History Main / SkeletonGovernment

6th Aug '16 1:52:32 PM Chytus
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Due to ConservationOfDetail, any story (no matter the genre) where the government is not important is likely to be this. It is most common in children's television, [[JustifiedTrope because it's hard to explain to a child how a government runs]] without reprising the "Bill" song from ''SchoolhouseRock''.

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Due to ConservationOfDetail, any story (no matter the genre) where the government is not important is likely to be this. It is most common in children's television, [[JustifiedTrope because it's hard to explain to a child how a government runs]] without reprising the "Bill" song from ''SchoolhouseRock''.
''WesternAnimation/SchoolhouseRock''.



* Most of the nations in ''NationStates'' are like this. It is justified by no player actually wanting to explain every single government institution. Some do, however.
* The Mushroom Kingdom from ''SuperMarioBros'' (and Bowser's kingdom) fall under this, it's never really shown that they have any officials so to speak other than the princess and/or a king and a bunch of random advisers and, perhaps, the Mushroom Chancellor from ''VideoGame/SuperMarioRPG''. The former also has no real shown army or method of defense other than "call Mario and Luigi to sort out their problems". We can see why everyone likes Peach then, apparently they have no taxes and their "defense budget" consists of giving Mario some [[strike:princess booty]] cake.
** Slightly better in Super Star Saga, where there are some officials related to the relations between the Mushroom and Bean-Bean Kingdoms. The Bean-Bean Kingdom also seems like more of an established Monarchy, and is also a far richer state. (1,000,000 Mushroom Coins = 10 Bean-Bean coins).
*** Exchange rates aren't always indicative of a countries wealth. Currently (March 19, 2011) 80 yen is about $1 Australian. However, Australian is the 17th country by GDP while Japan is third. A better determination of wealth might be how much one can buy with equivalent amounts of money in said countries, averaged over all industries (since a smaller island nation has less grazing land and more fishing, beef is proportionately more costly than fish).
* In ''VideoGame/{{Fable|I}}'' and its [[VideoGame/FableII sequel]], the only authority figures in the whole of Albion are the mayor of Bowerstone and the chief of Knothole glade. Someone must be organising all those guards. Subverted in ''VideoGame/FableIII'', where the plot revolves around becoming the king!
** It's hard to call that much of a subversion, considering that there doesn't seem to be much in the way of checks and balances on royal power and the bureaucracy that carries out the king's orders (if any) is largely invisible. The hierarchy appears to be nearly as simple as King > King's Butler > Low-Level Guardsman.
* ''{{Pokemon}}'' has hints to some sort of government, with the [[InexplicablyIdenticalIndividuals Nurse Joys and Officer Jennys]] in every city, and the very efficiently organized Pokemon battling hierarchy. But the government never plays much of a part in the story in either the game or the anime. The games actually have a stronger police presence and even park rangers but the criminal syndicates also have a much tighter grip on the world in the games so...
** Taken to extremes in ''[[{{Pokemon}} Orre]]'', where the player characters encounter precisely ''two'' police officers, and both in Pyrite Town, where there are more low-end hooligans than you can shake a Pokeball at. Is it any wonder Cipher's running the show in ''Pokemon Colosseum''?
** Given the fact that about '''everything''' in the Pokemon world seems to [[SeriousBusiness revolve around Pokemon training and battles]], it wouldn't be too much of a stretch to say that the Pokemon League organizers '''are''' the government. They also presumably would have [[BiggerStick little opposition]]. It would be some sort of [[SocialDarwinist semi-social Darwinist meritocracy]], but they seem [[BenevolentDictator nice enough]].
*** And this is more or less explicitly the case in the ''PokemonSpecial'' manga. The League chooses the Gym Leaders, who in turn are law-enforcers along with their Gym duties and are very well organized in getting together to take on threats. The Elite Four, as shown in the RS arc and possibly the HGSS one, are brought in when things get ''really'' serious.
** The PokeWars fanfic series elaborate on this apparent system, where each city is run by a local council and a "military" gym, which can vie for power over a city or region. Larger scale politics seem to consist mainly of coalitions of cities.
* ''GearsOfWar'' has the players under the banner of the "Coalition of Ordered Governments" (COG). That said, the actual government shown in the games is almost nil. Chairman Prescott, the only character representing non-military leadership, isn't even introduced until the opening cinematic of the second game. Justified in the third game, where the opening cinematic has [[MissionControl Anya Stroud]] recording a message that, since Prescott has gone missing and there are no freestanding COG cities left, they cannot call themselves a government any longer.

