History Main / ShamingTheMob

30th Nov '16 9:21:02 PM Kid
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** In "Rosebud", Maggie has a teddy bear which belonged to Mr. Burns, and Burns has taken away television and beer from the town until the bear is returned. An angry mob comes to confront Homer and takes the bear away, but when they see how Maggie feels, they remorsefully return it. As Dr. Hibbert laments, "We've given the word 'mob' a bad name." Then, at Principal Skinner's suggestion, they all head off to sing and volunteer at a hospital and head out with a cheery song

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** In "Rosebud", Maggie has a teddy bear which belonged to Mr. Burns, and Burns has taken away television and beer from the town until the bear is returned. An angry mob comes to confront Homer and takes the bear away, but when they see how Maggie feels, they remorsefully return it. As Dr. Hibbert laments, "We've given the word 'mob' a bad name." Then, at Principal Skinner's suggestion, they all head off to sing and volunteer at a hospital and head out with a cheery songsong.
30th Nov '16 9:17:26 PM Kid
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* Inverted in ''Series/TheMiddle''''s fifth-season episode "The Award". Mike, being feted for his 20 years on the job at the quarry[[note]]an accomplishment he considers rather dubious, since it made him realize he's spent that much time in the same place[[/note]], gives a speech at the dinner honoring him that depresses a happy crowd, reminding all present that he had recently had to lay people off and that anyone's job could be ended at any time, preventing them from reaching the same milestone.

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* Inverted in ''Series/TheMiddle''''s ''Series/TheMiddle'''s fifth-season episode "The Award". Mike, being feted for his 20 years on the job at the quarry[[note]]an accomplishment he considers rather dubious, since it made him realize he's spent that much time in the same place[[/note]], gives a speech at the dinner honoring him that depresses a happy crowd, reminding all present that he had recently had to lay people off and that anyone's job could be ended at any time, preventing them from reaching the same milestone.
30th Nov '16 9:10:33 PM Kid
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* In ''Film/Gladiator'', Maximus attempts this with his famous [[LargeHam "ARE YOU NOT ENTERTAINED?!"]] speech. It doesn't work, as the crowd decide that, yes, they are very entertained indeed.

