History Main / RashomonStyle

24th Aug '16 5:18:34 PM Blazer
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* In ''ComicBook/ArchieComicsSonicTheHedgehog'' there was the story "Total Re:Genesis", in which a battle against an enemy robot is told four times, once by each of the heroes and once by Nicole (a computer, who reports on what really happened). Not only does each of the heroes make themselves out to be single-handedly responsible for defeating the robot, but each version of the story is drawn by a different artist.

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* In ''ComicBook/ArchieComicsSonicTheHedgehog'' there was the story "Total Re:Genesis", in which Uncle Chuck tries to find out what happened between Sonic, Sally, Antoine and a battle against an enemy robot is told four times, once by each Combot army. The three Freedom Fighters attempt to paint a picture of what happened with them as the heroes hero, but Chuck gets tired of it and once by Nicole (a asks NICOLE, Sally's handheld computer, who reports on what really happened). Not only does each of to show the heroes make themselves out to be single-handedly responsible for defeating the robot, but each version of the story is drawn by a different artist.real events.
19th Aug '16 4:05:18 AM FarseerLolotea
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* In ''VideoGame/{{Rift}}'', it's difficult to say whether the [[OurDragonsAreDifferent Blood]] [[EldritchAbomination Storm]] got into Telara because the Vigil [[GodIsInept fucked up]] (as the Defiant would like you to believe), or if people should have known better than to mess around with {{magitek}} (as the Guardians would claim). To further confuse matters, each side's starting experience has the other acting TooDumbToLive and generally [[TheUsualAdversaries getting in the way out of sheer cussedness]].

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* In ''VideoGame/{{Rift}}'', it's difficult to say whether the [[OurDragonsAreDifferent Blood]] [[EldritchAbomination Storm]] got into Telara because the Vigil [[GodIsInept fucked up]] (as the Defiant would like you to believe), or if people should have known better than to mess around with {{magitek}} (as the Guardians would claim). To further confuse matters, each side's starting experience has the other acting TooDumbToLive and just generally [[TheUsualAdversaries getting in the way out of sheer cussedness]].cussedness]] and [[TooDumbToLive brainlessness]].



* One of the more hilarious quest lines to come out of ''VideoGame/WorldOfWarcraft'''s ''Cataclysm'' expansion is "The Day That Deathwing Came," concerning the dragon's attack on the Badlands. After asking some [=NPCs=] about it, you play through three reenactments of their stories: a dwarf claims that he punched his way through a rain of burning boulders to sock Deathwing right in the face, but a gnome interrupts and describes how he used a device to make himself big enough to snatch the dragon out of the sky and hurl him all the way to Kalimdor. And then an orc explains that he was showing off his motorcycle to a bunch of lovely ladies ([[{{Elfeminate}} and a blood elf male]]) when the dragon arrived, so he rode his ''flying motorbike'' to the top of a mesa to duel Deathwing in a knife fight, at which point the other characters interrupt and it all dissolves into chaos.

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* One of the more hilarious quest lines to come out of ''VideoGame/WorldOfWarcraft'''s ''Cataclysm'' expansion is "The Day That Deathwing Came," concerning the dragon's attack on the Badlands. After asking some [=NPCs=] about it, you play through three reenactments of their stories: a dwarf claims that he punched his way through a rain of burning boulders to sock Deathwing right in the face, but a gnome interrupts and describes how he used a device to make himself big enough to snatch the dragon out of the sky and hurl him all the way to Kalimdor. And then an orc explains that he was showing off his motorcycle to a bunch of lovely ladies ([[{{Elfeminate}} and a blood elf elf]] [[BiTheWay male]]) when the dragon arrived, so he rode his ''flying motorbike'' to the top of a mesa to duel Deathwing in a knife fight, at which point the other characters interrupt and it all dissolves into chaos.
6th Aug '16 12:22:24 PM merotoker
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* There was one ''WesternAnimation/DonaldDuck'' story where was called a hero for saving Daisy. Daisy, Gladstone and Huey, Dewey and Louie tell their own versions of the story.

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* There was one ''WesternAnimation/DonaldDuck'' story where Donald was called a hero for saving Daisy. Daisy, Gladstone and Huey, Dewey and Louie tell their own versions of the story.



** In Huey, Dewey and Louie's version, [[spoiler:both bees and lynx are very existent, but the real kicker is that where the rock slide came from: [[BigDamnHeroes It was caused by Huey, Dewey and Louie.]] [[CrowningMomentOfAwesome It was intentional.]]]]

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** In Huey, Dewey and Louie's version, [[spoiler:both bees and lynx are very existent, but the real kicker is that where the rock slide came from: [[BigDamnHeroes It was caused by Huey, Dewey and Louie.]] [[CrowningMomentOfAwesome It was intentional.]]]]intentional]]]].