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* Most of the nations in ''NationStates'' ''Website/NationStates'' are like this. It is justified by no player actually wanting to explain every single government institution. Some do, however.
* The Mushroom Kingdom and the Koopa Kingdom from ''SuperMarioBros'' (and Bowser's kingdom) ''Franchise/SuperMarioBros'' fall under this, it's never really shown that they have any officials so to speak other than the princess and/or a king and a bunch of random advisers and, perhaps, the Mushroom Chancellor from ''VideoGame/SuperMarioRPG''. The former also has no real shown army or method of defense other than "call Mario and Luigi to sort out their problems". We can see why everyone likes Peach then, apparently they have no taxes and their "defense budget" consists of giving Mario some [[strike:princess booty]] cake.
**
some cake.Slightly better in Super Star Saga, where there are some officials related to the relations between the Mushroom and Bean-Bean Kingdoms. The Bean-Bean Kingdom also seems like more of an established Monarchy, and is also a far richer state. (1,000,000 Mushroom Coins = 10 Bean-Bean coins).
*** Exchange rates aren't always indicative of a countries wealth. Currently (March 19, 2011) 80 yen is about $1 Australian. However, Australian is the 17th country by GDP while Japan is third. A better determination of wealth might be how much one can buy with equivalent amounts of money in said countries, averaged over all industries (since a smaller island nation has less grazing land and more fishing, beef is proportionately more costly than fish).
Monarchy.
* In ''VideoGame/{{Fable|I}}'' and its [[VideoGame/FableII sequel]], the only authority figures in the whole of Albion are the mayor of Bowerstone and the chief of Knothole glade. Someone must be organising all those guards. Subverted in ''VideoGame/FableIII'', where the plot revolves around becoming the king!\n** It's hard to call that much of a subversion, considering that there doesn't seem to be much in the way of checks and balances on royal power and the bureaucracy that carries out the king's orders (if any) is largely invisible. The hierarchy appears to be nearly as simple as King > King's Butler > Low-Level Guardsman.\n
* ''{{Pokemon}}'' ''Franchise/{{Pokemon}}'' has hints to some sort of government, with the [[InexplicablyIdenticalIndividuals Nurse Joys and Officer Jennys]] in every city, and the very efficiently organized Pokemon battling hierarchy. But the government never plays much of a part in the story in either the game or the anime. The games actually have a stronger police presence and even park rangers but the criminal syndicates also have a much tighter grip on the world in the games so...
** Taken to extremes in ''[[{{Pokemon}} ''[[VideoGame/PokemonColosseum Orre]]'', where the player characters encounter precisely ''two'' police officers, and both in Pyrite Town, where there are more low-end hooligans than you can shake a Pokeball at. Is it any wonder Cipher's running the show in ''Pokemon Colosseum''?
** Given the fact that about '''everything''' in the Pokemon world seems to [[SeriousBusiness revolve around Pokemon training and battles]], it wouldn't be too much of a stretch to say that the Pokemon League organizers '''are''' the government. They also presumably would have [[BiggerStick little opposition]]. It would be some sort of [[SocialDarwinist semi-social Darwinist meritocracy]], but they seem [[BenevolentDictator nice enough]].
*** And this
enough. This is more or less explicitly the case in the ''PokemonSpecial'' ''Manga/PokemonSpecial'' manga. The League chooses the Gym Leaders, who in turn are law-enforcers along with their Gym duties and are very well organized in getting together to take on threats. The Elite Four, as shown in the RS arc and possibly the HGSS one, are brought in when things get ''really'' serious.
** The PokeWars Fanfic/PokeWars fanfic series elaborate on this apparent system, where each city is run by a local council and a "military" gym, which can vie for power over a city or region. Larger scale politics seem to consist mainly of coalitions of cities.
* ''GearsOfWar'' ''VideoGame/GearsOfWar'' has the players under the banner of the "Coalition of Ordered Governments" (COG). That said, the actual government shown in the games is almost nil. Chairman Prescott, the only character representing non-military leadership, isn't even introduced until the opening cinematic of the second game. Justified in the third game, where the opening cinematic has [[MissionControl Anya Stroud]] recording a message that, since Prescott has gone missing and there are no freestanding COG cities left, they cannot call themselves a government any longer.



