History Main / PleaseSelectNewCityName

21st Dec '16 7:41:26 PM mirisu92
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*** The bill never passed, however, and there are no plans so far to refile it in the 17th Congress (that is, the Congress that assumed office after the May 2016 elections).
14th Dec '16 12:59:44 PM DarcyFoster
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* The capital of Estonia is Tallinn. It was called Reval before Estonian independence in 1918 - and it was reverted back to Reval when the Nazis invaded in 1941. It was re-renamed Tallinn when the Soviets regained Estonia in 1944.
6th Dec '16 7:56:30 AM AgentKyles
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* Persia => UsefulNotes/{{Iran}} (in this case reflecting local usage)
** Persia is a Greek exonym, the Persians/Iranians have been calling themselves some version of 'Irani' as long as they've been a distinct group. (The term derives ultimately from "Aryan," as the ancient Iranians and ancient Indo-Aryans were closely related and were probably two branches of one people, one that went west and the other east.)

to:

* Persia => UsefulNotes/{{Iran}} (in this case reflecting local usage)
**
usage). Persia is a Greek exonym, the Persians/Iranians have been calling themselves some version of 'Irani' as long as they've been a distinct group. (The term derives ultimately from "Aryan," as the ancient Iranians and ancient Indo-Aryans were closely related and were probably two branches of one people, one that went west and the other east.)



* Ceylon => Sri Lanka
** Another example of the international spelling changing to reflect the actual name of the place instead of what Europeans heard[[note]] The Portuguese used to call it "Ceilão"[[/note]].

to:

* Ceylon => Sri Lanka
**
Lanka. Another example of the international spelling changing to reflect the actual name of the place instead of what Europeans heard[[note]] The Portuguese used to call it "Ceilão"[[/note]].



* UsefulNotes/{{Singapore}} -- formerly Temasek.

to:

* UsefulNotes/{{Singapore}} '''UsefulNotes/{{Singapore}}''' -- formerly Temasek.



* '''The Philippines''', curiously enough, is the exception to this rule, as it's retained its Spanish colonial name, although it was originally lumped with other islands into a group collectively called the Spanish East Indies. Most likely this is attributable to the majority of Filipinos' sheer ForeignCultureFetish for their colonisers, Spain and the United States, not to mention the fact that the country didn't exist as a political unit before Spanish occupation.

to:

* '''The Philippines''', curiously enough, is the exception to this the rule, as it's retained its Spanish colonial name, although it was originally lumped with other islands into a group collectively called the Spanish East Indies. Most likely this is attributable to the majority of Filipinos' sheer ForeignCultureFetish for their colonisers, Spain and the United States, not to mention the fact that the country didn't exist as a political unit before Spanish occupation.
6th Dec '16 7:51:59 AM AgentKyles
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!!!Uses in Fiction

to:

!!!Uses !!Uses in Fiction



!!!Appearances in Real Life

to:

!!!Appearances !!Appearances in Real Life



* After the independence, many major cities of Madagascar changed their names to Malagasy-sounding ones. There were several distinct reasons though:
** The city already had a Malagasy name but the French colonists translated it. Examples: ''Antananarivo'' (Tananarive), ''Mahajanga'' (Majunga) and ''Toliary'' (Tuléar)
** The city already had a Malagasy name but the French colonists created another one from scratch. Example: ''Toamasina'' (Tamatave)
** The city was founded by Europeans but gained a Malagasy name with time. Examples: ''Antseranana'' (Diego-Suarez), ''Tolanaro'' (Fort-Dauphin) and the small city of ''Mahavelona'' (Hopeful Point, then frenchified as Foulpointe)
** Aversions: the French administration never bothered to translate or change the names of the major cities of ''Fianarantsoa'' and ''Antsirabe'', and on the other side the main city on the island of Nosy Be is still ''Hell-Ville'' as of now despite a Malagasy name (Andoany) existing.
* In South Africa:
** There is an ongoing controversial movement to change Pretoria's name to Tshwane. Pretoria is presently the name of the primary city of the municipality of Tshwane. Some politicians insist on renaming the city, but in a country with 11 official languages (seriously), each with their own name for the city, what would they call it?

to:

* After the independence, many major cities of Madagascar changed their names to Malagasy-sounding ones. There were several distinct reasons though:
** The city already had a Malagasy name but the French colonists translated it. Examples: ''Antananarivo'' (Tananarive), ''Mahajanga'' (Majunga) and ''Toliary'' (Tuléar)
** The city already had a Malagasy name but the French colonists created another one from scratch. Example: ''Toamasina'' (Tamatave)
** The city was founded by Europeans but gained a Malagasy name with time. Examples: ''Antseranana'' (Diego-Suarez), ''Tolanaro'' (Fort-Dauphin) and the small city of ''Mahavelona'' (Hopeful Point, then frenchified as Foulpointe)
** Aversions: the French administration never bothered to translate or change the names of the major cities of ''Fianarantsoa'' and ''Antsirabe'', and
%%Anyone can expand on the other side the main city on the island of Nosy Be is still ''Hell-Ville'' as of now despite a Malagasy name (Andoany) existing.
zero-context examples

!!!Southern Africa
* In South Africa:
'''UsefulNotes/SouthAfrica''':
** There is an ongoing controversial movement to change Pretoria's name to Tshwane. Pretoria is presently the name of the primary city of the municipality of Tshwane. Some politicians insist on renaming the city, but in a country with 11 official languages (seriously), [[IHaveManyNames each with their own name for the city, city]], what would they call it?



* Several African and Asian cities/countries adopted more "local" sounding names after colonial powers left.
** Salisbury in Southern Rhodesia became Harare in Zimbabwe.
** Northern Rhodesia became Zambia, though the major city was already Lusaka.
** Belgian Congo became the Republic of the Congo after gaining independence, but the name was changed to Democratic Republic of the Congo in 1964, probably because its neighbouring country, the former French Congo also chose the name "Republic of the Congo". The country was then renamed to Zaire between 1965 and 1997 but reverted to "Democratic Republic of the Congo" in 1998.
** The Republic of the Congo itself was the [[PeoplesRepublicOfTyranny People's Republic of the Congo]] 1970-[[TheGreatPoliticsMessUp 1992]].
** Bechuanaland became Botswana. In ''The No.1 Ladies' Detective Agency'' TV adaptation [[spoiler: Grace references this when complaining the office does not have a computer]].
* Likewise:
** Dahomey => Benin. Confusingly, not the successor to the historical Benin Empire. It was named after the Bight of Benin, which it borders, which was in turn named after the empire. The name was chosen as a compromise between the Dahomey, Atakora, and Burgu ethnic groups which make up the nation.
** Gold Coast => Ghana. Also named after a historical kingdom which was actually somewhere else (its furthest southern reach was a few kilometers north of current Ghana's northern border; any attempt to connect to the historical entity via ethnicity is also spurious, since very few of historical Ghana's dominant Soninke people live in modern Ghana, which is dominated by the unrelated Ashanti, Fanti, Akan, Guan, and Ewe peoples.
** Ivory Coast => Côte d'Ivoire (It means the same thing but has become the preferred form in English)
** Upper Volta => Burkina Faso
** Ubangi-Shari => Central African Republic => Central African Empire => Central African Republic
** Abyssinia => Ethiopia
** Tanganyika and Zanzibar => Tanzania (although that one was a portmanteau of two former colonies that united into one independent country)
*** [[TheSimpsons ...=> New Zanzibar => Pepsi(TM) presents New Zanzibar]]
** South-West Africa => Namibia
* Colonies tend to get rid of their master's name on independence, although frankly that's about as much because the old names have become inaccurate as that the locals don't like them.
** British East Africa => Kenya
** Spanish Sahara => Western Sahara
** Spanish Guinea => Equatorial Guinea
** Portuguese Guinea => Guinea-Bissau
*** It's not always so cut-and-dry, though. British East Africa was renamed Kenya in 1920, decades before independence; that was, however, ''also'' confusion-related, as the British had just taken Tanganyika--immediately to the south--from the Germans, and "British East Africa" could now refer to that as well, so the Brits decided to take the opportunity to make the old East Africa protectorate a Crown Colony called Kenya. Also Equatorial Guinea bore its current name during the last few years of Spanish rule in the 1960s.

to:

* Several African and Asian cities/countries adopted more "local" sounding names after colonial powers left.
**
South-West Africa used to be German before World War One, then it was taken over by South Africa for about 70 years. Now it's called '''Namibia'''.
*
Salisbury in Southern Rhodesia became Harare in Zimbabwe.
** * Northern Rhodesia became Zambia, though the major city was already Lusaka.
** * Bechuanaland became '''Botswana'''. In ''The No.1 Ladies' Detective Agency'' TV adaptation [[spoiler: Grace references this when complaining the office does not have a computer]].

!!!Central Africa
*
Belgian Congo became the Republic of the Congo after gaining independence, but the name was changed to Democratic Republic of the Congo in 1964, probably because its neighbouring country, the former French Congo also chose the name "Republic of the Congo". The country was then renamed to Zaire between 1965 and 1997 but reverted to "Democratic Republic of the Congo" in 1998.
** The Republic of the Congo itself was the [[PeoplesRepublicOfTyranny People's Republic of the Congo]] 1970-[[TheGreatPoliticsMessUp 1992]].
** Bechuanaland became Botswana. In ''The No.1 Ladies' Detective Agency'' TV adaptation [[spoiler: Grace references this when complaining the office does not have a computer]].
1970-1992.
* Likewise:
**
Ubangi-Shari => Central African Republic => Central African Empire => Central African Republic

!!!Western Africa
*
Dahomey => Benin.'''Benin'''. Confusingly, not the successor to the historical Benin Empire. It was named after the Bight of Benin, which it borders, which was in turn named after the empire. The name was chosen as a compromise between the Dahomey, Atakora, and Burgu ethnic groups which make up the nation.
** * Gold Coast => Ghana.'''Ghana'''. Also named after a historical kingdom which was actually somewhere else (its furthest southern reach was a few kilometers north of current Ghana's northern border; any attempt to connect to the historical entity via ethnicity is also spurious, since very few of historical Ghana's dominant Soninke people live in modern Ghana, which is dominated by the unrelated Ashanti, Fanti, Akan, Guan, and Ewe peoples.
** * Ivory Coast => Côte d'Ivoire (It means the same thing but has become the preferred form in English)
** * Upper Volta => Burkina Faso
** Ubangi-Shari * Spanish Sahara => Central African Republic Western Sahara
* Spanish Guinea
=> Central African Empire Equatorial Guinea (though it bore its current name during the last few years of Spanish rule in the 1960s).
* Portuguese Guinea
=> Central African Republic
**
Guinea-Bissau

!!!Eastern Africa
*
Abyssinia => Ethiopia
** * Tanganyika and Zanzibar => Tanzania (although that one was a portmanteau of two former colonies that united into one independent country)
*** ** [[TheSimpsons ...=> New Zanzibar => Pepsi(TM) presents New Zanzibar]]
** South-West Africa => Namibia
* Colonies tend to get rid of their master's name on independence, although frankly that's about as much because the old names have become inaccurate as that the locals don't like them.
**
British East Africa => Kenya
** Spanish Sahara => Western Sahara
** Spanish Guinea => Equatorial Guinea
** Portuguese Guinea => Guinea-Bissau
*** It's not always so cut-and-dry, though. British East Africa was renamed Kenya in
got the name '''Kenya''' as far back as 1920, decades before independence; that was, however, ''also'' confusion-related, as the British had just taken Tanganyika--immediately to the south--from the Germans, and "British East Africa" could now refer to that as well, so the Brits decided to take the opportunity to make the old East Africa protectorate a Crown Colony called Kenya. Also Equatorial Guinea bore its current Kenya.
* After the independence, many major cities of '''Madagascar''' changed their names to Malagasy-sounding ones. There were several distinct reasons though:
** The city already had a Malagasy
name during but the last few years of Spanish rule in French colonists translated it. Examples: ''Antananarivo'' (Tananarive), ''Mahajanga'' (Majunga) and ''Toliary'' (Tuléar)
** The city already had a Malagasy name but
the 1960s.French colonists created another one from scratch. Example: ''Toamasina'' (Tamatave)
** The city was founded by Europeans but gained a Malagasy name with time. Examples: ''Antseranana'' (Diego-Suarez), ''Tolanaro'' (Fort-Dauphin) and the small city of ''Mahavelona'' (Hopeful Point, then frenchified as Foulpointe)
** Aversions: the French administration never bothered to translate or change the names of the major cities of ''Fianarantsoa'' and ''Antsirabe'', and on the other side the main city on the island of Nosy Be is still ''Hell-Ville'' as of now despite a Malagasy name (Andoany) existing.



