History Main / OmniDisciplinaryScientist

20th Apr '17 12:24:51 AM Tuckerscreator
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* Dr. Noomi Rapace from ''Film/{{Prometheus}}'' was originally an archaeologist focused on the theory of AncientAstronauts. In the film she leads a survey mission on an alien planet and then later fronts a autopsy on a severed alien head.

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* Dr. Noomi Rapace from ''Film/{{Prometheus}}'' was originally an archaeologist focused on the theory of AncientAstronauts. In the film she leads a survey mission on an alien planet and then later fronts a an autopsy on a severed alien head.


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* Dr. Halsey in the ''{{Franchise/Halo}}'' ExpandedUniverse is a [[ImprobablyHighIQ 200 IQ scientist]] with a knack for seemingly every discipline. In her teens she created a complex model predicting the collapse of humanity's interstellar colonies into civil war (sociologist). In her twenties she personally sketched designs for an advanced set of PoweredArmor (engineer and roboticist). In the following years she recruited and trained numerous kidnapped children to indoctrinate them into soldiers (psychologist). Afterward she formulated the chemicals to physically augment them ''and'' performed the surgery herself (bio-chemist and surgeon). During the war against [[ScaryDogmaticAliens the Covenant]] she studied their weapons for reverse-engineering, their society for ways to subvert it, and the artifacts of the Forerunner species they worshipped (xenoarchaelogist). Then among her other accomplishments include cloning her own brain to create artificial intelligence, and creating designs for new starships made out of reverse-engineered Forerunner tech. [[ArsonMurderAndJaywalking Also she's not a bad artist.]]
4th Apr '17 12:35:35 PM Whatactually
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* In ''Dinosaur King'', Dr. Z spends a lot of his time working with machinery and biological modifications despite being a palaeontologist. Notably most of his devices and inventions are defective or [[StuffBlowingUp are prone to explode]], but it is played straighter with the Ancients, who are also palaeontologists, but have little trouble building a time machine or a device to detect powerful stones from the beginning of time, something even an advanced race of aliens couldn't manage.
20th Mar '17 11:23:28 AM Malitia
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** The late Silver Age of X-men includes [[Podcast.RachelAndMilesXPlainTheXMen Super Doctor Astronaut]] Peter Corbeau, who started out as an astronaut who was also a scientist, but Chris Claremont was soon using him any time the plot called for a scientist or medical doctor. Even his original appearance is somewhat questionable, since he's both a space shuttle pilot and a mission specialist, which are distinct roles in the the actual space program.

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** The late Silver Age of X-men includes [[Podcast.RachelAndMilesXPlainTheXMen JayAndMilesXPlainTheXMen Super Doctor Astronaut]] Peter Corbeau, who started out as an astronaut who was also a scientist, but Chris Claremont was soon using him any time the plot called for a scientist or medical doctor. Even his original appearance is somewhat questionable, since he's both a space shuttle pilot and a mission specialist, which are distinct roles in the the actual space program.
19th Mar '17 9:50:58 AM nombretomado
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* ''TabletopGame/GeniusTheTransgression'' has the same broad categories as all NewWorldOfDarkness games, but Geniuses also have the explicit ability to apply their skills to related yet bizarrely inappropriate circumstances. If they learn to drive a car they can use those skills to guide a spaceship through re-entry.

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* ''TabletopGame/GeniusTheTransgression'' has the same broad categories as all NewWorldOfDarkness TabletopGame/NewWorldOfDarkness games, but Geniuses also have the explicit ability to apply their skills to related yet bizarrely inappropriate circumstances. If they learn to drive a car they can use those skills to guide a spaceship through re-entry.
13th Mar '17 9:35:50 AM AthenaBlue
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** In [[Recap/DoctorWhoS28E2TheShakespeareCode "The Shakespeare Code"]] he manages to restart [[BizarreAlienBiology one of his hearts]] through a jury-rigged procedure, so he could have picked it up for real at some point, or he's simply better with Time Lord biology than human.