* In ''CityOfReality'' the government consists solely of the mayor. Who is a rabbit puppet.
* Justified for the Martians in ''AMiracleOfScience''; being a sort of post-Singularity CyberPunk quasi-HiveMind (it's complicated), decisions are taken by instantaneous majority-consensus polling of every Martian through their implanted wireless transceivers. They do have a president, but the post is largely ceremonial.

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* In ''CityOfReality'' ''Webcomic/CityOfReality'' the government consists solely of the mayor. Who is a rabbit puppet.
* Justified for the Martians in ''AMiracleOfScience''; ''Webcomic/AMiracleOfScience''; being a sort of post-Singularity CyberPunk quasi-HiveMind (it's complicated), decisions are taken by instantaneous majority-consensus polling of every Martian through their implanted wireless transceivers. They do have a president, but the post is largely ceremonial.



* The World Government of ''OnePiece'' was at first only seen through its military, but that's somewhat [[JustifiedTrope justified]] as the main characters of One Piece were criminals. As the series progressed, more was shown about its system of governing and politics began playing a larger role as the main characters became more wrapped up in [[GovernmentConspiracy hidden plots and intrigue]].

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* The World Government of ''OnePiece'' ''Manga/OnePiece'' was at first only seen through its military, but that's somewhat [[JustifiedTrope justified]] as the main characters of One Piece were criminals. As the series progressed, more was shown about its system of governing and politics began playing a larger role as the main characters became more wrapped up in [[GovernmentConspiracy hidden plots and intrigue]].



** To run an empire of several trillion souls ''without computers'', yet. Imagine the size of the file stacks!



** The series goes into detail about the Havenite government, as there has been two internal regime changes and one failed coup d'etat on screen, as well as several plebacites once Haven becomes a representative democratic republic once more. Keep in mind that Haven is the enemy of the good guys. The governments of several worlds get mentioned, but Grayson stands out as well by having its own system of government fleshed out, demonstrating how a theocratic feudal monarchy can avoid being a bad guy very well.
* In ''ASongOfIceAndFire,'' local lords theoretically have absolute power over their subjects, higher-ranking liege lords over the lower-ranking lords sworn to them, and the king over everyone, with succession determined at least as much by a complex set of traditions (along with a healthy helping of might-makes-right) as any kind of codified law. In practice, though, the frequency of armed rebellion means that nobody can afford to piss off their subjects too much, and getting anything done tends to require an absolutely brain-pummeling amount of politics.

to:

** The series goes into detail about the Havenite government, as there has been two internal regime changes and one failed coup d'etat on screen, as well as several plebacites plebiscites once Haven becomes a representative democratic republic once more. Keep in mind that Haven is the enemy of the good guys. The governments of several worlds get mentioned, but Grayson stands out as well by having its own system of government fleshed out, demonstrating how a theocratic feudal monarchy can avoid being a bad guy very well.
* In ''ASongOfIceAndFire,'' ''Literature/ASongOfIceAndFire,'' local lords theoretically have absolute power over their subjects, higher-ranking liege lords over the lower-ranking lords sworn to them, and the king over everyone, with succession determined at least as much by a complex set of traditions (along with a healthy helping of might-makes-right) as any kind of codified law. In practice, though, the frequency of armed rebellion means that nobody can afford to piss off their subjects too much, and getting anything done tends to require an absolutely brain-pummeling amount of politics.



