History Main / ReedRichardsISUseless

24th May '17 3:50:42 PM Materioptikon
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* Likewise, the Alan Scott Green Lantern was outright terrified of his ring in a few continuities. In a ''Batman: Black and White'' story, he joins Batman in searching a group of gangsters who nearly burned down the Gotham Broadcasting Building. In it, he effortlessly turns Batman invisible, travels back in time to save the gangsters (with zero timeline repercussions), uses the standard Green Lantern constructs, and more. He confesses that he eventually came to fear the sheer power of the ring, and that was the precise reason he abandoned Gotham - the city needs a hero... not a god.
18th May '17 9:48:57 PM chopshop
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* A major theme in ''ComicBook/AtomicRobo''. The comic is set in a world where crazy pulp sci-fi and fantasy concepts coexist comfortably with the mundanities of real life. This is a world where Nikola Tesla built a sapient robot, said robot runs a major scientific corporation, giant monsters and supervillains are regular nuisances, and more. And yet ultimately the world [[InSpiteOfANail really isn't that different]]. The global tech level is largely the same, as is cultural development, and generally it feels like the real world except there just ''happens'' to be robots and death rays flying around. As the comic goes on [[DeconstructedTrope Robo struggles more and more with a sense that he's failing to accomplish any meaningful change and that he's having time he could spend on actual science wasted by the constant pulp adventures him and his friends are being dragged into]].
** This really reaches its zenith when Robo discovers that [[spoiler: after Tesla died, the government confiscated all his unfinished research and rather than using to further science in general, they wasted on trying to win the UsefulNotes/ColdWar. Which ended up petering out exactly like it did in real life, meaning [[ShootTheShaggyDog they pissed away Tesla's life work for no reason]].]] When Robo learns this, he practically [[HeroicBSOD goes catatonic]].
-->"[[{{Tearjerker}} You could've helped them]]..."
7th May '17 9:37:22 AM nombretomado
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* In defence of the ''Franchise/{{Transformers|FilmSeries}}'' series, Optimus Prime says explicitly that [[YouAreNotReady humanity is not ready]] for the Autobots' advanced ''weaponry''. The same is ''not'' said about the Autobots' ''other'' significant technologies, such as (apparently) FTL travel, mindblowingly advanced computer miniaturisation, robotics, and fabrication. This is particularly egregious since in the first film Simmonds ''expressly'' says that ''much of humanity's'' best 20th century technologies -- from the CD player to the microwave to the internal combustion engine -- derives from what they learned studying a trapped an ''unconscious'' Transformer. Imagine how far they could have pushed if they had a consenting friendly one around to fill in the gaps. In the fourth film, one tech company manages to get their hands on "Transformium", the stuff Transformers are made of. Except their version is the raw stuff, giving it far more shapeshifting capability. We see it taking shapes like children's toys and handguns and [[spoiler:their own Transformers which they lose control of in short order]] -- wait, maybe Optimus was more right than we thought. To be fair, though, the only reason [[spoiler:they lose control of Galvatron is because Megatron downloaded himself into the new body]].