* There is a ''Franchise/SpiderMan'' story by PeterDavid, called ''Eye Witness'' (''Spectacular Spider-Man'' #121), where Mary Jane, Peter, and J. Jonah Jameson tell the story of a bank robbery where they were present. Mary Jane describes the robber as a menacing thug, Jameson acting bravely, and Spider-Man as a hero. Jameson describes the robber similarly, himself as the hero, and Spider-Man as a coward and a criminal. Peter tells the truth (apart from him being Spider-Man); the robber was an amateur with a BB gun, Jameson acted cowardly, and he (as Spider-Man) didn't have to do much.

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* There is a ''Franchise/SpiderMan'' story by PeterDavid, Creator/PeterDavid, called ''Eye Witness'' (''Spectacular Spider-Man'' #121), where Mary Jane, Peter, and J. Jonah Jameson tell the story of a bank robbery where they were present. Mary Jane describes the robber as a menacing thug, Jameson acting bravely, and Spider-Man as a hero. Jameson describes the robber similarly, himself as the hero, and Spider-Man as a coward and a criminal. Peter tells the truth (apart from him being Spider-Man); the robber was an amateur with a BB gun, Jameson acted cowardly, and he (as Spider-Man) didn't have to do much.
much.



* Subverted in the ''FanFic/PoniesOfOlympus'' series -- [[TheRival Ran Biao]] and Rarity both tell ''very'' different versions of what happened between Rarity and her first LoveInterest Razorwing, but it's strongly implied that Ran Biao completely made her version up in order to paint Rarity in a negative light and drive a wedge between her and Spike. Ultimately double subverted. As it turns out, Rarity's version wasn't entirely accurate, and there was some truth to Ran's version.

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* Subverted in the ''FanFic/PoniesOfOlympus'' series -- [[TheRival Ran Biao]] and Rarity both tell ''very'' different versions of what happened between Rarity and her first LoveInterest {{Love Interest|s}} Razorwing, but it's strongly implied that Ran Biao completely made her version up in order to paint Rarity in a negative light and drive a wedge between her and Spike. Ultimately double subverted. As it turns out, Rarity's version wasn't entirely accurate, and there was some truth to Ran's version.



** The short ''Have I Got a Story for You''. Each of four kids recounts a sighting of {{Franchise/Batman}}, giving different portions of the same events, while also giving different descriptions of what he is. The first kid makes him a LivingShadow creature like [[WesternAnimation/StaticShock Ebon]]; the girl an actual [[HalfHumanHybrid humanoid bat creature]]; the third a RidiculouslyHumanRobot. At the end they see the reality; he's [[BadassNormal a guy in a suit]]. Which was based on the ''WesternAnimation/BatmanTheAnimatedSeries'' "Legends of the Dark Knight" which itself was based on a 1970s story from the comics called "The Batman Nobody Knows", by Len Wein. One of the kids' story was what happened (according to his uncle), which was told in the style of comic book artist Dick Sprang and the '60s ''Series/{{Batman}}'' show, while the others are their own theories on what Batman looks like (with one of them being a retelling of ''Comicbook/TheDarkKnightReturns''). The other kid thought Batman was a bat-like creature that snatches criminals, similar to post Post-''ComicBook/ZeroHour'' interpretations of Superman's first encounter with Batman, whom he thought to be some kind of [[DifferentlyPoweredIndividual metahuman]].

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** The short ''Have I Got a Story for You''. Each of four kids recounts a sighting of {{Franchise/Batman}}, giving different portions of the same events, while also giving different descriptions of what he is. The first kid makes him a LivingShadow creature like [[WesternAnimation/StaticShock Ebon]]; the girl an actual [[HalfHumanHybrid humanoid bat creature]]; the third a RidiculouslyHumanRobot.{{Ridiculously Human Robot|s}}. At the end they see the reality; he's [[BadassNormal a guy in a suit]]. Which was based on the ''WesternAnimation/BatmanTheAnimatedSeries'' "Legends of the Dark Knight" which itself was based on a 1970s story from the comics called "The Batman Nobody Knows", by Len Wein. One of the kids' story was what happened (according to his uncle), which was told in the style of comic book artist Dick Sprang and the '60s ''Series/{{Batman}}'' show, while the others are their own theories on what Batman looks like (with one of them being a retelling of ''Comicbook/TheDarkKnightReturns'').''Comicbook/BatmanTheDarkKnightReturns''). The other kid thought Batman was a bat-like creature that snatches criminals, similar to post Post-''ComicBook/ZeroHour'' interpretations of Superman's first encounter with Batman, whom he thought to be some kind of [[DifferentlyPoweredIndividual metahuman]].



