History Main / RubberBandAI

4th Jun '16 9:38:35 PM nombretomado
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* The first ''VideoGame/WanganMidnight'' arcade game (and its revision ''Wangan Midnight R'', which was eventually ported to PS2) has rubber band AI that's especially present during the final battle against Akio. If you get ahead of him you better be good at blocking because the Devil Z will be on your ass the whole time.

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* The first ''VideoGame/WanganMidnight'' arcade game (and its revision ''Wangan Midnight R'', which was eventually ported to PS2) [=PS2=]) has rubber band AI that's especially present during the final battle against Akio. If you get ahead of him you better be good at blocking because the Devil Z will be on your ass the whole time.
1st Jun '16 9:37:02 AM speedyboris
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* ''Beach Buggy Racing'', an otherwise fun kart racer for UsefulNotes/XBoxOne, is hampered by rubber band AI, especially in the later tournaments. You can never be ahead of the pack for very long, since the AI will suddenly get infinite boosts to catch up and will often hit you with weapons to knock you to last place. A lot of times in the later races, winning feels like complete luck, which isn't how it should be.
24th May '16 2:46:47 PM erforce
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* ''{{Burnout}}''. At least in ''Burnout 3'' you can ram the caught-up cars, steal their boost, and regain your lead....

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* ''{{Burnout}}''. ''VideoGame/{{Burnout}}''.
** A common problem with the early games.
At least in ''Burnout 3'' ''VideoGame/Burnout3Takedown'', you can ram the caught-up cars, steal their boost, and regain your lead....



** ''Burnout Dominator'' has the charming tendency for opposing cars to make up lost distance ''while respawning''. So you can crash, take out two or three trailing cars in the process - meaning as many as half the cars other cars in the race crashed after you did - and then reappear in ''last place''.

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** ''Burnout Dominator'' ''VideoGame/BurnoutDominator'' has the charming tendency for opposing cars to make up lost distance ''while respawning''. So you can crash, take out two or three trailing cars in the process - meaning as many as half the cars other cars in the race crashed after you did - and then reappear in ''last place''.
10th May '16 7:52:02 AM TVT1234
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* ''DigimonRacing'''s rubberbanding becomes noticeable as you progress through the game. When I mean progress, it truly means the game progress, as in how much content you've unlocked in the game. Early on, when you begin playing through the game, opponents seem to hold back and, at best, they appear to be non-threatening at all to the player. If you've unlocked everything in the game, however, expect to lose easily due to how extremely quickly the opponents catch up to you and how [[SpitefulAI spiteful]] they behave against you as they harass you with items and special powers.

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* ''DigimonRacing'''s ''Digimon Racing'''s rubberbanding becomes noticeable as you progress through the game. When I mean progress, it truly means the game progress, as in how much content you've unlocked in the game. Early on, when you begin playing through the game, opponents seem to hold back and, at best, they appear to be non-threatening at all to the player. If you've unlocked everything in the game, however, expect to lose easily due to how extremely quickly the opponents catch up to you and how [[SpitefulAI spiteful]] they behave against you as they harass you with items and special powers.
10th May '16 7:51:39 AM TVT1234
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* ''DigimonRacing'''s rubberbanding becomes noticeable as you progress through the game. When I mean progress, it truly means the game progress, as in how much content you've unlocked in the game. Early on, when you begin playing through the game, opponents seem to hold back and, at best, they appear to be non-threatening at all to the player. If you've unlocked everything in the game, however, expect to lose easily due to how extremely quickly the opponents catch up to you and how [[SpitefulAI spiteful]] they behave against you as they harass you with items and special powers.
2nd May '16 8:45:25 AM Alexia
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* Drastically averted in the original ''TOCA Touring Car Championship'' for the UsefulNotes/PlayStation, in a way that was a revelation for driving games at the time. Sixteen cars on the grid at the start of the race, accurately modelled circuits with few walls and long grass runouts, pretty accurate physics meaning that if you put a couple of wheels on the grass at speed you were definitely going to spin out, and then when you do, the AI opponents give no quarter at all. Spin out at any point early in a race, and you'd do very well to even SEE the rest of the cars again, they'd be so far in front. Equally, on a short track, if you managed to nudge an opponent into a catastrophic spin, you'd have a reasonable chance of lapping him.

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* Drastically averted Averted in the original ''TOCA Touring Car Championship'' for the UsefulNotes/PlayStation, in a way that was a revelation for driving games at the time. Sixteen cars on the grid at the start of the race, accurately modelled circuits with few walls and long grass runouts, pretty accurate physics meaning that if you put a couple of wheels on the grass at speed you were definitely going to spin out, and then when you do, the AI opponents give no quarter at all. Spin out at any point early in a race, and you'd do very well to even SEE the rest of the cars again, they'd be so far in front. Equally, on a short track, if you managed to nudge an opponent into a catastrophic spin, you'd have a reasonable chance of lapping him.
29th Apr '16 7:59:50 PM mlsmithca
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* Quite blatant in the hoverboard races in ''VideoGame/{{RatchetAndClank2016}}''. No matter how well you do it is extremely difficult to get out of last or fifth place for the first two laps, and then you will suddenly shoot ahead to second place at the end of the third lap unless you make a lot of mistakes just then.

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* Quite blatant in the hoverboard races in ''VideoGame/{{RatchetAndClank2016}}''.''VideoGame/RatchetAndClank2016''. No matter how well you do it is extremely difficult to get out of last or fifth place for the first two laps, and then you will suddenly shoot ahead to second place at the end of the third lap unless you make a lot of mistakes just then.



* In Capcom brawler ''VideoGame/GodHand'', enemies can "level up" depending on how well the player continues attacking and dodging counterattacks successfully, increasing in speed and strength. On the flip side, they de-level if the player gets smacked around too much or uses the "grovel" [[LimitBreak God Reel technique]].
** There is an indicator on the side of the screen which shows you what "level" you're on. The more enemies you beat at a high level, the larger the money bonus at the end of the stage.