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* In ''Film/Gladiator'', ''Film/{{Gladiator}}'', Maximus attempts this with his famous [[LargeHam "ARE YOU NOT ENTERTAINED?!"]] speech. It doesn't work, as the crowd decide that, yes, they are very entertained indeed.
24th Nov '16 8:53:00 AM jakobitis
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* In ''Film/Gladiator'', Maximus attempts this with his famous [[LargeHam "ARE YOU NOT ENTERTAINED?!"]] speech. It doesn't work, as the crowd decide that, yes, they are very entertained indeed.
20th Nov '16 10:36:21 AM Reflextion
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[[folder: Real Life ]]
* On October 5, 1789, Queen MarieAntoinette mounts a window balcony and curtsies to the angry mob that had converged on Versailles. At first stunned and silenced, they begin shouting, "Long live the queen!"
* One of many stories about Joshua Norton, first and only [[http://www.molossia.org/norton.html Emperor of the United States]], says that he broke up a mob of anti-Chinese rioters by standing in their way, head down, reciting the Lord's Prayer. They left without incident.
** In an unusual version of this trope, Emperor Norton was later arrested for vagrancy, but the judge not only refused to prosecute, he gave the arresting officer a dressing-down, saying that Emperor Norton "had shed no blood, robbed no one and despoiled no country -- which is more than can be said of his fellows in that line".
* In another real-life example, though a bit less unruly than an actual mob, George Washington managed to discourage the Newburgh conspiracy, consisting of officers of the Continental Army that sought to start a military coup against Congress, by making a heartfelt speech to them claiming that he had gone gray and almost blind in service to his country. Many of the conspirators were brought to tears by Washington's speech.
** What makes that a CrowningMomentOfAwesome is that it wasn't Washington's words that first pulled it off. Though that ''was'' when some began to cry, he first managed to shame them by ''putting on his spectacles.'' The man had presence.
--->'''Washington:''' Gentlemen, you will permit me to put on my spectacles, for I have not only grown gray but almost blind in the service of my country.
* Another Washington story from the Hudson Valley during the Revolution takes place at [[http://stphilipshighlands.org/ St. Philip's Church in the Highlands]], located in Garrison, downriver from where [[http://nysparks.com/historic-sites/17/details.aspx Washington's headquarters]] were, in Newburgh, during the years after Yorktown but before the British had withdrawn all their troops from New York. Many of St. Philip's congregants had been Tories during the war[[note]]including Beverley Robinson, one of the church wardens, who had helped Benedict Arnold escape[[/note]] and an angry mob was duly convened to march on it with TorchesAndPitchforks. They were stunned to see ''Washington himself'' in the vestibule when they arrived. One ventured to ask what he was doing there, and the general replied "This, sir, is my church" whereupon the mob dissipated. When the current church was built in the 1850s, a stained glass window depicting Washington was installed in the front as a show of gratitude.
** In another, possibly more realistic version, Washington reminded the crowd that the Revolution had not been started to burn churches.
* During the Australian Aboriginal "Freedom Ride" of 1965, in one small town there was a mob of angry white men who threw things at the Aboriginal freedom riders... until one local Aboriginal woman called out some of their names and revealed they had been sleeping with the local Aboriginal girls. She did this ''in front of their wives''. The men had no choice but to am-scray.
* When [[UsefulNotes/NapoleonBonaparte Napoleon]] returned to France, a group of soldiers were sent to kill him. When they got to him, he said something to the effect of "If you would shoot your Emperor, then do it." They, of course, didn't. Not only did he talk his way out of being shot, he talked them into ''deserting and joining his army''. After that, the King of France sent out an army of his own to take down Napoleon, and Napoleon did it ''again''. After that, Napoleon sent a message to Louis saying something along the lines of "[[CrowningMomentOfAwesome My dear cousin, please stop sending soldiers to apprehend me, I have more than enough troops already]]."
* Creator/GaiusJuliusCaesar famously quelled a mutiny of his troops by addressing the rioters as "Quirites" ("Civilians"). [[OlderThanFeudalism You know what that means ...]] According to one theory, this was supposed to be a form of shaming them, as Caesar had always referred to his soldiers as his comrades or his brothers/soldiers in arms. Referring to them as Quirites (Citizens) was a rather blunt way of implying that they had already discharged themselves from his service by their mutiny. He offered to pay them their dues for the past 15 years and discharge them immediately because he claimed he did not need them. Reportedly, all the soldiers begged to be forgiven and taken back into his army.
* [[http://notalwaysright.com/the-child-after-the-storm/23789 This]] anecdote from Website/NotAlwaysRight.
* Gaius Octavian once shamed an angry mob besieging the Curia and threatening to burn the senate alive ''for not not making Octavian dictator''. He talked them down into having him made Grain Commissioner instead.
* A Hackney resident named Pauline Pearce famously stood up and chastised a lot of the rioters in the London riots of 2011, becoming an internet sensation when a video of her doing so went viral, and she gained much acclaim from the press and politicians.
* Attempted by Creator/WilliamButlerYeats during the riots over Seán O'Casey's play ''Theatre/ThePloughAndTheStars''. However, the political makeup of the audience, Yeats' close ties to the aristocracy, and his generally condescending tone (famously declaring "You have disgraced yourselves again", in reference to the earlier riots over Synge's ''Theatre/ThePlayboyOfTheWesternWorld'') meant that he ended up making things worse.
[[/folder]]


