History Main / RidiculousFutureInflation

27th Aug '16 9:16:48 AM Jaro7788
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* 1996, Poland revalued its currency by knocking off four of the zeros; there was a period in which both old and new currency was accepted and goods were double-priced accordingly.

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* 1996, 1995, Poland revalued its currency by knocking off four of the zeros; there was a period in which both old and new currency was accepted and goods were double-priced accordingly.accordingly. In fact, the main reason why the National Bank of Poland decided to go for denomination rather than just stabilize the old currency was precisely to avoid this trope as the post-communist Polish officials feared that having people pay thousands of currency units to get a basic daily product would earn the country a Third World reputation among foreign investors.
15th Aug '16 1:43:46 PM eroock
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Added DiffLines:

* Inverted in ''Film/AMillionWaysToDieInTheWest''. When Foy wages a dollar on the shooting match, townspeople don't believe he even has that much money, until he takes it out and shows them.
13th Aug '16 12:27:06 PM Kalaong
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*** One of the interesting aspects of the yen is that you won't find it among [[http://www.profitconfidential.com/u-s-dollar/the-10-most-expensive-currency/ the top ten valued currencies]]. However, if you treat the yen like any other subdivision (say, the US cent), it's equal to the ''[[UsefulNotes/{{Switzerland}} Swiss Franc]]''. It's sort of mindscrew to think about buying a can of soda in "100 cents".

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*** One of the interesting aspects of the yen is that you won't find it among [[http://www.profitconfidential.com/u-s-dollar/the-10-most-expensive-currency/ the top ten valued currencies]]. However, if you treat the yen like any other subdivision (say, the US cent), it's equal to the ''[[UsefulNotes/{{Switzerland}} Swiss Franc]]''. franc]].'' It's sort of mindscrew to think about buying a can of soda in "100 cents".
13th Aug '16 7:23:41 AM Kalaong
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*** One of the interesting aspects of the yen is that you won't find it among [[http://www.profitconfidential.com/u-s-dollar/the-10-most-expensive-currency/ the top ten valued currencies]]. However, if you treat the yen like any other subdivision (say, the US cent), it beats the ''[[UsefulNotes/{{Switzerland}} Swiss Franc]].'' It's sort of mindscrew to think about buying a can of soda in "100 cents".

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*** One of the interesting aspects of the yen is that you won't find it among [[http://www.profitconfidential.com/u-s-dollar/the-10-most-expensive-currency/ the top ten valued currencies]]. However, if you treat the yen like any other subdivision (say, the US cent), it beats it's equal to the ''[[UsefulNotes/{{Switzerland}} Swiss Franc]].'' Franc]]''. It's sort of mindscrew to think about buying a can of soda in "100 cents".
13th Aug '16 7:10:29 AM Kalaong
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*** One of the interesting aspects of the yen is that you won't find it among [[http://www.profitconfidential.com/u-s-dollar/the-10-most-expensive-currency/ the top ten valued currencies]]. However, if you treat the yen like any other subdivision (say, the US cent), it beats the ''[[UsefulNotes/Switzerland Swiss Franc]].'' It's sort of mindscrew to think about buying a can of soda in "100 cents".

to:

*** One of the interesting aspects of the yen is that you won't find it among [[http://www.profitconfidential.com/u-s-dollar/the-10-most-expensive-currency/ the top ten valued currencies]]. However, if you treat the yen like any other subdivision (say, the US cent), it beats the ''[[UsefulNotes/Switzerland ''[[UsefulNotes/{{Switzerland}} Swiss Franc]].'' It's sort of mindscrew to think about buying a can of soda in "100 cents".
13th Aug '16 7:10:08 AM Kalaong
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*** One of the interesting aspects of the yen is that you won't find it among the top ten currencies that are valuable. However, if you treat the yen like any other subdivision (say, the US cent), it becomes one of the most valued currencies. It's sort of mindscrew to think about buying a can of soda in "100 cents".

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*** One of the interesting aspects of the yen is that you won't find it among [[http://www.profitconfidential.com/u-s-dollar/the-10-most-expensive-currency/ the top ten currencies that are valuable. valued currencies]]. However, if you treat the yen like any other subdivision (say, the US cent), it becomes one of beats the most valued currencies. ''[[UsefulNotes/Switzerland Swiss Franc]].'' It's sort of mindscrew to think about buying a can of soda in "100 cents".
10th Aug '16 1:29:36 AM jormis29
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* The ''Film/AustinPowers'' films play this trope every which way:
10th Aug '16 1:22:47 AM Arcorann
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As a rule of thumb, prices double every 23 years with an average inflation rate of 3 percent, and every 10 years if the average rate is 7 percent. When a show pulls out this trope, use this to compare what future prices are actually likely to be at that time.