* In ''{{Mistborn}}'', the political structure of the Final Empire is explored in detail, particularly the uneasy relationship between the [[AristocratsAreEvil aristocracy]] and [[CorruptChurch Obligators]], because the heroes are deliberately exploiting the cracks in the system to make it collapse.

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* In ''{{Mistborn}}'', ''Franchise/{{Mistborn}}'', the political structure of the Final Empire is explored in detail, particularly the uneasy relationship between the [[AristocratsAreEvil aristocracy]] and [[CorruptChurch Obligators]], because the heroes are deliberately exploiting the cracks in the system to make it collapse.



** There are multiple [[BuffySpeak security-officer-police-guard-type-people]], it's just that only one (the one on the player's side, of course) is shown doing his job properly.

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** There are multiple [[BuffySpeak security-officer-police-guard-type-people]], security-officer-police-guard-type-people, it's just that only one (the one on the player's side, of course) is shown doing his job properly.



** ''[[VideoGame/TheElderScrollsIVOblivion Oblivion]]'' on the other hand plays it straight, you hardly ever get a glimpse of how the Empire and its people roll, and the plot only deals with the demon invasion, with no quests that involve political intrigue when compared to Morrowind, it is one of the reasons why [[BrokenBase Oblivion is such a polarizing game among the fanbase]]. For example, the Elder Council is supposed to be an advisory body to the Emperor and rule in the Emperor's name if he's incapacitated. You never meet or hear about anybody who is actually on the council, aside from Chancellor Ocato, who you only talk to a few times, never provides any sort of help and seems to be the only person that sits in the enormous Council Chamber.

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** ''[[VideoGame/TheElderScrollsIVOblivion Oblivion]]'' on the other hand plays it straight, you hardly ever get a glimpse of how the Empire and its people roll, and the plot only deals with the demon invasion, with no quests that involve political intrigue when compared to Morrowind, it is one of the reasons why [[BrokenBase Oblivion is such a polarizing game among the fanbase]].fanbase. For example, the Elder Council is supposed to be an advisory body to the Emperor and rule in the Emperor's name if he's incapacitated. You never meet or hear about anybody who is actually on the council, aside from Chancellor Ocato, who you only talk to a few times, never provides any sort of help and seems to be the only person that sits in the enormous Council Chamber.



* ''TheWitcher'' and its sequel avert this, with most towns and outposts in Temeria and the surrounding countries maintaining government posts. For example, the port town of Flotsam in ''Assassins of Kings'' is run by the official Bernard Loredo, his security detail, the post office, and government issued jobs on the town board.

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* ''TheWitcher'' ''VideoGame/TheWitcher'' and its sequel avert this, with most towns and outposts in Temeria and the surrounding countries maintaining government posts. For example, the port town of Flotsam in ''Assassins of Kings'' is run by the official Bernard Loredo, his security detail, the post office, and government issued jobs on the town board.
14th Jun '16 8:44:19 AM LadyJafaria
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** This continues in the series; they never got a new vizier. Basically the only people who seem to live ''or'' work in the palace (which is [[BigFancyHouse enormous]]) are the Sultan and Jasmine. ''Foreign'' leaders show up more often than any government employees of Agrabah do.

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** This continues in the series; they never got a new vizier. Basically the only people who seem to live ''or'' work in the palace (which is [[BigFancyHouse [[BigFancyCastle enormous]]) are the Sultan and Jasmine. ''Foreign'' leaders show up more often than any government employees of Agrabah do.
14th Jun '16 8:42:23 AM LadyJafaria
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Added DiffLines:

** This continues in the series; they never got a new vizier. Basically the only people who seem to live ''or'' work in the palace (which is [[BigFancyHouse enormous]]) are the Sultan and Jasmine. ''Foreign'' leaders show up more often than any government employees of Agrabah do.
28th Feb '16 2:11:05 PM TheGreatUnknown
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Added DiffLines:

