball league. But this doesn't help explain Tohru, whose mother was so incapacitated after the death of her father as to have forgotten to feed her 4-year-old daughter for weeks on end, or Uotani, whose emotionally distant and constantly drunk father fails to realize his daughter has joined a gang by the fifth grade. These guys give the NGE parents a run for the gold in the "emotional scaring" event in the Destructive Parenting Olympics.
** One reviewer noted: "in the world of Fruits Basket, good parents are as common as penguins in the Sahara—every single one is either neglectful, smothering, unfeeling, abusive, misguided, or dead."

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* Likewise, social services might as well be non-existent in ''Manga/FruitsBasket''. The Sohma family is large and powerful and probably capable of bribing the authorities to ignore all the kids they've traumatized, the number of which could start their own national baseball league. But this doesn't help explain Tohru, whose mother was so incapacitated after the death of her father as to have forgotten to feed her 4-year-old daughter for weeks on end, or Uotani, whose emotionally distant and constantly drunk father fails to realize his daughter has joined a gang by the fifth grade. These guys give the NGE parents a run for the gold in the "emotional scaring" event in the Destructive Parenting Olympics.
**
Olympics. One reviewer noted: "in the world of Fruits Basket, good parents are as common as penguins in the Sahara—every single one is either neglectful, smothering, unfeeling, abusive, misguided, or dead."



* ''Manga/DetectiveConan'': here's Conan, an apparent six year-old who's been abandoned by his parents for [[ComicBookTime well over a year]], living with a drunkard and a teenage girl, and witnessing/investigating several vicious murders a week... sometimes with his first-grader friends in tow (because [[ThereAreNoTherapists therapists don't exist either]])! This is all made slightly worse by the fact that Conan is in contact with both a lawyer and several dozen police officers regularly. There's also no mention that his parents, who initially had "gone to America and gotten in an accident", never came back to collect him and in fact have been doggedly coming up with random excuses for leaving him with the Mouris for the last 67 volumes.

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* ''Manga/DetectiveConan'': here's ''Manga/DetectiveConan'':
** Here's
Conan, an apparent six year-old who's been abandoned by his parents for [[ComicBookTime well over a year]], living with a drunkard and a teenage girl, and witnessing/investigating several vicious murders a week... sometimes with his first-grader friends in tow (because [[ThereAreNoTherapists therapists don't exist either]])! This is all made slightly worse by the fact that Conan is in contact with both a lawyer and several dozen police officers regularly. There's also no mention that his parents, who initially had "gone to America and gotten in an accident", never came back to collect him and in fact have been doggedly coming up with random excuses for leaving him with the Mouris for the last 67 volumes.



** Batman himself is one of the few superheroes to still consistently use kid sidekicks however with the increasing DarkerAndEdgier tone of the comics it hasn't escaped many fans that letting preteens and teenagers (especially [[BadassNormal non-superpowered ones]]) go around fighting mobsters and supervillains must break several child safety laws. It's unlikely Child Services could even catch Batman though. A few characters have taken [[WhatTheHellHero shots at Batman]] for his use of Robin's but the issue is rarely treated too seriously.

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** Batman himself is [[GrandfatherClause one of the few superheroes superheroes]] to still consistently use kid sidekicks however with the increasing DarkerAndEdgier tone of the comics it hasn't escaped many fans that letting preteens and teenagers (especially [[BadassNormal non-superpowered ones]]) go around fighting mobsters and supervillains must break several child safety laws. It's unlikely Child Services could even catch Batman though. A few characters have taken [[WhatTheHellHero shots at Batman]] for his use of Robin's but the issue is rarely treated too seriously.



* In ''VideoGame/{{The Sims 1}}', the Social Worker would come to pick up a baby who was starving, but wouldn't do anything about a school-age kid who was orphaned (or an all-child "family" that the player could create) -- the kids couldn't even call one in if the house still had a phone. In ''VideoGame/{{The Sims 2}}'', they shaped up somewhat, but they became a little over-responsive. They can take a child if they get a bad grade in school, so it's not much of an improvement. Luckily, ''VideoGame/{{The Sims 3}}'' seems to have fixed all of the problems with the social workers and children, but they won't do anything about teenagers though. Teens can starve to death and [[MinorLivingAlone live alone]], despite only being around 14 to 16 years old.

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* In ''VideoGame/{{The Sims 1}}', 1}}'', the Social Worker would come to pick up a baby who was starving, but wouldn't do anything about a school-age kid who was orphaned (or an all-child "family" that the player could create) -- the kids couldn't even call one in if the house still had a phone. In ''VideoGame/{{The Sims 2}}'', they shaped up somewhat, but they became a little over-responsive. They can take a child if they get a bad grade in school, so it's not much of an improvement. Luckily, ''VideoGame/{{The Sims 3}}'' seems to have fixed all of the problems with the social workers and children, but they won't do anything about teenagers though. Teens can starve to death and [[MinorLivingAlone live alone]], despite only being around 14 to 16 years old.
10th Apr '16 9:11:12 PM hellomoto
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** Furthermore abuse can be difficult to define and harder to prove. The difference between say corporal punishment as justified disciplining or abuse can be highly subjective, for example even spanking is abuse to some people. Various forms of emotional abuse naturally leave no physical evidence and happen in private leading to just the parent's word against the accusers. Children themselves are even less reliable then adults as witnesses. The authorities may well try and discover they have no leg to stand on legally.

