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History Main / OvenLogic

21st May '16 3:04:47 AM Vir
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-->'''Bloo:''' Okay, this is taking too long. Let's see, if it takes 20 minutes to cook at 250 degrees...it should take ''2 minutes'' at 2500 degrees! (Bloo does ties that causing the roof to explode) Whoops.

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-->'''Bloo:''' Okay, this is taking too long. Let's see, if it takes 20 minutes to cook at 250 degrees...it should take ''2 minutes'' at 2500 degrees! (Bloo ''(Bloo does ties that this, causing the roof to explode) be blown off)'' Whoops.
21st May '16 3:04:09 AM Vir
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* An episode of ''WesternAnimation/TheSimpsons'' which parodied ''[[Series/TwentyFour 24]]'' had Marge trying to bake a cake in time for a bake sale. The recipe called for 20 minutes at 300F, which she equated to 5 minutes at 1200F. The resulting Raisin Sponge cake was [[ChekhovsGun hard enough to break through inexplicably bullet-proof glass]].

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* An episode of ''WesternAnimation/TheSimpsons'' which parodied ''[[Series/TwentyFour 24]]'' had Marge trying to bake a cake in time for a bake sale. The recipe called for 20 minutes at 300F, which she equated to 5 minutes at 1200F. The resulting Raisin Sponge raisin sponge cake was [[ChekhovsGun hard enough to break through inexplicably bullet-proof glass]].
21st May '16 3:03:24 AM Vir
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* The [[WesternAnimation/GarfieldSpecials Garfield Thanksgiving special]] had Jon do this with the turkey - 350 degrees for five and a half hours becomes 500 degrees when he only has three hours: "Hmm. Guess I'll have to speed things up a bit. ''twist twist'' 500 degrees! That was easy." What's interesting is that this will actually work, if it's done correctly, although it's a little more complicated than simply putting the turkey in oven and cranking the heat up. It's known as "two hour turkey," and the technique is detailed [[http://www.epicurious.com/recipes/food/views/Two-Hour-Turkey-and-Gravy-104130 here]]. (It will not work with a turkey that's ''still frozen'', as Jon's was.)

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* The [[WesternAnimation/GarfieldSpecials Garfield Thanksgiving special]] had Jon do this with the turkey - 350 degrees for five and a half hours becomes 500 degrees when he only has three hours: "Hmm. Guess I'll have to speed things up a bit. ''twist twist'' ''(twist twist)'' 500 degrees! That was easy." What's interesting is that this will actually work, if it's done correctly, although it's a little more complicated than simply putting the turkey in the oven and cranking the heat up. It's known as "two hour "two-hour turkey," and the technique is detailed [[http://www.epicurious.com/recipes/food/views/Two-Hour-Turkey-and-Gravy-104130 here]]. (It will not work with a turkey that's ''still frozen'', as Jon's was.)
8th May '16 1:52:47 PM BunsenH
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The problem is that cooking (and chemistry) follow their own rules, which the character is not privy to--more specifically, there are several factors to the equation that the "cook" in question fails to consider beyond simply the amount of heat transferred. The rate of heat transfer is not proportional to the temperature of the oven, but to the ''difference'' between the temperatures of the oven and the food. Since the temperature of the food changes over time, you'd need to have a firm grasp of differential equations to be able to predict the time required at higher temperatures.[[note]]Broadly speaking, the time and temperature factors have to be such that enough heat will reach the interior of the food to get it to a cooked state when the outside of the food is nicely browned. Too high a temperature and the inside will still be raw when the outside is done; too low, and the inside will be overcooked and/or dried out when the outside is done.[[/note]] That's not even counting the effect on chemical kinetics, which will greatly increase the rate of reactions such as oxidation (burning) at high temperatures.[[note]]The general rule of thumb is that every 10°C increase around room temperature roughly doubles the rate.[[/note]] Of course, household temperature scales are also not based around absolute zero like the Kelvin scale is. After all, what ''exactly'' would be twice as hot as 100°F or 100°C?[[note]]It's 659.67°F and 473.15°C; you need to convert to Rankine(°F+459.67) and Kelvin(°C+273.15) before doubling.[[/note]]