* ''Film/{{Rashomon}}'' is both the {{Trope Namer|s}} and the {{Trope Maker|s}}. In medieval Japan a husband and wife are accosted by a bandit. We see the story of the encounter only in flashback. Facts common to all stories: 1) The husband is overpowered and tied up by the bandit, 2) there is a sexual encounter between the bandit and the wife, and 3) the husband ends up dead. At the murder trial each principal tells a different story of the incident that puts him/herself in a good light, but each confesses to the murder, so we don't believe anyone is outright lying just to conceal his/her own guilt. For the sake of getting the husband's story first hand, we are asked to believe that a local ShrineMaiden is able to summon his spirit to testify.

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* ''Film/{{Rashomon}}'' is both the {{Trope Namer|s}} and the {{Trope Maker|s}}. In medieval Japan a husband and wife are accosted by a bandit. We see the story of the encounter only in flashback. Facts common to all stories: 1) The husband is overpowered and tied up by the bandit, 2) there is a sexual encounter between the bandit and the wife, and 3) the husband ends up dead. At the murder trial each principal tells a different story of the incident that puts him/herself in a good light, but each confesses to the murder, so we don't believe anyone is outright lying just to conceal his/her own guilt. For the sake of getting the husband's story first hand, we are asked to believe that a local ShrineMaiden [[{{Miko}} Shrine Maiden]] is able to summon his spirit to testify.



* ''Film/{{Basic}}'' centers on a pair of military investigators trying to figure out what happened during a training exercise in which all but two of a team of special-forces operatives died or disappeared, with both survivors telling conflicting (and frequently changing) versions of the story. It's an interesting version of the trope, as [[spoiler:''none'' of the stories are true, and we're never shown what happened. While the very end of the movie does have some reveals, exactly what happened to set up the opening scenes remains a mystery.]]

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* ''Film/{{Basic}}'' centers on a pair of military investigators trying to figure out what happened during a training exercise in which all but two of a team of special-forces operatives died or disappeared, with both survivors telling conflicting (and frequently changing) versions of the story. It's an interesting version of the trope, as [[spoiler:''none'' of the stories are true, and we're never shown what happened. While the very end of the movie does have some reveals, exactly what happened to set up the opening scenes remains a mystery.]]mystery]].



* This happens in ''Film/{{Narc}}'' where the protagonist first hears one version of how an undercover cop died from his partner, who is also investigating it and the protagonist was brought in to help wrap up the case. Along the way, things are not as they seem and when they supposedly catch the real killers, they tell a different version of what happened. In the final confrontation, [[spoiler:the surviving partner is shot and gives what appears to be a deathbed confession of what really happened.]]

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* This happens in ''Film/{{Narc}}'' where the protagonist first hears one version of how an undercover cop died from his partner, who is also investigating it and the protagonist was brought in to help wrap up the case. Along the way, things are not as they seem and when they supposedly catch the real killers, they tell a different version of what happened. In the final confrontation, [[spoiler:the surviving partner is shot and gives what appears to be a deathbed confession of what really happened.]]happened]].



* ''Film/HeLovesMeHeLovesMeNot'', a French film, plays with this by having the first half or so of the film follow a girl who a man is apparently cheating on (and going to leave) his wife with her. However, he repeatedly fails to show up at all to their arranged meetings. Growing increasingly distraught, she finally [[spoiler:attempts suicide]]. In the second half, [[spoiler:it's from the man's point of view, and it's revealed that he isn't even aware that she exists, and the entire relationship was the product of her being insane.]]

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* ''Film/HeLovesMeHeLovesMeNot'', a French film, plays with this by having the first half or so of the film follow a girl who a man is apparently cheating on (and going to leave) his wife with her. However, he repeatedly fails to show up at all to their arranged meetings. Growing increasingly distraught, she finally [[spoiler:attempts suicide]]. In the second half, [[spoiler:it's from the man's point of view, and it's revealed that he isn't even aware that she exists, and the entire relationship was the product of her being insane.]]insane]].



* ''Film/GhostDogTheWayOfTheSamurai'' has a minor case of this occuring during a FlashBack scene. Both [[BornInTheWrongCentury Ghost Dog]] and [[TheFamilyForTheWholeFamily Louie the mobster]] have a flashback to when they first encountered each other. In both cases Ghost Dog is getting beat viciously by a group of thugs, and Louie comes over to end the disturbance. In Louie's version of events the leader of the group hesitates a second, then pulls a gun and points it at Louie, at which point Louie shoots him in self-defense and the rest of his gang run away. In Ghost Dog's version, the guy points a gun at Ghost Dog, and Louie then saves Ghost Dog's life by pulling the trigger first, which adds much more onto the IOweYouMyLife thing that Ghost Dog has going on towards Louie.

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* ''Film/GhostDogTheWayOfTheSamurai'' has a minor case of this occuring occurring during a FlashBack scene. Both [[BornInTheWrongCentury Ghost Dog]] and [[TheFamilyForTheWholeFamily Louie the mobster]] have a flashback to when they first encountered each other. In both cases Ghost Dog is getting beat viciously by a group of thugs, and Louie comes over to end the disturbance. In Louie's version of events the leader of the group hesitates a second, then pulls a gun and points it at Louie, at which point Louie shoots him in self-defense and the rest of his gang run away. In Ghost Dog's version, the guy points a gun at Ghost Dog, and Louie then saves Ghost Dog's life by pulling the trigger first, which adds much more onto the IOweYouMyLife thing that Ghost Dog has going on towards Louie.



