History Main / SidekickGraduationsStick

26th Jan '16 10:44:11 AM DragonRanger
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* After ''Comicbook/CivilWar'' Steve Rogers was killed, and was replaced as ComicBook/CaptainAmerica by ComicBook/BuckyBarnes, his WWII sidekick. You thought Bucky was a DeadSidekick? It's a long story... Anyway, when Steve came back, they decided that Bucky should be the one to continue on as Cap, as it's helped his CharacterDevelopment. Steve instead operated sans codename as a super-agent not unlike ComicBook/NickFury. Like other examples here, his was eventually reversed: after [[NotQuiteDead supposedly dying]] during ''ComicBook/FearItself'', Bucky decided to go back to his prior identity of the Winter Solder to pursue black-ops missions, [[FakingTheDead using his "death" as a cover]].
** Jack Monroe, the [[LegacyCharacter third]] Bucky, eventually became the solo hero Nomad.

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* ''ComicBook/CaptainAmerica'' and his friends have gone through this multiple times:
** At one point, Steve Rogers was forced out of the role by the US government and replaced by John Walker. When Steve came back, John continued as a hero called the U.S.Agent.
**
After ''Comicbook/CivilWar'' Steve Rogers was killed, killed and was replaced as ComicBook/CaptainAmerica Captain America by ComicBook/BuckyBarnes, his WWII sidekick. You thought Bucky was a DeadSidekick? It's a long story... Anyway, when Steve came back, they decided that Bucky should be the one to continue on as Cap, as it's it helped his CharacterDevelopment. Steve instead operated sans codename as a super-agent not unlike ComicBook/NickFury. Like other examples here, his was eventually reversed: after [[NotQuiteDead supposedly dying]] during ''ComicBook/FearItself'', Bucky decided to go back to his prior identity of the Winter Solder to pursue black-ops missions, [[FakingTheDead using his "death" as a cover]].
** Jack Monroe, Monroe and Rikki Barnes, the [[LegacyCharacter third]] Bucky, third and sixth]] Buckies, eventually each took up the Nomad identity that Steve once used and became the a solo hero act (Rikki doing so after Monroe's death). Later on, Steve's adopted son, Ian Zola (whose real father is Arnim Zola), took up the role of Nomad.



** And after Monroe's death, Rikki Barnes, the sixth Bucky, took up the Nomad identity and became a solo act.
** Prior to ''ComicBook/{{AXIS}}'', Steve Rogers had his Super Soldier Serum deactivated, reverting him to an 80-year-old man. Due to this, he hand-picked his new successor, Sam Wilson, the Falcon. Steve's adopted son, Ian Zola (whose real father is Arnim Zola), took up the role of Nomad prior to all of this.

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** And after Monroe's death, Rikki Barnes, the sixth Bucky, took up the Nomad identity and became a solo act.
** Prior to ''ComicBook/{{AXIS}}'', Steve Rogers had his Super Soldier Serum deactivated, reverting him to an 80-year-old man. Due to this, he hand-picked his new successor, Sam Wilson, the Falcon. Steve's adopted son, Ian Zola (whose real father is Arnim Zola), took up Steve eventually got his youth back and returned to superheroics, but he and Sam are now ''sharing'' the role title of Nomad prior to all of this.Captain America.



* Subverted and lampshaded in recent issues of {{The Incredible Hulk}}. With Bruce Banner safely locked away in a military base and unable to turn into the Hulk, a new, ComicBook/{{red Hulk}} (called "Rulk" by fans) shows up from out of nowhere. Who is he? All signs pointed to Rick Jones, the original Hulk's old sidekick, having graduated into the role...which just made it all the more shocking when we learn that Rick has graduated, but NOT into the Red Hulk...instead, he's become a creature called A-Bomb, strong enough to fight Rulk on his own level. [[spoiler:Rulk was eventually revealed to be General "Thunderbolt" Ross, having teamed up with the Leader to take down the Hulk, making this an example of HeWhoFightsMonsters.]]