!!!General
* After TheGreatPoliticsMessUp, many street names were changed. There used to be a Lenin street and a Stalin street in every village before, which usually got renamed to a national historical figure.
* Just about everywhere in western Poland (formerly eastern Germany, until the end of WWII), Kaliningrad Oblast (formerly northern East Prussia), and western Ukraine and Belarus (formerly eastern Poland) have had at least one nameswap in English.
** This is less a case of actual renaming and more a convention of which names are used in English. Preferred names in English tend to follow the language of the ruling power in the region (since they're all foreign to English speakers anyway), but in the languages themselves, the name may persist. For example, even though the Polish name for Warsaw is "Warszawa", English speakers call it Warsaw, German speakers call it Warschau et cetera. London is called "Londres" in French and Spanish.
** Actually in many cases it is what is easier to pronounce, for instance for a long time the West German city of Aachen was called Aix-la-Chapelle and Köln still is called Cologne in English, even though the only time these cities belonged to France was from 1796 to 1814, i. e. when Britain was at war with France (to complicate the issue further, said cities are known in Spanish as, respectively, Aquisgrán and Colonia; in both cases, these modern names derive from independent evolution of the original Latin names: "Aquis-granum" and "Colonia Claudia Ara Agrippinensium"; this happens in other languages as well: "Aquisgrana" in Italian, "Akwizgran" in Polish, etc.). München and Venezia, which never were part of France, are also called by their French names Munich and Venice (Venise) in English. And there is the Tuscan port of Livorno which for some reason is called "Leghorn" in English.
** The name "Leghorn" derives from occasional unconventional English pronunciation of "gh" as "f" (as in "laugh"). "Leghorn" was originally pronounced like "Leforn" in English, not too differently from the original.
* The Nazis [[AirstripOne renamed a few places in occupied parts of Eastern and Eastern Central Europe]], sometimes so they would sound German, sometimes as an {{Egopolis}}, e. g. Lodz became Litzmannstadt, named after a UsefulNotes/WorldWarOne general and early supporter of Hitler. Some insensitive (West) German officials long insisted that people from such places filled in these names in forms because that was their ''official'' name at the time of the birth etc. of the person concerned.
** Conversely, former-German-now-Polish (since 1945) towns and villages for the most part received names that were Polish forms or translations of the German ones (which had often existed earlier, partly due to the fact that many of these places had been Polish or Slavic before they became German).

!!!Russia



* In the Kaliningrad oblast, i. e. the part of East Prussia that became part of the Russian Federation (then the RSFSR) in 1945, all towns and villages were given entirely new Russian names, even if the original name of the place was of Baltic (Old Prussian or Lithuanian) or West Slavic (i.e. Polish and closely related languages) not German origin (e. g. Tilsit became Sovietsk), not just to match Soviet sensibilities, but also to please Russian patriotism, e. g. by naming them after Tsarist Generals like Kutuzov and Bagration (the latter however was Georgian, like Stalin) and to show the Lithuanians who was the boss. Today there is a Russian law to prevent the post-1945 names from being changed.

to:

* In the Kaliningrad oblast, i. e. the part of East Prussia that became part of the Russian Federation (then the RSFSR) in 1945, all towns and villages were given entirely new Russian names, even if the original name of the place was of Baltic (Old Prussian or Lithuanian) or West Slavic (i.e. Polish and closely related languages) not German origin (e. g. Tilsit became Sovietsk), not just to match Soviet sensibilities, but also to please Russian patriotism, e. g. by naming them after Tsarist Generals like Kutuzov and Bagration (the latter however was Georgian, like Stalin) and to show the Lithuanians who was the boss. Today there is a Russian law to [[DefiedTrope prevent the post-1945 names from being changed.changed]].




!!!Ukraine



* Just about everywhere in western Poland (formerly eastern Germany, until the end of WWII), Kaliningrad Oblast (formerly northern East Prussia), and western Ukraine and Belarus (formerly eastern Poland) have had at least one nameswap in English. This is less a case of actual renaming and more a convention of which names are used in English. Preferred names in English tend to follow the language of the ruling power in the region (since they're all foreign to English speakers anyway), but in the languages themselves, the name may persist. For example, even though the Polish name for Warsaw is "Warszawa", English speakers call it Warsaw, German speakers call it Warschau et cetera. London is called "Londres" in French and Spanish.
** Actually in many cases it is what is easier to pronounce, for instance for a long time the West German city of Aachen was called Aix-la-Chapelle and Köln still is called Cologne in English, even though the only time these cities belonged to France was from 1796 to 1814, i. e. when Britain was at war with France (to complicate the issue further, said cities are known in Spanish as, respectively, Aquisgrán and Colonia; in both cases, these modern names derive from independent evolution of the original Latin names: "Aquis-granum" and "Colonia Claudia Ara Agrippinensium"; this happens in other languages as well: "Aquisgrana" in Italian, "Akwizgran" in Polish, etc.). München and Venezia, which never were part of France, are also called by their French names Munich and Venice (Venise) in English. And there is the Tuscan port of Livorno which for some reason is called "Leghorn" in English.
** The name "Leghorn" derives from occasional unconventional English pronunciation of "gh" as "f" (as in "laugh"). "Leghorn" was originally pronounced like "Leforn" in English, not too differently from the original.
** Breslau -> Wroclaw
** Danzig -> Gdańsk (this name change has notoriously caused flame wars on TheOtherWiki - [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Talk:Gdansk the talk page contains eleven archives and still had the argument going on,]] but usage was finally settled by vote, varying by who controlled the city in several historical periods, and using one or the other name first but including the other for biographies.)
** Stettin -> Szczecin
** In the fifties Katowice was renamed Stalinogrod after Stalin... Which spawned numerous jokes since "Kat" is Polish for an executioner/torturer/murderer. This may have been why the name change didn't stick - whether the Communist official who proposed the name change [[GettingCrapPastTheRadar did so in order to facilitate these jokes]] is unknown. [[note]]There's an anecdote Częstochowa was first nominated for the name change, but it's the HolyCity in Poland, and somebody came to a conclusion "Our Lady of Stalin's City" sounds just too stupid.[[/note]] To add to the confusion, in Imperial Germany times, it was also known as Kattowitz.
*** And on the subject of Imperial Germany, several cities in former Eastern Germany reverted to their Polish names (or got new ones) in 1918 when Poland regained its independence.
** Oświęcim held that name for most of the history, being in the middle bit of Poland which Stalin and [[ThoseWackyNazis his predecessors]] only ethnically cleansed a little. Its name in German is far more infamous - Auschwitz.
* The capital of Montenegro, Podgorica, was known as Titograd in the days of Communism.
** Many, many other examples. Due to his cult-like status, everything had "Tito's" (Titovo) as an adjective in Montenegro and Serbia. Titovo Uzice? Uzice. Titograd is just a shorter version of "Tito's city". Now, almost all of the names are Tito-free.

to:


!!!Poland
* Just about everywhere in western Poland (formerly eastern Germany, until the end of WWII), Kaliningrad Oblast (formerly northern East Prussia), and western Ukraine and Belarus (formerly eastern Poland) have had at least one nameswap in English. This is less a case of actual renaming and more a convention of which names are used in English. Preferred names in English tend to follow the language of the ruling power in the region (since they're all foreign to English speakers anyway), but in the languages themselves, the name may persist. For example, even though the Polish name for Warsaw is "Warszawa", English speakers call it Warsaw, German speakers call it Warschau et cetera. London is called "Londres" in French and Spanish.
** Actually in many cases it is what is easier to pronounce, for instance for a long time the West German city of Aachen was called Aix-la-Chapelle and Köln still is called Cologne in English, even though the only time these cities belonged to France was from 1796 to 1814, i. e. when Britain was at war with France (to complicate the issue further, said cities are known in Spanish as, respectively, Aquisgrán and Colonia; in both cases, these modern names derive from independent evolution of the original Latin names: "Aquis-granum" and "Colonia Claudia Ara Agrippinensium"; this happens in other languages as well: "Aquisgrana" in Italian, "Akwizgran" in Polish, etc.). München and Venezia, which never were part of France, are also called by their French names Munich and Venice (Venise) in English. And there is the Tuscan port of Livorno which for some reason is called "Leghorn" in English.
** The name "Leghorn" derives from occasional unconventional English pronunciation of "gh" as "f" (as in "laugh"). "Leghorn" was originally pronounced like "Leforn" in English, not too differently from the original.
**
Breslau -> Wroclaw
** * Danzig -> Gdańsk (this Gdańsk. This name change has notoriously caused flame wars on TheOtherWiki - [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Talk:Gdansk the talk page contains eleven archives and still had the argument going on,]] but usage was finally settled by vote, varying by who controlled the city in several historical periods, and using one or the other name first but including the other for biographies.)
**
biographies.
*
Stettin -> Szczecin
** * In the fifties Katowice was renamed Stalinogrod after Stalin... Which spawned numerous jokes since "Kat" is Polish for an executioner/torturer/murderer. This may have been why the name change didn't stick - whether the Communist official who proposed the name change [[GettingCrapPastTheRadar did so in order to facilitate these jokes]] is unknown. [[note]]There's an anecdote Częstochowa was first nominated for the name change, but it's the HolyCity in Poland, and somebody came to a conclusion "Our Lady of Stalin's City" sounds just too stupid.[[/note]] To add to the confusion, in Imperial Germany times, it was also known as Kattowitz.
*** ** And on the subject of Imperial Germany, several cities in former Eastern Germany reverted to their Polish names (or got new ones) in 1918 when Poland regained its independence.
** * Oświęcim held that name for most of the history, being in the middle bit of Poland which Stalin and [[ThoseWackyNazis his predecessors]] only ethnically cleansed a little. Its name in German is far more infamous - Auschwitz.
* The capital of Montenegro, Podgorica, was known as Titograd in the days of Communism.
** Many, many other examples. Due to his cult-like status, everything had "Tito's" (Titovo) as an adjective in Montenegro and Serbia. Titovo Uzice? Uzice. Titograd is just a shorter version of "Tito's city". Now, almost all of the names are Tito-free.
Auschwitz.

!!!Czechoslovakia / Czech Republic



* The Nazis [[AirstripOne renamed a few places in occupied parts of Eastern and Eastern Central Europe]], sometimes so they would sound German, sometimes as an {{Egopolis}}, e. g. Lodz became Litzmannstadt, named after a UsefulNotes/WorldWarOne general and early supporter of Hitler. Some insensitive (West) German officials long insisted that people from such places filled in these names in forms because that was their ''official'' name at the time of the birth etc. of the person concerned.
* An older example from Finland: The city of Vaasa burned down in 1852. Emperor [[JerkAss Nicholas I]] [[JerkWithAHeartOfGold donated a large sum of money for its rebuilding]], and after his death, Vaasa was renamed to Nikolainkaupunki ("Nicholas's City") in his honour (a first attempt was made ''before'' his death, but he disapproved). Later during the reign of Nicholas II (whom everybody hated) the new name lost popularity, and it was changed back after he abdicated in 1917.
* After TheGreatPoliticsMessUp, many street names were changed. There used to be a Lenin street and a Stalin street in every village before, which usually got renamed to a national historical figure.

to:

* The Nazis [[AirstripOne renamed a few places in occupied parts of
!!!Other
Eastern and Eastern Central Europe]], sometimes so they would sound German, sometimes European countries
* The capital of Montenegro, Podgorica, was known as Titograd in the days of Communism.
** Many, many other examples. Due to his cult-like status, everything had "Tito's" (Titovo)
as an {{Egopolis}}, e. g. Lodz became Litzmannstadt, named after a UsefulNotes/WorldWarOne general adjective in Montenegro and early supporter Serbia. Titovo Uzice? Uzice. Titograd is just a shorter version of Hitler. Some insensitive (West) German officials long insisted that people from such places filled in these names in forms because that was their ''official'' name at the time "Tito's city". Now, almost all of the birth etc. of the person concerned.
* An older example from Finland: The city of Vaasa burned down in 1852. Emperor [[JerkAss Nicholas I]] [[JerkWithAHeartOfGold donated a large sum of money for its rebuilding]], and after his death, Vaasa was renamed to Nikolainkaupunki ("Nicholas's City") in his honour (a first attempt was made ''before'' his death, but he disapproved). Later during the reign of Nicholas II (whom everybody hated) the new name lost popularity, and it was changed back after he abdicated in 1917.
* After TheGreatPoliticsMessUp, many street
names were changed. There used to be a Lenin street and a Stalin street in every village before, which usually got renamed to a national historical figure.are Tito-free.



* An older example from Finland: The city of Vaasa burned down in 1852. Emperor Nicholas I [[JerkWithAHeartOfGold donated a large sum of money for its rebuilding]], and after his death, Vaasa was renamed to Nikolainkaupunki ("Nicholas's City") in his honour (a first attempt was made ''before'' his death, but he disapproved). Later during the reign of Nicholas II (whom everybody hated) the new name lost popularity, and it was changed back after he abdicated in 1917.