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[[folder: Real Life ]]
* On October 5, 1789, Queen MarieAntoinette mounts a window balcony and curtsies to the angry mob that had converged on Versailles. At first stunned and silenced, they begin shouting, "Long live the queen!"
* One of many stories about Joshua Norton, first and only [[http://www.molossia.org/norton.html Emperor of the United States]], says that he broke up a mob of anti-Chinese rioters by standing in their way, head down, reciting the Lord's Prayer. They left without incident.
** In an unusual version of this trope, Emperor Norton was later arrested for vagrancy, but the judge not only refused to prosecute, he gave the arresting officer a dressing-down, saying that Emperor Norton "had shed no blood, robbed no one and despoiled no country -- which is more than can be said of his fellows in that line".
* In another real-life example, though a bit less unruly than an actual mob, George Washington managed to discourage the Newburgh conspiracy, consisting of officers of the Continental Army that sought to start a military coup against Congress, by making a heartfelt speech to them claiming that he had gone gray and almost blind in service to his country. Many of the conspirators were brought to tears by Washington's speech.
** What makes that a CrowningMomentOfAwesome is that it wasn't Washington's words that first pulled it off. Though that ''was'' when some began to cry, he first managed to shame them by ''putting on his spectacles.'' The man had presence.
--->'''Washington:''' Gentlemen, you will permit me to put on my spectacles, for I have not only grown gray but almost blind in the service of my country.
* Another Washington story from the Hudson Valley during the Revolution takes place at [[http://stphilipshighlands.org/ St. Philip's Church in the Highlands]], located in Garrison, downriver from where [[http://nysparks.com/historic-sites/17/details.aspx Washington's headquarters]] were, in Newburgh, during the years after Yorktown but before the British had withdrawn all their troops from New York. Many of St. Philip's congregants had been Tories during the war[[note]]including Beverley Robinson, one of the church wardens, who had helped Benedict Arnold escape[[/note]] and an angry mob was duly convened to march on it with TorchesAndPitchforks. They were stunned to see ''Washington himself'' in the vestibule when they arrived. One ventured to ask what he was doing there, and the general replied "This, sir, is my church" whereupon the mob dissipated. When the current church was built in the 1850s, a stained glass window depicting Washington was installed in the front as a show of gratitude.
** In another, possibly more realistic version, Washington reminded the crowd that the Revolution had not been started to burn churches.
* During the Australian Aboriginal "Freedom Ride" of 1965, in one small town there was a mob of angry white men who threw things at the Aboriginal freedom riders... until one local Aboriginal woman called out some of their names and revealed they had been sleeping with the local Aboriginal girls. She did this ''in front of their wives''. The men had no choice but to am-scray.
* When [[UsefulNotes/NapoleonBonaparte Napoleon]] returned to France, a group of soldiers were sent to kill him. When they got to him, he said something to the effect of "If you would shoot your Emperor, then do it." They, of course, didn't. Not only did he talk his way out of being shot, he talked them into ''deserting and joining his army''. After that, the King of France sent out an army of his own to take down Napoleon, and Napoleon did it ''again''. After that, Napoleon sent a message to Louis saying something along the lines of "[[CrowningMomentOfAwesome My dear cousin, please stop sending soldiers to apprehend me, I have more than enough troops already]]."
* Creator/GaiusJuliusCaesar famously quelled a mutiny of his troops by addressing the rioters as "Quirites" ("Civilians"). [[OlderThanFeudalism You know what that means ...]] According to one theory, this was supposed to be a form of shaming them, as Caesar had always referred to his soldiers as his comrades or his brothers/soldiers in arms. Referring to them as Quirites (Citizens) was a rather blunt way of implying that they had already discharged themselves from his service by their mutiny. He offered to pay them their dues for the past 15 years and discharge them immediately because he claimed he did not need them. Reportedly, all the soldiers begged to be forgiven and taken back into his army.
* [[http://notalwaysright.com/the-child-after-the-storm/23789 This]] anecdote from Website/NotAlwaysRight.
* Gaius Octavian once shamed an angry mob besieging the Curia and threatening to burn the senate alive ''for not not making Octavian dictator''. He talked them down into having him made Grain Commissioner instead.
* A Hackney resident named Pauline Pearce famously stood up and chastised a lot of the rioters in the London riots of 2011, becoming an internet sensation when a video of her doing so went viral, and she gained much acclaim from the press and politicians.
* Attempted by Creator/WilliamButlerYeats during the riots over Seán O'Casey's play ''Theatre/ThePloughAndTheStars''. However, the political makeup of the audience, Yeats' close ties to the aristocracy, and his generally condescending tone (famously declaring "You have disgraced yourselves again", in reference to the earlier riots over Synge's ''Theatre/ThePlayboyOfTheWesternWorld'') meant that he ended up making things worse.
[[/folder]]

25th Oct '16 7:43:37 AM VPhantom
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* In ''YTheLastMan'', since all the men have died the US Government has become dominated by Democrats, who elect women more frequently. A mob of [[StrawmanPolitical shotgun-toting Republican Wives]] try to storm the White House to demand their husbands' political offices, but are talked down by the President (Who is, herself, Republican).

