History Main / RuinsForRuinsSake

20th May '17 9:48:39 AM nombretomado
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* Dungeons in the ''{{Ultima}}'' games are for the most part accepted as part of the natural geography of Britannia - who built them, if anyone, and for what purpose, is a mystery to all. In the early games it was implied (though not actually possible in-game) that if you traveled deep enough into one you would end up in "the underworld", the opposite side of the flat earth. When the underworld was destroyed, this became impossible.

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* Dungeons in the ''{{Ultima}}'' ''VideoGame/{{Ultima}}'' games are for the most part accepted as part of the natural geography of Britannia - who built them, if anyone, and for what purpose, is a mystery to all. In the early games it was implied (though not actually possible in-game) that if you traveled deep enough into one you would end up in "the underworld", the opposite side of the flat earth. When the underworld was destroyed, this became impossible.
5th May '17 5:20:59 AM Mrmadrigal
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**Averted in ''Ruby, Sapphire,'' and ''Emerald'' (along with the remakes), where all ruins have a purpose. Mt. Pyre is an ancient burial ground, the Sky Pillar is a tower meant to [[spoiler: honor/summon Rayquaza (though this is more evident in the remakes)]], and the mysterious monoliths scattered throughout the region are [[spoiler: explicitly said to be built to hold the Regis within]]. The latter does involve some ridiculously unintuitive and hard to crack puzzles, but they have a purpose non the less.
**The Kalos Victory Road in 'X' and 'Y' plays this straight, however. In the sections outside the caves, the roads are chock full of ancient, run down castle walls, some of which block the way and must be navigated around. They do add a nice touch to the environment, but one can't help but wonder why would someone build something like that in a place as hazardous and out-of-the-way.
19th Jan '17 4:54:05 AM Morgenthaler
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* Averted in ''TabletopGame/{{Earthdawn}},'' where the civilized races spent a few centuries hiding in underground cities called "kaers" while [[CthulhuMythos Cthulhuoid]] monsters called Horrors ravaged the Earth. The [=PCs=] are from kaers that survived, and most of the dungeons they explore are kaers that didn't.

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* Averted in ''TabletopGame/{{Earthdawn}},'' where the civilized races spent a few centuries hiding in underground cities called "kaers" while [[CthulhuMythos [[Franchise/CthulhuMythos Cthulhuoid]] monsters called Horrors ravaged the Earth. The [=PCs=] are from kaers that survived, and most of the dungeons they explore are kaers that didn't.
7th Jan '17 5:33:37 PM MiddleEighth
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[[folder: Fan Works]]
*The four run into several of these in ''Fanfic/TheKeysStandAlone: The Soft World''. They're told that [[AWizardDidIt the gods reshaped C'hou to be more like the G'heddi'onian homeworld]] so the new civilians would be comfortable there. And they note the insanity of these places ''every single time''.
**Gothmarik Citadel is a ruin/dungeon reminiscent of those in ''VideoGame/TheElderScrollsIIDaggerfall''. Ringo, who mentally explores the place, notes that he'd never seen anything like it the first time they were on C'hou, and the others make various comments as to whether the designer was on acid.
**The cliff dwelling where the white key is hidden. John notes that despite it being in mountains created only about five years ago, the dwelling is obviously hundreds of years old. Did the gods create it old?
**The Boidan Mine, the map of which shows a weird tangle of passages. “Why would we want to go to a mine?” George sensibly asks.
***Heck, the very first thing that happens to them after they decide to get off the mesa is that Paul crashes through the ground into an underground chamber with a poem carved into the wall. What's that chamber doing there? Who put the poem there? Is it even relevant to them?
[[/folder]]
1st Jan '17 10:11:58 PM Timber
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* In ''VideoGame/SkiesOfArcadia'', all dungeons are guilty of this but Rixis is justified; it's only so hard to navigate because of the huge craters everywhere. As for Glacia; [[FridgeBrilliance you came into through the visitor's entrance, all the buildings hang from the ceiling; and you're on a walkway that's halfway down, giving you an ideal view of the entire city. The walkway is the tour route.]]

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* In ''VideoGame/SkiesOfArcadia'', nearly all dungeons are guilty of avert this, with most being either ancient civilizations that were abandoned after an apocalyptic meteor shower or structures built specifically to contain powerful weapons and protect them from would-be thieves. The only ones that play this but Rixis trope straight are the Valuan Catacombs and Shrine Island, [[spoiler: at least until Soltis rises and Shrine Island is justified; it's only so hard revealed to navigate because have been a portion of it that for whatever reason didn't sink into Deep Sky with the rest of the huge craters everywhere. As for Glacia; [[FridgeBrilliance you came into through the visitor's entrance, all the buildings hang from the ceiling; and you're on a walkway that's halfway down, giving you an ideal view of the entire city. The walkway is the tour route.continent.]]