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As a rule of thumb, if inflation is 3 percent prices double every 23 years with an average inflation rate of 3 percent, and add a zero every 10 years 78 years, while if the average rate is 7 percent.percent prices double every 10 years. When a show pulls out this trope, use this to compare what future prices are actually likely to be at that time.



** Then again, given the amount of time that has passed and assuming the ten billion dollar bill is equivalent to a dollar today, it STILL averages out to an inflation of less than 3% annually, which is within most nations' economic goals.
* The ''Film/AustinPowers'' films play this trope every which way:



* Might seem to be the case in ''VideoGame/EVEOnline'' as the simplest of commodities cost hundreds of thousands ISK to millions, high-end ships cost hundreds of millions, and capital ships cost billions. However that's most likely a case of [[SciFiWritersHaveNoSenseOfScale sci-fi fans not having a sense]] of how expensive space ships, space travel, and Amarrian wheat by the metric ton, would be. [[AvertedTrope And the creators do.]] Taking the aversion deeping, ISK is actually a standardized currency with exchange rates against each empire's domestic currency, although this is irrelevant to the players. As underscored by the fact one quest item is a giant pile of unmarked non-sequential bills. As the quest handler points out, it's a lot to them, but it's not even peanuts to someone who deals in ISK.

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* Might seem to be the case in ''VideoGame/EVEOnline'' as the simplest of commodities cost hundreds of thousands ISK to millions, high-end ships cost hundreds of millions, and capital ships cost billions. However that's most likely a case of [[SciFiWritersHaveNoSenseOfScale sci-fi fans not having a sense]] of how expensive space ships, space travel, and Amarrian wheat by the metric ton, would be. [[AvertedTrope And the creators do.]] Taking the aversion deeping, deeper, ISK is actually a standardized currency with exchange rates against each empire's domestic currency, although this is irrelevant to the players. As underscored by the fact one quest item is a giant pile of unmarked non-sequential bills. As the quest handler points out, it's a lot to them, but it's not even peanuts to someone who deals in ISK.
5th Aug '16 6:43:52 AM Divra
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** Then again, given the amount of time that has passed and assuming the ten billion dollar bill is equivalent to a dollar today, it STILL averages out to an inflation of less than 3% annually, which is within most nations' economic goals.
26th Jul '16 5:19:15 AM Bissek
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* Based on RealLife, Literature/JamesBond, when in France at the beginning of ''Literature/OnHerMajestysSecretService'' likes to think of the money in his pocket in old francs because that makes him feel richer, while counting his expenses in new francs to make them seem smaller.

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* Based on RealLife, Literature/JamesBond, when in France at the beginning of ''Literature/OnHerMajestysSecretService'' (which was written shortly after the franc underwent a 1000:1 devaluation) likes to think of the money in his pocket in old francs because that makes him feel richer, while counting his expenses in new francs to make them seem smaller.



:: Al says "for the stamp" sarcastically, but if he's actually being honest and the cost of a stamp in Sam and Al's "present' time period (the late 1990s) is in the ballpark of $100; that would be a rate of inflation of 40,000% in less than a decade!

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:: Al says "for the stamp" sarcastically, but if he's actually being honest and the cost of a stamp in Sam and Al's "present' "present" time period (the late 1990s) is in the ballpark of $100; that would be a rate of inflation of 40,000% in less than a decade!decade! For the record, as of 2016, the cost of a single 1st class postage stamp has yet to go over fifty cents.



* The ''Franchise/AssassinsCreed'' games tend to transpose centuries worth of inflation into the prices you have to pay in the Animus. For example, the first sword you can get in ''VideoGame/AssassinsCreedIII'' costs £700 in 1754, which is considerably more money than most people in that time period would see over the course of their entire ''lives'' (£10-15 per year was a fairly good wage for working class people at the time), and still much more than a comparable sword would cost today. Now, if the currency of the game had been the pence rather than the pound, that sword would have cost the far more likely £2 11s 4d, which while still expensive, would not be so outrageously costly that it would be possible for the average person to be able to save up enough to buy one (And for the typical blacksmith to actually be able to find a customer able to afford it).

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* The ''Franchise/AssassinsCreed'' games tend to transpose centuries worth of inflation into the prices you have to pay in the Animus. For example, the first sword you can get in ''VideoGame/AssassinsCreedIII'' costs £700 in 1754, which is considerably more money than most people in that time period would see over the course of their entire ''lives'' (£10-15 per year was a fairly good wage for working class people at the time), and still much more than a comparable sword would cost today. Now, if the currency of the game had been the pence rather than the pound, that sword would have cost the far more likely £2 11s 4d, 11''s'' 4''d'', which while still expensive, would not be so outrageously costly that it would be possible low enough for the average person to be able to save up enough to buy one (And for the typical blacksmith to actually be able to find a customer able to afford it).
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