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The problem is that cooking (and chemistry) follow their own rules, which the character is not privy to--more specifically, there are several factors to the equation that the "cook" in question fails to consider beyond simply the amount of heat transferred. The rate of heat transfer is not proportional to the temperature of the oven, but to the ''difference'' between the temperatures of the oven and the food. Since the temperature of the food changes over time, you'd need to have a firm grasp of differential equations to be able to predict the time required at higher temperatures.temperatures... or enough experience to cook "by feel", of course.[[note]]Broadly speaking, the time and temperature factors have to be such that enough heat will reach the interior of the food to get it to a cooked state when the outside of the food is nicely browned. Too high a temperature and the inside will still be raw when the outside is done; too low, and the inside will be overcooked and/or dried out when the outside is done.[[/note]] That's not even counting the effect on chemical kinetics, which will greatly increase the rate of reactions such as oxidation (burning) at high temperatures.[[note]]The general rule of thumb is that every 10°C increase around room temperature roughly doubles the rate.[[/note]] Of course, household temperature scales are also not based around absolute zero like the Kelvin scale is. After all, what ''exactly'' would be twice as hot as 100°F or 100°C?[[note]]It's 659.67°F and 473.15°C; you need to convert to Rankine(°F+459.67) and Kelvin(°C+273.15) before doubling.[[/note]]
5th May '16 8:52:40 AM BunsenH
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For example, they'll assume a cake that needs 30 minutes at 375 Fahrenheit (or 190.5 Celsius) to bake can be baked just as well in 15 minutes at 750[[labelnote:or]]400 in Celsius[[/labelnote]] degrees (never mind that a normal kitchen oven won't go that high). Expect there to be flames, plenty of smoke, and for the LethalChef to pull out something resembling a forest fire from the oven. Or occasionally, a fireball that destroys the entire house, with a [[ParodiedTrope perfectly baked pie in the middle of the debris.]]

to:

For example, they'll assume a cake that needs 30 minutes at 375 375° Fahrenheit (or 190.5 Celsius) to bake can be baked just as well in 15 minutes at 750[[labelnote:or]]400 in Celsius[[/labelnote]] 750° Fahrenheit (or 400° Celsius) degrees (never mind that a normal kitchen oven won't go that high). Expect there to be flames, plenty of smoke, and for the LethalChef to pull out something resembling a forest fire from the oven. Or occasionally, a fireball that destroys the entire house, with a [[ParodiedTrope perfectly baked pie in the middle of the debris.]]



The problem is that cooking (and chemistry) follow their own rules, which the character is not privy to--more specifically, there are several factors to the equation that the "cook" in question fails to consider beyond simply the amount of heat transferred. The rate of heat transfer is not proportional to the temperature of the oven, but to the ''difference'' between the temperatures of the oven and the food. Since the temperature of the food changes over time, you'd need to have a firm grasp of differential equations to be able to predict the time required at higher temperatures. That's not even counting the effect on chemical kinetics, which will greatly increase the rate of reactions such as oxidation (burning) at high temperatures.[[note]]The general rule of thumb is that every 10°C increase around room temperature roughly doubles the rate.[[/note]] Of course, household temperature scales are also not based around absolute zero like the Kelvin scale is. After all, what ''exactly'' would be twice as hot as 100°F or 100°C?[[note]]It's 659.67°F and 473.15°C; you need to convert to Rankine(°F+459.67) and Kelvin(°C+273.15) before doubling.[[/note]]

to:

The problem is that cooking (and chemistry) follow their own rules, which the character is not privy to--more specifically, there are several factors to the equation that the "cook" in question fails to consider beyond simply the amount of heat transferred. The rate of heat transfer is not proportional to the temperature of the oven, but to the ''difference'' between the temperatures of the oven and the food. Since the temperature of the food changes over time, you'd need to have a firm grasp of differential equations to be able to predict the time required at higher temperatures. [[note]]Broadly speaking, the time and temperature factors have to be such that enough heat will reach the interior of the food to get it to a cooked state when the outside of the food is nicely browned. Too high a temperature and the inside will still be raw when the outside is done; too low, and the inside will be overcooked and/or dried out when the outside is done.[[/note]] That's not even counting the effect on chemical kinetics, which will greatly increase the rate of reactions such as oxidation (burning) at high temperatures.[[note]]The general rule of thumb is that every 10°C increase around room temperature roughly doubles the rate.[[/note]] Of course, household temperature scales are also not based around absolute zero like the Kelvin scale is. After all, what ''exactly'' would be twice as hot as 100°F or 100°C?[[note]]It's 659.67°F and 473.15°C; you need to convert to Rankine(°F+459.67) and Kelvin(°C+273.15) before doubling.[[/note]]
12th Apr '16 12:50:41 PM Eievie
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HilarityEnsues. A subset of the horrible cooking skills of a LethalChef. This has probably been TruthInTelevision for some of us at one point in [[RealLife our lives]]. Also, notice that some processes ''do'' behave according to Oven Logic; milk pasteurization, for example, can be done in 5 minutes at 70°C, or in less than 3 seconds at 150°C -- though again, the reduction in time is disproportionate to the increase in temperature (and doing it faster kills the taste by caramelizing the milk sugar).