* The first half or so of the ''Franchise/StarWars'' novel ''I, Jedi'' is one of these for the ''Literature/JediAcademyTrilogy.'' It gives a contrasting point of view of the events of that series without actually contradicting any of it, while simultaneously filling in a variety of {{Plot Hole}}s. The second half of the book tells the conclusion of the conflict that Corran Horn went to the academy to learn to deal with, which is related to, but separate from, the story of the happenings at the academy. Most consider it better than the trilogy
* Creator/AgathaChristie 's ''Literature/FiveLittlePigs'' has HerculePoirot solve a murder that took place sixteen years before by listening to the stories of the 5 people involved, who each provided a sightly different account on what had actually happened.

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* The first half or so of the ''Franchise/StarWars'' novel ''I, Jedi'' is one of these for the ''Literature/JediAcademyTrilogy.'' It gives a contrasting point of view of the events of that series without actually contradicting any of it, while simultaneously filling in a variety of {{Plot Hole}}s. The second half of the book tells the conclusion of the conflict that Corran Horn went to the academy to learn to deal with, which is related to, but separate from, the story of the happenings at the academy. Most consider it better than the trilogy
trilogy.
* Creator/AgathaChristie 's ''Literature/FiveLittlePigs'' has HerculePoirot Literature/HerculePoirot solve a murder that took place sixteen years before by listening to the stories of the 5 people involved, who each provided a sightly slightly different account on what had actually happened.



* The prologues to each book of ''Literature/{{Belgariad}}'' are an excerpt from an in-universe document that gives a piece of history relevant to the book in question--for the most part these are in accord, but the last one comes from ''The Book of Torak'', holy text of the ReligionOfEvil authored by (or possibly ghostwritten for by one of his [[TheDragon Disciples]]) the BigBad. It retells many of the same ''events'' but puts a ''radically'' different perspective on them- and one that Torak seems to actually believe, which really hits home just how crazy he is.

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* The prologues to each book of ''Literature/{{Belgariad}}'' ''Literature/TheBelgariad'' are an excerpt from an in-universe document that gives a piece of history relevant to the book in question--for the most part these are in accord, but the last one comes from ''The Book of Torak'', holy text of the ReligionOfEvil authored by (or possibly ghostwritten for by one of his [[TheDragon Disciples]]) the BigBad. It retells many of the same ''events'' but puts a ''radically'' different perspective on them- and one that Torak seems to actually believe, which really hits home just how crazy he is.



* This happens in the ''UglyBetty'' episode, "Crimes of Fashion" where Betty interrogates Christina, Amanda, Marc, Claire and then Alexis in order to find out [[spoiler: which one of them pushed Christina down a staircase]]. Each suspect supplies a piece of the story which helps Betty build up to the final conclusion that [[spoiler: it had to have been Daniel]] however, later on Betty discovers [[spoiler: it was really Alexis who had done it, which also explained her noticeably vague and shorter story.]]

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* This happens in the ''UglyBetty'' ''Series/UglyBetty'' episode, "Crimes of Fashion" where Betty interrogates Christina, Amanda, Marc, Claire and then Alexis in order to find out [[spoiler: which one of them pushed Christina down a staircase]]. Each suspect supplies a piece of the story which helps Betty build up to the final conclusion that [[spoiler: it had to have been Daniel]] however, later on Betty discovers [[spoiler: it was really Alexis who had done it, which also explained her noticeably vague and shorter story.]]story]].



** Another episode has the characters having dinner together and reminiscing about the time the oven caught fire. They begin discussing the incident from their own perspectives. Laverne recalls Carol upset over a recent breakup while Carol recalls the same breakup left her happy. Charlie recalls he was the life of the party that night, but doesn't remember the oven catching fire. Eventually, we see what really happened from the perspective of the real culprit: [[spoiler: Dreyfuss the dog.]]
* The ''Series/{{Mash}}'' episode "The Novocaine Mutiny" has Hawkeye court-martialed when Frank Burns accuses him of mutiny. While testifying, Frank speaks (and narrates) his version of events, in which he struggles heroically to treat the wounded while the other surgeons mewl and cower. During the scenes accompanying Frank's narrative he is shot in soft-focus, gleaming and white while shots of Hawk and Beej are dingy and unflattering. Hawkeye gave his version of events (which more or less, falls in line with the way the characters normally act).