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* In defence of the ''Franchise/{{Transformers|FilmSeries}}'' ''Film/{{Transformers|FilmSeries}}'' series, Optimus Prime says explicitly that [[YouAreNotReady humanity is not ready]] for the Autobots' advanced ''weaponry''. The same is ''not'' said about the Autobots' ''other'' significant technologies, such as (apparently) FTL travel, mindblowingly advanced computer miniaturisation, robotics, and fabrication. This is particularly egregious since in the first film Simmonds ''expressly'' says that ''much of humanity's'' best 20th century technologies -- from the CD player to the microwave to the internal combustion engine -- derives from what they learned studying a trapped an ''unconscious'' Transformer. Imagine how far they could have pushed if they had a consenting friendly one around to fill in the gaps. In the fourth film, one tech company manages to get their hands on "Transformium", the stuff Transformers are made of. Except their version is the raw stuff, giving it far more shapeshifting capability. We see it taking shapes like children's toys and handguns and [[spoiler:their own Transformers which they lose control of in short order]] -- wait, maybe Optimus was more right than we thought. To be fair, though, the only reason [[spoiler:they lose control of Galvatron is because Megatron downloaded himself into the new body]].
27th Apr '17 12:55:37 PM Linda58
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* Averted in ''Series/{{Arrow}}''. Felicity was shot in the Season 4 midseason finale and left in a wheelchair. Within a few episodes, Curtis able to use advanced technology to invent a chip that will allow her [[StatusQuoIsGod to walk again]]. It apparently can't be reproduced, but the implications alone are staggering. The criticism this drew (see motivation 3 at the top of the page) from viewers and even the actress who plays Felicity demonstrates why this trope is usually played straight.
25th Apr '17 12:01:14 PM MasterFuzzy
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** In the William Hartnell era, full of 'pure historical' stories, much is made of how the Doctor is unwilling to change history, with virtually no justification given (especially as this only applies to events on Earth, and not other cultures). While this restriction is not explained, the other characters regard it as atrocious in-universe (particularly in "The Aztecs", where Barbara attempts to use time travel to end the Aztecs' human sacrifice, and "The Massacre", where Steven is outraged by the Doctor refusing to intervene in a genocide in France).
** The Pertwee era has a couple of stories ("The Green Death" and "Planet of the Spiders") which involve a [[GreenRocks Metebelis sapphire]], a stone capable of a variety of psychic effects including ''curing mental disabilities''. The Doctor gave it away as a wedding present, and its recipient sent it back to him, where he never uses it ever again (except for appearing as a prop amongst a bunch of CowTools in a typical Fourth Doctor [[{{Hammerspace}} pocket gag]] in "Genesis of the Daleks").

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** In the William Hartnell era, full of 'pure historical' stories, much is made of how the Doctor is unwilling to change history, with virtually no justification given (especially as this only applies to events on Earth, and not other cultures). While this restriction is not explained, the other characters regard it as atrocious in-universe (particularly in "The Aztecs", where Barbara attempts to use time travel to end the Aztecs' human sacrifice, and "The Massacre", where Steven is outraged by the Doctor refusing to intervene in a genocide in France).
France). Presumably, these are the fixed points that must happen, and which the later series discusses.
** The Pertwee era has a couple of stories ("The Green Death" and "Planet of the Spiders") which involve a [[GreenRocks Metebelis sapphire]], a stone capable of a variety of psychic effects including ''curing mental disabilities''. The Doctor gave it away as a wedding present, and its recipient sent it back to him, where he never uses it ever again (except for appearing as a prop amongst a bunch of CowTools in a typical Fourth Doctor [[{{Hammerspace}} pocket gag]] in "Genesis of the Daleks"). But considering [[Recap/DoctorWhoS11E5PlanetOfTheSpiders how much trouble they caused him, this isn't surprising]].



** The Time Lords zealously guard time travel from falling into the hands of other species, though this one is half fears of the damage other species would cause and half the Time Lords being selfish pompous jackasses.

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** The Time Lords zealously guard time travel from falling into the hands of other species, though this one is half fears of the damage other species would cause and half the Time Lords being selfish pompous jackasses. Considering the way some people abuse time travel, this isn't entirely unjustified. The Doctor also relates one example of where the Time Lords tried to help a neighboring planet by giving it advanced technology-the Time Lords got "kicked out at gunpoint. Then they went to war with each other, learnt how to split the atom, [[OneOfTheseIsNotLikeTheOthers discovered the toothbrush]] and finally split the planet."



* In an interesting {{sitcom}} example, the premise of ''Series/TheBigBangTheory'' is about young, incredibly smart geniuses working at Caltech and their adventures trying to navigate a normal life. They have specialties ranging into high-end theoretical and experimental physics and are depicted as giving lectures, having papers published and even going on scientific expeditions but it is nothing truly groundbreaking or would make them celebrities. This is lampshaded by Leonard in the third episode, when Penny asked if anything was new in the physics world his response was a bemused "Nothing" and explained that all basic physics concepts have been in place since the 1930s and most of physics work today is basically advanced theories that can't be proven, only internally consistent. The show does break out of this on a few occasions:

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* In an interesting {{sitcom}} example, the premise of ''Series/TheBigBangTheory'' is about young, incredibly smart geniuses working at Caltech and their adventures trying to navigate a normal life. They have specialties ranging into high-end theoretical and experimental physics and are depicted as giving lectures, having papers published and even going on scientific expeditions but it is nothing truly groundbreaking or would make them celebrities. This is lampshaded by Leonard in the third episode, when Penny asked if anything was new in the physics world his response was a bemused "Nothing" and explained that all basic physics concepts have been in place since the 1930s and most of physics work today is basically advanced theories that can't be proven, only internally consistent. The show does break out of this on a few occasions: occasions, but most of these are things which, even if they are implemented, wouldn't be particularly notable:
25th Apr '17 11:47:58 AM MasterFuzzy
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** In the modern day, this is true, but wizards are also stuck in the past, and they well remember the witch hunts of previous centuries. It's implied that they are afraid of another one, and judging from the stories of wise men and local healers one can find in the Middle Ages, they probably ''did'' assist Muggle civilization before the witch hunts and Statue of Secrecy.



** In ''Literature/DeadBeat'' it is implied that WWI was caused by a necromancer who wanted a lot of bodies to work with, so some wizards have been involved in history, so [[VillainsActHeroesReact the bad guys start events and the White Council trying to counteract them]].
** It's shown in later books that the White Council is stretched to the breaking point just keeping up with their war with the vampires, so attempting to take a proactive stance in the affairs of normal humans is something they don't have the resources for to begin with. ''Literature/ColdDays'' shows that it's not vampires the White Council and other forces responsible for the {{masquerade}} have to remain vigilant against, so much as {{Eldritch Abomination}}s.

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** In ''Literature/DeadBeat'' it is implied that WWI was caused by a necromancer who wanted a lot of bodies to work with, so some wizards have been involved in history, so history. [[VillainsActHeroesReact the The bad guys start events and the White Council trying tries to counteract them]].
them]].
** It's shown in later books that the White Council is stretched to the breaking point just keeping up with their war with the vampires, so attempting to take a proactive stance in the affairs of normal humans is something they don't have the resources for to begin with. ''Literature/ColdDays'' **''Literature/ColdDays'' shows that it's not vampires the White Council and other forces responsible for the {{masquerade}} have to remain vigilant against, so much as {{Eldritch Abomination}}s.Abomination}}s.
** In general, it should be noted that both monsters and wizards want to keep up TheMasquerade, as it's noted that while the average human can't do much against, say, a vampire, a whole bunch of them is another matter.
7th Apr '17 5:21:30 AM ChronoLegion
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* Lampshaded in an episode of ''Series/LegendsOfTomorrow'', where Thawne points out that Ray's dwarf star reactor could be used to cleanly power an entire city. Instead, Ray uses the technology to build himself the Atom suit, so he can play superhero. Even later, when he obtains enough of the alloy for a dozen suits, he still doesn't think to use the rest to help out humanity. This is despite the fact that he started out as a tech billionaire. Averted with Thawne himself in the world he creates using the Spear of Destiny. There, he is once again in charge of S.T.A.R. Labs (though with his own face and name this time) and is praised all over the world for helping to fix climate change, save the polar bears, and other global problems. True, he's still a murdering bastard, but at least he goes back to his roots of wanting to be the hero.

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* Lampshaded in an episode of ''Series/LegendsOfTomorrow'', where Thawne points out that Ray's dwarf star reactor could be used to cleanly power an entire city. Instead, Ray uses the technology to build himself the Atom suit, so he can play superhero. Even later, when he obtains enough of the alloy for a dozen suits, he still doesn't think to use the rest to help out humanity. This is despite the fact that he started out as a tech billionaire. Averted with Thawne himself in the world he creates using the Spear of Destiny. There, he is once again in charge of S.T.A.R. Labs (though with his own face and name this time) and is praised all over the world for helping to fix climate change, save the polar bears, and other global problems. True, he's still a murdering bastard, but at least he goes back to his roots of wanting to be the hero. Also averted in a Season 1 episode, where the Legends travel to the BadFuture not long before Savage takes over and discover that Ray's Atom tech has been "appropriated" by his younger brother Sydney after [[GoneToTheFuture Ray's disappearance]], and Sydney's descendants have used it to build Atom-like robots that serve as the police force of the [[OneNationUnderCopyright Kasnia Conglomerate]], enforcing the board's totalitarian rule. Ray isn't happy about how his tech is misused.
7th Apr '17 5:04:00 AM ChronoLegion
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* Alfred is constantly harping on this trope to Bruce throughout ''Film/TheDarkKnightRises'', pointing out that if he shared his innovations he could do as much or even more good in Gotham as he tries to as a masked vigilante. Somewhat subverted when a great deal of those innovations are stolen by Bane, including a fusion energy source Bruce had shelved for exactly the reasons it becomes used for.