* Norway have got a few examples. Bergen used to be Bjørgvin, Trondheim was Nidaros (Name history: Nidaros, Trondhjem, Nidaros, Trondheim, Drontheim, Trondheim) and Oslo was Christiania from 1624 to 1877 and Kristiania from 1877 to 1924. Funnily enough, the church provinces around the two first still carries the same name and there is a discussion in Oslo about renaming the center back to Kristiania.
** The case of Trondheim is of particular interest in this case, as the name "Trondheim" came out as a compromise. At this point (1930), there was a boost of renaming in Norway, getting the country rid of Danish names. The most logical choice was to rename Trondheim with the original name: Nidaros. But the citizens protested against it, preferring to have the name "Trondhjem" ("Hjem" is more "danish" than "heim"). The city went by "Nidaros" for a year, but when the locals resorted to TorchesAndPitchforks, the ruling body quickly succumbed and renamed the city "Trondheim" - which actually made sense, because the area had gone by that name even before any town was founded there.

to:


!!!United Kingdom
* Norway In England most cities that weren't created during the Industrial Revolution have got a few examples. Bergen used to be Bjørgvin, Trondheim was Nidaros (Name history: Nidaros, Trondhjem, Nidaros, Trondheim, Drontheim, Trondheim) and Oslo was Christiania string of names from 1624 to 1877 successive waves of invaders. York was originally the Roman city of Eboracum, but when the Anglo-Saxons created the Kingdom of Northumbria they called it Eoforwic. Then the Vikings invaded and Kristiania from 1877 to 1924. Funnily enough, the church provinces Eoforwic got Scandinavianised into Jórvik, and finally mutated into York around the two first still carries 13th century.
* In Wales, all places are given names in both English and Welsh. Since Wales has been invaded about as often as England, usually by
the same people, names in both languages are often a weird mishmash of translations, transliterations, and renamings, and which is more accurate or original can be hard to tell. For example, Cardiff (the capital) appears to be an obvious corrupted transliteration of Caerdydd, meaning Castle of the Day. However, Caerdydd is itself a corruption (probably driven by people who thought Castle of the Day was a cool name) of the earlier Caerdyf (itself derived from an earlier Celtic name meaning "Castle on the Taff", but not technically meaning anything in Welsh), which would actually be closer to the modern English pronunciation.
** Other places have entirely disconnected names. Swansea was originally established as a Viking trading post,
and there is a discussion in Oslo most likely named after the Norse king Sweyn Forkbeard (other etymologies are argued, but all come from Old Norse). The Welsh name, Abertawe, simply means "Mouth of the River Tawe". Both names have been used concurrently for about renaming as long as the center back city has existed.
* Similarly
to Kristiania.
** The case
Ireland, many place names in Scotland are Anglifications of Trondheim Gaelic names such as Inbhir Nis (Inverness, "Mouth of the Ness") Obar Dheathain (Aberdeen, "Mouth of Two Rivers") and Dùn Dèagh (Dundee, "Fort of the Tay"). Edinburgh, contrary to popular belief, is not originally a Germanic or Gaelic toponym - being firstly the Brythonic "Din Eidyn" (Fort of Eidyn), which was transliterated as the Gaelic "Dùn Èideann" and only later became known by the Anglo-Saxon name "Edinburgh".
* This also applies to streets. One
particular interest example from Havering, a borough of London - a street had its name changed after the councillor it was named after was convicted for paedophilia.
** Penny Lane
in this case, as Liverpool was named after a 18th-century slave trader of that name, not the coin. The fact that the area was sung about by Music/TheBeatles is likely the only thing causing the name "Trondheim" came out as to be kept.
** [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gropecunt_Lane This is
a compromise. At this point (1930), there pretty decisive one.]]
** There is only one Anita Street in Britain. It's in Manchester. When it
was a boost of renaming first built in Norway, getting the country rid of Danish names. The most logical choice 19th century, it was to rename Trondheim the first street in the city where every house was equipped with an indoor flush toilet. The residents didn't like the advertising inherent in the original name: Nidaros. But name, and petitioned for it to be changed from Sanitary Street.
** Streets at
the citizens protested against it, preferring to have western end of Strand in London were named by the 18th-century landowner who built them so as to spell out his full name "Trondhjem" ("Hjem" is more "danish" than "heim"). The city went by "Nidaros" for a year, but when the locals resorted to TorchesAndPitchforks, the ruling body quickly succumbed and title: George Villiers Duke of Buckingham (George Street now lies underneath Charing Cross Station). Westminster City Council, having no sense of whimsy, renamed Of Alley to York Place sometime in the city "Trondheim" - which actually made sense, because the area had gone by that name even before any town was founded there. 1960s.

!!!Ireland



** Around the time of the formation of the Irish Free State, Kingstown and Queenstown were renamed Dún Laoghaire and Cobh. King's County and Queen's County were renamed County Offaly and County Laoghis (pronounced "leash" and later shortened to "County Laois").

to:

** * Around the time of the formation of the Irish Free State, Kingstown and Queenstown were renamed Dún Laoghaire and Cobh. King's County and Queen's County were renamed County Offaly and County Laoghis (pronounced "leash" and later shortened to "County Laois").



** Similarly, Philipstown became Daingean, Maryborough to Portlaoise.
*** Other placenames only partially caught on , meaning that either name is used -- Bagenalstown/Muine Bheag, Charleville/Ráth Luirc. And no-one beyond cartographers and government offices call Newbridge "Droichead Nua."
** This can lead to some somewhat strange circumstances where the English name is an anglicisation of an Irish one--but the Irish name is something completely different (e.g. the aforementioned Dublin--its Irish name is Baile Átha Cliath, meaning "Town of the Hurdled Ford" on account of an old fording place on the Liffey near what is now Father Matthew Bridge).
** Ireland is one of the few countries in Europe to have captions on the license plates. This was done because when the current numbering system was introduced, it included a one or two-letter county code, and people complained because these were abbreviations of the ''English'' county names. The solution? Keep them in the number itself, with the Gaelic county name spelled out in full across the top of the plate.
* [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fucking%2C_Austria This town]] had been contemplating a name change, at least in part because Anglophone tourists keep stealing the town sign. The residents refused a name change though, and so they decided to just have theft-resistant town signs.
** They also make a [[http://www.rnw.nl/english/article/german-beer-can-call-itself-fking-hell light beer]].
* Chemnitz, Germany was called Karl-Marx-Stadt from 1952 to 1990. No prizes for guessing [[EastGermany what part of Germany it's in]].
** Similar, Stalinstadt, founded in 1950, renamed in 1961 to Eisenhüttenstadt (City of the Ironworks).
* This also applies to streets. One particular example from Havering, a borough of London - a street had its name changed after the councillor it was named after was convicted for paedophilia.
** Penny Lane in Liverpool was named after a 18th-century slave trader of that name, not the coin. The fact that the area was sung about by Music/TheBeatles is likely the only thing causing the name to be kept.
** [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gropecunt_Lane This is a pretty decisive one.]]
** There is only one Anita Street in Britain. It's in Manchester. When it was first built in the 19th century, it was the first street in the city where every house was equipped with an indoor flush toilet. The residents didn't like the advertising inherent in the original name, and petitioned for it to be changed from Sanitary Street.
** Streets at the western end of Strand in London were named by the 18th-century landowner who built them so as to spell out his full name and title: George Villiers Duke of Buckingham (George Street now lies underneath Charing Cross Station). Westminster City Council, having no sense of whimsy, renamed Of Alley to York Place sometime in the 1960s.
* Wolfsburg, Germany was [[ThoseWackyNazis originally officially]] named ''Stadt des [=KdF=]-Wagens'' ("City of the Strength-through-Joy Car"); most non-officials of the era just called it ''die Autostadt'', which became the name of a large auto museum downtown. Also, in 2003 it was temporarily renamed "Golfsburg" (after the car not the game, just in case you hadn't guessed...)
** However, that "Golfsburg" thing wasn't an official name-change, just a marketing stunt.

to:

** * Similarly, Philipstown became Daingean, Maryborough to Portlaoise.
*** ** Other placenames only partially caught on , on, meaning that either name is used -- Bagenalstown/Muine Bheag, Charleville/Ráth Luirc. And no-one beyond cartographers and government offices call Newbridge "Droichead Nua."
** * This can lead to some somewhat strange circumstances where the English name is an anglicisation of an Irish one--but the Irish name is something completely different (e.g. the aforementioned Dublin--its Irish name is Baile Átha Cliath, meaning "Town of the Hurdled Ford" on account of an old fording place on the Liffey near what is now Father Matthew Bridge).
** * Ireland is one of the few countries in Europe to have captions on the license plates. This was done because when the current numbering system was introduced, it included a one or two-letter county code, and people complained because these were abbreviations of the ''English'' county names. The solution? Keep them in the number itself, with the Gaelic county name spelled out in full across the top of the plate.
* [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fucking%2C_Austria This town]] had been contemplating a name change, at least in part because Anglophone tourists keep stealing the town sign. The residents refused a name change though, and so they decided to just have theft-resistant town signs.
** They also make a [[http://www.rnw.nl/english/article/german-beer-can-call-itself-fking-hell light beer]].
* Chemnitz, Germany was called Karl-Marx-Stadt from 1952 to 1990. No prizes for guessing [[EastGermany what part of Germany it's in]].
** Similar, Stalinstadt, founded in 1950, renamed in 1961 to Eisenhüttenstadt (City of the Ironworks).
* This also applies to streets. One particular example from Havering, a borough of London - a street had its name changed after the councillor it was named after was convicted for paedophilia.
** Penny Lane in Liverpool was named after a 18th-century slave trader of that name, not the coin. The fact that the area was sung about by Music/TheBeatles is likely the only thing causing the name to be kept.
** [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gropecunt_Lane This is a pretty decisive one.]]
** There is only one Anita Street in Britain. It's in Manchester. When it was first built in the 19th century, it was the first street in the city where every house was equipped with an indoor flush toilet. The residents didn't like the advertising inherent in the original name, and petitioned for it to be changed from Sanitary Street.
** Streets at the western end of Strand in London were named by the 18th-century landowner who built them so as to spell out his full name and title: George Villiers Duke of Buckingham (George Street now lies underneath Charing Cross Station). Westminster City Council, having no sense of whimsy, renamed Of Alley to York Place sometime in the 1960s.
* Wolfsburg, Germany was [[ThoseWackyNazis originally officially]] named ''Stadt des [=KdF=]-Wagens'' ("City of the Strength-through-Joy Car"); most non-officials of the era just called it ''die Autostadt'', which became the name of a large auto museum downtown. Also, in 2003 it was temporarily renamed "Golfsburg" (after the car not the game, just in case you hadn't guessed...)
** However, that "Golfsburg" thing wasn't an official name-change, just a marketing stunt.
plate.



* Benevento, Italy was long ago called (roughly) "Maloenton" by the Oscan-speaking Samnites who inhabited it, meaning probably 'fruit market' in Oscan. To the Romans who conquered them, however, it sounded an awful lot like "Maleventum", a place of "bad events". So they changed it to something with a more positive meaning by switching out "male" (bad) with "bene" (well).
** According to the legend, the name was changed after a battle between the Romans and Pyrrhus (of PyrrhicVictory fame), which they had won, hence the transition from "place of ill omens" to "good omens".

to:


!!!Germany
* Benevento, Italy Wolfsburg, Germany was long ago [[ThoseWackyNazis originally officially]] named ''Stadt des [=KdF=]-Wagens'' ("City of the Strength-through-Joy Car"); most non-officials of the era just called (roughly) "Maloenton" by the Oscan-speaking Samnites who inhabited it, meaning probably 'fruit market' in Oscan. To the Romans who conquered them, however, it sounded an awful lot like "Maleventum", a place of "bad events". So they changed it to something with a more positive meaning by switching out "male" (bad) with "bene" (well).
** According to the legend,
''die Autostadt'', which became the name of a large auto museum downtown. Also, in 2003 it was changed temporarily renamed "Golfsburg" (after the car not the game, just in case you hadn't guessed...)
** However, that "Golfsburg" thing wasn't an official name-change, just a marketing stunt.
* In a similar move to revolutionary France, the German Democratic Republic, which until 1952 consisted of five ''Länder'' (Mecklenburg, Brandenburg, Sachsen, Sachsen-Anhalt and Thuringia), was redivided into 14 districts (''Bezirke'') named
after a battle the seat of its administration (from Rostock in the north to Suhl in the south). In this reorganisation it was made sure that the borders between two districts never coincided with an old border between two ''Länder''.
** Chemnitz, Germany was called Karl-Marx-Stadt from 1952 to 1990. No prizes for guessing [[EastGermany what part of Germany it's in]].
** Similar, Stalinstadt, founded in 1950, renamed in 1961 to Eisenhüttenstadt (City of
the Romans Ironworks).

!!!Austria
* [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fucking%2C_Austria This town]] had been contemplating a name change, at least in part because Anglophone tourists keep stealing the town sign. The residents refused a name change though,
and Pyrrhus (of PyrrhicVictory fame), so they decided to just have theft-resistant town signs.
** They also make a [[http://www.rnw.nl/english/article/german-beer-can-call-itself-fking-hell light beer]].
* The country itself was renamed "Ostmark" after the ''Anschluss'' [[AirstripOne to erase its national identity]]. It did not last long, as you have already guessed.

!!!France
* Up until UsefulNotes/TheFrenchRevolution France consisted of a number of historic provinces (such as Brittany, the Champagne, Lorraine, the Touraine etc.)
which they had won, hence their own laws, traditions, regional identities etc. The Revolution abolished this diversity in favour of national laws, systems of weights and measures etc. and in general tried to promote a sense of national identity over the transition old provincial ones. As part of this effort the old provinces were broken up into smaller administrative districts, the ''départements'', whose names were taken from "place geographical features rather than the historic names of ill omens" to "good omens".the regions, e. g. Seine, Vosges, Bas-Rhin, Vendée, Morbihan, and Marne.