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* The vast majority of the dungeons in ''VideoGame/TalesOfZestiria'' are ruins whose origin and purpose are a mystery.
4th Dec '16 9:01:17 AM Gosicrystal
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* ''Franchise/TheLegendOfZelda'' would not be much of a game without dungeons and temples. The three Goddesses leave them behind as a test of courage barring the way to the Triforce pieces. In many cases, Link has to go plundering for "pendants" or "orbs" before he can even begin assembling the Triforce pieces, which are hidden in still more temples.
-->'''[[WebAnimation/ZeroPunctuation Yahtzee:]]''' (on ''VideoGame/TheTalosPrinciple'') Hope you like [[BlockPuzzle weighing down switches with boxes]] and [[LightAndMirrorsPuzzle redirecting laser beams]] and everything else from the "Insert puzzle here"-guide to video game design....Even in context, it's admittedly busywork. It's Link's problem again, forever having to ''[[OnlyTheWorthyMayPass prove our sodding worth]]'', 'cause the ancient ones never even considered that there were probably a great many terribly '''un'''worthy people who can figure out how to redirect a laser beam.
* Averted (mostly) in ''VideoGame/TheLegendOfZeldaTwilightPrincess'', where the dungeons are prisons, mansions and mines, all looking fairly realistic and practical, even if they were just as malevolent as the more traditional dungeons. Averted further in ''VideoGame/TheLegendOfZeldaTheWindWaker'' where there's a ''very'' good reason for all these [[AfterTheEnd ruins]]. Arguable if they're ruins, the dungeons in ''VideoGame/ZeldaIITheAdventureOfLink'' are stated in the manual as tests for the legendary Hero.
** This trait was perhaps first seen in ''VideoGame/TheLegendOfZeldaOcarinaOfTime'', where major dungeons rather noticeably pull double duty, or did in the past; the Forest Temple is an old manor, the Spirit Temple is a place of worship, the Shadow Temple is [[SurpriseCreepy part torture complex, part necropolis.]]
*** The Fire Temple is a jail and the Water Temple is an Atlantis-like city.

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* ''Franchise/TheLegendOfZelda'' would not be much of a game without dungeons and temples. The three Goddesses leave them behind as a test of courage barring the way to the Triforce pieces. In many cases, Link has to go plundering for "pendants" or "orbs" before he can even begin assembling the Triforce pieces, which are hidden in still more temples.
-->'''[[WebAnimation/ZeroPunctuation Yahtzee:]]''' (on ''VideoGame/TheTalosPrinciple'') Hope you like [[BlockPuzzle weighing down switches with boxes]] and [[LightAndMirrorsPuzzle redirecting laser beams]] and everything else from the "Insert puzzle here"-guide to video game design....Even in context, it's admittedly busywork. It's Link's problem again, forever having to ''[[OnlyTheWorthyMayPass prove our sodding worth]]'', 'cause the ancient ones never even considered that there were probably a great many terribly '''un'''worthy people who can figure out how to redirect a laser beam.
* Averted (mostly) in ''VideoGame/TheLegendOfZeldaTwilightPrincess'',
temples.\\\
There are aversions, though,
where the dungeons serve other purposes other than being nonsensical ruins:
** In ''[[VideoGame/TheLegendOfZeldaTwilightPrincess Twilight Princess]]'',
the dungeons are prisons, mansions and mines, all looking fairly realistic and practical, even if they were just as malevolent as the more traditional dungeons. Averted further in ''VideoGame/TheLegendOfZeldaTheWindWaker'' where dungeons.
** In ''[[VideoGame/TheLegendOfZeldaTheWindWaker Wind Waker]]''
there's a ''very'' good reason for all these [[AfterTheEnd ruins]]. ruins]].
**
Arguable if they're ruins, the dungeons in ''VideoGame/ZeldaIITheAdventureOfLink'' are stated in the manual as tests for the legendary Hero.
** This trait was perhaps first seen ''All'' the dungeons in ''VideoGame/TheLegendOfZeldaOcarinaOfTime'', ''[[VideoGame/TheLegendOfZeldaOcarinaOfTime Ocarina of Time]]'', where major dungeons rather noticeably pull double duty, or did in the past; the past:
*** The
Forest Temple is an old manor, the manor.
*** The
Spirit Temple is a place of worship, the Shadow Temple is [[SurpriseCreepy part torture complex, part necropolis.]]
worship.
*** The Fire Temple is a jail and the jail.
*** The
Water Temple is an Atlantis-like city.



