History Main / ShowRunner

26th Feb '18 4:36:33 AM Cryoclaste
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** ''TalesOfTheGoldMonkey''

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** ''TalesOfTheGoldMonkey''''Series/TalesOfTheGoldMonkey''
18th Oct '17 9:38:13 AM ClintEastwood
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* Creator/MattGroening, James L. Brooks & Sam Simon: ''WesternAnimation/TheSimpsons'' (season 1 and 2)

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* Creator/MattGroening, James L. Brooks Creator/JamesLBrooks & Sam Simon: ''WesternAnimation/TheSimpsons'' (season 1 and 2)



* Carl Reiner: ''Series/TheDickVanDykeShow''

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* Carl Reiner: Creator/CarlReiner: ''Series/TheDickVanDykeShow''



** ''Series/StarTrekTheOriginalSeries'' (for the first several episodes of season 1, along with "The Menagerie" and "[[PoorlyDisguisedPilot Assignment: Earth]]")

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** ''Series/StarTrekTheOriginalSeries'' (for the first several episodes of season 1, along with "The Menagerie" and "[[PoorlyDisguisedPilot "[[Recap/StarTrekS2E26AssignmentEarth Assignment: Earth]]")



* J. Michael Straczynski: ''Series/BabylonFive''

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* J. Michael Straczynski: Creator/JMichaelStraczynski: ''Series/BabylonFive''




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* Creator/StevenMoffat and Creator/MarkGatiss: ''Series/{{Sherlock}}''.
* Creator/TerryNation: ''Series/{{Survivors}}'' and ''Series/BlakesSeven''.



* Gene L. Coon assumed the role of showrunner from Gene Roddenberry after the initial batch of episodes from the first season of ''Series/StarTrekTheOriginalSeries'', starting with "Miri", and he continued in this role until halfway through season 2 ("Bread and Circuses" was his last episode as Producer). He actively produced nearly half of the show's 79 episodes, more than anyone else. He was replaced for the rest of the second season by writer/director John Meredyth Lucas, who left only because Gene Roddenberry was supposed to come back the following season, though he ultimately did not. Notably, both Coon - under the pseudonym "Lee Cronin" - and Lucas continued to write (and in the latter's case, direct) for the show even after having stepped down as showrunner. Journeyman producer Fred Freiberger became showrunner for the third season (often referred to as the [[SeasonalRot turd season]]), and became the [[MisBlamed scapegoat]] for all its problems.

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* Gene L. Coon assumed the role of showrunner from Gene Roddenberry after the initial batch of episodes from the first season of ''Series/StarTrekTheOriginalSeries'', starting with "Miri", "[[{{Recap/StarTrekS1E8Miri}} Miri]]", and he continued in this role until halfway through season 2 ("Bread ("[[{{Recap/StarTrekS2E25BreadAndCircuses}} Bread and Circuses" Circuses]]" was his last episode as Producer). He actively produced nearly half of the show's 79 episodes, more than anyone else. He was replaced for the rest of the second season by writer/director John Meredyth Lucas, who left only because Gene Roddenberry was supposed to come back the following season, though he ultimately did not. Notably, both Coon - under the pseudonym "Lee Cronin" - and Lucas continued to write (and in the latter's case, direct) for the show even after having stepped down as showrunner. Journeyman producer Fred Freiberger became showrunner for the third season (often referred to as the [[SeasonalRot turd season]]), and became the [[MisBlamed scapegoat]] for all its problems.



* Maurice Hurley took over from Gene Roddenberry as showrunner late in the first season of ''Series/StarTrekTheNextGeneration'', officially starting with the episode "Coming of Age." He would later take over as showrunner for the second series of ''Series/{{Baywatch}} Nights''.

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* Maurice Hurley took over from Gene Roddenberry as showrunner late in the first season of ''Series/StarTrekTheNextGeneration'', officially starting with the episode "Coming "[[{{Recap/StarTrekTheNextGenerationS1E18ComingOfAge}} Coming of Age." Age]]". He would later take over as showrunner for the second series of ''Series/{{Baywatch}} Nights''.
8th Oct '17 11:46:59 AM Brainbin
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* Matt Williams: ''Series/{{Roseanne}}'' (left after season 1 due to CreativeDifferences with Roseanne Barr) and ''Series/HomeImprovement'' (with Carmen Finestra and David [=McFadzean=])

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* Matt Williams: ''Series/{{Roseanne}}'' (left after season 1 due to CreativeDifferences with Roseanne Barr) and ''Series/HomeImprovement'' (with co-creators Carmen Finestra and David [=McFadzean=])
8th Oct '17 11:46:27 AM Brainbin
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* Matt Williams: ''Series/{{Roseanne}}'' (left after season 1 due to ''extreme'' CreativeDifferences with Roseanne Barr) and ''Series/HomeImprovement'' (with Carmen Finestra and David McFadzean)

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* Matt Williams: ''Series/{{Roseanne}}'' (left after season 1 due to ''extreme'' CreativeDifferences with Roseanne Barr) and ''Series/HomeImprovement'' (with Carmen Finestra and David McFadzean)
[=McFadzean=])
8th Oct '17 11:46:04 AM Brainbin
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* Stephen Hillenburg: ''WesternAnimation/SpongeBobSquarePants'' during its first three seasons.



* Stephen Hillenburg: ''WesternAnimation/SpongeBobSquarePants'' during its first three seasons.

