History Main / SoapOpera

15th Mar '17 1:49:56 PM The_Glorious_SOB
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There are two mains schools of Soap Opera, the "Anglo" School, common to the USA, United Kingdom, and Australia; and the "Latin" School a.k.a. "{{Telenovela}}" or "Culebrón" (from "culebra", a word for "snake", which alludes to their length), which is the standard in almost every nation from Mexico southwards. The principal difference between the two schools is how long their continuous production runs: "Anglo" soaps are typically LongRunners, easily extending themselves for years and even ''decades'' when successful (the record-holder being ''(The) Series/GuidingLight'', 1937-2009), while the longest "Latin" soap lasted four years, with the average time being six to ten months. This difference holds globally: for instance, Arabic soaps are quite obviously of the "Latin" School, running for short periods of time (sometimes even just one month: Ramadan, when the fasting requirement means viewers are frequently too tired during the day to do anything other than watch TV). Japanese, Korean, and other Asian dramas also resemble this school. On the other hand, German and other continental European soaps are typically of the "Anglo" school, lasting for years and years, although "Latin" format is not unheard of.

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There are two mains main schools of Soap Opera, the "Anglo" School, common to the USA, United Kingdom, and Australia; and the "Latin" School a.k.a. "{{Telenovela}}" or "Culebrón" (from "culebra", a word for "snake", which alludes to their length), which is the standard in almost every nation from Mexico southwards. The principal difference between the two schools is how long their continuous production runs: "Anglo" soaps are typically LongRunners, easily extending themselves for years and even ''decades'' when successful (the record-holder being ''(The) Series/GuidingLight'', 1937-2009), while the longest "Latin" soap lasted four years, with the average time being six to ten months. This difference holds globally: for instance, Arabic soaps are quite obviously of the "Latin" School, running for short periods of time (sometimes even just one month: Ramadan, when the fasting requirement means viewers are frequently too tired during the day to do anything other than watch TV). Japanese, Korean, and other Asian dramas also resemble this school. On the other hand, German and other continental European soaps are typically of the "Anglo" school, lasting for years and years, although "Latin" format is not unheard of.
15th Mar '17 1:47:02 PM The_Glorious_SOB
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->'''Joey''': Well, I get the medical award for separating the siamese twins. Then Amber and I go to Venezuela to meet our other half-brother, Ramone. And that's where I find the world's biggest emerald. It's really big--but it's ''cursed.''

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->'''Joey''': Well, I get the medical award for separating the siamese Siamese twins. Then Amber and I go to Venezuela to meet our other half-brother, Ramone. And that's where I find the world's biggest emerald. It's really big--but it's ''cursed.''
22nd Feb '17 8:14:19 PM TropesForever
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Not to be confused with ''WesternAnimation/SoupeOpera''.
12th Feb '17 1:18:30 PM Morgenthaler
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* ''TheArchers'' (radio soap)

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* ''TheArchers'' ''Radio/TheArchers'' (radio soap)



* ''{{Emmerdale}}''

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* ''{{Emmerdale}}''''Series/{{Emmerdale}}''
12th Dec '16 6:17:52 PM DesertDragon
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** This could be related to the above in that, with more women going into the workforce rather than becoming stay-at-home housewives, the women who ''do'' still stay home are more likely to do so out of choice rather than due to pressure from their husbands and society. As such, they're likely to hold more conservative views ''vis a vis'' gender roles, gay rights, and other social issues, causing the people running the soaps to make their own programming more conservative in order to hold their viewers. It also explains why prime time has taken on the soaps' old edginess -- the liberal-leaning housewives who watched soaps before the rise of feminism have changed into liberal-leaning working women who watch prime time shows like the men do.

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** This could be related to the above in that, with more women going into the workforce rather than becoming being stay-at-home housewives, the women who ''do'' still stay home are more likely to do doing so out of by choice rather than due to pressure from their husbands and society. societal pressure. As such, they're likely to hold more conservative views ''vis a vis'' about gender roles, gay rights, and other social issues, causing the people running the soaps showrunners to make their own programming soaps more conservative in order to hold their retain viewers. It also explains why prime time has taken on the soaps' old edginess -- the liberal-leaning housewives who watched soaps before the rise of feminism have changed into liberal-leaning working women who watch prime time shows like the men do.
1st Nov '16 11:23:11 AM N1KF
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A genre of storytelling that began on [[RadioDrama radio]] in the United States in the early 1930's, so named because its [[{{Melodrama}} high drama]] was often interspersed with adverts for soap (Procter & Gamble, manufacturer of such products, was the sole sponsor and producer for many of them). But there's [[AntiHumor no soap radio]] anymore; with one exception, it has moved on to television. A soap opera is a drama with a large cast experiencing dramatic events in their day-to-day lives, usually broadcast five days a week. Designed to be viewed intermittently, so that a single event may be stretched over three or more days.