*** Dodongo's Cavern is a rock mine, and the Deku Tree and Jabu-Jabu are inherently nonsensical {{Womb Level}}s. Which leaves the Ice Cavern, which is [[ExactlyWhatItSaysOnTheTin a cavern, not ruins]].
*** It's also present in ''VideoGame/TheLegendOfZeldaMajorasMask''. The Woodfall Temple was a place of worship, the Snowhead Temple appears to be an abandoned city, the Great Bay Temple is a power plant, the Stone Tower Temple appears to have been a blasphemous monument designed to insult the Golden Goddesses and praise Majora, and Beneath the Well was a crypt.
*** This was also seen in World 6 of ''VideoGame/TheLegendOfZeldaTriForceHeroes''.

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*** Dodongo's Cavern is a rock mine, and the mine.
*** The
Deku Tree and Jabu-Jabu are inherently nonsensical {{Womb Level}}s. Which leaves the Level}}s.
*** The
Ice Cavern, which Cavern is [[ExactlyWhatItSaysOnTheTin a cavern, not ruins]].
*** It's also present in ''VideoGame/TheLegendOfZeldaMajorasMask''. ** The Woodfall Temple in ''[[VideoGame/TheLegendOfZeldaMajorasMask Majora's Mask]]'' was a place of worship, the Snowhead Temple appears to be an abandoned city, the Great Bay Temple is a power plant, the Stone Tower Temple appears to have been a blasphemous monument designed to insult the Golden Goddesses and praise Majora, and Beneath the Well was a crypt.
*** This was also seen in World 6 of ''VideoGame/TheLegendOfZeldaTriForceHeroes''.
crypt.
21st Nov '16 9:00:01 AM Morgenthaler
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* Exaggerated in ''[[CrimsonSkies Crimson Skies: High Road to Revenge]]'' in the South America levels. Along with massive temples and structures surrounding the mountain with a gigantic face in it, you need to tow a sunstone the size of a small house with your zeppelin to help unlock a door (the mouth of said giant face) and traverse the ruins inside the mountains. Said ruins are large enough for at 10 to 15 minutes of straight flying, with enough room to fit an entire city AND the surrounding urban sprawl and humongous death traps that are sized for attacking either aircraft or Franchise/{{Godzilla}}.

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* Exaggerated in ''[[CrimsonSkies ''[[VideoGame/CrimsonSkies Crimson Skies: High Road to Revenge]]'' in the South America levels. Along with massive temples and structures surrounding the mountain with a gigantic face in it, you need to tow a sunstone the size of a small house with your zeppelin to help unlock a door (the mouth of said giant face) and traverse the ruins inside the mountains. Said ruins are large enough for at 10 to 15 minutes of straight flying, with enough room to fit an entire city AND the surrounding urban sprawl and humongous death traps that are sized for attacking either aircraft or Franchise/{{Godzilla}}.
8th Nov '16 8:46:23 AM HighCrate
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** ''VideoGame/TheElderScrollsIVOblivion'' offers a partial aversion, with a few dungeons and supposed prisons actually containing the expected cells. Other than that, it generally falls into this, with some geographically unlikely (and even impossible) sets of generic ruins dotted around beneath innocuous looking caves and forts above. These typically lead to a final chamber where the hardest enemy and best loot can be found, but there's rarely an explanation of why any of the Goblins/Vampires/Whatever are even hanging around inside in the first place, or who would want to build such a place.
*** A large number of the ruins are old cities of the Ayleids, an old group of [[OurElvesAreDifferent Mer]] who once ruled the Men of Cyrodill. This despite the "cities" being unnecessarily mazelike, full of traps, etc. No wonder the Mer were defeated.
*** They're the catacombs of the abandoned cities - there's generally the remains of some suitably monumental building sat on top of them which was probably the Ayleid temple.
*** Also, the Imperial Legion has seen fit to allow ''every'' fort in the province to fall into disrepair and serve as shelter for all manner of monsters and villains. Some of these forts are built dangerously close to major roads, including one built ''directly on top of the road'' now ''infested with goblins''. In addition there isn't a single working mine in the province, they're all described as "deserted", "forgotten" or "haunted". All Ayleid cities only ever make sense if you take 'city' to mean 'necropolis', because burying people and treasures is all they do. They also suffer from BlatantItemPlacement in that you find Third Era Imperial currency ostensibly from the First Era Ayleid empire.
*** This, at least, makes sense when you realize that, since the ruined forts, abandoned mines, and Ayleid cities are currently being occupied by bandits, rogue mages, necromancers, etc., they'd bring whatever (modern) money and other goods they have with them and stash them there.
*** The question in ''Oblivion'' tends not to be so much "What were they for?" but rather "Why aren't half of them still being used (besides by goblins/brigands/etc.)?"
*** The answer being that, when they described the Third Empire of Tamriel as an empire in decline... they meant it.