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* Subverted and lampshaded in recent issues of {{The Incredible Hulk}}. ''ComicBook/TheIncredibleHulk''. With Bruce Banner safely locked away in a military base and unable to turn into the Hulk, a new, ComicBook/{{red Hulk}} ComicBook/RedHulk (called "Rulk" by fans) shows up from out of nowhere. Who is he? All signs pointed to Rick Jones, the original Hulk's old sidekick, having graduated into the role...which just made it all the more shocking when we learn that Rick has graduated, but NOT into the Red Hulk...instead, he's become a creature called A-Bomb, strong enough to fight Rulk on his own level. [[spoiler:Rulk was eventually revealed to be General "Thunderbolt" Ross, having teamed up with the Leader to take down the Hulk, making this an example of HeWhoFightsMonsters.]]
17th Jan '16 4:03:18 AM Doug86
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* Donna Troy stopped being WonderGirl, and started being... [[CanonDisContinuity well, we won't get into that]]. Almost nothing's stuck without having [[ContinuitySnarl new layers of convoluted continuity]] added on, but she's still not Wonder Girl again.

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* Donna Troy stopped being WonderGirl, ComicBook/WonderGirl, and started being... [[CanonDisContinuity well, we won't get into that]]. Almost nothing's stuck without having [[ContinuitySnarl new layers of convoluted continuity]] added on, but she's still not Wonder Girl again.
7th Nov '15 6:00:16 PM nombretomado
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* Subverted and lampshaded in recent issues of {{The Incredible Hulk}}. With Bruce Banner safely locked away in a military base and unable to turn into the Hulk, a new, {{red Hulk}} (called "Rulk" by fans) shows up from out of nowhere. Who is he? All signs pointed to Rick Jones, the original Hulk's old sidekick, having graduated into the role...which just made it all the more shocking when we learn that Rick has graduated, but NOT into the Red Hulk...instead, he's become a creature called A-Bomb, strong enough to fight Rulk on his own level. [[spoiler:Rulk was eventually revealed to be General "Thunderbolt" Ross, having teamed up with the Leader to take down the Hulk, making this an example of HeWhoFightsMonsters.]]

to:

* Subverted and lampshaded in recent issues of {{The Incredible Hulk}}. With Bruce Banner safely locked away in a military base and unable to turn into the Hulk, a new, {{red ComicBook/{{red Hulk}} (called "Rulk" by fans) shows up from out of nowhere. Who is he? All signs pointed to Rick Jones, the original Hulk's old sidekick, having graduated into the role...which just made it all the more shocking when we learn that Rick has graduated, but NOT into the Red Hulk...instead, he's become a creature called A-Bomb, strong enough to fight Rulk on his own level. [[spoiler:Rulk was eventually revealed to be General "Thunderbolt" Ross, having teamed up with the Leader to take down the Hulk, making this an example of HeWhoFightsMonsters.]]
10th Oct '15 2:04:55 PM nombretomado
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-->-- '''[[{{Nightwing}} Dick Grayson]]''', ''[[WesternAnimation/BatmanTheAnimatedSeries The New Batman Adventures]]''

In [[Main/{{SuperHero}} Super Hero]] [[Main/{{ComicBooks}} Comic Books]], the [[Main/{{StatusQuoIsGod}} Status Quo Is God]]. It might not seem like that at first, what with all the [[Main/{{KilledOffForReal}} deaths]], [[Main/{{BackFromTheDead}} resurrections]], [[Main/{{FaceHeelTurn}} Face Heel Turns]], [[Main/{{HeelFaceTurn}} Heel Face Turns]], and whatnot. It's a rare year -- honestly, a rare month -- where comic book readers aren't gravely informed that NothingIsTheSameAnymore.