* Similarly to Ireland, many place names in Scotland are Anglifications of Gaelic names such as Inbhir Nis (Inverness, "Mouth of the Ness") Obar Dheathain (Aberdeen, "Mouth of Two Rivers") and Dùn Dèagh (Dundee, "Fort of the Tay"). Edinburgh, contrary to popular belief, is not originally a Germanic or Gaelic toponym - being firstly the Brythonic "Din Eidyn" (Fort of Eidyn), which was transliterated as the Gaelic "Dùn Èideann" and only later became known by the Anglo-Saxon name "Edinburgh".
* In England most cities that weren't created during the Industrial Revolution have a string of names from successive waves of invaders. York was originally the Roman city of Eboracum, but when the Anglo-Saxons created the Kingdom of Northumbria they called it Eoforwic. Then the Vikings invaded and Eoforwic got Scandinavianised into Jórvik, and finally mutated into York around the 13th century.
* In Wales, all places are given names in both English and Welsh. Since Wales has been invaded about as often as England, usually by the same people, names in both languages are often a weird mishmash of translations, transliterations, and renamings, and which is more accurate or original can be hard to tell. For example, Cardiff (the capital) appears to be an obvious corrupted transliteration of Caerdydd, meaning Castle of the Day. However, Caerdydd is itself a corruption (probably driven by people who thought Castle of the Day was a cool name) of the earlier Caerdyf (itself derived from an earlier Celtic name meaning "Castle on the Taff", but not technically meaning anything in Welsh), which would actually be closer to the modern English pronunciation.
** Other places have entirely disconnected names. Swansea was originally established as a Viking trading post, and is most likely named after the Norse king Sweyn Forkbeard (other etymologies are argued, but all come from Old Norse). The Welsh name, Abertawe, simply means "Mouth of the River Tawe". Both names have been used concurrently for about as long as the city has existed.
* Up until UsefulNotes/TheFrenchRevolution France consisted of a number of historic provinces (such as Brittany, the Champagne, Lorraine, the Touraine etc.) which had their own laws, traditions, regional identities etc. The Revolution abolished this diversity in favour of national laws, systems of weights and measures etc. and in general tried to promote a sense of national identity over the old provincial ones. As part of this effort the old provinces were broken up into smaller administrative districts, the ''départements'', whose names were taken from geographical features rather than the historic names of the regions, e. g. Seine, Vosges, Bas-Rhin, Vendée, Morbihan, and Marne.
** In a similar move, the German Democratic Republic, which until 1952 consisted of five ''Länder'' (Mecklenburg, Brandenburg, Sachsen, Sachsen-Anhalt and Thuringia), was redivided into 14 districts (''Bezirke'') named after the seat of its administration (from Rostock in the north to Suhl in the south). In this reorganisation it was made sure that the borders between two districts never coincided with an old border between two ''Länder''.

to:


!!!Italy
* Similarly to Ireland, many Benevento, Italy was long ago called (roughly) "Maloenton" by the Oscan-speaking Samnites who inhabited it, meaning probably 'fruit market' in Oscan. To the Romans who conquered them, however, it sounded an awful lot like "Maleventum", a place names in Scotland are Anglifications of Gaelic names such as Inbhir Nis (Inverness, "Mouth of "bad events". So they changed it to something with a more positive meaning by switching out "male" (bad) with "bene" (well).
** According to
the Ness") Obar Dheathain (Aberdeen, "Mouth of Two Rivers") legend, the name was changed after a battle between the Romans and Dùn Dèagh (Dundee, "Fort of the Tay"). Edinburgh, contrary to popular belief, is not originally a Germanic or Gaelic toponym - being firstly the Brythonic "Din Eidyn" (Fort of Eidyn), Pyrrhus (of PyrrhicVictory fame), which they had won, hence the transition from "place of ill omens" to "good omens".

!!!Norway
* Norway have got a few examples. Bergen used to be Bjørgvin, Trondheim
was transliterated Nidaros (Name history: Nidaros, Trondhjem, Nidaros, Trondheim, Drontheim, Trondheim) and Oslo was Christiania from 1624 to 1877 and Kristiania from 1877 to 1924. Funnily enough, the church provinces around the two first still carries the same name and there is a discussion in Oslo about renaming the center back to Kristiania.
** The case of Trondheim is of particular interest in this case,
as the Gaelic "Dùn Èideann" and only later became known by the Anglo-Saxon name "Edinburgh".
* In England
"Trondheim" came out as a compromise. At this point (1930), there was a boost of renaming in Norway, getting the country rid of Danish names. The most cities that weren't created during logical choice was to rename Trondheim with the Industrial Revolution original name: Nidaros. But the citizens protested against it, preferring to have a string of names from successive waves of invaders. York was originally the Roman name "Trondhjem" ("Hjem" is more "danish" than "heim"). The city of Eboracum, went by "Nidaros" for a year, but when the Anglo-Saxons created locals resorted to TorchesAndPitchforks, the Kingdom of Northumbria they called it Eoforwic. Then ruling body quickly succumbed and renamed the Vikings invaded and Eoforwic got Scandinavianised into Jórvik, and finally mutated into York around the 13th century.
* In Wales, all places are given names in both English and Welsh. Since Wales has been invaded about as often as England, usually by the same people, names in both languages are often a weird mishmash of translations, transliterations, and renamings, and
city "Trondheim" - which is more accurate or original can be hard to tell. For example, Cardiff (the capital) appears to be an obvious corrupted transliteration of Caerdydd, meaning Castle of the Day. However, Caerdydd is itself a corruption (probably driven by people who thought Castle of the Day was a cool name) of the earlier Caerdyf (itself derived from an earlier Celtic name meaning "Castle on the Taff", but not technically meaning anything in Welsh), which would actually be closer to the modern English pronunciation.
** Other places have entirely disconnected names. Swansea was originally established as a Viking trading post, and is most likely named after the Norse king Sweyn Forkbeard (other etymologies are argued, but all come from Old Norse). The Welsh name, Abertawe, simply means "Mouth of the River Tawe". Both names have been used concurrently for about as long as the city has existed.
* Up until UsefulNotes/TheFrenchRevolution France consisted of a number of historic provinces (such as Brittany, the Champagne, Lorraine, the Touraine etc.) which had their own laws, traditions, regional identities etc. The Revolution abolished this diversity in favour of national laws, systems of weights and measures etc. and in general tried to promote a sense of national identity over the old provincial ones. As part of this effort the old provinces were broken up into smaller administrative districts, the ''départements'', whose names were taken from geographical features rather than the historic names of the regions, e. g. Seine, Vosges, Bas-Rhin, Vendée, Morbihan, and Marne.
** In a similar move, the German Democratic Republic, which until 1952 consisted of five ''Länder'' (Mecklenburg, Brandenburg, Sachsen, Sachsen-Anhalt and Thuringia), was redivided into 14 districts (''Bezirke'') named after the seat of its administration (from Rostock in the north to Suhl in the south). In this reorganisation it was
made sure sense, because the area had gone by that the borders between two districts never coincided with an old border between two ''Länder''.name even before any town was founded there.



* Persia => Iran (in this case reflecting local usage)

to:

* '''Iraq''': Revolution City, a suburb of Baghdad constructed in 1959, was later renamed Saddam City after the Baathist revolution, and since the 2003 overthrow of Saddam has become known as Sadr City (after well-respected Shia jurist/cleric/activist [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mohammad_Mohammad_Sadeq_al-Sadr Mohammed al-Sadr]], not his hothead son [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Muqtada_al-Sadr Muqtada]]).
* '''UsefulNotes/SaudiArabia''' is named after the ruling Saud dynasty; should they lose power, the country would probably be renamed (most likely to "[[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hejaz Hejaz]] and [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Najd Najd]]," the traditional names of the lands that make up most of its territory). TheOtherWiki, for example, describes the country as [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/History_of_Saudi_Arabia#Second_Saudi_State_.281824-1891.29 "Rashidi Arabia"]] during the 1890's when the Al Rashid dynasty was in power.
* Persia => Iran UsefulNotes/{{Iran}} (in this case reflecting local usage)



* Revolution City, a suburb of Baghdad constructed in 1959, was later renamed Saddam City after the Baathist revolution, and since the 2003 overthrow of Saddam has become known as Sadr City (after well-respected Shia jurist/cleric/activist [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mohammad_Mohammad_Sadeq_al-Sadr Mohammed al-Sadr]], not his hothead son [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Muqtada_al-Sadr Muqtada]]).
* UsefulNotes/SaudiArabia is named after the ruling Saud dynasty; should they lose power, the country would probably be renamed (most likely to "[[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hejaz Hejaz]] and [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Najd Najd]]," the traditional names of the lands that make up most of its territory). TheOtherWiki, for example, describes the country as [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/History_of_Saudi_Arabia#Second_Saudi_State_.281824-1891.29 "Rashidi Arabia"]] during the 1890's when the Al Rashid dynasty was in power.
* Tehran used to have streets with names like "[[UsefulNotes/DwightDEisenhower Eisenhower Boulevard]]" and "[[UsefulNotes/JohnFKennedy Kennedy Avenue]]," as did many other cities in UsefulNotes/{{Iran}}. Nowadays...[[TheRevolutionWillNotBeCivilized Not]] [[UsefulNotes/IranIraqWar so much]]...
** In 1981, Iran also renamed a street after Northern Irish hunger striker Bobby Sands. The street itself? Just happened to be the one where the British Embassy was located. This would have forced the Embassy to put the name of its country's most famous dead dissident ''in its mailing address'' had the embassy not [[CutTheKnot responded by moving the building's entrance to another street]], thus using that street in its address instead.

to:

* Revolution City, a suburb of Baghdad constructed in 1959, was later renamed Saddam City after the Baathist revolution, and since the 2003 overthrow of Saddam has become known as Sadr City (after well-respected Shia jurist/cleric/activist [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mohammad_Mohammad_Sadeq_al-Sadr Mohammed al-Sadr]], not his hothead son [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Muqtada_al-Sadr Muqtada]]).
* UsefulNotes/SaudiArabia is named after the ruling Saud dynasty; should they lose power, the country would probably be renamed (most likely to "[[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hejaz Hejaz]] and [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Najd Najd]]," the traditional names of the lands that make up most of its territory). TheOtherWiki, for example, describes the country as [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/History_of_Saudi_Arabia#Second_Saudi_State_.281824-1891.29 "Rashidi Arabia"]] during the 1890's when the Al Rashid dynasty was in power.
*
** Tehran used to have streets with names like "[[UsefulNotes/DwightDEisenhower Eisenhower Boulevard]]" and "[[UsefulNotes/JohnFKennedy Kennedy Avenue]]," as did many other cities in UsefulNotes/{{Iran}}.Iranian cities. Nowadays...[[TheRevolutionWillNotBeCivilized Not]] [[UsefulNotes/IranIraqWar so much]]...
** In 1981, Iran also renamed a street after Northern Irish hunger striker Bobby Sands. The street itself? Just happened to be the one where the British Embassy was located. This would have forced the Embassy to put the name of its country's most famous dead dissident ''in its mailing address'' had the embassy not [[CutTheKnot [[TakeAThirdOption responded by moving the building's entrance to another street]], thus using that street in its address instead.




to:

* '''Cambodia''' was (briefly) renamed to ''Democartic'' Kampuchea during the reign of Khmer Rouge. This didn't last long.
6th Dec '16 7:00:52 AM AgentKyles
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to:

* In general, colonies tend to get rid of their master's name on independence (for reasons that have as much to do with accuracy as with pride).



