History Main / PotteryBarnPoor

16th Jan '18 2:01:49 AM Thelancasterhouse02
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* Very common in Franchise/{{Barbie}} movies. In WesternAnimation/BarbiePrincessCharmSchool, if it wasn't for the malfunctioning TV, Blair's apartment look pretty nice. It's vast, clean, with pretty pink and flowered furniture.In WesternAnimation/BarbieAndTheThreeMusketeers, the four chambermaids heroines have a large room, canopy beds, and show up inexplicably with the fanciest dresses in a ball reserved to nobility. In WesternAnimation/BarbieAndTheDiamondCastle, Liana and Alexa are so poor, they have nothing else than jam sandwiches to eat. But they have a big cottage, canopy beds again, and even a mirror in a time they were a luxury only kings could afford.
26th Feb '17 9:33:22 AM jharrison3051
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Related to ImprobableFoodBudget, InformedPoverty, and FriendsRentControl. Compare FirstWorldProblems and PerpetualPoverty.

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Related to ImprobableFoodBudget, InformedPoverty, UnlimitedWardrobe, and FriendsRentControl. Compare FirstWorldProblems and PerpetualPoverty.
26th Feb '17 8:59:20 AM jharrison3051
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* ''Series/{{Friends}}'' was based on the premise of six twentysomethings struggling to make it in New York City, even though Manhattan apartments like the ones they lived in are far from cheap (outside of apparent FriendsRentControl, that is). The trope was literally applied in one episode, where Rachel, with apparently enough disposable income to nonchalantly spend $500 on an apothecary coffee table, buys up enough Pottery Barn furniture to warrant Ross comparing her living room to "page 72 of the catalog."

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* ''Series/{{Friends}}'' was based on the premise of six twentysomethings struggling to make it in New York City, even though Manhattan apartments like the ones they lived in are far from cheap (outside of apparent FriendsRentControl, that is). The trope was literally applied in one episode, where when Rachel, with apparently enough disposable income to nonchalantly spend buy numerous pieces like a $500 on an apothecary coffee table, buys up enough Pottery Barn furniture to warrant Ross comparing her living room to "page 72 of the catalog."
23rd Feb '17 11:14:06 AM jharrison3051
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* ''Series/{{Friends}}'' was based on the premise of six twentysomethings struggling to make it in New York City, even though Manhattan apartments like the ones they lived in are far from cheap (outside of apparent FriendsRentControl, that is). The trope was literally applied in one episode, where Rachel, with apparently enough disposable income to nonchalantly spend $500 on an Apothecary coffee table, buys up enough Pottery Barn furniture to warrant Ross comparing her living room to "page 72 of the catalog."

to:

* ''Series/{{Friends}}'' was based on the premise of six twentysomethings struggling to make it in New York City, even though Manhattan apartments like the ones they lived in are far from cheap (outside of apparent FriendsRentControl, that is). The trope was literally applied in one episode, where Rachel, with apparently enough disposable income to nonchalantly spend $500 on an Apothecary apothecary coffee table, buys up enough Pottery Barn furniture to warrant Ross comparing her living room to "page 72 of the catalog."
23rd Feb '17 11:13:00 AM jharrison3051
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* ''Series/{{Friends}}'' was based on the premise of six twentysomethings struggling to make it in New York City, even though Manhattan apartments like the ones they lived in are far from cheap (outside of apparent [[FriendsRentControl, that is). The trope was literally applied in one episode, where Rachel, with apparently enough disposable income to nonchalantly spend $500 on an Apothecary coffee table, buys up enough Pottery Barn furniture to warrant Ross comparing her living room to "page 72 of the catalog."

to:

* ''Series/{{Friends}}'' was based on the premise of six twentysomethings struggling to make it in New York City, even though Manhattan apartments like the ones they lived in are far from cheap (outside of apparent [[FriendsRentControl, FriendsRentControl, that is). The trope was literally applied in one episode, where Rachel, with apparently enough disposable income to nonchalantly spend $500 on an Apothecary coffee table, buys up enough Pottery Barn furniture to warrant Ross comparing her living room to "page 72 of the catalog."
23rd Feb '17 11:12:35 AM jharrison3051
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* ''Series/{{Friends}}'' was based on the premise of six twentysomethings struggling to make it in New York City, even though Manhattan apartments like the ones they lived in are far from cheap (outside of [[FriendsRentControl shows like these]], that is). The trope was literally applied in one episode, when one character decorated their apartment in Pottery Barn furniture and another one didn't like it.

to:

* ''Series/{{Friends}}'' was based on the premise of six twentysomethings struggling to make it in New York City, even though Manhattan apartments like the ones they lived in are far from cheap (outside of [[FriendsRentControl shows like these]], apparent [[FriendsRentControl, that is). The trope was literally applied in one episode, when one character decorated their apartment in where Rachel, with apparently enough disposable income to nonchalantly spend $500 on an Apothecary coffee table, buys up enough Pottery Barn furniture and another one didn't like it. to warrant Ross comparing her living room to "page 72 of the catalog."
11th Oct '16 10:39:18 PM Kalaong
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Related to ImprobableFoodBudget and FriendsRentControl. Compare FirstWorldProblems and PerpetualPoverty.

to:

Related to ImprobableFoodBudget ImprobableFoodBudget, InformedPoverty, and FriendsRentControl. Compare FirstWorldProblems and PerpetualPoverty.
10th May '16 8:55:55 PM trixus
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* ''WesternAnimation/TheSimpsons'' have a long history with this trope. The eponymous family's financial situation has been implied to be very poor during numerous occasions, but they still appear on the surface to be an average family that owns a house and two cars. This double standard is heavily lampshaded in "Homer's Enemy", where Frank Grimes sheds light on the fact that a perpetual screw-up like Homer Simpson still somehow has enough resources to live an upper-middle class lifestyle.

to:

* ''WesternAnimation/TheSimpsons'' have a long history with this trope. The eponymous family's financial situation has been implied to be very poor during numerous occasions, but they still appear on the surface to be an average family that owns a house and two cars. This double standard is heavily lampshaded in "Homer's Enemy", where Frank Grimes sheds light on the fact that a perpetual screw-up like Homer Simpson still somehow has enough resources to live an upper-middle class lifestyle. Although later it's shown that it's just a surface, the house is breaking apart, the cars has no insurance and Homer is putting everything on an HELOC and had the plan of declaring bankruptcy to cancel his debts.
5th May '16 9:58:53 PM MsChibi
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Related to ImprobableFoodBudget and FriendsRentControl. Compare FirstWorldProblems.

to:

Related to ImprobableFoodBudget and FriendsRentControl. Compare FirstWorldProblems.FirstWorldProblems and PerpetualPoverty.
19th Mar '16 8:53:40 PM MetaFour
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You're watching a movie or sitcom series. The characters are in their [[BigFancyHouse spacious home]] with [[LivingInAFurnitureStore their nice new, trendy furniture]]... then they start talking about how hard up for money they are, or [[PennyAmongDiamonds the n"rich people" across town.]]

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You're watching a movie or sitcom series. The characters are in their [[BigFancyHouse spacious home]] with [[LivingInAFurnitureStore their nice new, trendy furniture]]... then they start talking about how hard up for money they are, or [[PennyAmongDiamonds the n"rich "rich people" across town.]]
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Main.PotteryBarnPoor