The problem is that cooking (and chemistry) follow their own rules, which the character is not privy to - more specifically, there are several factors to the equation that the "cook" in question fails to consider beyond simply the amount of heat transferred. The rate of heat transfer is not proportional to the temperature of the oven, but to the ''difference'' between the temperatures of the oven and the food. Since the temperature of the food changes over time, you'd need to have a firm grasp of differential equations to be able to predict the time required at higher temperatures. That's not even counting the effect on chemical kinetics, which will greatly increase the rate of reactions such as oxidation (burning) at high temperatures.[[note]]The general rule of thumb is that every 10°C increase around room temperature roughly doubles the rate.[[/note]] Of course, household temperature scales are also not based around absolute zero like the Kelvin scale is. After all, what ''exactly'' would be twice as hot as 100°F or 100°C?[[note]]It's 659.67°F and 473.15°C; you need to convert to Rankine(°F+459.67) and Kelvin(°C+273.15) before doubling.[[/note]]

to:

HilarityEnsues. A subset of the horrible cooking skills of a LethalChef. This has probably been TruthInTelevision for some of us at one point in [[RealLife our lives]]. Also, notice that some processes ''do'' behave according to Oven Logic; milk pasteurization, for example, can be done in 5 minutes at 70°C, or in less than 3 seconds at 150°C -- though 150°C--though again, the reduction in time is disproportionate to the increase in temperature (and doing it faster kills the taste by caramelizing the milk sugar).

The problem is that cooking (and chemistry) follow their own rules, which the character is not privy to - more to--more specifically, there are several factors to the equation that the "cook" in question fails to consider beyond simply the amount of heat transferred. The rate of heat transfer is not proportional to the temperature of the oven, but to the ''difference'' between the temperatures of the oven and the food. Since the temperature of the food changes over time, you'd need to have a firm grasp of differential equations to be able to predict the time required at higher temperatures. That's not even counting the effect on chemical kinetics, which will greatly increase the rate of reactions such as oxidation (burning) at high temperatures.[[note]]The general rule of thumb is that every 10°C increase around room temperature roughly doubles the rate.[[/note]] Of course, household temperature scales are also not based around absolute zero like the Kelvin scale is. After all, what ''exactly'' would be twice as hot as 100°F or 100°C?[[note]]It's 659.67°F and 473.15°C; you need to convert to Rankine(°F+459.67) and Kelvin(°C+273.15) before doubling.[[/note]]
12th Apr '16 12:49:18 PM Eievie
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->''"Relax, Candace. It's simple math. Instead of cooking it at 350 degrees for one hour, we could cook it for five minutes at... ''(enters equation into calculator)'' 9000 degrees! What could go wrong?"''

to:

->''"Relax, Candace. It's simple math. Instead of cooking it at 350 degrees for one hour, we could cook it for five 5 minutes at... ''(enters equation into calculator)'' 9000 9,000 degrees! What could go wrong?"''
2nd Apr '16 9:18:31 AM alnair20aug93
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For example, they'll assume a cake that needs 30 minutes at 375 Fahrenheit to bake can be baked just as well in 15 minutes at 750 degrees (never mind that a normal kitchen oven won't go that high). Expect there to be flames, plenty of smoke, and for the LethalChef to pull out something resembling a forest fire from the oven. Or occasionally, a fireball that destroys the entire house, with a [[ParodiedTrope perfectly baked pie in the middle of the debris.]]

to:

For example, they'll assume a cake that needs 30 minutes at 375 Fahrenheit (or 190.5 Celsius) to bake can be baked just as well in 15 minutes at 750 750[[labelnote:or]]400 in Celsius[[/labelnote]] degrees (never mind that a normal kitchen oven won't go that high). Expect there to be flames, plenty of smoke, and for the LethalChef to pull out something resembling a forest fire from the oven. Or occasionally, a fireball that destroys the entire house, with a [[ParodiedTrope perfectly baked pie in the middle of the debris.]]
14th Mar '16 3:50:00 PM FiliasCupio
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-->-- '''Stacy''', "Moon Farm", ''WesternAnimation/PhineasAndFerb'' [[note]]The surface of the Sun is 9,940.73 degrees Fahrenheit, by the way.[[/note]]

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-->-- '''Stacy''', "Moon Farm", ''WesternAnimation/PhineasAndFerb'' [[note]]The surface of the Sun is 9,940.73 9,900 degrees Fahrenheit, by the way.[[/note]]
22nd Feb '16 7:09:37 PM Vir
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* Elmira does this in ''WesternAnimation/TinyToonAdventures'' when warming a bottle of milk.

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* Elmira Elmyra does this in ''WesternAnimation/TinyToonAdventures'' when warming a bottle of milk.
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