History Main / ReedRichardsISUseless

3rd Sep '16 7:05:14 PM ThatBitterTase
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** This is part of why being a [[TabletopGame/MageTheAwakening mage]] kind of sucks. You can change the world, such that it will never be the same again... and ten seconds after a Sleeper sees it the entire thing will come crashing down. Magic can't survive scrutiny by the nonmagical.



* As seen in ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyV'', where one of the main characters dies on an onscreen plot-related death and the rest of the party tries to use curative spells and items on him, but they turn out to be useless, as he dies anyway.

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* As seen in ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyV'', where one of the main characters dies on an onscreen plot-related death and the rest of the party tries to use curative spells and items on him, but they turn out to be useless, as he dies anyway. This is because he used up his entire life in that battle (he keeps fighting at ''zero hit points'').
1st Sep '16 8:37:03 AM Whitewings
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** Amazingly, in the ''ComicBook/AllNewAllDifferentMarvel'' era, Peter is actually ''averting'' this trope via his Parker Industries. So far, we know that he's developed a watch that acts like a much more hi-tech iPhone which is incredibly popular around the world.

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** Amazingly, in the ''ComicBook/AllNewAllDifferentMarvel'' era, Peter is actually ''averting'' this trope via his Parker Industries. So far, we know that he's developed a watch that acts like a much more hi-tech iPhone which is incredibly popular around the world. This aversion is also present in the Horizon Labs period, where many of the inventions Parker creates to fight super villains are turned to civilian use, like cryr-cubes for organ transport. He created the cryo-cube technology for use against Hydro-Man.
23rd Aug '16 4:00:09 PM Nerrin
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** The third-party book ''A Magical Medieval Society: Western Europe'' was based entirely on averting this trope by describing how magic could be integrated into an agrarian society for the betterment of all, from daily use of low-level magic to annual shots of high-level spells.
** ''TabletopGame/{{Eberron}}'' did a lot of work both averting and justifying this trope. Magic has been industrialized and (partially thanks to a recent war) a lot of people have two or three levels in various classes, making low-level magic a lot more prevalent and regularly applied to improving daily life. However, high-level magic is still rare, with only a small number of people able to pull off the grand tricks like teleportation with any regularity - and most can only do it once a day or just aren't for hire. As a result, people are healthier and more productive, but shipping via teleportation is prohibitively expensive and actually ''slower'' for bulk cargo, so you have to rely on old-fashioned mundane means like [[{{Magitek}} magic trains]].
17th Aug '16 5:45:24 PM Thranx
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** The lawyer example actually went meta with this trope: While the lawyer was proud of mounting a successful defense he was also very worried about the legal precedent he was setting.
17th Aug '16 12:22:45 AM Eagal
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* In ''WesternAnimation/CaptainPlanetAndThePlaneteers'' the Planeteers fly around in the "Geocruiser", a smallish VTOL aircraft which was designed and built by Gaea (who knew she had a machine shop on that island?) and is stated to run entirely on solar power and to produce no pollution whatsoever. It can apparently fly anywhere in the world in a few hours at most without ever producing a sonic boom and is so simple to control that a teenager can operate it without any training whatsoever. Yet even when one of the antagonists builds an equally impossible super-aircraft that runs on smog and makes even more smog Gaea never once considers she could do more good with her own ubertech than she could by keeping it exclusive to five self-righteous idiots who use it for nothing but getting to the next poor sap they feel like preaching to.

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* In ''WesternAnimation/CaptainPlanetAndThePlaneteers'' the Planeteers fly around in the "Geocruiser", a smallish VTOL aircraft which was designed and built by Gaea (who knew she had a machine shop on that island?) and is stated to run entirely on solar power and to produce no pollution whatsoever. It can apparently fly anywhere in the world in a few hours at most without ever producing a sonic boom and is so simple to control that a teenager can operate it without any training whatsoever. Yet even when one of the antagonists builds an equally impossible super-aircraft that runs on smog and makes even more smog Gaea never once considers she could do more good with her own ubertech than she could by keeping it exclusive to five self-righteous idiots who use it for nothing but getting to the next poor sap they feel like preaching to.Planeteers.
14th Aug '16 5:10:41 AM Morgenthaler
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* In Aleksandr Zarevin's ''Lonely Gods of the Universe'', a teleportation device is developed independently by a {{Human Alien|s}} on his homeworld and a modern-day human. However, neither tries to sell the device or use it for commercial applications. The alien, being a college student, tries to use it to stage a revolution on his home planet. His attempt eventually results in a NuclearWar, with him and a dozen others being the only known survivors, as they manage to teleport to a planet they call Pearl, populated by primitive humanoids, not long before all hell breaks loose. Not surprisingly, "Pearl" turns out to be Bronze Age Earth, and the aliens (who accidentally become TheAgeless) help jump-start the early Greek civilization and end up becoming responsible for any non-black hair color as well as both the Myth/ClassicalMythology and the story of {{Atlantis}}. Specifically, the part about the aliens helping the Atlanteans develop a powerful civilization with a strong navy averts this trope, and the inventor being unable to recreate the device on Earth is justified by the fact that he requires a key mineral that he is unable to find. His 20th century Russian counterpart is a young student who likes to tinker. Him and his friend end up going farther and accidentally invent a device that transports through both space ''and'' time. Naturally, they keep it to themselves and forget all about it until years later. They are eventually approached by the aliens (who've been living among us all this time) and hired to continue their work in a state-of-the-art lab. The aliens' main concern for the technology is to figure out how to use it to go back in time to Atlantis and warn their past selves about an impending cataclysm about to destroy the island. In the end, the protagonists realize that they're stuck in a time loop that threatens to unravel after several iterations, and they resolve to erase themselves from existence to survive (yeah, TimeyWimeyBall is involved) by preventing their own conceptions. It's not clear if the technology eventually ends up making it into public hands.