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* In Capcom brawler ''VideoGame/GodHand'', enemies can "level up" depending on how well the player continues attacking and dodging counterattacks successfully, increasing in speed and strength. On the flip side, they de-level if the player gets smacked around too much or uses the "grovel" [[LimitBreak God Reel technique]].
**
technique]]. There is an indicator on the side of the screen which shows you what "level" you're on. The more enemies you beat at a high level, the larger the money bonus at the end of the stage.



*** This happens again if you race against someone's Mii with the Street Pass feature in ''Mario Kart 7''. The Mii you race against seem to be only focused in making your race as difficult as possible. Are you driving in a kart with nearly maxed out top speed while the Mii is driving with mediocre stats all around? That Mii will always stay on your tail no matter how perfectly you race or how many times the Mii is attacked. Watching the map screen, you can see the Mii's AI gaining a big boost in speed to catch up to you while the other AI racers have their "normal" variances in rubber banding. If you fall behind, the Mii will then go very slow to let you catch up.

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*** ** This happens again if you race against someone's Mii with the Street Pass feature in ''Mario Kart 7''. The Mii you race against seem to be only focused in making your race as difficult as possible. Are you driving in a kart with nearly maxed out top speed while the Mii is driving with mediocre stats all around? That Mii will always stay on your tail no matter how perfectly you race or how many times the Mii is attacked. Watching the map screen, you can see the Mii's AI gaining a big boost in speed to catch up to you while the other AI racers have their "normal" variances in rubber banding. If you fall behind, the Mii will then go very slow to let you catch up.



** Later on, each of the opponent cars do this a little bit after the start of the race. This fact is the reason that you want to upgrade your car as much as possible, because if it isn't at full performance by the time this happens, you're screwed.
*** There are two separate effects at work here. There the "super turbo yellow car", which nearly always kicks in only if you use your weapons enough times (roll cages don't trigger it, because they can use them too). This super turbo is faster than your maximum possible top speed. Then there are the late game tracks where any car that gets ahead of you after you get out of the starting block will instantly super turbo. Either way, a missile or bomb will stop the madness, and bring the car back down to earth, for now.

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** Later on, each of the opponent cars do this a little bit after the start of the race. This fact is the reason that you want to upgrade your car as much as possible, because if it isn't at full performance by the time this happens, you're screwed.
***
screwed. There are two separate effects at work here. There the "super turbo yellow car", which nearly always kicks in only if you use your weapons enough times (roll cages don't trigger it, because they can use them too). This super turbo is faster than your maximum possible top speed. Then there are the late game tracks where any car that gets ahead of you after you get out of the starting block will instantly super turbo. Either way, a missile or bomb will stop the madness, and bring the car back down to earth, for now.



*** Note that the Rubber Band A.I. of this game works less like Rubber Band A.I. and more like a twisted form of scaled levelling-if they're behind, they'll take shortcuts, speed up, or when neither of those is an option, seem to literally vanish and reappear just behind you going half again as fast. But if they're ahead, they'll still speed up as you do. So oftentimes about the only way to win a race is to gain a lead in the first lap and then ''never make a mistake for the rest of the race''. If you crash, die or run out of AIR even once, you may as well start over, because there is no making a comeback.
*** Rubberbanding happens in its finest in Story mode where AI can pull any kind of tricks from its sleeves, from recovering from your super attacks in seconds, to doing super attacks after you knock out all of their rings.

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*** ** Note that the Rubber Band A.I. of this game works less like Rubber Band A.I. and more like a twisted form of scaled levelling-if they're behind, they'll take shortcuts, speed up, or when neither of those is an option, seem to literally vanish and reappear just behind you going half again as fast. But if they're ahead, they'll still speed up as you do. So oftentimes about the only way to win a race is to gain a lead in the first lap and then ''never make a mistake for the rest of the race''. If you crash, die or run out of AIR even once, you may as well start over, because there is no making a comeback.
*** ** Rubberbanding happens in its finest in Story mode where AI can pull any kind of tricks from its sleeves, from recovering from your super attacks in seconds, to doing super attacks after you knock out all of their rings.



** In their original arcade versions, all of the "Cruisin'" games (USA, World, Exotica) not only did the computer cars follow the "speed up when behind, slow down when ahead" principle, but the games were also programmed to ramp up the difficulty with each race you won, not resetting until you lost one. By the time you won three or four races in a row, the computer cars were so good that you could literally drive a perfect race and still only finish third or fourth. This was likely put in to limit your play time, since those games usually awarded you a free race for winning a track.
* In ''VideoGame/{{F-Zero}} GP Legend'', opponents won't take [[GameBreaker game-breaking]] shortcuts unless they're following at the right distance to be marked by a "CHECK" marker, at which point they will.

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** In their the original arcade versions, versions of all of the "Cruisin'" games (USA, World, Exotica) Exotica), not only did the computer cars follow the "speed up when behind, slow down when ahead" principle, but the games were also programmed to ramp up the difficulty with each race you won, not resetting until you lost one. By the time you won three or four races in a row, the computer cars were so good that you could literally drive a perfect race and still only finish third or fourth. This was likely put in to limit your play time, since those games usually awarded you a free race for winning a track.
* In ''VideoGame/{{F-Zero}} ''VideoGame/FZero GP Legend'', opponents won't take [[GameBreaker game-breaking]] shortcuts unless they're following at the right distance to be marked by a "CHECK" marker, at which point they will.



** In the Original ''VideoGame/{{F-Zero}}'' game it's [[UnwinnableByMistake physically impossible]] to beat the Death Wind course using the Golden Fox on the Master Difficulty. All the other vehicles have a max speed of 478 k/h and remain at that speed the whole race while the Golden Fox's top speed is 438. Well... ok, it's TECHNICALLY possible, but it's only been pulled off once, in a [[{{Speedrun}} Tool Assisted Speedrun]], [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=33dli_QAdHA by getting an early lead and making the car in second place push him along]].
** Well, ''VideoGame/{{F-Zero}}'' is infamous for that. You can, with just moderate skill, give the enemy a full lap of advantage, and still win, at least in easy mode (and mind you, the race is only 5 laps!). But getting more than a few seconds ahead of the enemy is completely impossible. Combine this with the game's habit of literally throwing explosive cars at you in the final turns, and you have a recipe for disaster.