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A genre of storytelling that began on [[RadioDrama radio]] {{radio|Drama}} in the United States in the early 1930's, so named because its [[{{Melodrama}} high drama]] was often interspersed with adverts for soap (Procter & Gamble, manufacturer of such products, was the sole sponsor and producer for many of them). But there's [[AntiHumor no soap radio]] anymore; with one exception, it has moved on to television. A soap opera is a drama with a large cast experiencing dramatic events in their day-to-day lives, usually broadcast five days a week. Designed to be viewed intermittently, so that a single event may be stretched over three or more days.



** Most of the remaining U.S. soaps air in a time period close to, if not over, the lunch hour. (''Series/TheBoldAndTheBeautiful'' and ''Series/TheYoungAndTheRestless'' on CBS, and ''Series/DaysOfOurLives'' on NBC. Only ABC's ''Series/GeneralHospital'' airs outside that time frame (but in many places in the Central and Mountain time zones, it airs at 1 p.m., just outside the lunch hour).
* The second is that the TV landscape in general has inverted in America. Originally, soaps were allowed to be edgy while UsefulNotes/{{prime time}} was more conservative back in [[TheFifties the '50s]] and [[TheSixties early '60s]], ''Series/ILoveLucy''[='=]s Lucy and Ricky Ricardo weren't allowed to say the word "pregnant", and ''Series/TheDickVanDykeShow''[='=]s Laura Petrie was criticized by MoralGuardians for wearing pants. As primetime TV has gotten edgier, daytime TV has conversely become somewhat stodgier. They seem to have intersected during the mid-1970's, when [[Series/AllMyChildren Erica Kane]] and [[Series/{{Maude}} Maude Finlay]] both got landmark abortions within a few months of each other. Soaps had a surge during TheEighties with the likes of Supercouple [[Series/GeneralHospital Luke and Laura]], but at that point, Prime Time was creating edgy shows with topical themes such as ''Series/{{Roseanne}}'' and ''Series/TheGoldenGirls'', (which were ''sitcoms'' and were still dealing with issues such as HIV and domestic violence, to say nothing of dramas of the time), and soaps began to decline. In addition, the soap opera has become part of the genetics of television drama -- it no longer needs to be contained in just daytime serials shows such as ''Revenge'' and the ''Dallas'' revival show that people still have a fondness for soaps, it's just that the mechanics of a heavily serialized daily show in primetime can't keep up with modern audiences.

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** Most of the remaining U.S. soaps air in a time period close to, if not over, the lunch hour. (''Series/TheBoldAndTheBeautiful'' and ''Series/TheYoungAndTheRestless'' on CBS, and ''Series/DaysOfOurLives'' on NBC. Only ABC's ''Series/GeneralHospital'' airs outside that time frame (but in many places in the Central and Mountain time zones, it airs at 1 p.m., just outside the lunch hour).
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* The second is that the TV landscape in general has inverted in America. Originally, [[ValuesDissonance Originally]], soaps were allowed to be edgy while UsefulNotes/{{prime time}} was more conservative back in [[TheFifties the '50s]] and [[TheSixties early '60s]], ''Series/ILoveLucy''[='=]s Lucy and Ricky Ricardo weren't allowed to say the word "pregnant", and ''Series/TheDickVanDykeShow''[='=]s Laura Petrie was criticized by MoralGuardians for wearing pants. As primetime TV has gotten edgier, daytime TV has conversely become somewhat stodgier. They seem to have intersected during the mid-1970's, when [[Series/AllMyChildren Erica Kane]] and [[Series/{{Maude}} Maude Finlay]] both got landmark abortions within a few months of each other. Soaps had a surge during TheEighties with the likes of Supercouple [[Series/GeneralHospital Luke and Laura]], but at that point, Prime Time was creating edgy shows with topical themes such as ''Series/{{Roseanne}}'' and ''Series/TheGoldenGirls'', (which were ''sitcoms'' and were still dealing with issues such as HIV and domestic violence, to say nothing of dramas of the time), and soaps began to decline. In addition, the soap opera has become part of the genetics of television drama -- it no longer needs to be contained in just daytime serials shows such as ''Revenge'' and the ''Dallas'' revival show that people still have a fondness for soaps, it's just that the mechanics of a heavily serialized daily show in primetime can't keep up with modern audiences.
9th Aug '16 7:56:52 PM MsChibi
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There are two mains schools of Soap Opera, the "Anglo" School, common to the USA, United Kingdom, and Australia; and the "Latin" School a.k.a. "Telenovela" or "Culebrón" (from "culebra", a word for "snake", which alludes to their length), which is the standard in almost every nation from Mexico southwards. The principal difference between the two schools is how long their continuous production runs: "Anglo" soaps are typically LongRunners, easily extending themselves for years and even ''decades'' when successful (the record-holder being ''(The) Series/GuidingLight'', 1937-2009), while the longest "Latin" soap lasted four years, with the average time being six to ten months. This difference holds globally: for instance, Arabic soaps are quite obviously of the "Latin" School, running for short periods of time (sometimes even just one month: Ramadan, when the fasting requirement means viewers are frequently too tired during the day to do anything other than watch TV). Japanese, Korean, and other Asian dramas also resemble this school. On the other hand, German and other continental European soaps are typically of the "Anglo" school, lasting for years and years, although "Latin" format is not unheard of.