!!!Middle East
* An ongoing example is what to call the land that was (indisputably) called '''Palestine''' from 135 CE up until 1948 (leaving aside that for a lot of that time "Palestine" also included territories east of the Jordan river and -- briefly -- on the Sinai peninsula). Most Palestinians (and indeed most Arabs and even most Muslims, if they're politically inclined) will refer to the whole thing (including what's now Israel and in some cases Jordan) as Palestine; certain Israelis will refer to the whole thing (including the areas under dispute--and sometimes even Jordan) as "the Land of Israel" (''Eretz Yisrael'' in Hebrew), and no matter what you call it, it has political overtones. The region currently governed by Israel[[note]]Although the international community universally regards the area as occupied, the situation is more complicated in Israel; many ultranationalist and religious groups regard it as an integral part of Israel, and prefer the term "disputed territories" when they are forced to recognize that there are a few million Arabs living there who would rather not be ruled by Israel. As a result, even what to call the ''status'' of this area--uncontroversial everywhere else--is a politically sensitive topic in Israel. Of course as they say, "[[JewsLoveToArgue two Israelis, three opinions]]."[[/note]] which borders the Dead Sea is known as the "West Bank"[[note]]It's the western side of the River Jordan, for the confused; the Hashemite Kingdom of Jordan is the "East Bank", as it were.[[/note]] by the Palestinian authorities and the international press, while in Israel it is known as "Judea and Samaria"--unless you want to strike a moderate, conciliatory tone towards the Palestinians, in which case it's "the Territories" or the "West Bank" again.
** To add to the confusion, up until 1948 Jews living in Palestine were called Palestinians (for instance up until then the "Jerusalem Post" was called the "Palestine Post") while Arabs living in Palestine were called (Palestinian) Arabs.
** This argument goes way back. When the Roman Empire crushed the Jewish uprising under Bar Kochba (in 135 CE), they merged the province Judea into a larger one which they called "Palaestina", after the name used for the (long since gone) Philistine realm. [[note]]And even before that Judea was known as Canaan...[[/note]]
** Local names for settlements and terrain features have also radically changed in the past 100 years. Many places that had up to that point had Arabic names have been renamed with Hebrew names - mostly after Biblical locales described as being in the same general areas 2000+ years ago.
** Jerusalem was said to have "70 names", and rightly so. Its name has been changed many times over the past few millennia, whether through conquest, mistranslations, or various local pronunciations. It was originally called "Salem" or "Ur Salem", then "Jebus", then several variations of "Yerushalem" during ancient Hebrew times. During the Jewish exile in Babylonia, it was also called "Zion". Then "Aelia Capitolina" by the Romans who destroyed and rebuilt it, "Hierosolyma" by the Greek translations, later "Jerusalem" by the Christians, "Al-Quds" by the Arabs--which is itself a shortening of the old term "''Urshalīm al-Quds''" ("Jerusalem the Holy")--and now finally "Yerushalayim" by the Israelis. The last three (as well as "Zion") are used concurrently today depending on one's language and/or political outlook, and many other languages still write or pronounce their own variations as well.
* Trucial Coast used to be named the Pirate Coast. After a major pirate hunting operation by the Royal Navy, involvin a series of truces and alliances with local rulers, it became known under the name "Trucial."
** Its name now? '''United Arab Emirates'''.
* Levant States => Syria + Lebanon
* Persia => Iran (in this case reflecting local usage)
** Persia is a Greek exonym, the Persians/Iranians have been calling themselves some version of 'Irani' as long as they've been a distinct group. (The term derives ultimately from "Aryan," as the ancient Iranians and ancient Indo-Aryans were closely related and were probably two branches of one people, one that went west and the other east.)
* Revolution City, a suburb of Baghdad constructed in 1959, was later renamed Saddam City after the Baathist revolution, and since the 2003 overthrow of Saddam has become known as Sadr City (after well-respected Shia jurist/cleric/activist [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mohammad_Mohammad_Sadeq_al-Sadr Mohammed al-Sadr]], not his hothead son [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Muqtada_al-Sadr Muqtada]]).
* UsefulNotes/SaudiArabia is named after the ruling Saud dynasty; should they lose power, the country would probably be renamed (most likely to "[[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hejaz Hejaz]] and [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Najd Najd]]," the traditional names of the lands that make up most of its territory). TheOtherWiki, for example, describes the country as [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/History_of_Saudi_Arabia#Second_Saudi_State_.281824-1891.29 "Rashidi Arabia"]] during the 1890's when the Al Rashid dynasty was in power.
* Tehran used to have streets with names like "[[UsefulNotes/DwightDEisenhower Eisenhower Boulevard]]" and "[[UsefulNotes/JohnFKennedy Kennedy Avenue]]," as did many other cities in UsefulNotes/{{Iran}}. Nowadays...[[TheRevolutionWillNotBeCivilized Not]] [[UsefulNotes/IranIraqWar so much]]...
** In 1981, Iran also renamed a street after Northern Irish hunger striker Bobby Sands. The street itself? Just happened to be the one where the British Embassy was located. This would have forced the Embassy to put the name of its country's most famous dead dissident ''in its mailing address'' had the embassy not [[CutTheKnot responded by moving the building's entrance to another street]], thus using that street in its address instead.
* The city of Iskenderun in Turkey was originally known as Alexandria near Issos (’Αλεξάνδρεια κατὰ ’Ισσόν ''Alexándreia katà Issón''). This was corrupted into Alexandria Scabiosa, which later turned into Alexandroukambousou. It was referred to by western pilgrims as Alexandretta, and after the Muslim conquest of Syria, it was rendered in Arabic as ''al-ʼIskandarūn''. This became a plot point in ''Film/IndianaJonesAndTheLastCrusade''.
** This is more the case of changing the name to its equivalent in the dominant language (like Chinese city names being referred by the Mandarin pronunciation rather than the local dialect). Iskanderun means virtually same thing as Alexandretta, as Iskander is simply how the name Alexander is rendered in Arabic. (Same with other cities named after UsefulNotes/AlexanderTheGreat. Alexandria in Egypt is called Iskandariyah in Arabic (although hardly anyone outside the Arab world calls it by its Arabic name. Alexandria in Afghanistan is called Kandahar in Pashtun (although no one calls it by its original Greek name.))

!!!South Asia



** Kolkata: Formerly Calcutta.
** Kozhikode: Formerly Calicut.
** Chennai: Formerly Madras.

to:

** Kolkata: Formerly Calcutta.
** Kozhikode: Formerly Calicut.
Since 2001, Calcutta is once again Kolkata.
** Chennai: Formerly Until 1996 used to be called Madras.



* UsefulNotes/{{China}} has lots of cases that look like name changes, although in fact, most of the names have stayed the same in Chinese. The apparent change is due to either the new transliteration system, or due to the government mandating the use of standard Mandarin for placenames rather than local languages/dialects. For further details, see UsefulNotes/WhyMaoChangedHisName.

to:

** Kozhikode: Formerly Calicut. Varanasi: Former Benares. [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Renaming_of_cities_in_India The list goes on and on and on...]]
* UsefulNotes/{{China}} Ceylon => Sri Lanka
** Another example of the international spelling changing to reflect the actual name of the place instead of what Europeans heard[[note]] The Portuguese used to call it "Ceilão"[[/note]].
** Formerly formerly Serendip. [[note]] Yes, the word "serendipity" comes from the Persian fairytale "The three princes of Serendip". "Ceylonity" would sound silly, eh? [[/note]] Formerly formerly formerly Lanka (in the Ramayana epos), so we went full circle.
* The French overseas department '''La Réunion''' in the Indian Ocean. First an uninhabited Island called Dina Maghrabin ("West Island") by the Arabs and Santa Apolonia by the Portuguese, it was claimed for France in 1640, named [[{{Egopolis}} Île Bourbon]] after the royal house, and colonized. Once [[UsefulNotes/TheFrenchRevolution the Bourbons were ousted from the throne and France became a republic]], the isle was renamed La Réunion in 1793 to commemorate the reunion of the volunteers from Marseille and the Parisian National Guard for the storming of the Tuileries on August 10, 1792. The local slave-owners were incensed when the French Republic tried to abolish slavery in 1794[[note]](this measure was never implemented on La Réunion and Île de France (Mauritius) because the local slave-owners made it clear they would rather hand over the islands to the British)[[/note]] and consequently they were so grateful to UsefulNotes/NapoleonBonaparte for restoring it throughout UsefulNotes/TheFrenchColonialEmpire that they renamed the island [[{{Egopolis}} Île Bonaparte]] in 1806. After the British took the island in 1810 they called it Île Bourbon again. That name stuck after it was returned to France, even after the Revolution of 1830, which once again deposed the Bourbons (the new reigning House of Orléans being a younger branch of the House of Bourbon). Finally, the February Revolution of 1848 brought back the republican name La Réunion.

!!!East Asia
* '''UsefulNotes/{{China}}'''
has lots of cases that look like name changes, although in fact, most of the names have stayed the same in Chinese. The apparent change is due to either the new transliteration system, or due to the government mandating the use of standard Mandarin for placenames rather than local languages/dialects. For further details, see UsefulNotes/WhyMaoChangedHisName.



** Occasional problem in other Asian languages also. While elongated "o" sound in Japanese is, in most cases, simply transliterated as plain "o" in English (thus, UsefulNotes/{{Tokyo}}), some insist on writing out the "correct" pronunciation as "ou"--thus "Tokyo" would be "Toukyou." While this is nice, it is also highly confusing; thus some have compromised and come up with macrons for long vowels--thus the capital city is spelled "Tōkyō".
*** In 19th century, Tokyo was also known as Tokei, based on now obsolete pronunciation.
*** Make that triple in Russian. Not only Cyrillic similarly lacks the easy method of indicating the long vowels, but the official transcription is also [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Phonemic_orthography phonemic]], not phonetic, and if read by the Russian orthography rules, sounds entirely wrong. Nevertheless, there are ''a lot'' of know-it-alls who insist on "correct" reading of the Japanese words, making it an ample FlameBait. Not to mention that the official Russian name of the city is [[ArtifactTitle an artifact of an another, long obsoleted system of transcription]], and back in the time when it was still called Edo there were at least ''four'' Cyrillic transcriptions of its name.

to:

** Occasional * Transliteration is an occasional problem in other Asian languages also. While elongated "o" sound in Japanese is, in most cases, simply transliterated as plain "o" in English (thus, UsefulNotes/{{Tokyo}}), some insist on writing out the "correct" pronunciation as "ou"--thus "Tokyo" would be "Toukyou." While this is nice, it is also highly confusing; thus some have compromised and come up with macrons for long vowels--thus the capital city is spelled "Tōkyō".
*** In 19th century, Tokyo was also known as Tokei, based on now obsolete pronunciation.
***
** Make that triple in Russian. Not only Cyrillic similarly lacks the easy method of indicating the long vowels, but the official transcription is also [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Phonemic_orthography phonemic]], not phonetic, and if read by the Russian orthography rules, sounds entirely wrong. Nevertheless, there are ''a lot'' of know-it-alls who insist on "correct" reading of the Japanese words, making it an ample FlameBait. Not to mention that the official Russian name of the city is [[ArtifactTitle an artifact of an another, long obsoleted system of transcription]], and back in the time when it was still called Edo there were at least ''four'' Cyrillic transcriptions of its name.
* While on the matter of '''Japan''', in 19th century, Tōkyō was also known as Tokei, based on now obsolete pronunciation.
** It used to be called Edo (roughly "estuary", being built on one), renamed when the official capital moved there from Kyōto in 1868. Of course, the move of the "official capital" merely meant that the Emperor moved there; the city had been the seat of government since the 17th century, with the Emperor as a ceremonial figurehead. The period during which Edo was the most powerful city in Japan despite not being the official capital is therefore called the "Edo-jidai" ("Edo Period").
** The former capital of Japan, Kyōto, was originally called Heian-kyō ("The Capital of Tranquility and Peace"), giving the golden era of the Imperial Court, the Heian-jidai, its
name. It was renamed to Kyōto ("Capital City") when that era came to a close. According to TheOtherWiki, it was also briefly renamed Saikyō ("western capital") when Edo was renamed. Before it was the capital, it was named Uda.
** One more example from Japan and one more former capital (or at least one more side of an emperor palace - Japan has lots of those): Nara, formerly Heijō-kyō.
* Formosa (from "Ilha Formosa" (the beautiful island) by early Portuguese explorers) => '''UsefulNotes/{{Taiwan}}'''. Of course, that's just the beginning...
** The state that controls the island of Taiwan is the Republic of China (ROC). Contrast the People's Republic of China (PRC), which rules the Chinese mainland (what most people mean by just "China"). Taiwan and mainland China essentially regard each other as rebellious provinces. The ROC lost a civil war on the mainland and was left in control of only Taiwan; decades later, the ''de facto'' situation is that Taiwan and mainland China are separate countries. But both the ROC and PRC consider Taiwan to be an inseparable part of China, so anyone who proposes making the ''de facto'' situation on the ground official -- or who uses terminology that ''implies'' that -- will attract the ire of both sides.
** In international sports, to allow people from Taiwan to compete without implying (a) support for either the PRC or ROC over the other or (b) acceptance of the status quo, they need a team name that both sides can accept. "Chinese Taipei"[[note]]Taipei being the main city of Taiwan and the capital of the ROC[[/note]] is the name in the Olympics and many other major competitions;
** Naturally Taiwan has independence movements, people who would like to renounce the claims to the mainland and make the ''de facto'' situation official. But even if they ever gained a supportive majority in the ROC government, [[ChineseWithChopperSupport the PRC would respond forcibly to any assertion of independence]].
* Another example is the disputed islands in the East China Sea that China, Taiwan, and Japan all claim as their territory. Japan, which currently controls the islands, calls them the Senkaku Islands. Though China and Taiwan are allied in this dispute, they too have different names for the islands. China calls them the Diaoyu Islands while Taiwan calls them the Tiaoyutai Islands.
* The capital city of UsefulNotes/{{South Korea}} was originally ''Hanseong'' (City [by] the Han [River]). When Korea was annexed by the Japanese in 1910, it was renamed ''Keijou'' or "the Capital City" in Japanese. Korean independence caused it to be renamed UsefulNotes/{{Seoul}}, meaning simply "capital city".
** However, in the ChineseLanguage the name was still a cognate of ''Hanseong'' (''Hànchéng'') up to mid-2000s, when Seoul requested the city should be called ''Shǒu'ěr'', a closely phoneticized form, in Chinese. The shock waves at the time caused ''several local songs to be written'' to [[RippedFromTheHeadlines incorporate]] this event.

!!!South-East Asia



* Revolution City, a suburb of Baghdad constructed in 1959, was later renamed Saddam City after the Baathist revolution, and since the 2003 overthrow of Saddam has become known as Sadr City (after well-respected Shia jurist/cleric/activist [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mohammad_Mohammad_Sadeq_al-Sadr Mohammed al-Sadr]], not his hothead son [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Muqtada_al-Sadr Muqtada]]).
* Myanmar and UsefulNotes/{{Thailand}}, ''entire countries'' whose names changed from Burma and Siam, respectively. The former change is highly controversial, with several governments and the opposition not accepting it. This is because the name was changed by a military junta which overthrew the democratically elected Burmese government.

to:

* Revolution City, a suburb of Baghdad constructed in 1959, was later renamed Saddam City after the Baathist revolution, '''Myanmar and since the 2003 overthrow of Saddam has become known as Sadr City (after well-respected Shia jurist/cleric/activist [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mohammad_Mohammad_Sadeq_al-Sadr Mohammed al-Sadr]], not his hothead son [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Muqtada_al-Sadr Muqtada]]).
* Myanmar and UsefulNotes/{{Thailand}},
UsefulNotes/{{Thailand}}''', ''entire countries'' whose names changed from Burma and Siam, respectively. The former change is highly controversial, with several governments and the opposition not accepting it. This is because the name was changed by a military junta which overthrew the democratically elected Burmese government.