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** In the Original ''VideoGame/{{F-Zero}}'' ''VideoGame/FZero'' game it's [[UnwinnableByMistake physically impossible]] to beat the Death Wind course using the Golden Fox on the Master Difficulty. All the other vehicles have a max speed of 478 k/h and remain at that speed the whole race while the Golden Fox's top speed is 438. Well... ok, it's TECHNICALLY possible, but it's only been pulled off once, in a [[{{Speedrun}} Tool Assisted Speedrun]], [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=33dli_QAdHA by getting an early lead and making the car in second place push him along]].
** Well, ''VideoGame/{{F-Zero}}'' ''VideoGame/FZero'' is infamous for that. You can, with just moderate skill, give the enemy a full lap of advantage, and still win, at least in easy mode (and mind you, the race is only 5 laps!). But getting more than a few seconds ahead of the enemy is completely impossible. Combine this with the game's habit of literally throwing explosive cars at you in the final turns, and you have a recipe for disaster.



** A patch was released for this game that makes the difficulty the opposite of NintendoHard for the first third of the game. The difficulty is supposed to ramp up after that, but if you get the Kawasaki Ninja ZX-14 and max the performance stats out, not even rubber band AI will make it challenging...
*** How much did Kawasaki pay to make the game do that?

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** A patch was released for this game that makes the difficulty the opposite of NintendoHard for the first third of the game. The difficulty is supposed to ramp up after that, but if you get the Kawasaki Ninja ZX-14 and max the performance stats out, not even rubber band AI will make it challenging...
***
challenging... How much did Kawasaki pay to make the game do that?



* In ''VideoGame/{{Carmageddon}}'', opponents will constantly respawn somewhere nearby, never actually going around the course. This means that it is impossible to lose the race to an enemy - you can only lose if your car is destroyed or you run out of time on the clock. However, it should be noted that this is probably intentional, as the point of the game is clearly to destroy your opponents rather than race them to the finish line. Destruction of opponents gives massive rewards, including sometimes the ability to steal an opponent's car and add it to your collection, so that it can be driven in future races. Also, destroying opponents, or seeking and running down pedestrians, adds time to your clock, allowing you to either finish the race more comfortably or (you guessed it) to destroy your opponents thoroughly.
** However, it should be noted that if you run the game with the map on full-screen, the opponent cars will NOT teleport to your vicinity when they get out of range. But the moment you put the cockpit view on fullscreen, those cars will teleport again.

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* In ''VideoGame/{{Carmageddon}}'', opponents will constantly respawn somewhere nearby, never actually going around the course. This means that it is impossible to lose the race to an enemy - you can only lose if your car is destroyed or you run out of time on the clock. However, it should be noted that this is probably intentional, as the point of the game is clearly to destroy your opponents rather than race them to the finish line. Destruction of opponents gives massive rewards, including sometimes the ability to steal an opponent's car and add it to your collection, so that it can be driven in future races. Also, destroying opponents, or seeking and running down pedestrians, adds time to your clock, allowing you to either finish the race more comfortably or (you guessed it) to destroy your opponents thoroughly.
**
thoroughly. However, it should be noted that if you run the game with the map on full-screen, the opponent cars will NOT teleport to your vicinity when they get out of range. But the moment you put the cockpit view on fullscreen, those cars will teleport again.



* ''DiddyKongRacing'' averts this... at least, from the outset. While the original game's racers did not initially rubberband or gang up on you, you could enter a code that activated this. Opponents got real cheap ''real'' fast.

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* ''DiddyKongRacing'' ''VideoGame/DiddyKongRacing'' averts this... at least, from the outset. While the original game's racers did not initially rubberband or gang up on you, you could enter a code that activated this. Opponents got real cheap ''real'' fast.



*** Comically, Homestar's opponents are always Kid Speedy (a fat little kid), Strong Sad (a fat, doughy nerd), and the King Of Town (a fat old man), meaning that even though he's Homestar Freakin' Runner, he's still struggling to outrun some fat doughboy who wouldn't stand a chance against him in a proper cartoon.

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*** ** Comically, Homestar's opponents are always Kid Speedy (a fat little kid), Strong Sad (a fat, doughy nerd), and the King Of Town (a fat old man), meaning that even though he's Homestar Freakin' Runner, he's still struggling to outrun some fat doughboy who wouldn't stand a chance against him in a proper cartoon.



* Quite a big problem in ''VideoGame/ModNationRacers''. For the first quarter of the career mode, it's fairly simple and, while challenging, possible to win every race and get every bonus in each level. But then... At a clear point (the Flaming Jumps track, specifically), the AI's rubber band is folded over itself twice or thrice, and doesn't compensate for players who aren't as good. The slowest computer opponent can almost always drive faster than your maximum speed, and all constantly launch Level 3 targeting weapons at you, guaranteeing you'll run out of boost by the third lap.
** Not to mention the bonuses get practically impossible by this point. After struggling just to get 3rd place to continue the story, the game tells you to blow up "Nato's explosives," which aren't located or even mentioned before then, and to get 1st place at the same time. You can blow up all three of the explosives and, on the final curve, be exploded by a hundred missiles and come in 11th place, losing the bonus.

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* Quite a big problem in ''VideoGame/ModNationRacers''. For the first quarter of the career mode, it's fairly simple and, while challenging, possible to win every race and get every bonus in each level. But then... At a clear point (the Flaming Jumps track, specifically), the AI's rubber band is folded over itself twice or thrice, and doesn't compensate for players who aren't as good. The slowest computer opponent can almost always drive faster than your maximum speed, and all constantly launch Level 3 targeting weapons at you, guaranteeing you'll run out of boost by the third lap.
**
lap. Not to mention the bonuses get practically impossible by this point. After struggling just to get 3rd place to continue the story, the game tells you to blow up "Nato's explosives," which aren't located or even mentioned before then, and to get 1st place at the same time. You can blow up all three of the explosives and, on the final curve, be exploded by a hundred missiles and come in 11th place, losing the bonus.