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** In [[Recap/DoctorWhoS28E2TheShakespeareCode [[Recap/DoctorWhoS29E2TheShakespeareCode "The Shakespeare Code"]] he manages to restart [[BizarreAlienBiology one of his hearts]] through a jury-rigged procedure, so he could have picked it up for real at some point, or he's simply better with Time Lord biology than human.
13th Mar '17 9:35:21 AM AthenaBlue
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* Dr. Spaceman (pronounced "Spatchemmen") in ''Series/ThirtyRock'' performs work of all kinds; he's equally unskilled at all branches of science...
* ''Series/AgentsOfSHIELD''.
** Subverted. Fitz, Simmons, and Skye are an engineer, a biologist, and a hacker, respectively, and each tends to solve the problems most suited to their domain. Simmons skirts this trope as she often acts as TheMedic, but multiple episodes show her reaching the edge of her knowledge and seeking help from actual doctors.
** Season 2 plays this painfully straight with Simmons as the most qualified medical practitioner in S.H.I.E.L.D., even going so far as to have her perform surgery for a gunshot wound and check the work of actual medical professionals because "there's no one whose opinion" is more trusted. Compared to the more realistic limits on her medical skills in Season 1, it's a bit jarring.
** Subverted with Radcliffe. He's a roboticist with a strong interest in transhumanism and cybernetics, so he has broad mechanical, programming, and biological knowledge. He's still not completely omnidisciplinary, though; he needs Fitz's help putting the finishing touch on his prototype LMD (especially her social programming), and when ordered by the BigBad to fix a missile, he has absolutely no idea what he's doing. He ends up just grabbing the instruction manual and stalling until he gets a chance to surrender to S.H.I.E.L.D.
* Fred in ''Series/{{Angel}}'' is presented as a physics student, but by the fifth season she's doing autopsies, examining things under microscopes, and boiling up chemicals. This despite the fact that she never even finished her ''first'' physics degree. Like other examples here, she does at least have a team that she works with.



* Gaius Baltar in ''Series/BattlestarGalactica2003'' is possibly a {{deconstruction}}. He's a computer scientist who's too arrogant to admit that biochemistry (or whatever other science he's consulted on) is out of his area of expertise. It's even {{Lampshaded}} in one episode. After Baltar is left for dead on New Caprica, the job of plotting a course to Earth (previously one of Baltar's many responsibilities) is turned over to Lt. Gaeta, who, as ''Galactica'''s tactical officer, has an actual background in astronomy. Admiral Adama and President Roslin comment on the sudden improvement in efficiency.
%%* Lem and Phil on ''Series/BetterOffTed''.
* Leonard and Sheldon from ''Series/TheBigBangTheory'' are physicists, but seem well-versed enough in biology, genetics, robotics, and computer science to conduct experiments involving them as well. This is not including the various areas of science that they can discuss casually and in great depth.
** Most of the show's main characters are ''geeks''. While not absolving them of [[HollywoodNerd stereotyping]], their nerdy pursuits would allow them to have working knowledge of any geeky interest they enjoy, as they would want to know how something from comic books or science fiction would be plausible; indeed, many {{cold open}}s are the guys debating the workings of superpowers, TimeTravel, or science in general.
** Howard's being an engineer, not a physicist, is brought up fairly often by other characters disparaging him because he "only" has an M. Eng.
--->'''Howard:''' I have a master's degree!\\
'''Gablehauser:''' Who doesn't?
*** In fact, only Sheldon is a theoretical physicist. Leonard is an experimental physicist and Raj an astrophysicist.
** Subverted when Howard claimed that as the engineer he is, he will fix the elevator in no time. Then claims the elevator is beyond repair.



* Averted in ''Series/{{Caprica}}''. Dr. Amanda Graystone works at the hospital as a ''plastic surgeon''. Therefore, when she sees a car accident, she does not rush over to offer first aid.
* Reid on ''Series/CriminalMinds'' has Ph.D.s in chemistry, mathematics and engineering, [=BAs=] in psychology and sociology, and he is working on a bachelor's degree in philosophy.
** From the very first episode:
--> '''Hotchner:''' This is Special Agent Gideon; Special Agent Morgan, our expert obsessional crime; Special Agent Reid--\\
'''Gideon:''' ''Doctor'' Reid.\\
'''Hotch:''' --Doctor Reid, our expert on, well, everything.
* On ''Series/CrossingJordan'' Nigel Townsend is a straight example of this. He knows everything about everything and readily admits it. It is even addressed by another character in one of the episodes. 'Dare I ask how he knows these things?' Another character responds, 'It's better not to question it.'
* Dr. Julia Hoffman of ''Series/DarkShadows'' qualifies. When first mentioned (but not yet seen), she's an expert on blood disorders, then turns up at Windcliff Sanitarium where she demonstrates psychiatric/psychological training, and in later episodes turns out to be a qualified surgeon, research scientist (her search for a cure for Barnabas), and electrical engineer.