** The only time we actually see something relating to a real government function is in ''[[VideoGame/TheLegendOfZeldaTwilightPrincess Twilight Princess]]'', when Ordona, a foreign nation apparently long ago annexed by Hyrule, prepares to participate in a ceremonial renewal of feudal ties.
25th Dec '15 3:43:01 PM t209
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** However, the newer episodes like [[Recap/MyLittlePonyFriendshipIsMagicS5E10PrincessSpike Princess Spike]] do portray Equestria as TheFederation with each settlement having autonomy to run their own affairs with sending delegations to Canterlot for conference.
14th Oct '15 3:17:05 PM FF32
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'''KingArthur''': Be quiet! I order you to be quiet!\\

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'''KingArthur''': '''Myth/KingArthur''': Be quiet! I order you to be quiet!\\
4th Aug '15 1:52:35 AM justanid
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->''"One main problem in calling the Empire evil is that we are offered precious little information as to how the Empire is run. It could be a democracy for all we know."''

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->''"One main problem in calling the Empire evil is that we are offered precious little information as to how the Empire is run. It could be a democracy democratic, communist, socialist or an absolute monarchy, for all we know."''
8th Jul '15 1:21:20 PM StarSword
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[[AC:LiveActionTV]]
* ''Franchise/StarTrek'' uses this a lot, due primarily to the LawOfConservationOfDetail: the protagonists and antagonists are chiefly military personnel so most of the civilian workings are off-screen.
** The Federation, overall. There are frequent references made to the Federation Council as a legislature, and the current President of the Federation appears in a two-parter in ''Series/StarTrekDeepSpaceNine'', but as the stories chiefly revolve around Starfleet most of the Federation's civilian legal workings are off-screen, and some of the lines are blurry: Website/StarDestroyerDotNet has observed among other things that Starfleet's military justice system seems to have some jurisdiction in civilian cases, with uniformed admirals appearing in judgment of civilians. The Franchise/StarTrekExpandedUniverse goes into more detail: the Federation government is looked at particularly closely in ''Literature/StarTrekArticlesOfTheFederation'', a novel which is essentially a GovernmentProcedural.
** The Klingon Empire has the High Council, led by the Chancellor, plus a [[AuthorityInNameOnly powerless figurehead emperor]] starting in season six of ''Series/StarTrekTheNextGeneration''. There's also references to a FeudalFuture system of noble houses but little actual detail.
** The Romulan Star Empire has the Senate, led by the Praetor. Amusingly we get more detail on the nation's StateSec, the Tal Shiar, than we do on the actual government.



* ''Franchise/TheLegendOfZelda'' series: Besides Princess Zelda, the guards, and sometimes a mayor, Hyrule appears to be more a loose confederacy of autonomous city-states than a kingdom

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* ''Franchise/TheLegendOfZelda'' series: Besides Princess Zelda, the guards, and sometimes a mayor, Hyrule appears to be more a loose confederacy of autonomous city-states than a kingdomkingdom. Some of the later games have the actual King of Hyrule appear.
2nd Jul '15 8:59:03 PM nombretomado
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* A major focus in ''Series/{{Battlestar Galactica|Reimagined}}'' is the functioning of the civilian government of the fleet and the interactions it has with the military.

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* A major focus in ''Series/{{Battlestar Galactica|Reimagined}}'' Galactica|2003}}'' is the functioning of the civilian government of the fleet and the interactions it has with the military.
22nd Jun '15 5:54:52 PM TompaDompa
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* There is an intricate system of military governors (Moffs) in the ''StarWars'' universe, although The Emperor and Vader still maintain the majority of decision-making power. The prequels show the ''massive'' Senate building that serves as the legislative core of the Republic.

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* There is an intricate system of military governors (Moffs) in the ''StarWars'' ''Franchise/StarWars'' universe, although The Emperor and Vader still maintain the majority of decision-making power. The prequels show the ''massive'' Senate building that serves as the legislative core of the Republic.
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