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** Another episode has the characters having dinner together and reminiscing about the time the oven caught fire. They begin discussing the incident from their own perspectives. Laverne recalls Carol upset over a recent breakup while Carol recalls the same breakup left her happy. Charlie recalls he was the life of the party that night, but doesn't remember the oven catching fire. Eventually, we see what really happened from the perspective of the real culprit: [[spoiler: Dreyfuss the dog.]]
dog]].
* The ''Series/{{Mash}}'' ''Series/{{MASH}}'' episode "The Novocaine Mutiny" has Hawkeye court-martialed when Frank Burns accuses him of mutiny. While testifying, Frank speaks (and narrates) his version of events, in which he struggles heroically to treat the wounded while the other surgeons mewl and cower. During the scenes accompanying Frank's narrative he is shot in soft-focus, gleaming and white while shots of Hawk and Beej are dingy and unflattering. Hawkeye gave his version of events (which more or less, falls in line with the way the characters normally act).



* ''Series/{{Smallville}}'' used this trope in the third season episode "Suspect". [[MagnificentBastard Lionel Luthor]] is shot at the Luthor mansion and the prime suspect is Jonathan Kent. After investigating a lot of people, Clark finds out that [[spoiler: Sheriff Ethan did it.]]

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* ''Series/{{Smallville}}'' used this trope in the third second season episode "Suspect". [[MagnificentBastard Lionel Luthor]] is shot at the Luthor mansion and the prime suspect is Jonathan Kent. After investigating a lot of people, Clark finds out that [[spoiler: Sheriff Ethan did it.]]it]].



* In an episode of ''Series/MagnumPI'', Magnum listens to Rick, T.C., and Higgins explaining the events of a robbery at Rick's nightclub. Each gives a different version of the events. Magnum focuses on the details of the robbery that ''don't'' change in the retelling, and cracks the case. Played for laughs: they each tell Magnum a different version of the holdup, with many argumentative interruptions by the others and more than one SelfServingMemory. Magnum then recounts a '''fourth''' version based on what he's heard and what he knows of his friends before revealing [[spoiler:the bartender let the thieves in.]]

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* In an episode of ''Series/MagnumPI'', Magnum listens to Rick, T.C., and Higgins explaining the events of a robbery at Rick's nightclub. Each gives a different version of the events. Magnum focuses on the details of the robbery that ''don't'' change in the retelling, and cracks the case. Played for laughs: they each tell Magnum a different version of the holdup, with many argumentative interruptions by the others and more than one SelfServingMemory. Magnum then recounts a '''fourth''' version based on what he's heard and what he knows of his friends before revealing [[spoiler:the bartender let the thieves in.]]in]].



One twist used in this version is that the actor playing each character doesn't appear in any of the retellings until that character tells his or her version of events. So, for example, there's a blonde waitress who appears in every version of the story who turns out to be Parker, but before Parker tells her version the waitress isn't played by Beth Riesgraf. They also all have different perceptions of Sophie's [[FakeBrit accent]] -- Sophie herself remembers using her normal [=RP=]; Eliot has her doing an exaggerated Cockney; Hardison remembers a mad Scotswoman; and Parker's version is... well... the best guess is an extremely mad 80-year-old Duchess who has just finished a couple of bottles of sherry. Also for extra credit, consider the order in which the stories are told and the dagger's location determined. Sophie explains that she had the dagger sent to her safe house in London, but never got it. Eliot explains that it never got there because he was driving the truck it was supposed to be on, but also never got it. Hardison explains that he had the dagger moved to storage, but never got it himself. Parker then explains that she snagged it from storage, but lost it while duct-crawling. Then Nate explains that it dropped into his hands, and he also proved that [[spoiler: the dagger was never there to begin with.]] Nate also manages to spin the fact that they all foiled each other as an {{Aesop}} about how his crew is better working with one another than against, as the team was starting to crack under the larger StoryArc.

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One twist used in this version is that the actor playing each character doesn't appear in any of the retellings until that character tells his or her version of events. So, for example, there's a blonde waitress who appears in every version of the story who turns out to be Parker, but before Parker tells her version the waitress isn't played by Beth Riesgraf. They also all have different perceptions of Sophie's [[FakeBrit accent]] -- Sophie herself remembers using her normal [=RP=]; Eliot has her doing an exaggerated Cockney; Hardison remembers a mad Scotswoman; and Parker's version is... well... the best guess is an extremely mad 80-year-old Duchess who has just finished a couple of bottles of sherry. Also for extra credit, consider the order in which the stories are told and the dagger's location determined. Sophie explains that she had the dagger sent to her safe house in London, but never got it. Eliot explains that it never got there because he was driving the truck it was supposed to be on, but also never got it. Hardison explains that he had the dagger moved to storage, but never got it himself. Parker then explains that she snagged it from storage, but lost it while duct-crawling. Then Nate explains that it dropped into his hands, and he also proved that [[spoiler: the dagger was never there to begin with.]] with]]. Nate also manages to spin the fact that they all foiled each other as an {{Aesop}} AnAesop about how his crew is better working with one another than against, as the team was starting to crack under the larger StoryArc.