Yet, take a look at the major characters of [[Main/{{TheDCU}} The DCU]] or the [[Main/{{MarvelUniverse}} Marvel Universe]] today and five or ten years ago. Things will be different, but not ''that'' different, and most of the major changes will seem to have happened recently. The companies that own these characters, like all large corporations, are conservative (in this case meaning wanting to maintain a status quo), and all these dramatic changes have a noticeable tendency to cancel out in the long run. Once a character establishes an iconic status quo, or becomes part of another character's iconic status quo, it can be extremely difficult to change anything major about that character.

There is, however, one category of change that's an interesting exception: the "graduation" of [[Main/{{Sidekick}} sidekicks]] to become independent heroes in their own right, or [[Main/{{LegacyCharacter}} assume their mentor's mantle]]. Perhaps it is only because this tends to be accompanied by [[Main/{{ComicBookTime}} finally aging the character from a teen to an adult]], and even in the [[Main/{{RetCon}} Ret Con]]-happy world of comics, reversing that without breaking the [[Main/{{WillingSuspensionOfDisbelief}} Willing Suspension Of Disbelief]] is hard.

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-->-- '''[[{{Nightwing}} '''[[ComicBook/{{Nightwing}} Dick Grayson]]''', ''[[WesternAnimation/BatmanTheAnimatedSeries The New Batman Adventures]]''

In [[Main/{{SuperHero}} Super Hero]] [[Main/{{ComicBooks}} Comic Books]], SuperHero ComicBooks, the [[Main/{{StatusQuoIsGod}} Status Quo Is God]]. StatusQuoIsGod. It might not seem like that at first, what with all the [[Main/{{KilledOffForReal}} [[KilledOffForReal deaths]], [[Main/{{BackFromTheDead}} [[BackFromTheDead resurrections]], [[Main/{{FaceHeelTurn}} [[FaceHeelTurn Face Heel Turns]], [[Main/{{HeelFaceTurn}} [[HeelFaceTurn Heel Face Turns]], and whatnot. It's a rare year -- honestly, a rare month -- where comic book readers aren't gravely informed that NothingIsTheSameAnymore.

Yet, take a look at the major characters of [[Main/{{TheDCU}} The DCU]] Franchise/TheDCU or the [[Main/{{MarvelUniverse}} Marvel Universe]] Franchise/MarvelUniverse today and five or ten years ago. Things will be different, but not ''that'' different, and most of the major changes will seem to have happened recently. The companies that own these characters, like all large corporations, are conservative (in this case meaning wanting to maintain a status quo), and all these dramatic changes have a noticeable tendency to cancel out in the long run. Once a character establishes an iconic status quo, or becomes part of another character's iconic status quo, it can be extremely difficult to change anything major about that character.

There is, however, one category of change that's an interesting exception: the "graduation" of [[Main/{{Sidekick}} sidekicks]] {{Sidekick}}s to become independent heroes in their own right, or [[Main/{{LegacyCharacter}} [[LegacyCharacter assume their mentor's mantle]]. Perhaps it is only because this tends to be accompanied by [[Main/{{ComicBookTime}} [[ComicBookTime finally aging the character from a teen to an adult]], and even in the [[Main/{{RetCon}} Ret Con]]-happy RetCon-happy world of comics, reversing that without breaking the [[Main/{{WillingSuspensionOfDisbelief}} Willing Suspension Of Disbelief]] WillingSuspensionOfDisbelief is hard.
10th Oct '15 10:06:52 AM nombretomado
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* Wally West, aka ComicBook/TheFlash, previously the greatest example of this trope, is now the greatest subversion. After the second Flash, Barry Allen, died in the ComicBook/CrisisOnInfiniteEarths, Wally stepped up from the role of Kid Flash to Flash. Over the course of a quarter-century, he appeared in more issues of ''Flash'' than Barry, in ''far'' more spin-off comics and team-up books, was a founding member of four different incarnations of the Franchise/{{Justice League|of America}}, appeared in the ''WesternAnimation/JusticeLeague'' animated series, and acquired his own stable of supporting cast. Then Barry came back, ''Comicbook/{{Flashpoint}}'' happened, and in the ''{{New 52}},'' Wally has been {{retgone}}'d, along with most of his supporting cast. His graduation stuck so hard, GeoffJohns had to ''wipe him out of existence'' in order to un-stick it. (Bonus points for Barry being [[ContinuityRebooter personally responsible for the wiping]].)
** Bart Allen is another subversion. Originally Impulse, then Kid Flash, then the Flash, then dead, then back to Kid Flash. After the {{New 52}} kicked in, his time as Impulse & the Flash was erased and now he's a ''different'' & the first Kid Flash.
* Franchise/{{Batman}}'s sidekick Dick Grayson became {{Nightwing}}, and has never returned to being Comicbook/{{Robin}}; unlike many characters with successors, he's never referred to as the "real" Robin, just the first. (Although his counterpart in the original [[AlternateUniverse Earth-2]] never gave up the Robin identity.)