** Actually all of AKI's wrestling-games had this. In the N64-games opponents started countering anything reliably once close to losing. While it might seem that was meant to reflect the comeback-effect from wrestling, it doesn't work the same way for the player.
* Some WWE wrestling games have this. Play without a loss for too long and the player will eventually be presented with a match where victory is impossible. The Rubber Band AI has snapped so far that enemy players will be completely immune to attacks and able to win via submission or escaping the cage without any problems. In some games the computer will cheat, by making the player so weak that a single hit will make the player unable to get up for long enough that the computer escapes.
** Of course, that's pretty close to how things work in the source material.

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** Actually all * All of AKI's wrestling-games had this. In the N64-games N64 games, opponents started countering anything reliably once close to losing. While it might seem that was meant to reflect the comeback-effect from wrestling, it doesn't work the same way for the player.
* Some WWE wrestling games have this. Play without a loss for too long and the player will eventually be presented with a match where victory is impossible. The Rubber Band AI has snapped so far that enemy players will be completely immune to attacks and able to win via submission or escaping the cage without any problems. In some games the computer will cheat, by making the player so weak that a single hit will make the player unable to get up for long enough that the computer escapes.
**
escapes. Of course, that's pretty close to how things work in the source material.



** In ''VideoGame/MortalKombat9'', opponents in both Ladder and Story will ease up on repeated tries, even bosses. If you can't beat Shao Kahn on Medium, he'll eventually reduce himself to doing a lot of taunts around the 4th attempt.

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** * In ''VideoGame/MortalKombat9'', opponents in both Ladder and Story will ease up on repeated tries, even bosses. If you can't beat Shao Kahn on Medium, he'll eventually reduce himself to doing a lot of taunts around the 4th attempt.



* ''VideoGame/Left4Dead'' has this, thanks to the AI Director. If the group is doing very well, there will be fewer pills and med kits to find (not counting the ones in the safe room and the finales) and special infected will spawn at a more frequent rate. Also, a Tank is likely to appear if the group is playing too well and there's usually a high chance that after you killed a Tank, the director will spawn a Boomer, Smoker, and Hunter right after that to make sure you don't have it easy. Naturally, if the team is doing poorly, there will be more health items to find and enemy count is lessened somewhat. On Expert, the director will punish you every step of the way if you even spend as much as 10 seconds in one area.
** It should be noted that in the case of ''Left 4 Dead'', this is seen as a good thing and generally works very well.
*** Inversely, in ''VideoGame/Left4Dead2'' the director [[TheComputerIsACheatingBastard HATES YOU]] and revels in your misery.
*** The game tries to discourage players separating from the group, by becoming cheaper and cheaper as a player survives longer on their own. Before long, a Smoker will spawn on the roof within 5 seconds of you looking the other way and tag you with an auto-targeting hose from 30 feet, requiring assistance from another survivor to free you. Or a Charger will show up as you reload and swerve to hit you as you try to dodge, or a Jockey will actually dodge your sights so it can jump on your head. When it says "stay with your friends to survive", the game is not kidding.
*** This actually spawned the meme of Karma Charger, which came from the habit of chargers conveniently spawning and punting a player halfway across the map if they leave their group. While any infected can do this, Chargers are the hardest of them to kill, and cannot be pushed off other survivors and must be killed.
*** Karma Charger actually appears whenever the team is making a dickish move, at least as per the meme. One of the most obvious ones is teamkilling.

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* ''VideoGame/Left4Dead'' has this, thanks to the AI Director. If the group is doing very well, there will be fewer pills and med kits to find (not counting the ones in the safe room and the finales) and special infected will spawn at a more frequent rate. Also, a Tank is likely to appear if the group is playing too well and there's usually a high chance that after you killed a Tank, the director will spawn a Boomer, Smoker, and Hunter right after that to make sure you don't have it easy. Naturally, if the team is doing poorly, there will be more health items to find and enemy count is lessened somewhat. On Expert, the director will punish you every step of the way if you even spend as much as 10 seconds in one area.
**
area. It should be noted that in the case of ''Left 4 Dead'', this is seen as a good thing and generally works very well.
*** * Inversely, in ''VideoGame/Left4Dead2'' the director [[TheComputerIsACheatingBastard HATES YOU]] and revels in your misery.
*** ** The game tries to discourage players separating from the group, by becoming cheaper and cheaper as a player survives longer on their own. Before long, a Smoker will spawn on the roof within 5 seconds of you looking the other way and tag you with an auto-targeting hose from 30 feet, requiring assistance from another survivor to free you. Or a Charger will show up as you reload and swerve to hit you as you try to dodge, or a Jockey will actually dodge your sights so it can jump on your head. When it says "stay with your friends to survive", the game is not kidding.
*** ** This actually spawned the meme of Karma Charger, which came from the habit of chargers conveniently spawning and punting a player halfway across the map if they leave their group. While any infected can do this, Chargers are the hardest of them to kill, and cannot be pushed off other survivors and must be killed.
*** ** Karma Charger actually appears whenever the team is making a dickish move, at least as per the meme. One of the most obvious ones is teamkilling.



* Canary Mary from ''[VideoGame/BanjoKazooie Banjo-Tooie]]'' is a particularly bad example of this in her appearance in Cloud Cuckooland. You have to race her a total of four times for [[PlotCoupon Jiggies]] or Cheato Pages. The race is done by simply hitting the A button; the faster you press, the faster you go. She employs Rubber Band AI during each race, so if you mash the A button, you'll only make it harder to win. The first two races in the mines are no problem, and the first race in Cloud Cuckooland is tough but doable, but the last cloud race will kick your ass. You can win by staying just a little behind her for the entire race until the very end, but [[GuideDangIt good luck figuring that out on your own]], especially given that she's very beatable in the mines.
** Actually, it ''is'' possible to beat her by button mashing, if you mash, pause, mash, etc. until you win.
*** Practically the only way that has been 100% proven to beat her is to have a N64 controller that is equipped with a '''Turbo''' button.
** While not nearly as infamous, and not predicated on button-mashing, the second Boggy Race in the original ''[VideoGame/BanjoKazooie Banjo-Kazooie]]'' also featured this. If the player is simply running at full speed the entire race, what can happen is that you'll seem to blaze ahead for a sizable lead, only for Boggy to suddenly gain a huge surge of speed and pass you, almost invariably on the final stretch where it's too late to do anything about it. Similar to Canary Mary, the best strategy is to lag behind for most of the race, then pass him on the final stretch.
*** While not technically a race, Mr Vile also does this in his eating mini-game. The more points you're ahead of him, the faster he'll move, making it easier for him to grab the Yumblies and Grumblies to catch up. Thankfully you don't have to worry about it as much as the above examples, though the game is still a pain due to the random nature of how the Yumblies and Grumblies spawn.