* Likewise:
** Trucial Coast/States => United Arab Emirates
*** Trucial Coast was the Pirate Coast before that. It changed its name after a major pirate hunting operation by the Royal Navy which involved a series of truces and alliances with local rulers hence the term "Trucial."
** Levant States => Syria + Lebanon
** Persia => Iran (in this case reflecting local usage)
*** Persia is a Greek exonym, the Persians/Iranians have been calling themselves some version of 'Irani' as long as they've been a distinct group. (The term derives ultimately from "Aryan," as the ancient Iranians and ancient Indo-Aryans were closely related and were probably two branches of one people, one that went west and the other east.)
* Colonies tend to get rid of their master's name on independence (for reasons that have as much to do with accuracy as with pride).
** British North Borneo => Sabah
** Dutch East Indies => Indonesia
** Portuguese Timor => Timor Leste
** The Philippines, curiously enough, is the exception—it's retained its Spanish colonial name, although it was originally lumped with other islands into a group collectively called the Spanish East Indies. Most likely this is attributable to the majority of Filipinos' sheer ForeignCultureFetish for their colonisers, Spain and the United States, not to mention the fact that the country didn't exist as a political unit before Spanish occupation.
*** Although during the Martial Law era in the 1970s there were plans to rename the Philippines to "Maharlika", after the precolonial warrior class (but only of Tagalog kingdoms).
*** And, finally, the entire Philippines is this—having been named for the Spanish King Philip II. Prior to Spanish colonisation the archipelago was ruled by a number of largely independent but interconnected royal city-states, such as the Kingdoms of Tondo and Maynila, the Rajahnate of Cebu, the Kingdom of Butuan, the Sulu Sultanate, and others.
*** The term "Manila," the name of the current Philippine capital, is a sort of [[InvertedTrope inversion]]; its meaning has evolved over the centuries. Originally it referred to the precolonial Kingdom of Maynila south of the Pasig River (which itself used to be named "Selurong" or "Seludong"); after the conquistadores arrived, "Manila" became Intramuros, the CitadelCity the Spanish built over the ruins of the Kingdom of Maynila. Much later, [[RoaringTwenties during]] [[TheGreatDepression the]] [[AmericaTakesOverTheWorld American]] [[{{Eagleland}} occupation]], Manila's jurisdiction expanded beyond Intramuros and grew to encompass surrounding districts. Today "Manila" has come to refer to both the country's capital ''and'' the conglomeration of sixteen cities [[AndZoidberg (and the single municipality of Pateros)]] situated in the region—which is more accurately called "''Metro'' Manila", but visiting foreigners and out-of-towners don't make the distinction.
* There's a joke that in the Philippines, street names tend to change with every new administration, largely out of a need to satisfy political egos.
** In the most recent case, several Filipino politicians, in a bid to ingratiate themselves to the [[HereditaryRepublic (second)]] Aquino administration, even filed a bill to change the name of EDSA, Metro Manila's main highway, to [[{{Egopolis}} Corazon Aquino Expressway]] (after the mother of the previous President, Benigno "Noynoy" Aquino III, who was ''[[GenerationXerox also]]'' a former President).
*** In their defence, the Aquinos are intimately associated with the highway, the site of popular protests that threw the Marcos dictatorship out in 1986 and [[FullCircleRevolution installed Cory Aquino in power]]. Quite a number of Filipinos continue to believe, however, and not without good reason, that the politicians pushing the name change have [[{{Understatement}} a slight case of]] SkewedPriorities, given much more urgent issues like disaster management, poverty, and of course their own corruption.
*** EDSA itself used to be called Highway 54 in the 1950s.
*** And "Junio 19" before ''that''.
** A few major streets may or may not have changed names for ostensibly nationalist reasons. For instance, Dewey Boulevard, which borders Manila Bay, was later renamed Roxas Boulevard, after the Philippine President Manuel Roxas. Ironically the said President was [[TheQuisling extremely subservient towards American interests]]—when the Americans granted the Philippines its formal "independence" in 1946, Roxas was promptly installed as the Republic's first chief executive, and in order to finance the rebuilding of the country after the devastation of UsefulNotes/WorldWarII, he had to play nice with the U.S. government. (The American legacy associated with Dewey/Roxas Boulevard is still evident in the fact that the U.S. Embassy is still headquartered there.)
* The city of [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bangkok#Full_name Bangkok]] had its name changed back in the late 1700s. Nobody outside of Thailand uses the new name, which happens to be [[OverlyLongName "Krung Thep Mahanakhon Amon Rattanakosin Mahinthara Yuthaya Mahadilok Phop Noppharat Ratchathani Burirom Udomratchaniwet Mahasathan Amon Piman Awatan Sathit Sakkathattiya Witsanukam Prasit"]], which translates to [[OverlyLongName "The city of angels, the great city, the eternal jewel city, the impregnable city of God Indra, the grand capital of the world endowed with nine precious gems, the happy city, abounding in an enormous Royal Palace that resembles the heavenly abode where reigns the reincarnated god, a city given by Indra and built by Vishnukam"]]. No wonder most people stick to "Bangkok" (if they're foreigners) or abbreviate it to its first two or three words (if they're Thai).
* Singapore -- formerly Temasek.

to:

* Likewise:
** Trucial Coast/States => United Arab Emirates
*** Trucial Coast was the Pirate Coast before that. It changed its name after a major pirate hunting operation by the Royal Navy which involved a series of truces and alliances with local rulers hence the term "Trucial."
** Levant States => Syria + Lebanon
** Persia => Iran (in this case reflecting local usage)
*** Persia is a Greek exonym, the Persians/Iranians have been calling themselves some version of 'Irani' as long as they've been a distinct group. (The term derives ultimately from "Aryan," as the ancient Iranians and ancient Indo-Aryans were closely related and were probably two branches of one people, one that went west and the other east.)
* Colonies tend to get rid of their master's name on independence (for reasons that have as much to do with accuracy as with pride).
** British North Borneo => Sabah
** Dutch East Indies => Indonesia
** Portuguese Timor => Timor Leste
** The Philippines, curiously enough, is the exception—it's retained its Spanish colonial name, although it was originally lumped with other islands into a group collectively called the Spanish East Indies. Most likely this is attributable to the majority of Filipinos' sheer ForeignCultureFetish for their colonisers, Spain and the United States, not to mention the fact that the country didn't exist as a political unit before Spanish occupation.
*** Although during the Martial Law era in the 1970s there were plans to rename the Philippines to "Maharlika", after the precolonial warrior class (but only of Tagalog kingdoms).
*** And, finally, the entire Philippines is this—having been named for the Spanish King Philip II. Prior to Spanish colonisation the archipelago was ruled by a number of largely independent but interconnected royal city-states, such as the Kingdoms of Tondo and Maynila, the Rajahnate of Cebu, the Kingdom of Butuan, the Sulu Sultanate, and others.
*** The term "Manila," the name of the current Philippine capital, is a sort of [[InvertedTrope inversion]]; its meaning has evolved over the centuries. Originally it referred to the precolonial Kingdom of Maynila south of the Pasig River (which itself used to be named "Selurong" or "Seludong"); after the conquistadores arrived, "Manila" became Intramuros, the CitadelCity the Spanish built over the ruins of the Kingdom of Maynila. Much later, [[RoaringTwenties during]] [[TheGreatDepression the]] [[AmericaTakesOverTheWorld American]] [[{{Eagleland}} occupation]], Manila's jurisdiction expanded beyond Intramuros and grew to encompass surrounding districts. Today "Manila" has come to refer to both the country's capital ''and'' the conglomeration of sixteen cities [[AndZoidberg (and the single municipality of Pateros)]] situated in the region—which is more accurately called "''Metro'' Manila", but visiting foreigners and out-of-towners don't make the distinction.
* There's a joke that in the Philippines, street names tend to change with every new administration, largely out of a need to satisfy political egos.
** In the most recent case, several Filipino politicians, in a bid to ingratiate themselves to the [[HereditaryRepublic (second)]] Aquino administration, even filed a bill to change the name of EDSA, Metro Manila's main highway, to [[{{Egopolis}} Corazon Aquino Expressway]] (after the mother of the previous President, Benigno "Noynoy" Aquino III, who was ''[[GenerationXerox also]]'' a former President).
*** In their defence, the Aquinos are intimately associated with the highway, the site of popular protests that threw the Marcos dictatorship out in 1986 and [[FullCircleRevolution installed Cory Aquino in power]]. Quite a number of Filipinos continue to believe, however, and not without good reason, that the politicians pushing the name change have [[{{Understatement}} a slight case of]] SkewedPriorities, given much more urgent issues like disaster management, poverty, and of course their own corruption.
*** EDSA itself used to be called Highway 54 in the 1950s.
*** And "Junio 19" before ''that''.
** A few major streets may or may not have changed names for ostensibly nationalist reasons. For instance, Dewey Boulevard, which borders Manila Bay, was later renamed Roxas Boulevard, after the Philippine President Manuel Roxas. Ironically the said President was [[TheQuisling extremely subservient towards American interests]]—when the Americans granted the Philippines its formal "independence" in 1946, Roxas was promptly installed as the Republic's first chief executive, and in order to finance the rebuilding of the country after the devastation of UsefulNotes/WorldWarII, he had to play nice with the U.S. government. (The American legacy associated with Dewey/Roxas Boulevard is still evident in the fact that the U.S. Embassy is still headquartered there.)
*
The city of [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bangkok#Full_name Bangkok]] had its name changed back in the late 1700s. Nobody outside of Thailand uses the new name, which happens to be [[OverlyLongName "Krung Thep Mahanakhon Amon Rattanakosin Mahinthara Yuthaya Mahadilok Phop Noppharat Ratchathani Burirom Udomratchaniwet Mahasathan Amon Piman Awatan Sathit Sakkathattiya Witsanukam Prasit"]], which translates to [[OverlyLongName "The city of angels, the great city, the eternal jewel city, the impregnable city of God Indra, the grand capital of the world endowed with nine precious gems, the happy city, abounding in an enormous Royal Palace that resembles the heavenly abode where reigns the reincarnated god, a city given by Indra and built by Vishnukam"]]. No wonder most people stick to "Bangkok" (if they're foreigners) or abbreviate it to its first two or three words (if they're Thai).
* Singapore UsefulNotes/{{Singapore}} -- formerly Temasek.