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* Wally West, aka ComicBook/TheFlash, previously the greatest example of this trope, is now the greatest subversion. After the second Flash, Barry Allen, died in the ComicBook/CrisisOnInfiniteEarths, Wally stepped up from the role of Kid Flash to Flash. Over the course of a quarter-century, he appeared in more issues of ''Flash'' than Barry, in ''far'' more spin-off comics and team-up books, was a founding member of four different incarnations of the Franchise/{{Justice League|of America}}, appeared in the ''WesternAnimation/JusticeLeague'' animated series, and acquired his own stable of supporting cast. Then Barry came back, ''Comicbook/{{Flashpoint}}'' happened, and in the ''{{New ''ComicBook/{{New 52}},'' Wally has been {{retgone}}'d, along with most of his supporting cast. His graduation stuck so hard, GeoffJohns had to ''wipe him out of existence'' in order to un-stick it. (Bonus points for Barry being [[ContinuityRebooter personally responsible for the wiping]].)
** Bart Allen is another subversion. Originally Impulse, then Kid Flash, then the Flash, then dead, then back to Kid Flash. After the {{New ComicBook/{{New 52}} kicked in, his time as Impulse & the Flash was erased and now he's a ''different'' & the first Kid Flash.
* Franchise/{{Batman}}'s sidekick Dick Grayson became {{Nightwing}}, ComicBook/{{Nightwing}}, and has never returned to being Comicbook/{{Robin}}; unlike many characters with successors, he's never referred to as the "real" Robin, just the first. (Although his counterpart in the original [[AlternateUniverse Earth-2]] never gave up the Robin identity.)



*** And then he became Batman an a more permanent basis with Bruce Wayne's 'inconveniencing' in the event ''ComicBook/FinalCrisis''. Fans guessed this would be reverted as soon as Bruce got back, but it actually stuck around for a little while with ''both'' men operating as Batman - in fact, Bruce is ''franchising'' and appointing even more Batmen worldwide. Dick's promotion was eventually reversed by the {{New 52}} relaunch, where he went back to being Nightwing.

to:

*** And then he became Batman an a more permanent basis with Bruce Wayne's 'inconveniencing' in the event ''ComicBook/FinalCrisis''. Fans guessed this would be reverted as soon as Bruce got back, but it actually stuck around for a little while with ''both'' men operating as Batman - in fact, Bruce is ''franchising'' and appointing even more Batmen worldwide. Dick's promotion was eventually reversed by the {{New ComicBook/{{New 52}} relaunch, where he went back to being Nightwing.



** Later played straight when Stephanie reappeared (she had been [[HesJustHiding Just Hiding]]) and graduated again, this time to [[ComicBook/{{Batgirl 2009}} Batgirl]]... At least until the {{New 52}} relaunch, where Barbara took the mantle of [[ComicBook/{{Batgirl 2011}} Batgirl]] back. Stephanie Brown: ButtMonkey of the Bat-Family.