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** Furthermore abuse can be difficult to define and harder to prove. The difference between say corporal punishment as justified disciplining or abuse can be highly subjective, for example even spanking is abuse to some people.people and normal behavior to others. Various forms of emotional abuse naturally leave no physical evidence and happen in private leading to just the parent's word against the accusers. Children themselves are even less reliable then adults as witnesses. The authorities may well try and discover they have no leg to stand on legally.
3rd Apr '16 10:47:14 AM nombretomado
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* A borderline example might be the Barone family in 'EverybodyLovesRaymond'', who leave their adult sons full of complexes and neuroses after a hit-and-miss upbringing. Marie and Frank combine MyBelovedSmother with an emotionally illiterate father and play favourites to such an extent that you wonder if Social Services might at least have placed Robert and Ray on an at-risk register...

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* A borderline example might be the Barone family in 'EverybodyLovesRaymond'', 'Series/EverybodyLovesRaymond'', who leave their adult sons full of complexes and neuroses after a hit-and-miss upbringing. Marie and Frank combine MyBelovedSmother with an emotionally illiterate father and play favourites to such an extent that you wonder if Social Services might at least have placed Robert and Ray on an at-risk register...
27th Mar '16 12:44:44 PM Pichu-kun
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* Ryuunosuke and her father in ''Anime/UruseiYatsura'', often considered the prototype for Ranma, although Ryuunosuke is an actual girl who was raised as a guy by a dad who refuses to recognize that she's a girl, mainly because he doesn't think a girl can take over his precious tea shop. This has left her with rather bad gender issues; she's fully aware she's a girl, and wants to be a "real" girl more than anything, but her father refuses to allow her to wear female clothes or even talk of herself as being a girl, nevermind try and get a boyfriend or try to act like a girl... in fact, because she's spent so long being brought up to act like a boy, she doesn't even know how to act like a girl.
** She also has an arranged marriage she doesn't want. Namely because her fiance Nagisa Shiowatara's father is just as much a loony as her own- upon having a son, rather than raise him as a boy, he deliberately raises him as a girl in order to match the "boy" that Ryuunosuke was raised to be. Unlike her, however, he does seem to know how to act like a guy, and he does realize that he's actually male, but he enjoys crossdressing. What makes things worse for her is that he possesses a number of ghostly powers, due to having died from eating sea urchin ice cream then coming back from the dead... though this also gives him some ghostly weaknesses, like being repelled by spirit wards. He's also, despite his {{Bishonen}} body, an expert sumo wrestler and quite capable of beating her in a fight.

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* Ryuunosuke and her father in ''Anime/UruseiYatsura'', often considered the prototype for Ranma, although Ryuunosuke is an actual girl who was raised as a guy by a dad who refuses to recognize that she's a girl, mainly because he doesn't think a girl can take over his precious tea shop. This has left her with rather bad gender issues; she's fully aware she's a girl, and wants to be a "real" girl more than anything, but her father refuses to allow her to wear female clothes or even talk of herself as being a girl, nevermind try and get a boyfriend or try to act like a girl... in fact, because she's spent so long being brought up to act like a boy, she doesn't even know how to act like a girl.
**
girl. She also has an arranged marriage she doesn't want. Namely because her fiance Nagisa Shiowatara's father is just as much a loony as her own- upon having a son, rather than raise him as a boy, he deliberately raises him as a girl in order to match the "boy" that Ryuunosuke was raised to be. Unlike her, however, he does seem to know how to act like a guy, and he does realize that he's actually male, but he enjoys crossdressing. What makes things worse for her is that he possesses a number of ghostly powers, due to having died from eating sea urchin ice cream then coming back from the dead... though this also gives him some ghostly weaknesses, like being repelled by spirit wards. He's also, despite his {{Bishonen}} body, an expert sumo wrestler and quite capable of beating her in a fight.



* Manga/Isuca has all the main characters go through this. Shinchiro is all but abandoned at the family apartment, when both his stage magician parents go globe-trotting "for training" over an extended period of time. What's worse is that in the process, they also force him, a full time high school student, to go get a job as well because they cut off his funds while leaving him responsible for the daily and monthly expenses involved in living at that apartment. Isuca's parents "go missing" seven years prior to the start of the story, (making them legally dead), and she has to live in a mansion, alone, taking on the dangerous job of "demon slaying," again, alone, because the rest of the family, save for her maternal grandmother, wants her dead or gone. Her cousin, Suseri, is forced to undergo a training regiment that would be considered felonious child abuse just about anywhere else because of her mother's inferiority complex towards Isuca's mother, up to the point that (in the manga, at least) she would put her own daughter's life in peril, without hesitation, for even the slightest chance to steal away Isuca's chances to take the title of Clan Head so that Suseri will become a Puppet King. Granted, Social Services probably aren't equipped to deal with the supernatural, but all the mundane stuff that these characters go through should raise some eyebrows.

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* Manga/Isuca ''Manga/{{Isuca}}'' has all the main characters go through this. Shinchiro is all but abandoned at the family apartment, when both his stage magician parents go globe-trotting "for training" over an extended period of time. What's worse is that in the process, they also force him, a full time high school student, to go get a job as well because they cut off his funds while leaving him responsible for the daily and monthly expenses involved in living at that apartment. Isuca's parents "go missing" seven years prior to the start of the story, (making them legally dead), and she has to live in a mansion, alone, taking on the dangerous job of "demon slaying," again, alone, because the rest of the family, save for her maternal grandmother, wants her dead or gone. Her cousin, Suseri, is forced to undergo a training regiment that would be considered felonious child abuse just about anywhere else because of her mother's inferiority complex towards Isuca's mother, up to the point that (in the manga, at least) she would put her own daughter's life in peril, without hesitation, for even the slightest chance to steal away Isuca's chances to take the title of Clan Head so that Suseri will become a Puppet King. Granted, Social Services probably aren't equipped to deal with the supernatural, but all the mundane stuff that these characters go through should raise some eyebrows.
This list shows the last 10 events of 161. Show all.
http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Main.SocialServicesDoesNotExist