History Main / SillyRabbitCynicismIsForLosers

20th May '17 12:19:02 PM Tzen
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*** Let's let Paul field that one. "Somebody said to me,'But the Beatles were anti-materialistic.' That's a huge myth. John and I literally used to sit down and say, 'Now, let's write a swimming pool'." Cynicism does not mean not being able to tell what other people wants to hear.
4th May '17 6:55:15 AM ChaoticNovelist
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*''VideoGame/KidIcarus'': Pit has a song that goes "you gotta stay upbeat, upbeat, upbeat. Or you're gonna be dead meat, dead meat, dead meat". Dark Pit, naturally, thinks it's annoying.
4th May '17 6:46:48 AM ChaoticNovelist
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The argument ''can'' be abused if it's used to stifle legitimate protest, such as when someone justifiably complaining about some social ill is told to [[NoSympathy shut up and stop ruining everyone's fun]] - or, worse yet, ''[[BlameGame blamed]]'' for the misfortune, or it can also be used to demonstrate a character's naivety. It can also meet somewhere in the middle; the character doing the calling-out may be overly idealistic and may be oversimplifying the situation but still has a point, while the cynic may be doing the same about the idealist having an overly sunny view of a truly bad situation. The dividing line is if, after justifiably complaining, the cynic use the same argument as an excuse to do nothing about the problem or to do something horribly selfish.

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The argument ''can'' be abused if it's used to stifle legitimate protest, such as when someone justifiably complaining about some social ill is told to [[NoSympathy shut up and stop ruining everyone's fun]] - or, worse yet, ''[[BlameGame blamed]]'' for the misfortune, or it can also be used to demonstrate a character's naivety. It can also meet somewhere in the middle; the character doing the calling-out may be overly idealistic and may be oversimplifying the situation but still has a point, while the cynic may be doing the same about the idealist having an overly sunny view of a truly bad situation. The dividing line is if, after justifiably complaining, the cynic use uses the same argument as an excuse to do nothing about the problem or to do something horribly selfish.
27th Apr '17 1:30:09 PM TheNicestGuy
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* Music/LouisArmstrong is of course famous for his recording of "What a Wonderful World" from 1967, but he did another, less-famous version later. For this second take, he added a spoken-word "preface" that directly addressed naysayers who pointed out that the world wasn't so wonderful after all.
-->'''Louis:''' Seems to me, it ain't the world that's so bad, but what we're doing to it. And all I'm saying is, "See what a wonderful world it would be, if only we gave it a chance."
26th Mar '17 7:00:31 PM TheNicestGuy
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* In ''Series/SamuraiGourmet'', this is sometimes what Kasumi would like to say to say to a fellow patron, but can't because of JapanesePoliteness. Then the samurai demonstrates that it's really the right thing to do. Occasionally, Kasumi will actually follow through on this inspiration; other times, it will be made moot before Kasumi can embarrass himself.
18th Mar '17 9:18:40 AM HasturHasturHastur
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* The core message of the Music/MiseryIndex songs "The Weakener" and "Gallows Humor": evil loves lazy cynics and blind nihilists, ''especially'' the vocal ones, and it really doesn't care how little you care when it's at your doorstep and ready to take you away.
4th Jan '17 7:10:14 PM KingLyger
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The argument ''can'' be abused if it's used to stifle legitimate protest, such as when someone justifiably complaining about some social ill is told to [[NoSympathy shut up and stop ruining everyone's fun]] - or, worse yet, ''[[BlameGame blamed]]'' for the misfortune, or it can also be used to demonstrate a character's naivety. It can also meet somewhere in the middle; the character doing the calling-out may be overly idealistic and may be oversimplifying the situation but still has a point, while the cynic may be similarly blind and may also be oversimplifying the situation, but may also have a point about the idealist having an overly sunny view of a truly bad situation. The dividing line is if, after justifiably complaining, they use the same argument as an excuse to do nothing about the problem or to do something horribly selfish.

to:

The argument ''can'' be abused if it's used to stifle legitimate protest, such as when someone justifiably complaining about some social ill is told to [[NoSympathy shut up and stop ruining everyone's fun]] - or, worse yet, ''[[BlameGame blamed]]'' for the misfortune, or it can also be used to demonstrate a character's naivety. It can also meet somewhere in the middle; the character doing the calling-out may be overly idealistic and may be oversimplifying the situation but still has a point, while the cynic may be similarly blind and may also be oversimplifying doing the situation, but may also have a point same about the idealist having an overly sunny view of a truly bad situation. The dividing line is if, after justifiably complaining, they the cynic use the same argument as an excuse to do nothing about the problem or to do something horribly selfish.



* ''Anime/SailorMoon'': Uranus and Neptune can't seem to get through their heads that choosing the more cynical options will only make the end results worse.
** This is especially clear after Usagi became one of the targets of the Death Busters halfway through the third season, which meant Uranus and Neptune may have had to kill her if her pure heart held one of the talismans. After learning of her real identity, Haruka and Michiru haven't yet grasped that they were willing to ''kill'' the very girl whom they are trying to ensure will live long enough to become queen.