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* Canary Mary from ''[VideoGame/BanjoKazooie ''[[VideoGame/BanjoKazooie Banjo-Tooie]]'' is a particularly bad example of this in her appearance in Cloud Cuckooland. You have to race her a total of four times for [[PlotCoupon Jiggies]] or Cheato Pages. The race is done by simply hitting the A button; the faster you press, the faster you go. She employs Rubber Band AI during each race, so if you mash the A button, you'll only make it harder to win. The first two races in the mines are no problem, and the first race in Cloud Cuckooland is tough but doable, but the last cloud race will kick your ass. You can win by staying just a little behind her for the entire race until the very end, but [[GuideDangIt good luck figuring that out on your own]], especially given that she's very beatable in the mines.
** Actually, it It ''is'' possible to beat her by button mashing, if you mash, pause, mash, etc. until you win.
***
win. Practically the only way that has been 100% proven to beat her is to have a N64 controller that is equipped with a '''Turbo''' button.
** While not nearly as infamous, and not predicated on button-mashing, the second Boggy Race in the original ''[VideoGame/BanjoKazooie Banjo-Kazooie]]'' ''VideoGame/BanjoKazooie'' also featured this. If the player is simply running at full speed the entire race, what can happen is that you'll seem to blaze ahead for a sizable lead, only for Boggy to suddenly gain a huge surge of speed and pass you, almost invariably on the final stretch where it's too late to do anything about it. Similar to Canary Mary, the best strategy is to lag behind for most of the race, then pass him on the final stretch.
*** ** While not technically a race, Mr Vile also does this in his eating mini-game. The more points you're ahead of him, the faster he'll move, making it easier for him to grab the Yumblies and Grumblies to catch up. Thankfully you don't have to worry about it as much as the above examples, though the game is still a pain due to the random nature of how the Yumblies and Grumblies spawn.



** Similar things occur in ''{{Pokemon}} Puzzle League'' at the higher difficulty levels, particularly if he/she is on their last Pokemon. You might think you have the match, and then they will not only [[TheComputerIsACheatingBastard get out of the corner]], but [[OhCrap send a monstrous cascade of garbage blocks your way]].

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** * Similar things occur in ''{{Pokemon}} ''VideoGame/{{Pokemon}} Puzzle League'' at the higher difficulty levels, particularly if he/she is on their last Pokemon. You might think you have the match, and then they will not only [[TheComputerIsACheatingBastard get out of the corner]], but [[OhCrap send a monstrous cascade of garbage blocks your way]].



* Prevalent on [=GameTek=] versions of ''Series/{{Jeopardy}}'' where if you go too far ahead of your AI opponent(s), they will suddenly start buzzing in faster than you and providing all the correct responses. Earlier versions allow you to ring in as soon as the clue is exposed, meaning the computer will buzz in ''before you have the chance to read the clue.''
** The SNES version deserves a special mention. The AI opponents in this version buzz in on the first possible frame, meaning even if you play it frame-perfect on a tool-assisted emulator, the computer will still ring in before you. In a sense, [[TheComputerIsACheatingBastard the game cheats so hard that]] [[MyRulesAreNotYourRules out-cheating it is impossible.]]

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* Prevalent on [=GameTek=] versions of ''Series/{{Jeopardy}}'' where if you go too far ahead of your AI opponent(s), they will suddenly start buzzing in faster than you and providing all the correct responses. Earlier versions allow you to ring in as soon as the clue is exposed, meaning the computer will buzz in ''before you have the chance to read the clue.''
**
'' The SNES version deserves a special mention. The AI opponents in this version buzz in on the first possible frame, meaning even if you play it frame-perfect on a tool-assisted emulator, the computer will still ring in before you. In a sense, [[TheComputerIsACheatingBastard the game cheats so hard that]] [[MyRulesAreNotYourRules out-cheating it is impossible.]]



* ''VideoGame/{{Homeworld}} 2'' is notorious in some circles for doing this trope badly. Each level's enemy fleet is based solely on the makeup of your fleet as you start the level. This has the obvious abuse potential of selling all or most of your fleet at the end of each level, leaving you with enough resources to buy a new fleet in the next level capable of defeating the much weaker enemy fleet.
** What is truly bad however, is how far this over-adjusts the enemy, especially towards the last missions. If the player has a cap-sized fleet, in one mission, the enemy might as well destroy what the player is to protect before his heavy ships are even in firing range, and even then, are badly outnumbered, without the targets hp getting adjusted at all; a later mission lets the enemy start with as much as ''seven'' battle cruisers, while the player is capped at ''two'' ...
*** This would be more threatening if they didn't attack one at a time with minimal support.
* {{Sierra}}'s outer space RTS ''VideoGame/{{Outpost 2}}'' features this not only with enemy AI, but also with your population. You can opt to research items that improve the quality of life in the colony, however by doing so, the colony knows it exists and demands that you meet their needs. If you research any weapons systems, unless [[TheComputerIsACheatingBastard the enemy already has them]], the computer will start attacking your base. You could say researching anything that remotely deals with these two aspects aren't worth researching.