** In the Second Doctor story, "The Moonbase," the Doctor mentions that he studied human medicine under Joseph Lister, which means his knowledge of human medicine might be just a little bit out of date. (In addition, he gives the wrong time and place to have studied under Lister, suggesting he's misremembering or bluffing).
** In "The Shakespeare Code" he manages to restart [[BizarreAlienBiology one of his hearts]] through a rather strange jury-rigged procedure, so he could have picked it up for real at some point, or he's simply better with Time Lord biology than human.
** When asked in "Colony In Space" if he's "some kind of scientist", the Third Doctor replies that "I'm every kind of scientist."
** In "The Empty Child", he performs (with his sonic screwdriver) an autopsy (effectively), listing all the possible reasons for the [[OurZombiesAreDifferent sci-fi zombie's]] "deaths".

to:

** In the Second Doctor story, [[Recap/DoctorWhoS4E6TheMoonbase "The Moonbase," Moonbase"]], the Doctor mentions that he studied human medicine under Joseph Lister, which means his knowledge of human medicine might be just a little bit out of date. (In addition, he gives the wrong time and place to have studied under Lister, suggesting he's misremembering or bluffing).
** In "The Shakespeare Code" he manages to restart [[BizarreAlienBiology one of his hearts]] through a rather strange jury-rigged procedure, so he could have picked it up for real at some point, or he's simply better with Time Lord biology than human.
** When asked in "Colony In Space" if he's "some kind of scientist", the Third Doctor replies that "I'm every kind of scientist."
** In "The Empty Child", he performs (with his sonic screwdriver) an autopsy (effectively), listing all the possible reasons for the [[OurZombiesAreDifferent sci-fi zombie's]] "deaths".
bluffing).



** When asked in [[Recap/DoctorWhoS8E4ColonyInSpace "Colony in Space"]] if he's "some kind of scientist", the Third Doctor replies that "I'm every kind of scientist."



** Averted wonderfully in "Remembrance of the Daleks" when Allison is examining a soldier. When asked, "Is he all right?" she replies, "No idea, [[NotThatKindOfDoctor I'm a physicist.]]"

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** Averted wonderfully in [[Recap/DoctorWhoS25E1RemembranceOfTheDaleks "Remembrance of the Daleks" Daleks"]] when Allison is examining a soldier. When asked, "Is he all right?" she replies, "No idea, [[NotThatKindOfDoctor I'm a physicist.]]"]]"
** In [[Recap/DoctorWhoS27E9TheEmptyChild "The Empty Child"]], he performs (with his sonic screwdriver) an autopsy (effectively), listing all the possible reasons for the [[OurZombiesAreDifferent sci-fi zombie's]] "deaths".
** In [[Recap/DoctorWhoS28E2TheShakespeareCode "The Shakespeare Code"]] he manages to restart [[BizarreAlienBiology one of his hearts]] through a jury-rigged procedure, so he could have picked it up for real at some point, or he's simply better with Time Lord biology than human.
* Topher Brink of ''{{Series/Dollhouse}}'' is an expert in neuroscience, computers, and electrical engineering. It's somewhat necessary for his job. He's also been to medical school, though we don't actually know if he's an MD.
** Echo is a more justified example - she has dozens of different personalities in her head, including a nurse and a few rocket scientists.
* Dr. Jacob Hood, biophysicist and special science advisor to the FBI, from ''Series/EleventhHour''. Being an Omnidisciplinarian with an extra helping of awesomesauce is the entire role of his character.
* On ''{{Series/Eureka}}'':
** Henry Deacon manages to be Omnidisciplinarian whenever the plot requires despite living in a town populated by scientific geniuses and which should, in theory, be able to field a team of specialists on whatever virus/natural disaster/temporal anomaly is threatening the town this week. He's also the town's mechanic. [[LampshadeHanging Lampshaded]] whenever he changes the patch he wears on his uniform to reflect whatever job he happens to be doing, as when he pulled a patch reading "Coroner" out of his pocket just as he walked into a morgue. The sheriff's dependence on Henry may be partially justified: given how eccentric most of the people he's met in Eureka appear to be, he might prefer to work with a guy who seems relatively "normal", and isn't going to wander off to play fetch with his robot dog or whatever.
** Fargo seems to wind up as the assistant to anyone at Global Dynamics who's doing anything interesting, dangerous, or plot-important. It helps him live up to his ButtMonkey status, though you have to wonder how someone who looks like he's just out of high school could possibly have had the ''time'' to learn that much. He also takes over from Henry on several occasions. Later in an {{AU}} timeline (but still the same Fargo) he's smart and composed enough to run Global Dynamics and keep track of everything.
** Interestingly subverted in one episode in which a disease that makes people stupid runs through Eureka. When Carter rounds up the scientists who weren't infected [[spoiler:on account of being vegetarians who didn't eat the broken ArtificialMeat]] and ask them to fix it, he quickly finds out that not every scientist is an expert in human immunology, winding up with a "chemist, a botanist, a math theorist, and a...lepipotamus[[note]] [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lepidoptera lepidopterist]][[/note]]".
* ''Series/{{Farscape}}'':
** Scorpius specializes in many different fields: originally a researcher in wormhole physics, he's also skilled enough in engineering, cybernetics and neuroscience to invent the Aurora chair and a neurochip containing a replica of his personality. And he's also WickedCultured.
** For that matter, Crichton himself. He holds no doctorates, calls himself a "God damned scientist" and gives his rank as "Commander" when he first encounters Aeryn (indicating he was the commander of the shuttle mission in which he disappeared through a wormhole). He's also a crack pilot proven to at ''least'' be on par with Aeryn in space and possibly a ''superior'' pilot in atmosphere, an engineer who designed and built the [=FarScape=] module (with his friend D.K.'s help) himself, is an accomplished enough technician to assist Gilina with repairing and installing a Peacekeeper defense screen salvaged from ''Zelbinion'' aboard Moya, heavily modified his module with Leviathan and Peacekeeper technology, even ''before'' having wormhole knowledge implanted in his head by the Ancients was well on his way towards single-handedly cracking wormhole travel (which entire ''races'' have attempted and failed), and built a ''nuclear bomb'', among other feats.
* Simon Campos on ''Series/FlashForward2009'' is a quantum physicist who also reads medical charts and breaks encryption.
* Natalie on ''Series/ForeverKnight'', although she's the medical examiner, is represented as doing a variety of science stuff (although not much is shown onscreen) in attempting to understand vampire Nick Knight's condition and "cure" him.
* ''{{Series/Fringe}}'':
** Walter Bishop's expertise ranges from biology to teleportation technology but at least has the good grace to not build things that work perfectly on his first try. (the teleporter for example does [[NoodleIncident something very nasty, but non-lethal]], to you). His son is close enough to this that he can point out when Walter is ignoring the laws of physics and common sense.
** Fringe has actually been fairly consistent about it - Walter is mostly a trained biochemist, but he is also superintelligent and has spent a lot of time working with other disciplines. His more elaborate inventions were pretty explicitly developed in collaboration with other people. And he has a great deal of trouble with stuff outside his knowledge -- when given a stack of books that explain a time machine, he complains that it would take 20 years and a team of expert assistants for him to absorb all the information. But he's smart enough to get the gist of how it works, even if he couldn't build one.
** The show behaves as if "fringe science" were a single category of scientific endeavor, overlapping physics, biology, biochemistry, and a dozen or so others (Sonoma State University may have once offered a degree in fringe science, but Harvard not so much). Walter Bishop is shown as an expert on teleporters one minute and performing autopsies the next. They even occasionally send patients to his clearly unhygienic lab to have him perform surgeries. Not that the character isn't a hoot. He also knows a lot about LSD.