* On ''Series/{{Victorious}}'' after Trina's harness is cut in ''Who Did It To Trina'', the cast are questioned about their motives for doing it. Tori, Jade, and Robbie give differing accounts, while [[CloudCuckoolander Cat]] relays the ''Series/DrakeAndJosh'' episode "I Love Sushi". Then in the end, [[spoiler: the culprit is revealed to be Rex.]]

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* On ''Series/{{Victorious}}'' after Trina's harness is cut in ''Who "Who Did It To Trina'', Trina", the cast are questioned about their motives for doing it. Tori, Jade, and Robbie give differing accounts, while [[CloudCuckoolander Cat]] relays the ''Series/DrakeAndJosh'' episode "I Love Sushi". Then in the end, [[spoiler: the culprit is revealed to be Rex.]]Rex]].



* On ''TheMiddle'' episode ''Hecks at the Movie'' Frankie and Mike have very different accounts on how Mike shut Frankie in the middle of a conversation; in Frankie's account Mike was incredibly rude and everyone felt sorry for her whilst in Mike's account she was interrupting one of their friends telling a story and he was very tender and polite with her, of course the audience see was really happened at the beginning of the episode (unlike most Rashomon stories) which is part of the joke.

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* On ''TheMiddle'' In ''Series/TheMiddle'' episode ''Hecks "Hecks at the Movie'' Movie" Frankie and Mike have very different accounts on how Mike shut Frankie in the middle of a conversation; in Frankie's account Mike was incredibly rude and everyone felt sorry for her whilst in Mike's account she was interrupting one of their friends telling a story and he was very tender and polite with her, of course the audience see was really happened at the beginning of the episode (unlike most Rashomon stories) which is part of the joke.



** The novel ''Fallen Anges'' just makes things even more confusing. The soon-to-be-Fallen uncover a [[TheCorruption Chaotic]] conspiracy that has nothing to do with Lion El'Johnson. At the very end of the novel we get the Cult's view of events: [[spoiler:they were intending to seal away the daemons, not summon them, and they may or may not be caught in the middle of a FrameUp.]] After the cult's defeat the planet of Caliban declares their independence from both the Imperium and El'Johnson, with a huge multitude of possible reasons as to ''why''.

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** The novel ''Fallen Anges'' just makes things even more confusing. The soon-to-be-Fallen uncover a [[TheCorruption Chaotic]] conspiracy that has nothing to do with Lion El'Johnson. At the very end of the novel we get the Cult's view of events: [[spoiler:they were intending to seal away the daemons, not summon them, and they may or may not be caught in the middle of a FrameUp.]] FrameUp]]. After the cult's defeat the planet of Caliban declares their independence from both the Imperium and El'Johnson, with a huge multitude of possible reasons as to ''why''.



* In ''VideoGame/TheElderScrollsIIIMorrowind'', [[BigBad Dagoth Ur]], [[PhysicalGod Vivec]], [[TheChessmaster Azura]], [[CorruptChurch the Tribunal Temple]] (which worships Vivec), [[NobleSavage the Ashlanders]] and the [[DefectorFromDecadence Dissident Priests]] all have differing accounts of the last days of Lord Indoril Nerevar, placing most of the blame on his death on either the Tribunal or Dagoth Ur. Interestingly, [[UnreliableNarrator one of the versions]] given by Vivec contradicts the Tribunal Temple's official stance by claiming [[spoiler: that although he didn't ''kill'' Nerevar, he broke a vow to him and was summarily cursed for his dishonesty and impudence by Nerevar's patron, Azura.]] That isn't the only version given by Vivec to contradict the official stance: another of his version have him claim that [[HalfTruth he]] didn't kill Nerevar... [[spoiler: but Vehk the mortal, who became Vivec the god, did.]]

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* In ''VideoGame/TheElderScrollsIIIMorrowind'', [[BigBad Dagoth Ur]], [[PhysicalGod Vivec]], [[TheChessmaster Azura]], [[CorruptChurch the Tribunal Temple]] (which worships Vivec), [[NobleSavage the Ashlanders]] and the [[DefectorFromDecadence Dissident Priests]] all have differing accounts of the last days of Lord Indoril Nerevar, placing most of the blame on his death on either the Tribunal or Dagoth Ur. Interestingly, [[UnreliableNarrator one of the versions]] given by Vivec contradicts the Tribunal Temple's official stance by claiming [[spoiler: that although he didn't ''kill'' Nerevar, he broke a vow to him and was summarily cursed for his dishonesty and impudence by Nerevar's patron, Azura.]] Azura]]. That isn't the only version given by Vivec to contradict the official stance: another of his version have him claim that [[HalfTruth he]] didn't kill Nerevar... [[spoiler: but Vehk the mortal, who became Vivec the god, did.]]