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* Alfred is constantly harping on this trope to Bruce throughout ''Film/TheDarkKnightRises'', pointing out that if he shared his innovations he could do as much or even more good in Gotham as he tries to as a masked vigilante. Somewhat subverted when a great deal of those innovations are stolen by Bane, including a fusion energy source Bruce had shelved for exactly the reasons it becomes used for. Additionally, the whole reason Bruce was able to get his hands on the tech is because a lot of it was in the "dead end" department, usually things deemed impractical or too costly for mass production. For example, the [[CoolCar Tumbler]]'s purpose was to jump rivers and build temporary bridges. They were able to get the jumping to work but not the bridge-building, so the project was scrapped. The advanced bodysuit was deemed too costly for equipping every single soldier with it. On the other hand, Bruce also has no right to take that stuff, as it belongs to his company and investors rather than him personally. If it ever comes to light, then he'll be up on embezzlement charges.
7th Apr '17 4:59:53 AM ChronoLegion
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* In defence of the ''Franchise/{{Transformers|FilmSeries}}'' series, Optimus Prime says explicitly that [[YouAreNotReady humanity is not ready]] for the Autobots' advanced ''weaponry''. The same is ''not'' said about the Autobots' ''other'' significant technologies, such as (apparently) FTL travel, mindblowingly advanced computer miniaturisation, robotics, and fabrication. This is particularly egregious since in the first film Simmonds ''expressly'' says that ''much of humanity's'' best 20th century technologies -- from the CD player to the microwave to the internal combustion engine -- derives from what they learned studying a trapped an ''unconscious'' Transformer. Imagine how far they could have pushed if they had a consenting friendly one around to fill in the gaps. In the fourth film, one tech company manages to get their hands on "Transformium", the stuff Transformers are made of. Except their version is the raw stuff, giving it far more shapeshifting capability. We see it taking shapes like children's toys and handguns and [[spoiler:their own Transformers which they lose control of in short order]] -- wait, maybe Optimus was more right than we thought.

to:

* In defence of the ''Franchise/{{Transformers|FilmSeries}}'' series, Optimus Prime says explicitly that [[YouAreNotReady humanity is not ready]] for the Autobots' advanced ''weaponry''. The same is ''not'' said about the Autobots' ''other'' significant technologies, such as (apparently) FTL travel, mindblowingly advanced computer miniaturisation, robotics, and fabrication. This is particularly egregious since in the first film Simmonds ''expressly'' says that ''much of humanity's'' best 20th century technologies -- from the CD player to the microwave to the internal combustion engine -- derives from what they learned studying a trapped an ''unconscious'' Transformer. Imagine how far they could have pushed if they had a consenting friendly one around to fill in the gaps. In the fourth film, one tech company manages to get their hands on "Transformium", the stuff Transformers are made of. Except their version is the raw stuff, giving it far more shapeshifting capability. We see it taking shapes like children's toys and handguns and [[spoiler:their own Transformers which they lose control of in short order]] -- wait, maybe Optimus was more right than we thought. To be fair, though, the only reason [[spoiler:they lose control of Galvatron is because Megatron downloaded himself into the new body]].
7th Apr '17 4:48:49 AM ChronoLegion
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* Lampshaded in an episode of ''Series/LegendsOfTomorrow'', where Thawne points out that Ray's dwarf star reactor could be used to cleanly power an entire city. Instead, Ray uses the technology to build himself the Atom suit, so he can play superhero. Even later, when he obtains enough of the alloy for a dozen suits, he still doesn't think to use the rest to help out humanity. This is despite the fact that he started out as a tech billionaire. Averted with Thawne himself in the world he creates using the Spear of Destiny. There, he is once again in charge of S.T.A.R. Labs (though with his own face and name this time) and is praised all over the world for helping to fix climate change, save the polar bears, and other global problems. True, he's still a murdering bastard, but at least he goes back to his roots of wanting to be the hero.
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