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* In ''YTheLastMan'', ''ComicBook/YTheLastMan'', since all the men have died the US Government has become dominated by Democrats, who elect women more frequently. A mob of [[StrawmanPolitical shotgun-toting Republican Wives]] try to storm the White House to demand their husbands' political offices, but are talked down by the President (Who is, herself, Republican).
5th Oct '16 7:23:35 AM ClatoLawa
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* Attempted in the ''WesternAnimation/MiraculousLadybug'' fic ''[[http://archiveofourown.org/works/7253290/chapters/16467754 Back to Us]]''. The mob in question are essentially an Akuma hate group, who have come to believe that Akumatised victims should be met with lethal force rather than Ladybug purifying the butterflies. After Ladybug narrowly prevents the latest victim from committing suicide, she climbs on top of a news van, grabs a megaphone and delivers the following speech (much of it directed at Chat Noir, whose own increasingly ruthless attitude is responsible for the mob's creation).
-->'''Ladybug''': Citizens of Paris. Today, I am forced to say something I have never had the cause to say ever since becoming Parisí hero: Iím disappointed in you. Just a minute ago, a womanís ''life'' almost ended, because she was dreading this ''exact reaction'' from you. Tell me, Paris ó when did this behavior become acceptable? Standing here before you now, Iím ashamed to be a citizen of Paris myself ó ashamed to be your hero! Who in their right mind would want to defend a city thatís so determined to destroy itself from the inside out? When did you lose your heart, Paris? How could you act so thoughtlessly? How could you have become so cruel? (''glances up at Chat on a nearby rooftop'') This madness ''has ''to end. The akumatized victims have no more control over their emotions than any other citizen of Paris. To blame them for being taken advantage of is to blame them for daring to be upset, which is ridiculous. ''No on''e can control their emotions like that. And before you say something ridiculous, like they had the darkness inside them all along or something, ''think'': how would you feel if it was someone you loved? A relative you adore? Your best friend? ÖWhat if ''youíre'' next? Is this how you want to be saved? Coming back to yourself, confused, scaredÖ surrounded by angry people who have no idea what theyíre talking about? Iím trying. Iím doing everything I can. But Iíll say it: Iím scared, too. Scared of what this new enemy means, of the damage heís causingÖ and what weíve become as a result. Iím scared, but I know that this is not right. Things shouldnít be like this. Iíll always be here to protect ParisÖ but just because I ''can'' do it alone doesnít mean that I ''want'' to. The only way I can keep goingÖis to know that youíre on my side. I need your support. IÖI need you. Please, please donít make me do this alone anymore. Come back. (''She watches as Chat turns and leaves. When she looks back to the mob, she notes that at least some of them have been affected by her loss of composure.'') We can be better than this, Paris, and we ''will'' be. Iím going to get to the bottom of this, and Iím going to stop this second Hawk MothÖ but I can only do that if I know that Hawk Mothís victims will ''not'' be harassed for something they had no control over. I donít judge or blame any of the victims, and neither should you. Please, letís bring back the Paris that I love. The Paris that Iím proud to protect. Letís be better together, Paris.
14th Sep '16 7:59:38 PM PaulA
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* ''Literature/EndersGame'' sequel ''Xenocide'': Grego shames the living hell out of a mob of his fellow villagers ''after'' they had already accomplished most of the damage they'd intended. After all, was ''his'' mob in the first place.

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* ''Literature/EndersGame'' sequel ''Xenocide'': ''Literature/{{Xenocide}}'': Grego shames the living hell out of a mob of his fellow villagers ''after'' they had already accomplished most of the damage they'd intended. After all, was ''his'' mob in the first place.
30th Aug '16 11:47:23 AM Eddy1215
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* ''WesternAnimation/CampLazlo'' Downplayed example. An angry mob has run Almondine out of camp for not wearing a wig ([[NoodleImplements don't ask]]), when Patsy and the rest of the Squirrel Scouts step between them and announce that it's not the wigs that make them pretty. They proceed to take off their wigs, hair, noses, eyes, etc. to show that they're still gorgeous on the inside. The mob isn't ''shamed'', but the walk off out of disgust and annoyance anyway. Then everyone starts dancing.

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* ''WesternAnimation/CampLazlo'' Downplayed example. An angry mob has run Almondine out of camp for not wearing a wig ([[NoodleImplements don't ask]]), when Patsy and the rest of the Squirrel Scouts step between them and announce that it's not the wigs that make them pretty. They proceed to take off their wigs, hair, noses, eyes, etc. to show that they're still gorgeous on the inside. The mob isn't ''shamed'', but the they walk off out of disgust and annoyance anyway. Then everyone starts dancing.
19th Aug '16 9:24:57 PM MoonByte
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* In ''Anime/SummerWars'', guest Kenji is [[spoiler: framed]] of having caused plenty of chaos by corrupting OZ. The entire family instantly turns on him and he gets arrested on the spot. He politely bows to them ''in handcuffs'' and thanks them for having allowed him to experience a real family. Everyone just freezes with visible awkwardness and shame for a moment.
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Main.ShamingTheMob