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* In Aleksandr Zarevin's ''Lonely Gods of the Universe'', a teleportation device is developed independently by a {{Human Alien|s}} on his homeworld and a modern-day human. However, neither tries to sell the device or use it for commercial applications. The alien, being a college student, tries to use it to stage a revolution on his home planet. His attempt eventually results in a NuclearWar, nuclear war, with him and a dozen others being the only known survivors, as they manage to teleport to a planet they call Pearl, populated by primitive humanoids, not long before all hell breaks loose. Not surprisingly, "Pearl" turns out to be Bronze Age Earth, and the aliens (who accidentally become TheAgeless) help jump-start the early Greek civilization and end up becoming responsible for any non-black hair color as well as both the Myth/ClassicalMythology and the story of {{Atlantis}}. Specifically, the part about the aliens helping the Atlanteans develop a powerful civilization with a strong navy averts this trope, and the inventor being unable to recreate the device on Earth is justified by the fact that he requires a key mineral that he is unable to find. His 20th century Russian counterpart is a young student who likes to tinker. Him and his friend end up going farther and accidentally invent a device that transports through both space ''and'' time. Naturally, they keep it to themselves and forget all about it until years later. They are eventually approached by the aliens (who've been living among us all this time) and hired to continue their work in a state-of-the-art lab. The aliens' main concern for the technology is to figure out how to use it to go back in time to Atlantis and warn their past selves about an impending cataclysm about to destroy the island. In the end, the protagonists realize that they're stuck in a time loop that threatens to unravel after several iterations, and they resolve to erase themselves from existence to survive (yeah, TimeyWimeyBall is involved) by preventing their own conceptions. It's not clear if the technology eventually ends up making it into public hands.
9th Aug '16 12:15:01 PM Ripburger
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* In ''VideoGame/RaidouKuzunohaVsKingAbaddon'' you can find an "element #115", which matches to the atomic number of [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ununpentium Ununpentium]], an element where all known isotopes have a half-life measured in ''milliseconds'', that can stay in your items for the entire game. What do you do with this seemingly stable form of an element too short lived to research? Make swords! (Admittedly this is a ShoutOut to ''VideoGame/XCom'', a game made before the element physically existed.)

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* In ''VideoGame/RaidouKuzunohaVsKingAbaddon'' you can find an "element #115", which matches to the atomic number of [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ununpentium Ununpentium]], an element where all known isotopes have a half-life measured in ''milliseconds'', that can stay in your items for the entire game. What do you do with this seemingly stable form of an element too short lived to research? Make swords! (Admittedly this is a ShoutOut to ''VideoGame/XCom'', ''[[VideoGame/XCOMUFODefense X-COM]]'', a game made before the element physically existed.)
3rd Aug '16 8:31:20 AM Ichneumon
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* For all their devotion to private enterprise and the profit motive, the heroes of ''Literature/AtlasShrugged'' never bother much about making money, and nobody less than John Galt. He invents an engine that makes power from nowhere ("from static electicity," which is to say ItRunsOnNonsensoleum), but gets so annoyed at his employers' failed attempts to make the firm into a workers' co-operative that he walks away from his unfinished prototype and only builds one more, as the power plant for his mountain hideout. He also invents a large scale hologram projector that could revolutionise cinema and TV, and uses it to hide the Gulch from passing aircraft.

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* For all their devotion to private enterprise and the profit motive, the heroes of ''Literature/AtlasShrugged'' never bother much about making money, and nobody less than John Galt. He invents an engine that makes power from nowhere ("from static electicity," electricity," which is to say ItRunsOnNonsensoleum), but gets so annoyed at his employers' failed attempts to make the firm into a workers' co-operative that he walks away from his unfinished prototype and only builds one more, as the power plant for his mountain hideout. He also invents a large scale hologram projector that could revolutionise cinema and TV, and uses it to hide the Gulch from passing aircraft.aircraft.
** Justified in-universe in great detail, and indeed the producers' reasons for withdrawing from the world and withholding their talents/inventions make up the central theme of the book. Even the title highlights their "going on strike" as the focus of the story.
29th Jul '16 6:51:47 PM Fireblood
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* In ''Film/ThePrestige,'' UsefulNotes/NikolaTesla makes magician Robert Angier a machine which was intended to be a teleporter but turns out to be a matter replicator. It could be used to make unlimited quantities of food, clothing, machine parts, construction materials... it could put an end to hunger and material poverty for all time. And Angier can think of no better use for it than a stage-magic act. DiscussedTrope in that Tesla himself is aware of the duplicator's full potential and feels TheWorldIsNotReady for such a revolutionary invention, and only gives it to Angier ''because'' Angier will waste its potential on magic tricks.

