History Main / RealityIsUnRealistic

15th Jun '18 10:05:25 AM angie710
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* AggressiveDrugDealer: ''Actual'' drug dealers don't come up to random kids or teens (or adults for that matter) and pressure them into trying and getting hooked on drugs, or slip them drugs in the guise of "candy." Most people who use drugs get their first dose from a friend or family member, or even their own doctor. If they then want more or become addicted (and they don't ''always''), ''they'' seek out a dealer, often by asking a friend who "knows someone." Going up to random people (especially minors) and pressuring them into trying drugs is a ''great'' way to wind up in {{Prison}}, and most dealers take great pains to stay BeneathNotice. For the same reason, drug dealers do not ([[DeadUnicornTrope and likely never did]]) loiter around {{Pay Phone}}s waiting for "customers" to call them; that would generate suspicion, which is exactly the opposite of what they want.

to:

* AggressiveDrugDealer: TheAggressiveDrugDealer: ''Actual'' drug dealers don't come up to random kids or teens (or adults for that matter) and pressure them into trying and getting hooked on drugs, or slip them drugs in the guise of "candy." Most people who use drugs get their first dose from a friend or family member, or even their own doctor. If they then want more or become addicted (and they don't ''always''), ''they'' seek out a dealer, often by asking a friend who "knows someone." Going up to random people (especially minors) and pressuring them into trying drugs is a ''great'' way to wind up in {{Prison}}, and most dealers take great pains to stay BeneathNotice. For the same reason, drug dealers do not ([[DeadUnicornTrope and likely never did]]) loiter around {{Pay Phone}}s waiting for "customers" to call them; that would generate suspicion, which is exactly the opposite of what they want.


Added DiffLines:

* TooSmartForStrangers: ''Most'' children who are kidnapped, are taken not by a stranger luring them with candy/a sob story about a lost puppy/the promise of a ride home/whatever else, but someone they ''already'' know and trust, including family members (such as parents in a custody battle).
15th Jun '18 10:01:53 AM angie710
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

* AggressiveDrugDealer: ''Actual'' drug dealers don't come up to random kids or teens (or adults for that matter) and pressure them into trying and getting hooked on drugs, or slip them drugs in the guise of "candy." Most people who use drugs get their first dose from a friend or family member, or even their own doctor. If they then want more or become addicted (and they don't ''always''), ''they'' seek out a dealer, often by asking a friend who "knows someone." Going up to random people (especially minors) and pressuring them into trying drugs is a ''great'' way to wind up in {{Prison}}, and most dealers take great pains to stay BeneathNotice. For the same reason, drug dealers do not ([[DeadUnicornTrope and likely never did]]) loiter around {{Pay Phone}}s waiting for "customers" to call them; that would generate suspicion, which is exactly the opposite of what they want.
4th Jun '18 4:56:53 PM costanton11
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* In [[WebOriginal/CinemaSins Everything Wrong With]] ''Film/Terminator2JudgmentDay'' the movie gets a sin for Sarah "proving you can pick any lock with something metal and straight". Not only is the lock picking portrayed in a ''very'' realistic light (Sarah clearly uses part of a paper clip as a tension bar and begins finding and setting the individual pins with the other part) but Creator/LindaHamilton actually picked that lock for real during filming of that scene. Yes, she proved she ''actually can'' pick any lock with something metal and straight.

to:

* In [[WebOriginal/CinemaSins [[WebVideo/CinemaSins Everything Wrong With]] ''Film/Terminator2JudgmentDay'' the movie gets a sin for Sarah "proving you can pick any lock with something metal and straight". Not only is the lock picking portrayed in a ''very'' realistic light (Sarah clearly uses part of a paper clip as a tension bar and begins finding and setting the individual pins with the other part) but Creator/LindaHamilton actually picked that lock for real during filming of that scene. Yes, she proved she ''actually can'' pick any lock with something metal and straight.
3rd Jun '18 1:43:38 PM vergess
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* YaoiGenre: Traditional yaoi stories involved a {{Seme}} and an {{Uke}}, in very fixed roles. Real male-male relationships aren't necessarily like that. The yaoi genre is aimed at straight women, by straight women, for fetishising queer people, as is a lot of works in both Japan and America depicting an unrealistic, often to the point of offensiveness, portrayal of female-female relationships (or solely intercourse, more common in the case of American fetishising works)

to:

* YaoiGenre: Traditional yaoi stories involved involve a {{Seme}} and an {{Uke}}, in very fixed roles. Real male-male relationships aren't necessarily like that. The yaoi genre is aimed at straight women, by straight women, for fetishising queer people, as is a lot of works in both Japan and America depicting an unrealistic, often are not obligated to the point of offensiveness, portrayal of female-female relationships (or solely intercourse, more common in the case of American fetishising works)conform to these roles.
30th Apr '18 10:53:46 PM KYCubbie
Is there an issue? Send a Message


