History Main / OvenLogic

20th Aug '16 8:16:39 PM KidDynamite
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* ''Series/KateAndAllie'' had an episode where Allie wasn't going to be around for dinner but prepared it in advance, leaving instructions to put it in the oven at a specified temperature for an hour. Not wanting to wait that long, Kate decided to double the temperature, thinking it would then only take half as long. Cut to the next scene where Kate is scraping the burnt dinner into the garbage, while her daughter, Emma, ate a slice of the pizza they wound up ordering.
* A later episode of ''Series/ThreesCompany'' had an episode where Jack was appearing on TV doing a cooking segment, with Janet and Terri as his assistants. During their rehearsal, Janet addresses the issue and Jack explained why it wasn't a good idea.
18th Aug '16 9:27:24 AM PrimeEvil
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* This happened on an episode of ''Series/PeeWeesPlayhouse''. They were baking bread, and one of the puppets turned the oven up all the way to ''700''.

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* This happened on an episode of ''Series/PeeWeesPlayhouse''. They Pee-Wee and Ms. Yvonne were baking bread, bread at 360 degrees, and one of the puppets Randy turned the oven up all the way to ''700''.''700'', thinking that it would get done in half the time.
13th Aug '16 5:36:11 PM edderiofer
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* Rice is best cooked with a ratio of water to rice 1:1, with an additional half cup of water for evaporation loss. So one cup of rice should be cooked with one-and-a-half cups, two cups two-and-a-half, and so on. Seeing just one cup:one-and-a-half cups without understanding why may naturally lead to the conclusion that four cups of rice is to be made with six cups of water, which results in congee instead of rice.
2nd Jun '16 8:02:07 AM legendaryweredragon
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* [[http://www.foresthillcomic.org/comics/2272644/re-order/ This page from ]]''Webcomic/ForestHill''.
29th May '16 10:23:12 AM nombretomado
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* A Thanksgiving episode of ''GoodLuckCharlie'' has Amy turning the turkey fryer UpToEleven to speed the cooking time. The ensuing explosion launches the turkey into the air and it falls on Teddy. The family ends up eating sandwiches that "may contain turkey" around her hospital bed.

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* A Thanksgiving episode of ''GoodLuckCharlie'' ''Series/GoodLuckCharlie'' has Amy turning the turkey fryer UpToEleven to speed the cooking time. The ensuing explosion launches the turkey into the air and it falls on Teddy. The family ends up eating sandwiches that "may contain turkey" around her hospital bed.
21st May '16 3:04:47 AM Vir
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-->'''Bloo:''' Okay, this is taking too long. Let's see, if it takes 20 minutes to cook at 250 degrees...it should take ''2 minutes'' at 2500 degrees! (Bloo does ties that causing the roof to explode) Whoops.

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-->'''Bloo:''' Okay, this is taking too long. Let's see, if it takes 20 minutes to cook at 250 degrees...it should take ''2 minutes'' at 2500 degrees! (Bloo ''(Bloo does ties that this, causing the roof to explode) be blown off)'' Whoops.
21st May '16 3:04:09 AM Vir
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* An episode of ''WesternAnimation/TheSimpsons'' which parodied ''[[Series/TwentyFour 24]]'' had Marge trying to bake a cake in time for a bake sale. The recipe called for 20 minutes at 300F, which she equated to 5 minutes at 1200F. The resulting Raisin Sponge cake was [[ChekhovsGun hard enough to break through inexplicably bullet-proof glass]].

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* An episode of ''WesternAnimation/TheSimpsons'' which parodied ''[[Series/TwentyFour 24]]'' had Marge trying to bake a cake in time for a bake sale. The recipe called for 20 minutes at 300F, which she equated to 5 minutes at 1200F. The resulting Raisin Sponge raisin sponge cake was [[ChekhovsGun hard enough to break through inexplicably bullet-proof glass]].
21st May '16 3:03:24 AM Vir
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* The [[WesternAnimation/GarfieldSpecials Garfield Thanksgiving special]] had Jon do this with the turkey - 350 degrees for five and a half hours becomes 500 degrees when he only has three hours: "Hmm. Guess I'll have to speed things up a bit. ''twist twist'' 500 degrees! That was easy." What's interesting is that this will actually work, if it's done correctly, although it's a little more complicated than simply putting the turkey in oven and cranking the heat up. It's known as "two hour turkey," and the technique is detailed [[http://www.epicurious.com/recipes/food/views/Two-Hour-Turkey-and-Gravy-104130 here]]. (It will not work with a turkey that's ''still frozen'', as Jon's was.)

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* The [[WesternAnimation/GarfieldSpecials Garfield Thanksgiving special]] had Jon do this with the turkey - 350 degrees for five and a half hours becomes 500 degrees when he only has three hours: "Hmm. Guess I'll have to speed things up a bit. ''twist twist'' ''(twist twist)'' 500 degrees! That was easy." What's interesting is that this will actually work, if it's done correctly, although it's a little more complicated than simply putting the turkey in the oven and cranking the heat up. It's known as "two hour "two-hour turkey," and the technique is detailed [[http://www.epicurious.com/recipes/food/views/Two-Hour-Turkey-and-Gravy-104130 here]]. (It will not work with a turkey that's ''still frozen'', as Jon's was.)
8th May '16 1:52:47 PM BunsenH
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The problem is that cooking (and chemistry) follow their own rules, which the character is not privy to--more specifically, there are several factors to the equation that the "cook" in question fails to consider beyond simply the amount of heat transferred. The rate of heat transfer is not proportional to the temperature of the oven, but to the ''difference'' between the temperatures of the oven and the food. Since the temperature of the food changes over time, you'd need to have a firm grasp of differential equations to be able to predict the time required at higher temperatures.[[note]]Broadly speaking, the time and temperature factors have to be such that enough heat will reach the interior of the food to get it to a cooked state when the outside of the food is nicely browned. Too high a temperature and the inside will still be raw when the outside is done; too low, and the inside will be overcooked and/or dried out when the outside is done.[[/note]] That's not even counting the effect on chemical kinetics, which will greatly increase the rate of reactions such as oxidation (burning) at high temperatures.[[note]]The general rule of thumb is that every 10°C increase around room temperature roughly doubles the rate.[[/note]] Of course, household temperature scales are also not based around absolute zero like the Kelvin scale is. After all, what ''exactly'' would be twice as hot as 100°F or 100°C?[[note]]It's 659.67°F and 473.15°C; you need to convert to Rankine(°F+459.67) and Kelvin(°C+273.15) before doubling.[[/note]]