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* ''VideoGame/{{Homeworld}} 2'' is notorious in some circles for doing this trope badly. Each level's enemy fleet is based solely on the makeup of your fleet as you start the level. This has the obvious abuse potential of selling all or most of your fleet at the end of each level, leaving you with enough resources to buy a new fleet in the next level capable of defeating the much weaker enemy fleet.
**
fleet. What is truly bad however, is how far this over-adjusts the enemy, especially towards the last missions. If the player has a cap-sized fleet, in one mission, the enemy might as well destroy what the player is to protect before his heavy ships are even in firing range, and even then, are badly outnumbered, without the targets hp getting adjusted at all; a later mission lets the enemy start with as much as ''seven'' battle cruisers, while the player is capped at ''two'' ...
***
''two'' ... This would be more threatening if they didn't attack one at a time with minimal support.
* {{Sierra}}'s Creator/{{Sierra}}'s outer space RTS ''VideoGame/{{Outpost 2}}'' features this not only with enemy AI, but also with your population. You can opt to research items that improve the quality of life in the colony, however by doing so, the colony knows it exists and demands that you meet their needs. If you research any weapons systems, unless [[TheComputerIsACheatingBastard the enemy already has them]], the computer will start attacking your base. You could say researching anything that remotely deals with these two aspects aren't worth researching.



* In ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyVII,'' Bizarro∙ & Safer∙Sephiroth's stats are based on a ton of variables, one of which is your party members' levels. Having all of your characters at level 99 makes Safer one of the strongest final bosses in the series, only surpassed by [[VideoGame/FinalFantasyXIII Orphan]]. Of course, by that point, you probably have [[GameBreaker Knights of the Round]]...

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* In ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyVII,'' Bizarro∙ & and Safer∙Sephiroth's stats are based on a ton of variables, one of which is your party members' levels. Having all of your characters at level 99 makes Safer one of the strongest final bosses in the series, only surpassed by [[VideoGame/FinalFantasyXIII Orphan]]. Of course, by that point, you probably have [[GameBreaker Knights of the Round]]...



*** Of course, the first-time players and people who didn't know how to exploit the system were horrendously screwed. Normal enemies became insanely powerful, and BonusBoss Omega Weapon was nigh-unstoppable at level 100 (and the game would cheat and punch Omega up ten or so levels if the character average was 90 or so).
*** Depending on the version, Omega Weapon might be at Level 100 regardless of what your actual average level is. It can be at any level in the PC version.

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*** ** Of course, the first-time players and people who didn't know how to exploit the system were horrendously screwed. Normal enemies became insanely powerful, and BonusBoss Omega Weapon was nigh-unstoppable at level 100 (and the game would cheat and punch Omega up ten or so levels if the character average was 90 or so).
*** ** Depending on the version, Omega Weapon might be at Level 100 regardless of what your actual average level is. It can be at any level in the PC version.



* In ''VideoGame/TheElderScrollsIVOblivion'', enemies would get better weapons and armor as you leveled up. It got a bit silly late-game however, when common highway bandits wore the best light armor available. If they can afford that, why are they highwaymen?
** One aspect worth mentioning which does ''not'' level with you in the game are AI allies. Thus, quests where you get others to help you in a fight are much easier at low levels, while doing the same quests on high levels would get your allies killed instantly.

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* In ''VideoGame/TheElderScrollsIVOblivion'', enemies would get better weapons and armor as you leveled up. It got a bit silly late-game however, when common highway bandits wore the best light armor available. If they can afford that, why are they highwaymen?
**
highwaymen? One aspect worth mentioning which does ''not'' level with you in the game are AI allies. Thus, quests where you get others to help you in a fight are much easier at low levels, while doing the same quests on high levels would get your allies killed instantly.



*** Rank was designed originally to avoid UnstableEquilibrium. When they started putting powerups into shooters, you'd get to the point where it was easy with the powerups, but impossible without them. So someone came up with the bright idea of making the enemies more aggressive if you powered up, so they would still be a threat to your powered ship, and then when you died, they would go back down to normal so you had a chance at recovery. Before, they instead had to balance the enemy power to what you'd have if you didn't die, meaning that if you die once you might as well restart. Hence, rank. This is not usually considered a bad thing, as making recovery from death impossible is considered worse. The real hate is only when it ratchets up too much when you powerup, meaning that not powering up in the first place was preferable. Fortunately this is rare, but see Battle Garegga below.

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*** ** Rank was designed originally to avoid UnstableEquilibrium. When they started putting powerups into shooters, you'd get to the point where it was easy with the powerups, but impossible without them. So someone came up with the bright idea of making the enemies more aggressive if you powered up, so they would still be a threat to your powered ship, and then when you died, they would go back down to normal so you had a chance at recovery. Before, they instead had to balance the enemy power to what you'd have if you didn't die, meaning that if you die once you might as well restart. Hence, rank. This is not usually considered a bad thing, as making recovery from death impossible is considered worse. The real hate is only when it ratchets up too much when you powerup, meaning that not powering up in the first place was preferable. Fortunately this is rare, but see Battle Garegga below.but...



*** Raizing games are designed to punish the player for playing them wrong. In this case, you are supposed to play the game for score, to give you extra lives so you could die more often to lower the rank. Fortunately, most of them aren't that bad... Battle Bakraid actually lets you beat it by playing the game traditionally for survival.

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*** ** Raizing games are designed to punish the player for playing them wrong. In this case, you are supposed to play the game for score, to give you extra lives so you could die more often to lower the rank. Fortunately, most of them aren't that bad... Battle Bakraid actually lets you beat it by playing the game traditionally for survival.



*** ''NBA 2k'' and ''NBA Live'' actually have this as a feature, Clutch Factor and CPU Assistance respectively. It does work both ways, though. Doesn't make it any less irritating to see Kobe Bryant missing clutch layup after clutch layup.
*** Truth in real life for that last one after game 7 of the 2010 NBA finals, where Kobe shot a horrible 6-for-24 in the biggest game of his career.
* The original ''NBA Jam'' would frequently job you out of victories with miraculous, last-second, full-court shots. It got to the point where a two-point lead with just seconds to play was an almost certain loss if the computer got the last shot. The player had a similar ability, but not nearly to the same extent as the computer.
** This feature is called "computer assistance" and is also on in human versus human matches. A full court shot for the tie or for the win has over a 70% chance of going in, ALWAYS. Unless you use the "no cpu assistance" code.
*** The ''NFL Blitz'' series is infamous for rubberband AI too. Again, it's always active against the CPU, but can be turned off with a code against a human. Manifests usually through fumbles and cheap interceptions, or people just magically blowing past blockers and sacking you.
*** In ''Blitz'', Points after Touchdown are fully automatic; you choose it and the game says "It's Good!"... but it might turn out to be "No Good!" if you were too far in the lead.
* The arcade game ''Pigskin: 621 A.D.'' (released as ''Jerry Glanville's Pigskin Footbrawl'' on the Sega Genesis) is a game vaguely reminiscent of rugby and American football, though set in the Middle Ages. You could punch other players out, or get into a brawl (read: two characters collide and [[BigBallOfViolence turn into a dust cloud]]) on the field. If one side is losing badly, the crowd starts chanting, "Send in the troll!" At which point a big green troll enters the field for the losing side. He's immune to the game's weapons and much more difficult to knock down. If the fortunes reverse and the losing team starts winning, a troll can come in for the ''opposite'' side as well, to even things up.
** Still, win or lose it was a fun game, trolls notwithstanding..
** Then of course, if one team is truly getting a spanking? Simple, TROLL BOWL!!! Every player is swapped out for invincible, immortal Trolls!