** The 1991 World Series in its entirety. Seven contests, all won by the home team, four - including the climactic Game 7 - won in extra innings; Game 7 won in a 1-0 shutout by the 40-year-old starting pitcher. And both the [[UsefulNotes/MLBTeams Minnesota Twins]] and [[UsefulNotes/MLBTeams Atlanta Braves]] having finished last in their division the previous year.

to:

** The 1991 World Series in its entirety. Seven contests, all won by the home team, four - including the climactic Game 7 - won in extra innings; Game 7 won in a 1-0 10 shutout by the 40-year-old a veteran starting pitcher.pitcher who went all 10 innings. And both the [[UsefulNotes/MLBTeams Minnesota Twins]] and [[UsefulNotes/MLBTeams Atlanta Braves]] having finished last in their division the previous year.



* There's this Quarterback. Let's call him P.M. He is by all measurable (and some unmeasurable) categories the best of his era. However, any team he plays for suffers from chronic EveryYearTheyFizzleOut - and the blame is often (justly or unjustly) put on him. Cue his last season (for all we know) where he plays horribly but for the first time in ''ages'' is surrounded by a good or even above average defense and special teams. Of course he makes it to the Super Bowl (beating his long time rival with a reputation of being "clutch" in a 20:18 squeaker that went down to the wire to get there) against the undisputed MVP and probably one of the best young QBs of his era. Of course "P.M." wins his game. Of course this all just too cheesy to be true. Only that it is the story of Peyton Manning and the Denver Broncos in Super Bowl 50.
* In the 2016 NBA season, Stephen Curry's shooting was so unrealistically good that it was not replicable in the video game series NBA 2k, leading the developers [[http://www.forbes.com/sites/bensin/2016/02/22/how-steph-curry-broke-the-way-basketball-video-games-are-being-built/2/#57fdcfa0125d to remark that they have to change the shooting algorithm they had been developing for the past decade]] just to reflect Curry's shooting ability.

to:

* There's this Quarterback. Let's call him P.M. He is by all measurable (and some unmeasurable) categories the best of his era. However, any team he plays for suffers from chronic EveryYearTheyFizzleOut - and the blame is often (justly or unjustly) put on him. Cue his last season (for all we know) where he plays horribly but for the first time in ''ages'' is surrounded by a good or even above average defense and special teams. Of course he makes it to the Super Bowl (beating his long time rival [[Creator/TomBrady longtime rival]] with a reputation of being "clutch" in a 20:18 squeaker that went down to the wire to get there) against the undisputed MVP and probably one of the best young QBs [=QBs=] of his era. Of course "P.M." wins his game. Of course this all just too cheesy to be true. Only that it is the story of Peyton Manning Creator/PeytonManning and the Denver Broncos in Super Bowl 50.
* In the 2016 NBA season, Stephen Curry's UsefulNotes/StephenCurry's shooting was so unrealistically good that it was not replicable in the video game series NBA 2k, ''[=NBA 2K=]'', leading the developers [[http://www.forbes.com/sites/bensin/2016/02/22/how-steph-curry-broke-the-way-basketball-video-games-are-being-built/2/#57fdcfa0125d to remark that they have to change the shooting algorithm they had been developing for the past decade]] just to reflect Curry's shooting ability.
28th Apr '18 9:06:07 PM jormis29
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* In [[WebOriginal/CinemaSins Everything Wrong With]] ''Film/Terminator2JudgmentDay'' the movie gets a sin for Sarah "proving you can pick any lock with something metal and straight". Not only is the lock picking portrayed in a ''very'' realistic light (Sarah clearly uses part of a paper clip as a tension bar and begins finding and setting the individual pins with the other part) but Linda Hamilton actually picked that lock for real during filming of that scene. Yes, she proved she ''actually can'' pick any lock with something metal and straight.

to:

* In [[WebOriginal/CinemaSins Everything Wrong With]] ''Film/Terminator2JudgmentDay'' the movie gets a sin for Sarah "proving you can pick any lock with something metal and straight". Not only is the lock picking portrayed in a ''very'' realistic light (Sarah clearly uses part of a paper clip as a tension bar and begins finding and setting the individual pins with the other part) but Linda Hamilton Creator/LindaHamilton actually picked that lock for real during filming of that scene. Yes, she proved she ''actually can'' pick any lock with something metal and straight.
26th Apr '18 6:08:02 AM Berrenta
Is there an issue? Send a Message



to:

[[/folder]]
26th Apr '18 1:25:36 AM Arcorann
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* RealityIsUnrealistic/VisualNovels


Added DiffLines:

[[folder:Visual Novels]]
* ''Franchise/AceAttorney'':
** In ''VisualNovel/ApolloJusticeAceAttorney'', the first victim is killed with a glass bottle to the forehead, leading to people to question why it didn't shatter, leaving it to be presented in court intact (made worse by the fact that the series is based on finding such contradictions, but asking this in game isn't an option and a previous game in the series featured a bottle that broke when someone was hit non-lethally). Glass is not as fragile as depicted in Hollywood, and the process used to make the bottle (of which there are several) and the quality and amount of material used are a factor. In fact, the non-lethal broken bottle from the previous game was likely a cheaper product, and was non-lethal because it broke, which absorbed a significant amount of the energy involved, while the unbroken bottle would have transferred more energy into the skull, thus causing more damage. The common misconception of Soft Glass exists because scenes where glass is broken don't use real glass they used to use "sugar glass" (essentially, flat rock candy), and now just use a plastic "breakaway glass".
** The entire series falls into this, for most people. The Japanese legal system is represented in game in an exaggerated and outright over the top fashion but it is represented nonetheless. Ask the average player of the games and they'll tell you that the legal system of the Ace Attorney world is so unrealistically absurd that it borderlines over the top. But in reality, the only thing that's not true to real life, is the contents of the cases themselves and how fast-paced and twisty the trials are. The laws, trial procedures, treatment of the defense, and "guilty until proven innocent" motto are all in fact true to the Japanese Bench System, which the games are based on.
** The act of calling a parrot to the stand in the first game seems ridiculous (the person who brings it up as a possibility does so to mock Phoenix), for good reason, but in actuality, such a thing has happened in real life trials before, and the idea of using words a parrot can speak as legal evidence is something that has happened before. The absurd part is how the game presents it in the context of such a series moment in a murder trial, along with the way the parrot's cross-examination is treated in the same manner as that of an ordinary person's, rather then how it would realistically be if you were to use a parrot's understanding of human language as proof.
** One of the cases, Turnabout Big Top, is considered the worst among fans, with one of the reasons being the absurd coincidences which answer a lot of the cases riddles. Such as how did a witness see the defendant fly away? The killer, who just happened to have an exact murder plot which involved dropping a heavy object out a window, used a random object that his monkey pet has in his stash, which just happened to be a bust of the defendant. And the victim just happened to wear the defendant's clothes, and when the bust fell onto him, the defendant's cloak just happened to fly forward off him and snag onto the bust. Then the killer pulled the bust on a rope back up. So when the witness looked out the window, it was only by an absurd string of coincidences that he saw the defendant's silhouette 'flying' upwards as the killer pulled the bust up. And it was also only by these absurd coincidences that the defendant ended up being the prime suspect. In actual fact though, what's not realistic is the typical murder plots seen in Ace Attorney where everything's completely planned out. If anything, this case is one that'd be more likely to happen in real life then most.
** [[TheJudge The regular judge]] in the series is portrayed often as a feeble-minded old man, who has trouble keeping up with the proceedings. However, you'll often see people lumping moments in which the judge asks for clarification over a specific thing that he should already know about as a judge, or something that ''anyone'' should know, into being part of this character trait. For example, he asks Edgeworth to explain exactly what he means, when he says that the defendant has lost her chance of escaping criminality for her killing.[[labelnote:Note]]The victim had attacked the defendant, so justified self-defense was at first thought likely. But the autopsy concluded that the victim was struck twice, and that the first blow knocked him unconscious. So the second, killing blow, was delivered to someone the defendant knew had already been fully immobilized.[[/labelnote]] In fact, this is a realistic and common thing for judges to do during a trial, and they're very often quoted as asking for clarification on what something rather common place is, or for a legal dispute to be given more clarity or put into more simplistic wording. This is mainly for the sake of those in the courtroom such as the jurors, and the actual sides involved in the case, as well as the gallery, who may not understand what is being talked about. As stated on the show ''QI'':
---> Stephen: ''Judges have to make sure that absolutely everything in the course of the trial is abundantly clear to everyone in the courtroom, particularly the members of the jury. So judges often ask for such clarification on behalf of everyone else, because you never know when there's that one woman who's been living in a cave for the last hundred years and honestly doesn't know who Music/TheRollingStones are. That's why you often see judges being quoted as asking stuff like, "So, what exactly is a [[Franchise/TheMuppets Muppet]]?".''
21st Apr '18 1:42:11 PM schoi30
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

* ThreateningShark: You're more likely to be struck by lightning than eaten by a shark. And even then, only ''two'' species of sharks are consistently dangerous to humans.
21st Apr '18 1:39:01 PM schoi30
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

* StockBeehive: In fiction, wild beehives resemble hornet nests. In reality, not so much.
This list shows the last 10 events of 251. Show all.
http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Main.RealityIsUnRealistic