History Main / ShiftingSpotlight

9th Dec '12 6:55:45 AM lu127
Is there an issue? Send a Message


Every episode is ADayInTheLimelight for a different character.

The primary focus of most works is TheHero. Even when there are LoadsAndLoadsOfCharacters, one or two of them will always take precedence, being given the best plots and the most screentime. Supporting characters will sometimes have their time in the spotlight, but no more than once or twice a season. This trope is what happens when that formula is broken: every episode focuses entirely on a different character.

TheHero may have a three or four episodes to himself each year, depending on how long the season is, but TheLancer will have just as many, the love interest will have three, the PluckyComicRelief will have maybe two, supporting characters and even one-off guests will have one each. Sometimes the work wil mix it up by giving spotlight episodes to couples, or even small groups of characters, or by having the occasional episode with no focus.

This is ''not'' what happens when the series has no protagonist, and focuses on everyone equally. Every episode is clearly centric to one or a few specific characters, which changes from episode to episode.

----
!!Examples:

[[foldercontrol]]

[[folder: Live Action TV ]]

* ''Lost'' is arguably the TropeCodifier. Each episode of the series focused on one character, who recieved flashbacks (later flash-forwards and flash-sideways) to a specific off-island event. Several episodes focused on couples or pairs, usually Sun and Jin, and season finales were usually centric to large groups with no primary focus.
* ''OnceUponATime'', which shares a showrunner with ''Lost'', uses the same format: each episode details the fairytale backstory of one of the Storybrooke characters, while at the same time following them in the present.
* ''Skins'', both the US and UK versions, centered each episode on one character, or in rare cases two, titling the episode after them. Season finales were generally titled "Everyone", and didn't have one centric character. In later seasons, this could get confusing. Several episode titles were doubled up, and there are four seperate episodes titled "Effy".
[[/folder]]
[[folder: Comic Books ]]
* "Solo Avengers"(later renamed "Avengers Spotlight") usually featured two story's, one staring Hawkeye and another staring a different Avenger every issue.
[[/folder]]



----

to:

Every episode is ADayInTheLimelight for a different character.

The primary focus of most works is TheHero. Even when there are LoadsAndLoadsOfCharacters, one or two of them will always take precedence, being given the best plots and the most screentime. Supporting characters will sometimes have their time in the spotlight, but no more than once or twice a season. This trope is what happens when that formula is broken: every episode focuses entirely on a different character.

TheHero may have a three or four episodes to himself each year, depending on how long the season is, but TheLancer will have just as many, the love interest will have three, the PluckyComicRelief will have maybe two, supporting characters and even one-off guests will have one each. Sometimes the work wil mix it up by giving spotlight episodes to couples, or even small groups of characters, or by having the occasional episode with no focus.

This is ''not'' what happens when the series has no protagonist, and focuses on everyone equally. Every episode is clearly centric to one or a few specific characters, which changes from episode to episode.

----
!!Examples:

[[foldercontrol]]

[[folder: Live Action TV ]]

* ''Lost'' is arguably the TropeCodifier. Each episode of the series focused on one character, who recieved flashbacks (later flash-forwards and flash-sideways) to a specific off-island event. Several episodes focused on couples or pairs, usually Sun and Jin, and season finales were usually centric to large groups with no primary focus.
* ''OnceUponATime'', which shares a showrunner with ''Lost'', uses the same format: each episode details the fairytale backstory of one of the Storybrooke characters, while at the same time following them in the present.
* ''Skins'', both the US and UK versions, centered each episode on one character, or in rare cases two, titling the episode after them. Season finales were generally titled "Everyone", and didn't have one centric character. In later seasons, this could get confusing. Several episode titles were doubled up, and there are four seperate episodes titled "Effy".
[[/folder]]
[[folder: Comic Books ]]
* "Solo Avengers"(later renamed "Avengers Spotlight") usually featured two story's, one staring Hawkeye and another staring a different Avenger every issue.
[[/folder]]



----
[[redirect:RotatingProtagonist]]
6th Oct '12 1:05:53 PM FlintlockWolfman
Is there an issue? Send a Message


[[/folder]]



* "Solo Avengers"( later renamed "Avengers Spotlight")usually featured two story's, one staring Hawkeye and another staring a different Avenger every issue.

to:

* "Solo Avengers"( later Avengers"(later renamed "Avengers Spotlight")usually Spotlight") usually featured two story's, one staring Hawkeye and another staring a different Avenger every issue.
6th Oct '12 1:05:14 PM FlintlockWolfman
Is there an issue? Send a Message



to:

[[folder: Comic Books ]]
* "Solo Avengers"( later renamed "Avengers Spotlight")usually featured two story's, one staring Hawkeye and another staring a different Avenger every issue.
5th Oct '12 1:45:42 PM TwilightChronicles
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

Every episode is ADayInTheLimelight for a different character.

The primary focus of most works is TheHero. Even when there are LoadsAndLoadsOfCharacters, one or two of them will always take precedence, being given the best plots and the most screentime. Supporting characters will sometimes have their time in the spotlight, but no more than once or twice a season. This trope is what happens when that formula is broken: every episode focuses entirely on a different character.

TheHero may have a three or four episodes to himself each year, depending on how long the season is, but TheLancer will have just as many, the love interest will have three, the PluckyComicRelief will have maybe two, supporting characters and even one-off guests will have one each. Sometimes the work wil mix it up by giving spotlight episodes to couples, or even small groups of characters, or by having the occasional episode with no focus.

This is ''not'' what happens when the series has no protagonist, and focuses on everyone equally. Every episode is clearly centric to one or a few specific characters, which changes from episode to episode.

----
!!Examples:

[[foldercontrol]]

[[folder: Live Action TV ]]

* ''Lost'' is arguably the TropeCodifier. Each episode of the series focused on one character, who recieved flashbacks (later flash-forwards and flash-sideways) to a specific off-island event. Several episodes focused on couples or pairs, usually Sun and Jin, and season finales were usually centric to large groups with no primary focus.
* ''OnceUponATime'', which shares a showrunner with ''Lost'', uses the same format: each episode details the fairytale backstory of one of the Storybrooke characters, while at the same time following them in the present.
* ''Skins'', both the US and UK versions, centered each episode on one character, or in rare cases two, titling the episode after them. Season finales were generally titled "Everyone", and didn't have one centric character. In later seasons, this could get confusing. Several episode titles were doubled up, and there are four seperate episodes titled "Effy".

[[/folder]]



----
This list shows the last 4 events of 4. Show all.
http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Main.ShiftingSpotlight