** This is particularly {{egregious}} in ''Imperishable Night'', where, presumably, nearly the same events have to happen at least twice in a row for the BigBad to be truly defeated (since you have to play one game being diverted first).

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** This is particularly {{egregious}} JustForFun/{{egregious}} in ''Imperishable Night'', where, presumably, nearly the same events have to happen at least twice in a row for the BigBad to be truly defeated (since you have to play one game being diverted first).







* The manga-only Beyond Midnight Arc of ''VisualNovel/HigurashiWhenTheyCry,'' which is directly inspired by ''Film/{{Rashomon}}.

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* The manga-only Beyond Midnight Arc of ''VisualNovel/HigurashiWhenTheyCry,'' which is directly inspired by ''Film/{{Rashomon}}.''Film/{{Rashomon}}''.






* An episode of ''WesternAnimation/GarfieldAndFriends'', "Twice Told Tale", involved Jon and Garfield both trying to blame the other for a disastrous attempt at homemade yogurt. They stopped arguing when Odie refused to confirm either version as the truth. What makes this one interesting is that the story is the same (Jon takes Garfield out for yogurt, finds it too expensive, Jon heads home and decides to make yogurt himself and things go out of control) with the only difference being who was being an angel and who was being a jerk (Odie's refusal to answer seems to hint that both were at fault.)[[note]]On an amusing meta level though, Jon's account comes off as more credible based on Garfield's innately (if usually played for comedy) selfish and greedy personality.

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* An episode of ''WesternAnimation/GarfieldAndFriends'', "Twice Told Tale", involved Jon and Garfield both trying to blame the other for a disastrous attempt at homemade yogurt. They stopped arguing when Odie refused to confirm either version as the truth. What makes this one interesting is that the story is the same (Jon takes Garfield out for yogurt, finds it too expensive, Jon heads home and decides to make yogurt himself and things go out of control) with the only difference being who was being an angel and who was being a jerk (Odie's refusal to answer seems to hint that both were at fault.)[[note]]On an amusing meta level though, Jon's account comes off as more credible based on Garfield's innately (if usually played for comedy) selfish and greedy personality.[[/note]]



* ''WesternAnimation/{{Rugrats}}'' episode "The Trial" in which the babies attempt to figure out who broke Tommy's clown lamp via a trial. It's played with quite a bit as Angelica keeps trying to paint Chuckie or the twins as the culprit through various reasoning (the twins spinning around it too fast and Chuckie being absolutely terrified of it and actually wanting to get rid of it.) This is a bit of a HoistByTheirOwnPetard moment for the real culprit, Angelica, who wouldn't of known those things if ''she wasn't there''.

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* ''WesternAnimation/{{Rugrats}}'' episode "The Trial" in which the babies attempt to figure out who broke Tommy's clown lamp via a trial. It's played with quite a bit as Angelica keeps trying to paint Chuckie or the twins as the culprit through various reasoning (the twins spinning around it too fast and Chuckie being absolutely terrified of it and actually wanting to get rid of it.) This is a bit of a HoistByTheirOwnPetard HoistByHisOwnPetard moment for the real culprit, Angelica, who wouldn't of known those things if ''she wasn't there''.



** Granddad tells a cliched action movie plot, with escaped slave Catcher Freeman as a {{badass}} {{hero}} who rescues slaves from slavers; Thelma as a vapid but attractive DamselInDistress and LoveInterest; Master Colonel as the BigBad; and Colonel's [[TheDragon loyal slave]] Tobias, as a generally useless [[BoomerangBigot race-traitor house slave]] who wrote the world's first film script... [[AnachronismStew before films were invented]].

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** Granddad tells a cliched action movie plot, with escaped slave Catcher Freeman as a {{badass}} {{hero}} who rescues slaves from slavers; Thelma as a vapid but attractive DamselInDistress and LoveInterest; {{Love Interest|s}}; Master Colonel as the BigBad; and Colonel's [[TheDragon loyal slave]] Tobias, as a generally useless [[BoomerangBigot race-traitor house slave]] who wrote the world's first film script... [[AnachronismStew before films were invented]].



** Huey finally sets both of them straight with the true version, ''from the internet'', which reveals: [[spoiler:The so-called "Catcher Freeman" was based on Tobias, Master Colonel's illegitimate slave son, FakeUltimateHero, a writing genius, and... a generally useless race traitor. He takes credit after he accidentally kills Master Colonel (he meant to shoot Thelma). Thelma was the real hero of the story, and Master Colonel was a fairly decent slave master, leaving Ruckus and Granddad in an agreement to disagree with each other, but more so [[CassandraTruth Huey]].]]