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* Stephen Hillenburg: ''WesternAnimation/SpongeBobSquarePants'' during its first three seasons.
Matt Williams: ''Series/{{Roseanne}}'' (left after season 1 due to ''extreme'' CreativeDifferences with Roseanne Barr) and ''Series/HomeImprovement'' (with Carmen Finestra and David McFadzean)
6th Oct '17 3:53:05 PM Brainbin
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The initial showrunner is usually the creator (frequently the writer of the {{pilot}}). In this case, the showrunner will often have their associated production company appear as a VanityPlate in the ClosingCredits, usually ''right'' before the studio's credit. As the years pass, the original showrunner may leave and a new one may join - this can often be a JumpTheShark or GrowingTheBeard moment. Creator/showrunners who step down from active production duties will often continue to be credited as an executive producer for the remainder of the show's run.

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The initial showrunner is usually the creator (frequently the writer of the {{pilot}}). In this case, the showrunner will often have their associated production company appear as a VanityPlate in the ClosingCredits, usually ''right'' before the studio's credit. As the years pass, the original showrunner may leave and a new one may join - this can often be a JumpTheShark or GrowingTheBeard moment. Creator/showrunners who step down from active production duties will often continue to be credited as an executive producer for the remainder of the show's run.
run, although sometimes they will be "demoted" to consulting producer or creative consultant.
6th Oct '17 3:50:57 PM Brainbin
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The initial showrunner is usually the creator (frequently the writer of the {{pilot}}). In this case, the showrunner will often have their associated production company appear as a VanityPlate in the ClosingCredits, usually ''right'' before the studio's credit. As the years pass, the original showrunner may leave and a new one may join - this can often be a JumpTheShark or GrowingTheBeard moment. Creator/showrunners who resign from active production duties will often continue to be credited as an executive producer for the remainder of the show's run.

to:

The initial showrunner is usually the creator (frequently the writer of the {{pilot}}). In this case, the showrunner will often have their associated production company appear as a VanityPlate in the ClosingCredits, usually ''right'' before the studio's credit. As the years pass, the original showrunner may leave and a new one may join - this can often be a JumpTheShark or GrowingTheBeard moment. Creator/showrunners who resign step down from active production duties will often continue to be credited as an executive producer for the remainder of the show's run.
6th Oct '17 3:48:51 PM Brainbin
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In short, the executive producer who serves as the head writer.[[note]]On older shows, the showrunner was sometimes credited as simply "Producer".[[/note]] The longer answer is that the showrunner is the person who gives the show its tone and direction, the one who makes the creative decisions. Theoretically, the buck stops here. (In practice, the showrunner can be - and very often ''is'' - overruled by any combination of the studio producing the show[[note]]This is the role of the "executive in charge of production", who despite the showrunner-sounding title is the standard name for the liaison with the studio[[/note]], the network or service on which the show will air, and/or the advertisers and sponsors.)

The initial showrunner is usually the creator (frequently the writer of the {{pilot}}). As the years pass, the original showrunner may leave and a new one may join - this can often be a JumpTheShark or GrowingTheBeard moment.

to:

In short, the executive producer who serves as the head writer.[[note]]On older shows, the showrunner was sometimes credited as simply "Producer".[[/note]] The longer answer is that the showrunner is the person who gives the show its tone and direction, the one who makes the creative decisions. Theoretically, the buck stops here. (In practice, the showrunner can be - and very often ''is'' - overruled by any combination of the studio producing the show[[note]]This is the role of the "executive in charge of production", who despite the showrunner-sounding title is the standard name for the liaison with the studio[[/note]], the network or service on which the show will air, be broadcast, and/or the advertisers and sponsors.)

The initial showrunner is usually the creator (frequently the writer of the {{pilot}}). In this case, the showrunner will often have their associated production company appear as a VanityPlate in the ClosingCredits, usually ''right'' before the studio's credit. As the years pass, the original showrunner may leave and a new one may join - this can often be a JumpTheShark or GrowingTheBeard moment.
moment. Creator/showrunners who resign from active production duties will often continue to be credited as an executive producer for the remainder of the show's run.
2nd Oct '17 3:20:05 AM OlfinBedwere
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* ''Series/StarTrekDiscovery'' was created by Creator/BryanFuller and Alex Kurtzman, but the former dropped out early in production due to creative differences, while the latter didn't have time to actively oversee the show due to directing ''Film/TheMummy2017''. Gretchen Berg and Aaron Harberts therefore acted as the initial showrunners.
13th Aug '17 9:29:25 AM Brainbin
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In short, the executive producer who serves as the head writer. The longer answer is that the showrunner is the person who gives the show its tone and direction, the one who makes the creative decisions. Theoretically, the buck stops here. (In practice, the showrunner can be - and very often ''is'' - overruled by any combination of the studio producing the show, the network or service on which the show will air, and/or the advertisers and sponsors.)

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In short, the executive producer who serves as the head writer. [[note]]On older shows, the showrunner was sometimes credited as simply "Producer".[[/note]] The longer answer is that the showrunner is the person who gives the show its tone and direction, the one who makes the creative decisions. Theoretically, the buck stops here. (In practice, the showrunner can be - and very often ''is'' - overruled by any combination of the studio producing the show, show[[note]]This is the role of the "executive in charge of production", who despite the showrunner-sounding title is the standard name for the liaison with the studio[[/note]], the network or service on which the show will air, and/or the advertisers and sponsors.)
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Main.ShowRunner