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* ''Anime/SailorMoon'': Uranus and Neptune can't seem to get through their heads that choosing the more cynical options will only make the end results worse. \n** This is especially clear after Usagi became one of the targets of the Death Busters halfway through the third season, which meant Uranus and Neptune may have had to kill her if her pure heart held one of the talismans. After learning of her real identity, Haruka and Michiru haven't yet grasped that they were willing to ''kill'' the very girl whom they are trying to ensure will live long enough to become queen.
20th Dec '16 10:29:49 AM HasturHasturHastur
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The argument ''can'' be abused if it's used to stifle legitimate protest, such as when someone justifiably complaining about some social ill is told to [[NoSympathy shut up and stop ruining everyone's fun]] - or, worse yet, ''[[BlameGame blamed]]'' for the misfortune, or it can also be used to demonstrate a character's naivety. The dividing line is if, after justifiably complaining, they use the same argument as an excuse to do nothing about the problem or to do something horribly selfish.

to:

The argument ''can'' be abused if it's used to stifle legitimate protest, such as when someone justifiably complaining about some social ill is told to [[NoSympathy shut up and stop ruining everyone's fun]] - or, worse yet, ''[[BlameGame blamed]]'' for the misfortune, or it can also be used to demonstrate a character's naivety. It can also meet somewhere in the middle; the character doing the calling-out may be overly idealistic and may be oversimplifying the situation but still has a point, while the cynic may be similarly blind and may also be oversimplifying the situation, but may also have a point about the idealist having an overly sunny view of a truly bad situation. The dividing line is if, after justifiably complaining, they use the same argument as an excuse to do nothing about the problem or to do something horribly selfish.
8th Dec '16 8:26:41 PM ChaoticNovelist
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** This also seems to have been the case for Girard Draketooth, who distrusted paladins to the point where he ''expected'' his paladin friend Soon Kim to break an oath not to investigate other gates and gave him false directions, which ended up biting everyone in the rear since the heroes got their direction's from Soon's successors. Soon, of course, ''never'' broke his oath and made the rest of the order swear never to do so either. Rogue-like types are subject to this, it seems.
*** When you spend your life behind people (either to put a hand in their pocket or a knife in their back), it's only natural you start thinking ''everyone's'' behind your back, waiting to put ''their'' hand in ''your'' pocket, or a knife in ''your'' back.

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** This also seems to have been the case for Girard Draketooth, who distrusted paladins to the point where he ''expected'' his paladin friend Soon Kim to break an oath not to investigate other gates and gave him false directions, which ended up biting everyone in the rear since the heroes got their direction's from Soon's successors. Soon, of course, ''never'' broke his oath and made the rest of the order swear never to do so either. Rogue-like types are subject to this, it seems.
***
seems. [[note]] When you spend your life behind people (either to put a hand in their pocket or a knife in their back), it's only natural you start thinking ''everyone's'' behind your back, waiting to put ''their'' hand in ''your'' pocket, or a knife in ''your'' back.back. This is why Gresky City is a WretchedHive; most of the population is rogues. [[/note]]
3rd Dec '16 4:18:08 AM VoxAquila
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* This is what happens to the dwarves at the end of ''Literature/TheLastBattle'' -- they end up in [[{{Heaven}} Aslan's country]] with everybody else, but they're too cynical to believe it, and manage to delude themselves into believing they're still locked in the dark stable they were thrown into. Even when Aslan makes a feast appear before him, they change it in their minds to the yucky stuff you might find in a stable (hay, donkey water, so on).

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* C. S. Lewis:
**
This is what happens to the dwarves at the end of ''Literature/TheLastBattle'' -- they end up in [[{{Heaven}} Aslan's country]] with everybody else, but they're too cynical to believe it, and manage to delude themselves into believing they're still locked in the dark stable they were thrown into. Even when Aslan makes a feast appear before him, they change it in their minds to the yucky stuff you might find in a stable (hay, donkey water, so on).on).
** The [[SeenItAll Hard-Bitten Ghost]] of ''Literature/TheGreatDivorce'' has lost his ability to enjoy anything, including Heaven, partially because he doesn't trust anything. He is a conspiracy theorist that thinks that every Wonder of the World is the product of a World Combine that's there to extort money out of travelers, and that Heaven and Hell are on the same side, playing a scam on the Ghosts. He is in sight of eternal happiness, but he can't accept it because he's too cynical to believe it exists. The AuthorAvatar, being the kind of person who would generally trust the kind of person the Hard-Bitten Ghost was in life, can't quite shake off the other man's cycism and finds himself asking his (eventual) guide why the people of heaven don't rescue the people of hell. (As it turns out, that's an ability exclusive to {{God}}. Given that the AuthorAvatar himself had arrived in heaven via riding a bus, that raises interesting implications to [[GodWasMyCopilot Who the Driver was]].)



* The [[SeenItAll Hard-Bitten Ghost]] of C.S. Lewis's ''Literature/TheGreatDivorce'' has lost his ability to enjoy anything, including Heaven, partially because he doesn't trust anything. He is a conspiracy theorist that thinks that every Wonder of the World is the product of a World Combine that's there to extort money out of travelers, and that Heaven and Hell are on the same side, playing a scam on the Ghosts. He is in sight of eternal happiness, but he can't accept it because he's too cynical to believe it exists. The AuthorAvatar, being the kind of person who would generally trust the kind of person the Hard-Bitten Ghost was in life, can't quite shake off the other man's cycism and finds himself asking his (eventual) guide why the people of heaven don't rescue the people of hell. (As it turns out, that's an ability exclusive to {{God}}. Given that the AuthorAvatar himself had arrived in heaven via riding a bus, that raises interesting implications to [[GodWasMyCopilot Who the Driver was]].)
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