* Tōkyō - Used to be called Edo (roughly "estuary", being built on one), renamed when the official capital moved there from Kyōto in 1868. Of course, the move of the "official capital" merely meant that the Emperor moved there; the city had been the seat of government since the 17th century, with the Emperor as a ceremonial figurehead. The period during which Edo was the most powerful city in Japan despite not being the official capital is therefore called the "Edo-jidai" ("Edo Period").
* The former capital of Japan, Kyōto, was originally called Heian-kyō ("The Capital of Tranquility and Peace"), giving the golden era of the Imperial Court, the Heian-jidai, its name. It was renamed to Kyōto ("Capital City") when that era came to a close. According to TheOtherWiki, it was also briefly renamed Saikyō ("western capital") when Edo was renamed.
** Before it was the capital, it was named Uda.
* One more example from Japan and one more former capital (or at least one more side of an emperor palace - Japan has lots of those): Nara, formerly Heijō-kyō.
* An ongoing example is what to call the land that was (indisputably) called Palestine from 135 CE up until 1948 (leaving aside that for a lot of that time "Palestine" also included territories east of the Jordan river and -- briefly -- on the Sinai peninsula). Most Palestinians (and indeed most Arabs and even most Muslims, if they're politically inclined) will refer to the whole thing (including what's now Israel and in some cases Jordan) as Palestine; certain Israelis will refer to the whole thing (including the areas under dispute--and sometimes even Jordan) as "the Land of Israel" (''Eretz Yisrael'' in Hebrew), and no matter what you call it, it has political overtones. The region currently governed by Israel[[note]]Although the international community universally regards the area as occupied, the situation is more complicated in Israel; many ultranationalist and religious groups regard it as an integral part of Israel, and prefer the term "disputed territories" when they are forced to recognize that there are a few million Arabs living there who would rather not be ruled by Israel. As a result, even what to call the ''status'' of this area--uncontroversial everywhere else--is a politically sensitive topic in Israel. Of course as they say, "[[JewsLoveToArgue two Israelis, three opinions]]."[[/note]] which borders the Dead Sea is known as the "West Bank"[[note]]It's the western side of the River Jordan, for the confused; the Hashemite Kingdom of Jordan is the "East Bank", as it were.[[/note]] by the Palestinian authorities and the international press, while in Israel it is known as "Judea and Samaria"--unless you want to strike a moderate, conciliatory tone towards the Palestinians, in which case it's "the Territories" or the "West Bank" again.
** To add to the confusion, up until 1948 Jews living in Palestine were called Palestinians (for instance up until then the "Jerusalem Post" was called the "Palestine Post") while Arabs living in Palestine were called (Palestinian) Arabs.
** This argument goes way back. When the Roman Empire crushed the Jewish uprising under Bar Kochba (in 135 CE), they merged the province Judea into a larger one which they called "Palaestina", after the name used for the (long since gone) Philistine realm.
** Local names for settlements and terrain features have also radically changed in the past 100 years. Many places that had up to that point had Arabic names have been renamed with Hebrew names - mostly after Biblical locales described as being in the same general areas 2000+ years ago.
** Jerusalem was said to have "70 names", and rightly so. Its name has been changed many times over the past few millennia, whether through conquest, mistranslations, or various local pronunciations. It was originally called "Salem" or "Ur Salem", then "Jebus", then several variations of "Yerushalem" during ancient Hebrew times. During the Jewish exile in Babylonia, it was also called "Zion". Then "Aelia Capitolina" by the Romans who destroyed and rebuilt it, "Hierosolyma" by the Greek translations, later "Jerusalem" by the Christians, "Al-Quds" by the Arabs--which is itself a shortening of the old term "''Urshalīm al-Quds''" ("Jerusalem the Holy")--and now finally "Yerushalayim" by the Israelis. The last three (as well as "Zion") are used concurrently today depending on one's language and/or political outlook, and many other languages still write or pronounce their own variations as well.
* Ceylon => Sri Lanka
** Another example of the international spelling changing to reflect the actual name of the place instead of what Europeans heard[[note]] The Portuguese used to call it "Ceilão"[[/note]].
** Formerly formerly Serendip. [[note]] Yes, the word "serendipity" comes from the Persian fairytale "The three princes of Serendip". "Ceylonity" would sound silly, eh? [[/note]] Formerly formerly formerly Lanka (in the Ramayana epos), so we went full circle.
* Formosa => UsefulNotes/{{Taiwan}}. Of course, that's just the beginning...
** The state that controls the island of Taiwan is the Republic of China (ROC). Contrast the People's Republic of China (PRC), which rules the Chinese mainland (what most people mean by just "China"). Taiwan and mainland China essentially regard each other as rebellious provinces. The ROC lost a civil war on the mainland and was left in control of only Taiwan; decades later, the ''de facto'' situation is that Taiwan and mainland China are separate countries. But both the ROC and PRC consider Taiwan to be an inseparable part of China, so anyone who proposes making the ''de facto'' situation on the ground official -- or who uses terminology that ''implies'' that -- will attract the ire of both sides.
** In international sports, to allow people from Taiwan to compete without implying (a) support for either the PRC or ROC over the other or (b) acceptance of the status quo, they need a team name that both sides can accept. "Chinese Taipei"[[note]]Taipei being the main city of Taiwan and the capital of the ROC[[/note]] is the name in the Olympics and many other major competitions;
** Naturally Taiwan has independence movements, people who would like to renounce the claims to the mainland and make the ''de facto'' situation official. But even if they ever gained a supportive majority in the ROC government, [[ChineseWithChopperSupport the PRC would respond forcibly to any assertion of independence]].
* Another example is the disputed islands in the East China Sea that China, Taiwan, and Japan all claim as their territory. Japan, which currently controls the islands, calls them the Senkaku Islands. Though China and Taiwan are allied in this dispute, they too have different names for the islands. China calls them the Diaoyu Islands while Taiwan calls them the Tiaoyutai Islands.
* The capital city of UsefulNotes/{{South Korea}} was originally ''Hanseong'' (City [by] the Han [River]). When Korea was annexed by the Japanese in 1910, it was renamed ''Keijou'' or "the Capital City" in Japanese. Korean independence caused it to be renamed UsefulNotes/{{Seoul}}, meaning simply "capital city".
** However, in the ChineseLanguage the name was still a cognate of ''Hanseong'' (''Hànchéng'') up to mid-2000s, when Seoul requested the city should be called ''Shǒu'ěr'', a closely phoneticized form, in Chinese. The shock waves at the time caused ''several local songs to be written'' to [[RippedFromTheHeadlines incorporate]] this event.
* Saudi Arabia is named after the ruling Saud dynasty; should they lose power, the country would probably be renamed (most likely to "[[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hejaz Hejaz]] and [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Najd Najd]]," the traditional names of the lands that make up most of its territory). TheOtherWiki, for example, describes the country as [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/History_of_Saudi_Arabia#Second_Saudi_State_.281824-1891.29 "Rashidi Arabia"]] during the 1890's when the Al Rashid dynasty was in power.
* Tehran used to have streets with names like "[[UsefulNotes/DwightDEisenhower Eisenhower Boulevard]]" and "[[UsefulNotes/JohnFKennedy Kennedy Avenue]]," as did many other cities in UsefulNotes/{{Iran}}. Nowadays...[[TheRevolutionWillNotBeCivilized Not]] [[UsefulNotes/IranIraqWar so much]]...
** In 1981, Iran also renamed a street after Northern Irish hunger striker Bobby Sands. The street itself? Just happened to be the one where the British Embassy was located. This would have forced the Embassy to put the name of its country's most famous dead dissident ''in its mailing address'' had the embassy not responded by moving the building's entrance to another street, thus using that street in its address instead.
* Sunda Kelapa renamed to Jaya Karta, then renamed to Batavia, lastly renamed to Jakarta

to:

* Tōkyō - Used to be called Edo (roughly "estuary", being built on one), renamed when '''The Philippines''', curiously enough, is the official capital moved there from Kyōto in 1868. Of course, the move of the "official capital" merely meant that the Emperor moved there; the city had been the seat of government since the 17th century, with the Emperor exception to this rule, as a ceremonial figurehead. The period during which Edo was the most powerful city in Japan despite not being the official capital is therefore called the "Edo-jidai" ("Edo Period").
* The former capital of Japan, Kyōto,
it's retained its Spanish colonial name, although it was originally lumped with other islands into a group collectively called Heian-kyō ("The Capital of Tranquility and Peace"), giving the golden era of the Imperial Court, the Heian-jidai, its name. It was renamed to Kyōto ("Capital City") when that era came to a close. According to TheOtherWiki, it was also briefly renamed Saikyō ("western capital") when Edo was renamed.
** Before it was the capital, it was named Uda.
* One more example from Japan and one more former capital (or at least one more side of an emperor palace - Japan has lots of those): Nara, formerly Heijō-kyō.
* An ongoing example is what to call the land that was (indisputably) called Palestine from 135 CE up until 1948 (leaving aside that for a lot of that time "Palestine" also included territories east of the Jordan river and -- briefly -- on the Sinai peninsula).
Spanish East Indies. Most Palestinians (and indeed most Arabs and even most Muslims, if they're politically inclined) will refer likely this is attributable to the whole thing (including what's now Israel majority of Filipinos' sheer ForeignCultureFetish for their colonisers, Spain and in some cases Jordan) as Palestine; certain Israelis will refer to the whole thing (including United States, not to mention the areas under dispute--and sometimes even Jordan) fact that the country didn't exist as "the Land of Israel" (''Eretz Yisrael'' in Hebrew), and no matter what you call it, it has a political overtones. The region currently governed by Israel[[note]]Although unit before Spanish occupation.
** Although during
the international community universally regards Martial Law era in the area as occupied, the situation is more complicated in Israel; many ultranationalist and religious groups regard it as an integral part of Israel, and prefer the term "disputed territories" when they are forced to recognize that 1970s there are a few million Arabs living there who would rather not be were plans to rename the Philippines to "Maharlika", after the precolonial warrior class (but only of Tagalog kingdoms).
** And, finally, the entire Philippines is this—having been named for the Spanish King Philip II. Prior to Spanish colonisation the archipelago was
ruled by Israel. As a result, even what to call the ''status'' number of this area--uncontroversial everywhere else--is a politically sensitive topic in Israel. Of course as they say, "[[JewsLoveToArgue two Israelis, three opinions]]."[[/note]] which borders the Dead Sea is known largely independent but interconnected royal city-states, such as the "West Bank"[[note]]It's Kingdoms of Tondo and Maynila, the western side Rajahnate of Cebu, the River Jordan, for the confused; the Hashemite Kingdom of Jordan is Butuan, the "East Bank", as it were.[[/note]] by the Palestinian authorities Sulu Sultanate, and the international press, while in Israel it is known as "Judea and Samaria"--unless you want to strike a moderate, conciliatory tone towards the Palestinians, in which case it's "the Territories" or the "West Bank" again.
others.
** To add to the confusion, up until 1948 Jews living in Palestine were called Palestinians (for instance up until then the "Jerusalem Post" was called the "Palestine Post") while Arabs living in Palestine were called (Palestinian) Arabs.
** This argument goes way back. When the Roman Empire crushed the Jewish uprising under Bar Kochba (in 135 CE), they merged the province Judea into a larger one which they called "Palaestina", after the name used for the (long since gone) Philistine realm.
** Local names for settlements and terrain features have also radically changed in the past 100 years. Many places that had up to that point had Arabic names have been renamed with Hebrew names - mostly after Biblical locales described as being in the same general areas 2000+ years ago.
** Jerusalem was said to have "70 names", and rightly so. Its name has been changed many times over the past few millennia, whether through conquest, mistranslations, or various local pronunciations. It was originally called "Salem" or "Ur Salem", then "Jebus", then several variations of "Yerushalem" during ancient Hebrew times. During the Jewish exile in Babylonia, it was also called "Zion". Then "Aelia Capitolina" by the Romans who destroyed and rebuilt it, "Hierosolyma" by the Greek translations, later "Jerusalem" by the Christians, "Al-Quds" by the Arabs--which is itself a shortening of the old
The term "''Urshalīm al-Quds''" ("Jerusalem "Manila," the Holy")--and now finally "Yerushalayim" by the Israelis. The last three (as well as "Zion") are used concurrently today depending on one's language and/or political outlook, and many other languages still write or pronounce their own variations as well.
* Ceylon => Sri Lanka
** Another example of the international spelling changing to reflect the actual
name of the place instead current Philippine capital, is a sort of what Europeans heard[[note]] The Portuguese used to call it "Ceilão"[[/note]].
** Formerly formerly Serendip. [[note]] Yes, the word "serendipity" comes from the Persian fairytale "The three princes of Serendip". "Ceylonity" would sound silly, eh? [[/note]] Formerly formerly formerly Lanka (in the Ramayana epos), so we went full circle.
* Formosa => UsefulNotes/{{Taiwan}}. Of course, that's just the beginning...
** The state that controls the island of Taiwan is the Republic of China (ROC). Contrast the People's Republic of China (PRC), which rules the Chinese mainland (what most people mean by just "China"). Taiwan and mainland China essentially regard each other as rebellious provinces. The ROC lost a civil war on the mainland and was left in control of only Taiwan; decades later, the ''de facto'' situation is that Taiwan and mainland China are separate countries. But both the ROC and PRC consider Taiwan to be an inseparable part of China, so anyone who proposes making the ''de facto'' situation on the ground official -- or who uses terminology that ''implies'' that -- will attract the ire of both sides.
** In international sports, to allow people from Taiwan to compete without implying (a) support for either the PRC or ROC
[[InvertedTrope inversion]]; its meaning has evolved over the other or (b) acceptance centuries. Originally it referred to the precolonial Kingdom of Maynila south of the status quo, they need a team name that both sides can accept. "Chinese Taipei"[[note]]Taipei being the main city of Taiwan and the capital of the ROC[[/note]] is the name in the Olympics and many other major competitions;
** Naturally Taiwan has independence movements, people who would like to renounce the claims to the mainland and make the ''de facto'' situation official. But even if they ever gained a supportive majority in the ROC government, [[ChineseWithChopperSupport the PRC would respond forcibly to any assertion of independence]].
* Another example is the disputed islands in the East China Sea that China, Taiwan, and Japan all claim as their territory. Japan, which currently controls the islands, calls them the Senkaku Islands. Though China and Taiwan are allied in this dispute, they too have different names for the islands. China calls them the Diaoyu Islands while Taiwan calls them the Tiaoyutai Islands.
* The capital city of UsefulNotes/{{South Korea}} was originally ''Hanseong'' (City [by] the Han [River]). When Korea was annexed by the Japanese in 1910, it was renamed ''Keijou'' or "the Capital City" in Japanese. Korean independence caused it
Pasig River (which itself used to be renamed UsefulNotes/{{Seoul}}, meaning simply "capital city".
** However, in the ChineseLanguage the name was still a cognate of ''Hanseong'' (''Hànchéng'') up to mid-2000s, when Seoul requested the city should be called ''Shǒu'ěr'', a closely phoneticized form, in Chinese. The shock waves at the time caused ''several local songs to be written'' to [[RippedFromTheHeadlines incorporate]] this event.
* Saudi Arabia is
named "Selurong" or "Seludong"); after the ruling Saud dynasty; should they lose power, conquistadores arrived, "Manila" became Intramuros, the country would probably be renamed (most likely to "[[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hejaz Hejaz]] and [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Najd Najd]]," CitadelCity the traditional names Spanish built over the ruins of the lands that make up most Kingdom of its territory). TheOtherWiki, for example, describes Maynila. Much later, [[RoaringTwenties during]] [[TheGreatDepression the]] [[AmericaTakesOverTheWorld American]] [[{{Eagleland}} occupation]], Manila's jurisdiction expanded beyond Intramuros and grew to encompass surrounding districts. Today "Manila" has come to refer to both the country as [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/History_of_Saudi_Arabia#Second_Saudi_State_.281824-1891.29 "Rashidi Arabia"]] during the 1890's when the Al Rashid dynasty was in power.
* Tehran used to have streets with names like "[[UsefulNotes/DwightDEisenhower Eisenhower Boulevard]]" and "[[UsefulNotes/JohnFKennedy Kennedy Avenue]]," as did many other cities in UsefulNotes/{{Iran}}. Nowadays...[[TheRevolutionWillNotBeCivilized Not]] [[UsefulNotes/IranIraqWar so much]]...
** In 1981, Iran also renamed a street after Northern Irish hunger striker Bobby Sands. The street itself? Just happened to be the one where the British Embassy was located. This would have forced the Embassy to put the name of its
country's most famous dead dissident ''in its mailing address'' had capital ''and'' the embassy not responded by moving conglomeration of sixteen cities [[AndZoidberg (and the building's entrance to another street, thus using single municipality of Pateros)]] situated in the region—which is more accurately called "''Metro'' Manila", but visiting foreigners and out-of-towners don't make the distinction.
** In the Philippines, there's a joke
that street names tend to change with every new administration, largely out of a need to satisfy political egos.
*** In the most recent case, several Filipino politicians,
in a bid to ingratiate themselves to the [[HereditaryRepublic (second)]] Aquino administration, even filed a bill to change the name of EDSA, Metro Manila's main highway[[note]]which itself used to be called Highway 54 in the 1950s, and Junio 19 before ''that''[[/note]], to [[{{Egopolis}} Corazon Aquino Expressway]] (after the mother of the previous President, Benigno "Noynoy" Aquino III, who was ''[[GenerationXerox also]]'' a former President). In their defence, the Aquinos are intimately associated with the highway, the site of popular protests that threw the Marcos dictatorship out in 1986 and [[FullCircleRevolution installed Cory Aquino in power]]. Quite a number of Filipinos continue to believe, however, and not without good reason, that the politicians pushing the name change have [[{{Understatement}} a slight case of]] SkewedPriorities, given much more urgent issues like disaster management, poverty, and of course their own corruption.
** A few major streets may or may not have changed names for ostensibly nationalist reasons. For instance, Dewey Boulevard, which borders Manila Bay, was later renamed Roxas Boulevard, after the Philippine President Manuel Roxas. Ironically the said President was [[TheQuisling extremely subservient towards American interests]]—when the Americans granted the Philippines
its address instead.
formal "independence" in 1946, Roxas was promptly installed as the Republic's first chief executive, and in order to finance the rebuilding of the country after the devastation of UsefulNotes/WorldWarII, he had to play nice with the U.S. government. (The American legacy associated with Dewey/Roxas Boulevard is still evident in the fact that the U.S. Embassy is still headquartered there.)
* '''Indonesia''':
** The country itself, known before 1945 as Dutch East Indies.
**
Sunda Kelapa was renamed to Jaya Karta, then Karta (City of Glory) when Fatahillah, the general of the Sultanate of Demak, [[WoodenShipsAndIronMen defeated the Portuguese]] in the 16th century. When the Dutch took over a century later, they gave it the name Batavia. Lastly, after gaining independence in the aftermath of World War II, the new authorities renamed it to Batavia, lastly renamed to JakartaJakarta.