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** Huey finally sets both of them straight with the true version, ''from the internet'', Internet'', which reveals: [[spoiler:The so-called "Catcher Freeman" was based on Tobias, Master Colonel's illegitimate slave son, FakeUltimateHero, a writing genius, and... a generally useless race traitor. He takes credit after he accidentally kills Master Colonel (he meant to shoot Thelma). Thelma was the real hero of the story, and Master Colonel was a fairly decent slave master, leaving Ruckus and Granddad in an agreement to disagree with each other, but more so [[CassandraTruth Huey]].]]Huey]]]].
30th Jul '16 1:58:23 PM Morgenthaler
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* Discussed and used in [[http://www.digitalpimponline.com/strips.php?title=movie&id=320 a strip]] of ''Webcomic/JoeLovesCrappyMovies''. Ironically, it was used to describe the premise of ''Film/VantagePoint'', which wasn't a true example: the movie has several P.O.V.s but these are completely objective and merely follow certain characters.

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* Discussed and used in [[http://www.digitalpimponline.com/strips.php?title=movie&id=320 a strip]] of ''Webcomic/JoeLovesCrappyMovies''. Ironically, it was used to describe the premise of ''Film/VantagePoint'', which wasn't a true example: the movie has several P.O.V.s but these are completely objective and merely follow certain characters. Similarly, the demonstration the comic itself uses isn't an example either, but also rotating [=POVs=] that don't conflict with each other.
27th Jul '16 5:32:16 PM BobTanaka
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* One episode of ''The Donna Reed Show,'' has Donna and Alex both telling Mary the story of their disastrous first date. They each remember the other being perfect and themselves being a complete wreck.
23rd Jul '16 9:15:47 AM rafi
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* In an ''WesternAnimation/AlvinAndTheChipmunks'' episode, each chipmunk has a different version of how Dave's piano got destroyed and had instant pudding in it. Alvin, Simon, and Theodore notably each paint themselves as an innocent, unwilling victim of the situation while their two respective siblings are portrayed as more bullying figures.

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* In an ''WesternAnimation/AlvinAndTheChipmunks'' episode, the episode from ''WesternAnimation/AlvinAndTheChipmunks'', "Every Chipmunk Tells a Story"", each chipmunk has a different version of how Dave's piano got destroyed and had instant pudding in it. Alvin, Simon, and Theodore notably each paint themselves as an innocent, unwilling victim of the situation while their two respective siblings are portrayed as more bullying figures.
22nd Jul '16 10:05:05 AM Adept
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* Creator/AgathaChristie 's ''Literature/FiveLittlePigs'' has HerculePoirot solve a murder that took place sixteen years before by listening to the stories of the people involved.

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* Creator/AgathaChristie 's ''Literature/FiveLittlePigs'' has HerculePoirot solve a murder that took place sixteen years before by listening to the stories of the 5 people involved.involved, who each provided a sightly different account on what had actually happened.
16th Jul '16 4:33:00 PM CompletelyNormalGuy
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** In Daisy's version, all six were canoeing when suddenly some bees attacked , causing him to lose control of the canoe and crashing into a rock. Bad things happen and Daisy ends up getting on a log, directly aiming at a waterfall. tries to save her by catching her at a nearby tree, but fails. Then he comes up with another plan -- just before they are about to drop at the fall, makes a particularly epic jump on the ground, holding Daisy.
** In Gladstone's version, there are no bees, but crashes into a rock because he is an idiot. Then he doesn't run into a tree to save Daisy, but to escape a lynx. And they are not saved from the waterfall by 's jumping abilities, but a particularly ridiculous DeusExMachina; a ROCK SLIDE that stops the log.

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** In Daisy's version, all six were canoeing when suddenly some bees attacked , causing him to lose control of the canoe and crashing into a rock. Bad things happen and Daisy ends up getting on a log, directly aiming at a waterfall. Donald tries to save her by catching her at a nearby tree, but fails. Then he comes up with another plan -- just before they are about to drop at the fall, he makes a particularly epic jump on the ground, holding Daisy.
** In Gladstone's version, there are no bees, but Donald crashes into a rock because he is an idiot. Then he doesn't run into a tree to save Daisy, but to escape a lynx. And they are not saved from the waterfall by 's Donald's jumping abilities, but a particularly ridiculous DeusExMachina; a ROCK SLIDE that stops the log.
30th Jun '16 8:45:14 PM damus2300
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Added DiffLines:

* The ''Series/GameOfThrones'' Blu-ray lore does this with Westeros history. The people and events that viewers are familiar with look different depending on the characters describing them.
23rd Jun '16 3:09:45 AM Luppercus
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* On ''TheMiddle'' episode ''Hecks at the Movie'' Frankie and Mike have very different accounts on how Mike shut Frankie in the middle of a conversation; in Frankie's account Mike was incredibly rude and everyone felt sorry for her whilst in Mike's account she was interrupting one of their friends telling a story and he was very tender and polite with her, of course the audience see was really happened at the beginning of the episode (unlike most Rashomon stories) which is part of the joke.
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Main.RashomonStyle