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The problem is that cooking (and chemistry) follow their own rules, which the character is not privy to--more specifically, there are several factors to the equation that the "cook" in question fails to consider beyond simply the amount of heat transferred. The rate of heat transfer is not proportional to the temperature of the oven, but to the ''difference'' between the temperatures of the oven and the food. Since the temperature of the food changes over time, you'd need to have a firm grasp of differential equations to be able to predict the time required at higher temperatures.temperatures... or enough experience to cook "by feel", of course.[[note]]Broadly speaking, the time and temperature factors have to be such that enough heat will reach the interior of the food to get it to a cooked state when the outside of the food is nicely browned. Too high a temperature and the inside will still be raw when the outside is done; too low, and the inside will be overcooked and/or dried out when the outside is done.[[/note]] That's not even counting the effect on chemical kinetics, which will greatly increase the rate of reactions such as oxidation (burning) at high temperatures.[[note]]The general rule of thumb is that every 10°C increase around room temperature roughly doubles the rate.[[/note]] Of course, household temperature scales are also not based around absolute zero like the Kelvin scale is. After all, what ''exactly'' would be twice as hot as 100°F or 100°C?[[note]]It's 659.67°F and 473.15°C; you need to convert to Rankine(°F+459.67) and Kelvin(°C+273.15) before doubling.[[/note]]
5th May '16 8:52:40 AM BunsenH
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For example, they'll assume a cake that needs 30 minutes at 375 Fahrenheit (or 190.5 Celsius) to bake can be baked just as well in 15 minutes at 750[[labelnote:or]]400 in Celsius[[/labelnote]] degrees (never mind that a normal kitchen oven won't go that high). Expect there to be flames, plenty of smoke, and for the LethalChef to pull out something resembling a forest fire from the oven. Or occasionally, a fireball that destroys the entire house, with a [[ParodiedTrope perfectly baked pie in the middle of the debris.]]

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For example, they'll assume a cake that needs 30 minutes at 375 375° Fahrenheit (or 190.5 Celsius) to bake can be baked just as well in 15 minutes at 750[[labelnote:or]]400 in Celsius[[/labelnote]] 750° Fahrenheit (or 400° Celsius) degrees (never mind that a normal kitchen oven won't go that high). Expect there to be flames, plenty of smoke, and for the LethalChef to pull out something resembling a forest fire from the oven. Or occasionally, a fireball that destroys the entire house, with a [[ParodiedTrope perfectly baked pie in the middle of the debris.]]



The problem is that cooking (and chemistry) follow their own rules, which the character is not privy to--more specifically, there are several factors to the equation that the "cook" in question fails to consider beyond simply the amount of heat transferred. The rate of heat transfer is not proportional to the temperature of the oven, but to the ''difference'' between the temperatures of the oven and the food. Since the temperature of the food changes over time, you'd need to have a firm grasp of differential equations to be able to predict the time required at higher temperatures. That's not even counting the effect on chemical kinetics, which will greatly increase the rate of reactions such as oxidation (burning) at high temperatures.[[note]]The general rule of thumb is that every 10°C increase around room temperature roughly doubles the rate.[[/note]] Of course, household temperature scales are also not based around absolute zero like the Kelvin scale is. After all, what ''exactly'' would be twice as hot as 100°F or 100°C?[[note]]It's 659.67°F and 473.15°C; you need to convert to Rankine(°F+459.67) and Kelvin(°C+273.15) before doubling.[[/note]]

to:

The problem is that cooking (and chemistry) follow their own rules, which the character is not privy to--more specifically, there are several factors to the equation that the "cook" in question fails to consider beyond simply the amount of heat transferred. The rate of heat transfer is not proportional to the temperature of the oven, but to the ''difference'' between the temperatures of the oven and the food. Since the temperature of the food changes over time, you'd need to have a firm grasp of differential equations to be able to predict the time required at higher temperatures. [[note]]Broadly speaking, the time and temperature factors have to be such that enough heat will reach the interior of the food to get it to a cooked state when the outside of the food is nicely browned. Too high a temperature and the inside will still be raw when the outside is done; too low, and the inside will be overcooked and/or dried out when the outside is done.[[/note]] That's not even counting the effect on chemical kinetics, which will greatly increase the rate of reactions such as oxidation (burning) at high temperatures.[[note]]The general rule of thumb is that every 10°C increase around room temperature roughly doubles the rate.[[/note]] Of course, household temperature scales are also not based around absolute zero like the Kelvin scale is. After all, what ''exactly'' would be twice as hot as 100°F or 100°C?[[note]]It's 659.67°F and 473.15°C; you need to convert to Rankine(°F+459.67) and Kelvin(°C+273.15) before doubling.[[/note]]
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