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** ''VideoGame/TheElderScrollsIVOblivion'' offers a partial aversion, with a few dungeons and supposed prisons actually containing the expected cells. Other than that, it generally falls into this, with ''VideoGame/TheElderScrollsIVOblivion'': There are some geographically unlikely (and even impossible) sets of generic ruins dotted around beneath innocuous looking caves and forts above. These typically lead to a final chamber where the hardest enemy and best loot can be found, but there's rarely an explanation of why any of the Goblins/Vampires/Whatever are even hanging around inside in the first place, or who would want to build such a place.
*** *** A large number of the ruins are old cities of the Ayleids, an old group of [[OurElvesAreDifferent Mer]] who once ruled the Men of Cyrodill. This despite the "cities" being unnecessarily mazelike, full of traps, etc. No wonder the Mer were defeated.
*** They're the catacombs of the abandoned cities - there's generally the remains of some suitably monumental building sat on top of them which was probably the Ayleid temple.
*** Also, the Imperial Legion has seen fit to allow ''every'' fort in the province to fall into disrepair and serve as shelter for all manner of monsters and villains. Some of these forts are built dangerously close to major roads, including one built ''directly on top of the road'' now ''infested with goblins''. In addition there isn't a single working mine in the province, they're all described as "deserted", "forgotten" or "haunted". All Ayleid cities only ever make sense if you take 'city' to mean 'necropolis', because burying people and treasures is all they do. They also suffer from BlatantItemPlacement in that you find Third Era Imperial currency ostensibly from the First Era Ayleid empire. \n*** This, at least, makes sense when you realize that, since the ruined forts, abandoned mines, and Ayleid cities are currently being occupied by bandits, rogue mages, necromancers, etc., they'd bring whatever (modern) money and other goods they have with them and stash them there.\n*** The question in ''Oblivion'' tends not to be so much "What were they for?" but rather "Why aren't half of them still being used (besides by goblins/brigands/etc.)?"\n*** The answer being that, when they described the Third Empire of Tamriel as an empire in decline... they meant it.
8th Nov '16 7:41:59 AM HighCrate
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[[folder:Film]]
* We see numerous ruins throughout the film version of ''Film/TheLordOfTheRings'', most memorably after the Fellowship sets out from Rivendell. At one point Aragorn names Weathertop as the Great Watchtower of Amun-sul with a wistful look on his face, which implies that they're from his ancestral kingdom, but it's not explicitly stated that it's old kingdoms of Arnor and Eregion.
[[/folder]]



** Or to occasionally act as Chekov's Architechture.
** [[JustifiedTrope Justified]] since this takes place AfterTheEnd — the Age of Legends had such amazing technology that pieces of their civilization remains over three thousand years after their annihilation.
21st Sep '16 1:51:43 PM Steam_Lord
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** The Blackrock Depths however, are a bizarre blend of worked and rough stone leading off in all directions, full of dead ends. As it is partially a mine, this would be understandable if the areas of dead ends and the rough stone corresponded at all. Then again, the Blackrock Depths is one of the few "evil cities" that we invade as dungeons that actually has taverns, prisons, coliseums, forges and whatnot and looks vaguely usable as an underground city. Also, they aren't exactly ruins because ''the people who built them are still living there.'' Not that they will be for very long, given the [=PCs=] intentions in going there. It is more a case when an active city has a confusing layout.

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**Ancient mogu and Apexis ruins can come off as this, as they are just wall sections placed into jumbled patterns. Night elf ruins are similar, but they at least have individual buildings as set-pieces.
** The Blackrock Depths however, are a bizarre blend of worked and rough stone leading off in all directions, full of dead ends. As it is partially a mine, this would be understandable if the areas of dead ends and the rough stone corresponded at all. Then again, the Blackrock Depths is one of the few "evil cities" that we invade as dungeons that actually has taverns, prisons, coliseums, forges and whatnot and looks vaguely usable as an underground city. Also, they aren't exactly ruins because ''the people who built them are still living there.'' Not that they will be for very long, given the [=PCs=] intentions in going there. It is more a case when an active city has a confusing layout. Blackrock Spire (inhabited, but bigger and in disrepair) has it worse.



** The Ruins of Ahn'Qiraj make little sense. It was supposed to be a research facility that was taken over by evil insects, but it seems to have been a series of plazas and empty rooms. The qiraji do not even seem have the equipment needed to forge any of the weapons and golems that they have.
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