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* In ''Film/ThePrestige,'' UsefulNotes/NikolaTesla makes magician Robert Angier a machine which was intended to be a teleporter but turns out to be a matter replicator. It could be used to make unlimited quantities of food, clothing, machine parts, construction materials... it could put an end to hunger and material poverty for all time. And Angier can think of no better use for it than a stage-magic act. DiscussedTrope in that Tesla himself is aware of the duplicator's full potential and feels TheWorldIsNotReady for such a revolutionary invention, and only gives it to Angier ''because'' Angier will waste its potential on magic tricks. Not to mention that his rival Thomas Edison sends men to destroy Tesla's work so this doesn't happen.



** In ''Film/StarTrek'' Scotty (with a little help from the future) quickly modifies a transporter so it can send people across vast interstellar distances. This is used to get Scotty and Kirk onto the Enterprise (which has been travelling away from their starting point for hours at [[FasterThanLightTravel high warp speeds]]). So the transporter modification is used to resolve a dramatic point in the plot, but no-one seems to realise it could also be used for [[CasualInterstellarTravel mundane travel between star systems]]. The transport doesn't have the necessary accuracy yet; it nearly got Scotty killed when they used it. Addressed in ''Film/StarTrekIntoDarkness''; Scotty mentions that his transwarp beaming equation was confiscated by security, allowing John Harrison to beam from Earth to [[spoiler:Qo'noS]].
** By the end of ''Film/StarTrekIntoDarkness'', Bones manages to synthesize a formula from that can effectively [[spoiler:''resurrect the dead'']]. No mention is made of future use of it. This is justified [[spoiler:given that the formula requires the blood of extremely dangerous genetically altered ''ubermenschen''. The last time just ''one'' got loose, he nearly destroyed Starfleet HQ and ''did'' destroy a good portion of San Francisco]].
* In ''Film/{{Flubber}}'', the Creator/RobinWilliams remake of ''Film/TheAbsentMindedProfessor'', Professor Braniard (Williams) has to come up with some sort of scientific breakthrough to secure enough funding to keep his college solvent. If only he had some sort of supertech available to show potential investors... like a flying, self-aware RobotBuddy. Oh, wait... This is later {{justified|Trope}} when he explains that Weebo was a "happy accident", he actually has no idea why she's intelligent. To figure that out would probably involve dismantling her... i.e., "killing" her. [[spoiler:Weebo herself managed to figure it out, though, and leaves lbehind a set of blueprints that will allow Braniard to re-create the process.]] It's also explained his previous sucessful inventions have been stolen by a rival.

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** In ''Film/StarTrek'' Scotty (with a little help from the future) quickly modifies a transporter so it can send people across vast interstellar distances. This is used to get Scotty and Kirk onto the Enterprise (which has been travelling away from their starting point for hours at [[FasterThanLightTravel high warp speeds]]). So the transporter modification is used to resolve a dramatic point in the plot, but no-one seems to realise realize it could also be used for [[CasualInterstellarTravel mundane travel between star systems]]. The transport doesn't have the necessary accuracy yet; it nearly got Scotty killed when they used it. Addressed in ''Film/StarTrekIntoDarkness''; Scotty mentions that his transwarp beaming equation was confiscated by security, allowing John Harrison to beam from Earth to [[spoiler:Qo'noS]].
** By the end of ''Film/StarTrekIntoDarkness'', Bones manages to synthesize a formula from that can effectively [[spoiler:''resurrect the dead'']]. No mention is made of future use of it. This is justified [[spoiler:given that the formula requires the blood of extremely dangerous genetically altered ''ubermenschen''. The last time just ''one'' got loose, he nearly destroyed Starfleet HQ and ''did'' destroy a good portion of San Francisco]].
* In ''Film/{{Flubber}}'', the Creator/RobinWilliams remake of ''Film/TheAbsentMindedProfessor'', Professor Braniard (Williams) has to come up with some sort of scientific breakthrough to secure enough funding to keep his college solvent. If only he had some sort of supertech available to show potential investors... like a flying, self-aware RobotBuddy. Oh, wait... This is later {{justified|Trope}} when he explains that Weebo was a "happy accident", he actually has no idea why she's intelligent. To figure that out would probably involve dismantling her... i.e., "killing" her. [[spoiler:Weebo herself managed to figure it out, though, and leaves lbehind lehind a set of blueprints that will allow Braniard to re-create the process.]] It's also explained his previous sucessful successful inventions have been stolen by a rival.
19th Jul '16 6:45:48 PM Agent333
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[[TheStinger As a side note,]] Doom is pleased with the name of this trope. He would prefer it to be lengthened, but the censors wouldn't allow it.

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[[TheStinger As a side note,]] Doom [[SelfDemonstrating/DoctorDoom Doom]] is pleased with the name of this trope. He would prefer it to be lengthened, but the censors wouldn't allow it.
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