to:

*** ** ''NBA 2k'' and ''NBA Live'' actually have this as a feature, Clutch Factor and CPU Assistance respectively. It does work both ways, though. Doesn't make it any less irritating to see Kobe Bryant missing clutch layup after clutch layup.
*** ** Truth in real life for that last one after game 7 of the 2010 NBA finals, where Kobe shot a horrible 6-for-24 in the biggest game of his career.
* The original ''NBA Jam'' would frequently job you out of victories with miraculous, last-second, full-court shots. It got to the point where a two-point lead with just seconds to play was an almost certain loss if the computer got the last shot. The player had a similar ability, but not nearly to the same extent as the computer.
**
computer. This feature is called "computer assistance" and is also on in human versus human matches. A full court shot for the tie or for the win has over a 70% chance of going in, ALWAYS. Unless you use the "no cpu assistance" code.
*** * The ''NFL Blitz'' series is infamous for rubberband AI too. Again, it's always active against the CPU, but can be turned off with a code against a human. Manifests usually through fumbles and cheap interceptions, or people just magically blowing past blockers and sacking you.
*** In ''Blitz'',
you.Points after Touchdown are fully automatic; you choose it and the game says "It's Good!"... but it might turn out to be "No Good!" if you were too far in the lead.
* The arcade game ''Pigskin: 621 A.D.'' (released as ''Jerry Glanville's Pigskin Footbrawl'' on the Sega Genesis) is a game vaguely reminiscent of rugby and American football, though set in the Middle Ages. You could punch other players out, or get into a brawl (read: two characters collide and [[BigBallOfViolence turn into a dust cloud]]) on the field. If one side is losing badly, the crowd starts chanting, "Send in the troll!" At which point a big green troll enters the field for the losing side. He's immune to the game's weapons and much more difficult to knock down. If the fortunes reverse and the losing team starts winning, a troll can come in for the ''opposite'' side as well, to even things up.
** Still, win or lose it was a fun game, trolls notwithstanding..
**
up. Then of course, if one team is truly getting a spanking? Simple, TROLL BOWL!!! Every player is swapped out for invincible, immortal Trolls!



** Just like Tiger. Hmm.
*** Only not really. Tiger often destroys his opponents in the first (and or second) round and then sits back shooting rounds of 70.



* The multiplayer game ''{{VideoGame/MULE}}'' will inflict whichever player currently has the highest score with with bad "random" events, while whoever is bringing up the rear will only have good things happen to them.
** At least, that's the way it's supposed to work. Leading players can still receive good random events, but it's true that when there is a bad event during production, it ALWAYS hits the lead player. Also, whoever is in the lead loses the tie, barring racial exceptions, like the long-necked one always winning ties in land auctions.

to:

* The multiplayer game ''{{VideoGame/MULE}}'' will inflict whichever player currently has the highest score with with bad "random" events, while whoever is bringing up the rear will only have good things happen to them.
**
them. At least, that's the way it's supposed to work. Leading players can still receive good random events, but it's true that when there is a bad event during production, it ALWAYS hits the lead player. Also, whoever is in the lead loses the tie, barring racial exceptions, like the long-necked one always winning ties in land auctions.



[[AC:{{WesternAnimation}}]]

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[[AC:{{WesternAnimation}}]][[AC:WesternAnimation]]



** And you white collar workers thought you were safe? There is a theory -- ThePeterPrinciple -- that if you show competence in a position, you will be promoted to a new one. If you keep getting good at these new positions you'll get assigned to higher ones. The resultant effect is that a person will keep getting promoted until they reach a position in which they prove incompetent.
*** Which has led to "TheDilbertPrinciple", named by [[ComicStrip/{{Dilbert}} Scott Adams]]. Companies now leave good workers in their current positions, and only promote incompetents, because they can hurt the company less as management. Adams snarks that this does not prove to be [[SarcasmMode the winning strategy one would imagine it to be]].
** A similar problem is when a higher power allocates a budget to your service. If you're under-budget at the end of the term, some managers will "reward" your service by ''cutting'' the surplus from next term's budget, so people usually waste company money on trivialities to prevent this.
*** This is the standard operating procedure for the U.S. Federal Government. This is made worse by the fact that most departments far overestimate what their budgets will be since they are usually given less than what they ask for. But they usually still end up with more than they need.
* Most tournament bowling leagues impose handicaps that are inversely proportional to a player's average, so if you play poorly, you still stand a good chance against a much better opponent, so long as you play better than your average. Likewise, if you are a very good player, your chances of losing to a beginner aren't too bad either, particularly if you don't play as well as you normally do on that round.
** Of course, like in any other game with Rubber Band AI, you can abuse the system. This is sandbagging. The essence of sandbagging is to win small and lose big. Once it is clear that your team is not going to win this time after handicap, then it is in your best interest to tank every shot. When victory seems possible, then it is in your best interest to keep it close, so as not to raise your handicap too much. The natural tendency of players to give up when they know they can't win doesn't help matters, so accusations are difficult to prove. The only sure way to spot one is if a team continues to win small and lose big. In theory anyone who would want to sandbag should move to a scratch league, but there are plenty who know they aren't good enough to get the money in one, but who can sandbag and get away with it in a money handicap league.