* Batang Berjuntai, a town in Malaysia was renamed to Bestari Jaya.

to:

* Portuguese Timor: Timor Leste since 1976.
* Batang Berjuntai, a town in Malaysia '''Malaysia''' was renamed to Bestari Jaya.



** Malaysia itself is an example as well. It was the Federation of Malaya when independence was gained in 1957. The country name was change to Malaysia in 1963 when British North Borneo, Sarawak and Singapore joined the federation.
* The city of Iskenderun in Turkey was originally known as Alexandria near Issos (’Αλεξάνδρεια κατὰ ’Ισσόν ''Alexándreia katà Issón''). This was corrupted into Alexandria Scabiosa, which later turned into Alexandroukambousou. It was referred to by western pilgrims as Alexandretta, and after the Muslim conquest of Syria, it was rendered in Arabic as ''al-ʼIskandarūn''. This became a plot point in ''Film/IndianaJonesAndTheLastCrusade''.
** This is more the case of changing the name to its equivalent in the dominant language (like Chinese city names being referred by the Mandarin pronunciation rather than the local dialect). Iskanderun means virtually same thing as Alexandretta, as Iskander is simply how the name Alexander is rendered in Arabic. (Same with other cities named after UsefulNotes/AlexanderTheGreat. Alexandria in Egypt is called Iskandariyah in Arabic (although hardly anyone outside the Arab world calls it by its Arabic name. Alexandria in Afghanistan is called Kandahar in Pashtun (although no one calls it by its original Greek name.))
* The French overseas department La Réunion in the Indian Ocean. First an uninhabited Island called Dina Maghrabin ("West Island") by the Arabs and Santa Apolonia by the Portuguese, it was claimed for France in 1640, named [[{{Egopolis}} Île Bourbon]] after the royal house, and colonized. Once [[UsefulNotes/TheFrenchRevolution the Bourbons were ousted from the throne and France became a republic]], the isle was renamed La Réunion in 1793 to commemorate the reunion of the volunteers from Marseille and the Parisian National Guard for the storming of the Tuileries on August 10, 1792. The local slave-owners were incensed when the French Republic tried to abolish slavery in 1794[[note]](this measure was never implemented on La Réunion and Île de France (Mauritius) because the local slave-owners made it clear they would rather hand over the islands to the British)[[/note]] and consequently they were so grateful to UsefulNotes/NapoleonBonaparte for restoring it throughout UsefulNotes/TheFrenchColonialEmpire that they renamed the island [[{{Egopolis}} Île Bonaparte]] in 1806. After the British took the island in 1810 they called it Île Bourbon again. That name stuck after it was returned to France, even after the Revolution of 1830, which once again deposed the Bourbons (the new reigning House of Orléans being a younger branch of the House of Bourbon). Finally, the February Revolution of 1848 brought back the republican name La Réunion.

to:

** Malaysia itself is an example UsefulNotes/{{Malaysia}} as a whole country counts as well. It was the Federation of Malaya when independence was gained in 1957. The country name was change to Malaysia in 1963 when British North Borneo, Sarawak and Singapore joined the federation.
* The city of Iskenderun in Turkey was originally known as Alexandria near Issos (’Αλεξάνδρεια κατὰ ’Ισσόν ''Alexándreia katà Issón''). This was corrupted into Alexandria Scabiosa, which later turned into Alexandroukambousou. It was referred to by western pilgrims as Alexandretta, and after the Muslim conquest of Syria, it was rendered in Arabic as ''al-ʼIskandarūn''. This became a plot point in ''Film/IndianaJonesAndTheLastCrusade''.
** This is more the case of changing the name to its equivalent in the dominant language (like Chinese city names being referred by the Mandarin pronunciation rather than the local dialect). Iskanderun means virtually same thing as Alexandretta, as Iskander is simply how the name Alexander is rendered in Arabic. (Same with other cities named after UsefulNotes/AlexanderTheGreat. Alexandria in Egypt is called Iskandariyah in Arabic (although hardly anyone outside the Arab world calls it by its Arabic name. Alexandria in Afghanistan is called Kandahar in Pashtun (although no one calls it by its original Greek name.))
* The French overseas department La Réunion in the Indian Ocean. First an uninhabited Island called Dina Maghrabin ("West Island") by the Arabs and Santa Apolonia by the Portuguese, it was claimed for France in 1640, named [[{{Egopolis}} Île Bourbon]] after the royal house, and colonized. Once [[UsefulNotes/TheFrenchRevolution the Bourbons were ousted from the throne and France became a republic]], the isle was renamed La Réunion in 1793 to commemorate the reunion of the volunteers from Marseille and the Parisian National Guard for the storming of the Tuileries on August 10, 1792. The local slave-owners were incensed when the French Republic tried to abolish slavery in 1794[[note]](this measure was never implemented on La Réunion and Île de France (Mauritius) because the local slave-owners made it clear they would rather hand over the islands to the British)[[/note]] and consequently they were so grateful to UsefulNotes/NapoleonBonaparte for restoring it throughout UsefulNotes/TheFrenchColonialEmpire that they renamed the island [[{{Egopolis}} Île Bonaparte]] in 1806. After the British took the island in 1810 they called it Île Bourbon again. That name stuck after it was returned to France, even after the Revolution of 1830, which once again deposed the Bourbons (the new reigning House of Orléans being a younger branch of the House of Bourbon). Finally, the February Revolution of 1848 brought back the republican name La Réunion.
22nd Nov '16 12:39:02 PM Josef5678
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* There used to be an area in Texas called "Dead [[NWordPrivileges Nigger]] Creek," which was eventually changed to the ever-so-slightly less offensive "Dead Negro Draw."

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* There used to be an area in Texas called "Dead [[NWordPrivileges Nigger]] Nigger Creek," which was eventually changed to the ever-so-slightly less offensive "Dead Negro Draw."
20th Nov '16 8:35:03 AM Morgenthaler
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[[folder:Live Action TV]]

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[[folder:Live Action [[folder:Live-Action TV]]



* ''{{Traveller}}: The New Era'' gives us an example involving ''planets'' - the Reformation Coalition gave several of its planets new names relating to its philosophy of hope and rebirth, to make the point that the Imperium (the source of the former names) was gone and not coming back.
* The capital of Karameikos, a nation from the {{Mystara}} D&D setting, was changed from Specularum to Mirros by royal decree. In-character, this was done because "Specularum" was a name imposed by the Thyatians and raised bad feelings among the Traladaran populace, whom King Stephan wanted to appease; out-of-character, it's because one of [=TSR=]'s female employees pointed out that "Specularum" sounds unpleasantly like a [[WomensMysteries gynecological implement]].

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* ''{{Traveller}}: ''TabletopGame/{{Traveller}}: The New Era'' gives us an example involving ''planets'' - the Reformation Coalition gave several of its planets new names relating to its philosophy of hope and rebirth, to make the point that the Imperium (the source of the former names) was gone and not coming back.
* The capital of Karameikos, a nation from the {{Mystara}} ''TabletopGame/{{Mystara}}'' D&D setting, was changed from Specularum to Mirros by royal decree. In-character, this was done because "Specularum" was a name imposed by the Thyatians and raised bad feelings among the Traladaran populace, whom King Stephan wanted to appease; out-of-character, it's because one of [=TSR=]'s female employees pointed out that "Specularum" sounds unpleasantly like a [[WomensMysteries gynecological implement]].



* The TropeNamer is a standard fixture of FourX games like ''Civilization''. In some games, when conquering an enemy city the player is asked to issue a new name.
* In ''[[VideoGame/FalloutNewVegas Fallout: New Vegas]]'', Las Vegas has been renamed, as per the title, New Vegas. On the road between Nipton and New Vegas is a town name Novac, after a motel's [[SignsOfDisrepair half-erased 'No Vacancy' sign.]]

to:

* The TropeNamer is a standard fixture of FourX games like ''Civilization''.''VideoGame/{{Civilization}}''. In some games, when conquering an enemy city the player is asked to issue a new name.
* In ''[[VideoGame/FalloutNewVegas Fallout: New Vegas]]'', ''VideoGame/FalloutNewVegas'', Las Vegas has been renamed, as per the title, New Vegas. On the road between Nipton and New Vegas is a town name Novac, after a motel's [[SignsOfDisrepair half-erased 'No Vacancy' sign.]]
4th Nov '16 11:19:05 AM PDL
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* Toronto, Ontario was named York. Note that the original name for the area was Toronto and it was renamed to Toronto (a native name) when New York was growing and becoming larger, i.e. they did not want to be a 'second York' in North America. Made funnier ever since Peter Ustinov called the city "New York run by the Swiss."

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* Toronto, Ontario was named York. Note that the original name for the area was Toronto and it was renamed to Toronto (a native name) when New York was growing and becoming larger, i.e. they did not want to be a 'second York' in North America. Made funnier ever since Peter Ustinov called the city "New York run by the Swiss."" One section of Toronto is still known as "North York".
4th Nov '16 10:47:54 AM Cuddles
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Added DiffLines:

* In Wales, all places are given names in both English and Welsh. Since Wales has been invaded about as often as England, usually by the same people, names in both languages are often a weird mishmash of translations, transliterations, and renamings, and which is more accurate or original can be hard to tell. For example, Cardiff (the capital) appears to be an obvious corrupted transliteration of Caerdydd, meaning Castle of the Day. However, Caerdydd is itself a corruption (probably driven by people who thought Castle of the Day was a cool name) of the earlier Caerdyf (itself derived from an earlier Celtic name meaning "Castle on the Taff", but not technically meaning anything in Welsh), which would actually be closer to the modern English pronunciation.
** Other places have entirely disconnected names. Swansea was originally established as a Viking trading post, and is most likely named after the Norse king Sweyn Forkbeard (other etymologies are argued, but all come from Old Norse). The Welsh name, Abertawe, simply means "Mouth of the River Tawe". Both names have been used concurrently for about as long as the city has existed.
17th Oct '16 5:06:49 PM nombretomado
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* An episode of ''WesternAnimation/KingOfTheHill'' has Peggy do some digging into Arlen's history and discover, to her horror, that it used to be named Harlotown[[note]]Yes, an entire city of brothels; somewhere, FrankMiller is looking on and smiling[[/note]], and the name "Arlen" developed because of people who were in a hurry to get there and didn't have time to say the real name.

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* An episode of ''WesternAnimation/KingOfTheHill'' has Peggy do some digging into Arlen's history and discover, to her horror, that it used to be named Harlotown[[note]]Yes, an entire city of brothels; somewhere, FrankMiller Creator/FrankMiller is looking on and smiling[[/note]], and the name "Arlen" developed because of people who were in a hurry to get there and didn't have time to say the real name.
This list shows the last 10 events of 182. Show all.
http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Main.PleaseSelectNewCityName