History Main / PrepositionsAreNotToEndSentencesWith

25th May '17 1:43:33 PM ironballs16
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'''Creator/RonWhite:''' He just ended a sentence in nine prepositions.\\

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'''Creator/RonWhite:''' He just ended a sentence in nine ''nine'' prepositions.\\
29th Dec '16 12:20:03 AM Trying2CIt
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-->-- [[AuthorsOfQuote Attributed]] to '''UsefulNotes/WinstonChurchill''', on being criticized for this.

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-->-- [[AuthorsOfQuote Attributed]] to '''UsefulNotes/WinstonChurchill''', on being criticized for this.
this.[[note]]A more commonly missed joke is that the speaker thought that "up" was used here as a preposition, so he erroneously put it in front of "which".[[/note]]



This is actually applying Latin grammar rules to English, and while some of those can actually apply in the latter language (like no double negatives), this one doesn't (same with splitting infinitives, which is ''impossible'' in Latin). Many sentences just don't flow in English if this rule is shoehorned in, and evidence has been shown that ending sentences with prepositions has been in the language since Anglo-Saxon. The blind insistence that Latin represented the "perfect" language and all other language grammars must be shoe-horned into Latin grammatical conventions bedevilled foreign language learning in Great Britain until well into the 20th century. Even utterly unrelated languages like Irish and Scottish Gaelic were forced into a Latinate grammatical analysis for which they were not intended. And in schools, "English Grammar" in practice meant applying Latin structure to a Germanic language, much to the bewilderment of pupils. This was the case even into the 1970's in many schools.

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This One oft-claimed source of this is actually applying some overzealous grammarians' attempts to apply Latin grammar rules to English, and while some of those can actually apply in the latter language (like no double negatives), this one doesn't (same with splitting infinitives, which is ''impossible'' in Latin). Many sentences just don't flow in English if this rule is shoehorned in, and evidence has been shown that ending sentences with prepositions has been in the language since Anglo-Saxon. The blind insistence that Latin represented the "perfect" language and all Some grammarians analyzed other language grammars must be shoe-horned into Latin grammatical conventions bedevilled foreign language learning in Great Britain until well into the 20th century. Even utterly languages, even quite unrelated languages like such as Irish and or Scottish Gaelic were forced into a Latinate grammatical analysis for which they were not intended. And in schools, "English Grammar" in practice meant applying Gaelic, with models based upon Latin structure grammar, to a Germanic language, much to various degrees of success and correctness.

A more concrete source of this grammar superstition is an English grammarian named Robert Lowth, who actually discussed, in his grammar, separating prepositions from
the bewilderment of pupils. This relative that they govern. He said that it was an idiom "which our language is strongly inclined to" and fit the case even into "familiar style" but did not fit the 1970's in many schools.
"solemn and elevated style". In other words, his critique of this was based upon ''style'', not ''grammar''. Unfortunately, some teachers and grammarians probably misinterpreted this as an absolute rule, whence came the superstition.
10th Jul '16 5:50:34 PM eroock
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* Played for laughs in ''Website/CollegeHumor'''s [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=N4vf8N6GpdM parody]] of ''Film/InglouriousBasterds'':
-->'''Perrier [=LaPadite=]:''' I swear I do not know where Mademoiselle Dreyfus was at!\\
'''Col. Hans Landa:''' Did you just end a sentence with a preposition?\\
'''Perrier [=LaPadite=]:''' ...Forgive me, Colonel.
10th Jul '16 5:40:11 PM eroock
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-->--[[AuthorsOfQuote Attributed]] to '''UsefulNotes/WinstonChurchill''', on being criticized for this.

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-->--[[AuthorsOfQuote -->-- [[AuthorsOfQuote Attributed]] to '''UsefulNotes/WinstonChurchill''', on being criticized for this.
9th Jun '16 8:05:04 PM bwburke94
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* (Anecdotal story, possibly untrue - therefore "in universe") When British Prime Minister was criticized for making this supposed grammatical mistake, he replied "This is a piece of insolence up with which I will not put!"
19th Apr '16 5:23:11 PM WillKeaton
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* This is what sparks the {{hilarity|Ensues}} in the ''WebVideo/HitlerRants'' video "[[GrammarNazi Downfall of Grammar]]".

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* This is what sparks the {{hilarity|Ensues}} in the ''WebVideo/HitlerRants'' video "[[GrammarNazi Downfall of Grammar]]".
Grammar.]]"



* In ''WesternAnimation/BeavisAndButtheadDoAmerica'', Agent Flemming [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Q4XCZfkGF8k admonishes a fellow ATF agent for doing this]]. That agent then ties his sentences in knots trying to get around this.

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* In ''WesternAnimation/BeavisAndButtheadDoAmerica'', Agent Flemming [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Q4XCZfkGF8k admonishes a fellow ATF agent for doing this]]. this.]] That agent then ties his sentences in knots trying to get around this.
19th Apr '16 5:21:42 PM WillKeaton
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A preposition, a specific type of [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Preposition_and_postposition adposition]], is a word describing a relationship between two nouns. These include words such as "on", "to", "beneath", "before", etc.

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A preposition, a specific type of [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Preposition_and_postposition adposition]], adposition,]] is a word describing a relationship between two nouns. These include words such as "on", "to", "beneath", "before", etc.
12th Mar '16 2:49:47 AM gravious
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* Shows up in this ''Webcomic/PerryBibleFellowship'' [[http://pbfcomics.com/99/ strip.]]
18th Feb '16 3:46:47 PM ironballs16
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* In ''WesternAnimation/BeavisAndButtheadDoAmerica'', Agent Flemming admonishes a fellow ATF agent for doing this. That agent then ties his sentences in knots trying to get around this.

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* In ''WesternAnimation/BeavisAndButtheadDoAmerica'', Agent Flemming [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Q4XCZfkGF8k admonishes a fellow ATF agent for doing this.this]]. That agent then ties his sentences in knots trying to get around this.
27th Oct '15 6:57:30 PM AndyLA
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The story of a working class freshman on his first day at (insert prestigious university of choice)who asks "Can you please tell me where the bathroom is at?" and is publicly humiliated for being so crass as to end a sentence with a proposition, and told to rephrase his question without breaking this rule. To which he replies "OK. Can you please tell me where the bathroom is at, asshole?"

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* The story of a working class freshman on his first day at (insert prestigious university of choice)who asks "Can you please tell me where the bathroom is at?" and is publicly humiliated for being so crass as to end a sentence with a proposition, and told to rephrase his question without breaking this rule. To which he replies "OK. Can you please tell me where the bathroom is at, asshole?"
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Main.PrepositionsAreNotToEndSentencesWith