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** Later played straight when Stephanie reappeared (she had been [[HesJustHiding Just Hiding]]) and graduated again, this time to [[ComicBook/{{Batgirl 2009}} Batgirl]]... At least until the {{New ComicBook/{{New 52}} relaunch, where Barbara took the mantle of [[ComicBook/{{Batgirl 2011}} Batgirl]] back. Stephanie Brown: ButtMonkey of the Bat-Family.
8th Oct '15 9:10:21 PM nombretomado
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* An unusual example: MoonKnight reluctantly took on Midnight--the son of one of his enemies--as a sidekick. Eventually Midnight was [[FaceHeelTurn "promoted" to villain status]], after [[WeCanRebuildHim becoming an evil cyborg]]. This graduation stuck until Moon Knight recently [[KillHimAlready euthanized his old charge]].

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* An unusual example: MoonKnight ComicBook/MoonKnight reluctantly took on Midnight--the son of one of his enemies--as a sidekick. Eventually Midnight was [[FaceHeelTurn "promoted" to villain status]], after [[WeCanRebuildHim becoming an evil cyborg]]. This graduation stuck until Moon Knight recently [[KillHimAlready euthanized his old charge]].
25th Sep '15 4:20:23 PM nombretomado
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* The original Speedy has long since moved on from being GreenArrow's sidekick, becoming first Arsenal, then Red Arrow, then Arsenal again.

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* The original Speedy has long since moved on from being GreenArrow's ComicBook/GreenArrow's sidekick, becoming first Arsenal, then Red Arrow, then Arsenal again.
25th Sep '15 7:12:21 AM Digifiend
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** In SarahJaneAdventures it reveals that she hasn't slowed down, and is now a major environment defender, traveling from problem to problem so fast, even the Doctor can't keep up.

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** In SarahJaneAdventures it reveals The Sarah Jane Adventures it's revealed that she hasn't slowed down, and is now a major environment defender, traveling from problem to problem so fast, even the Doctor can't keep up.
23rd Sep '15 7:27:25 AM Mr.Movie
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Yet, take a look at the major characters of [[Main/{{TheDCU}} The DCU]] or the [[Main/{{MarvelUniverse}} Marvel Universe]] today and five or ten years ago. Things will be different, but not ''that'' different, and most of the major changes will seem to have happened recently. The companies that own these characters, like all large corporations, are conservative, and all these dramatic changes have a noticeable tendency to cancel out in the long run. Once a character establishes an iconic status quo, or becomes part of another character's iconic status quo, it can be extremely difficult to change anything major about that character.

to:

Yet, take a look at the major characters of [[Main/{{TheDCU}} The DCU]] or the [[Main/{{MarvelUniverse}} Marvel Universe]] today and five or ten years ago. Things will be different, but not ''that'' different, and most of the major changes will seem to have happened recently. The companies that own these characters, like all large corporations, are conservative, conservative (in this case meaning wanting to maintain a status quo), and all these dramatic changes have a noticeable tendency to cancel out in the long run. Once a character establishes an iconic status quo, or becomes part of another character's iconic status quo, it can be extremely difficult to change anything major about that character.
21st Sep '15 6:04:27 PM nombretomado
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*** And then he became Batman an a more permanent basis with Bruce Wayne's 'inconveniencing' in the event ''FinalCrisis''. Fans guessed this would be reverted as soon as Bruce got back, but it actually stuck around for a little while with ''both'' men operating as Batman - in fact, Bruce is ''franchising'' and appointing even more Batmen worldwide. Dick's promotion was eventually reversed by the {{New 52}} relaunch, where he went back to being Nightwing.

to:

*** And then he became Batman an a more permanent basis with Bruce Wayne's 'inconveniencing' in the event ''FinalCrisis''.''ComicBook/FinalCrisis''. Fans guessed this would be reverted as soon as Bruce got back, but it actually stuck around for a little while with ''both'' men operating as Batman - in fact, Bruce is ''franchising'' and appointing even more Batmen worldwide. Dick's promotion was eventually reversed by the {{New 52}} relaunch, where he went back to being Nightwing.
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