to:

** And you white collar workers thought you were safe? There is a theory -- ThePeterPrinciple -- that if you show competence in a position, you will be promoted to a new one. If you keep getting good at these new positions you'll get assigned to higher ones. The resultant effect is that a person will keep getting promoted until they reach a position in which they prove incompetent.
***
incompetent. Which has led to "TheDilbertPrinciple", named by [[ComicStrip/{{Dilbert}} Scott Adams]]. Companies now leave good workers in their current positions, and only promote incompetents, because they can hurt the company less as management. Adams snarks that this does not prove to be [[SarcasmMode the winning strategy one would imagine it to be]].
** A similar problem is when a higher power allocates a budget to your service. If you're under-budget at the end of the term, some managers will "reward" your service by ''cutting'' the surplus from next term's budget, so people usually waste company money on trivialities to prevent this.
***
this. This is the standard operating procedure for the U.S. Federal Government. This is made worse by the fact that most departments far overestimate what their budgets will be since they are usually given less than what they ask for. But they usually still end up with more than they need.
* Most tournament bowling leagues impose handicaps that are inversely proportional to a player's average, so if you play poorly, you still stand a good chance against a much better opponent, so long as you play better than your average. Likewise, if you are a very good player, your chances of losing to a beginner aren't too bad either, particularly if you don't play as well as you normally do on that round.
**
round. Of course, like in any other game with Rubber Band AI, you can abuse the system. This is sandbagging. The essence of sandbagging is to win small and lose big. Once it is clear that your team is not going to win this time after handicap, then it is in your best interest to tank every shot. When victory seems possible, then it is in your best interest to keep it close, so as not to raise your handicap too much. The natural tendency of players to give up when they know they can't win doesn't help matters, so accusations are difficult to prove. The only sure way to spot one is if a team continues to win small and lose big. In theory anyone who would want to sandbag should move to a scratch league, but there are plenty who know they aren't good enough to get the money in one, but who can sandbag and get away with it in a money handicap league.



** And the ''TabletopGame/NewWorldOfDarkness'' discarded the "botch" rule for just that reason. "[[CriticalFailure Dramatic Failure]]" requires that penalties ''completely'' erase your dice pool, ''and'' that you roll a 1 on the "chance die" you get instead (which only succeeds on a 10). Instead of "The better you are, the harder you fall", it becomes "If things go against you, you're going to suffer". It's still possible to botch, but only in certain situations. For example, making any roll involving Presence as a [[VampireTheRequiem Nosferatu]][[note]]A clan of vampires that all have some aspect that makes others inclined to avoid them[[/note]] not only reinstates the botch rule for that roll, but also removes the ability to re-roll on 10's.

to:

** * And the ''TabletopGame/NewWorldOfDarkness'' discarded the "botch" rule for just that reason. "[[CriticalFailure Dramatic Failure]]" requires that penalties ''completely'' erase your dice pool, ''and'' that you roll a 1 on the "chance die" you get instead (which only succeeds on a 10). Instead of "The better you are, the harder you fall", it becomes "If things go against you, you're going to suffer". It's still possible to botch, but only in certain situations. For example, making any roll involving Presence as a [[VampireTheRequiem Nosferatu]][[note]]A clan of vampires that all have some aspect that makes others inclined to avoid them[[/note]] not only reinstates the botch rule for that roll, but also removes the ability to re-roll on 10's.



* [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=D31rhjKHytg Jalyss]] weighs in re: [[EmptyLevels scaled levelling]]. (Spoiler: She doesn't like it any more than the rest of us)

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* [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=D31rhjKHytg Jalyss]] weighs in re: [[EmptyLevels scaled levelling]]. (Spoiler: She doesn't like it any more than the rest of us)us.)
17th Apr '16 9:29:59 PM LaymanX
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* Quite blatant in the hoverboard races in ''VideoGame/{{RatchetAndClank2016}}. No matter how well you do it is extremely difficult to get out of last or fifth place for the first two laps, and then you will suddenly shoot ahead to second place at the end of the third lap unless you make a lot of mistakes just then.

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* Quite blatant in the hoverboard races in ''VideoGame/{{RatchetAndClank2016}}.''VideoGame/{{RatchetAndClank2016}}''. No matter how well you do it is extremely difficult to get out of last or fifth place for the first two laps, and then you will suddenly shoot ahead to second place at the end of the third lap unless you make a lot of mistakes just then.
17th Apr '16 9:29:27 PM LaymanX
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Added DiffLines:

* Quite blatant in the hoverboard races in ''VideoGame/{{RatchetAndClank2016}}. No matter how well you do it is extremely difficult to get out of last or fifth place for the first two laps, and then you will suddenly shoot ahead to second place at the end of the third lap unless you make a lot of mistakes just then.
14th Apr '16 11:27:50 AM MrLavisherMoot
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* Drastically averted in the original ''TOCA Touring Cars'' for the Playstation, in a way that was a revelation for driving games at the time. Sixteen cars on the grid at the start of the race, accurately modeled circuits with few walls and long grass runouts, pretty accurate physics meaning that if you put a couple of wheels on the grass at speed you were definitely going to spin out, and then when you do, the AI opponents give no quarter at all. Spin out at any point early in a race, and you'd do very well to even SEE the rest of the cars again, they'd be so far in front. Equally, on a short track, if you managed to nudge an opponent into a catastrophic spin, you'd have a reasonable chance of lapping him.

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* Drastically averted in the original ''TOCA Touring Cars'' Car Championship'' for the Playstation, UsefulNotes/PlayStation, in a way that was a revelation for driving games at the time. Sixteen cars on the grid at the start of the race, accurately modeled modelled circuits with few walls and long grass runouts, pretty accurate physics meaning that if you put a couple of wheels on the grass at speed you were definitely going to spin out, and then when you do, the AI opponents give no quarter at all. Spin out at any point early in a race, and you'd do very well to even SEE the rest of the cars again, they'd be so far in front. Equally, on a short track, if you managed to nudge an opponent into a catastrophic spin, you'd have a reasonable chance of lapping him.
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