to:

There are two mains schools of Soap Opera, the "Anglo" School, common to the USA, United Kingdom, and Australia; and the "Latin" School a.k.a. "Telenovela" "{{Telenovela}}" or "Culebrón" (from "culebra", a word for "snake", which alludes to their length), which is the standard in almost every nation from Mexico southwards. The principal difference between the two schools is how long their continuous production runs: "Anglo" soaps are typically LongRunners, easily extending themselves for years and even ''decades'' when successful (the record-holder being ''(The) Series/GuidingLight'', 1937-2009), while the longest "Latin" soap lasted four years, with the average time being six to ten months. This difference holds globally: for instance, Arabic soaps are quite obviously of the "Latin" School, running for short periods of time (sometimes even just one month: Ramadan, when the fasting requirement means viewers are frequently too tired during the day to do anything other than watch TV). Japanese, Korean, and other Asian dramas also resemble this school. On the other hand, German and other continental European soaps are typically of the "Anglo" school, lasting for years and years, although "Latin" format is not unheard of.
22nd Jul '16 8:06:13 PM MsChibi
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You can see the level of respect that countries have for these types of shows by the timeslot they put them in. Spanish-speaking countries (and Brazil) often run their soaps in Prime Time, as do the Brits with their best soaps and favourite Aussie imports, and as do Australians themselves. By contrast, American stations traditionally quarantine soaps into a late-morning or early-afternoon timeslot. That said, daytime soaps were reliable moneyspinners for the American networks from the days of {{radio}} all the way into TheNineties, and served as a career springboard for many actors and actresses who went on to great success in more "legit" film and TV productions.

It is worth noting that, although classic soap operas originated in the United States, the genre there has of late undergone a severe decline to the point that many media watchers have declared it effectively though not quite actually dead. During the transition to TheNewTens, four of the longest running and most successful soaps in history reached their finales ''Series/GuidingLight'' (the longest continuous narrative in human history) was cancelled in 2009 after 72 years; ''Series/AsTheWorldTurns'' ended in 2010 after 54 years; ''Series/AllMyChildren'' ended in 2011 and ''Series/OneLifeToLive'' ended in 2012, both having run for over 40 years. Those were the first, but not the last, casualties. There are several popular, somewhat interconnecting, theories as to why soaps have declined in America:

to:

You can see the level of respect that countries have for these types of shows by the timeslot they put them in. Spanish-speaking countries (and Brazil) often run their soaps in Prime Time, PrimeTime, as do the Brits with their best soaps and favourite Aussie imports, and as do Australians themselves. By contrast, American stations traditionally quarantine soaps into a late-morning or early-afternoon timeslot. That said, daytime soaps were reliable moneyspinners for the American networks from the days of {{radio}} all the way into TheNineties, and served as a career springboard for many actors and actresses who went on to great success in more "legit" film and TV productions.

It is worth noting that, although classic soap operas originated in the United States, the genre there has of late [[DeadHorseGenre undergone a severe decline decline]] to the point that many media watchers have declared it effectively though not quite actually dead. During the transition to TheNewTens, four of the longest running and most successful soaps in history reached their finales ''Series/GuidingLight'' (the longest continuous narrative in human history) was cancelled in 2009 after 72 years; ''Series/AsTheWorldTurns'' ended in 2010 after 54 years; ''Series/AllMyChildren'' ended in 2011 and ''Series/OneLifeToLive'' ended in 2012, both having run for over 40 years. Those were the first, but not the last, casualties. There are several popular, somewhat interconnecting, theories as to why soaps have declined in America:
19th Jul '16 9:18:20 AM Pichu-kun
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* ''La Reina Del Sur'' is a telenovela about a poor woman who ends up becoming the biggest drug trafficker in Mexico. It was so popular that it got an English language remake, ''Series/QueenOfTheSouth''.
20th Jun '16 3:12:11 PM Digifiend
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* ''Series/{{Crossroads}}''
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Main.SoapOpera