* Every version of ''Franchise/StarTrek'' has at least one Omnidisciplinary Scientist and [[OpenHeartDentistry Open Heart Dentist]], always justified by some means or another: ''Series/StarTrekTheNextGeneration'' had SuperPrototype android Data, ''[[Series/StarTrekDeepSpaceNine Deep Space Nine]]'' had [[DesignerBabies Designer Baby]] Doctor Bashir. The rest of the time they just called in a Vulcan, whose ''[[PlanetOfHats Hat]]'' seems to be "Omnidisciplinary '''''whatever I choose to study'''''", and an extensive amount of BackStory is devoted to justifying this. Vulcan neurochemistry has what would be in humans super-high levels of various hormones that facilitate learning, recall, analysis, and reflexes. They also result in [[HotBlooded hair-trigger tempers]]; prior to the coming of Surak, they were even more violent than ''[[ProudWarriorRaceGuy Klingons]]''. His Message was that all problems were solvable through AwesomenessByAnalysis, whereas DontThinkFeel would only lead to TheEndOfTheWorldAsWeKnowIt. He wasn't all that popular until he gained a {{Foil}}, T'Pel, who executed the story of ''Film/FightClub'' UpToEleven, freaking the ''entire planet'' out so badly that they've followed him ever since. The Foil then left Vulcan to found a Planet Of Hats that have been the Vulcans' Foil ever since - the [[MagnificentBastard Romulans]].
** This is rather elegantly demonstrated in the J.J. Abrams ''Film/StarTrek'' movie during the scene showing the Vulcan "learning pits." The schoolchildren are answering rapid-fire questions from many, many disparate disciplines, showing how Vulcan education is intensely omnidisciplinary from very early on. This scene is actually a CallBack to ''Film/StarTrekIVTheVoyageHome''. Spock, getting back in mental shape after his [[BackFromTheDead recent inconvenience]], stands encircled by multiple computers all of which are engaged in separate tests which he has to complete or solve at the same time in various different ways - some require verbal answers, others typed answers, others touch-screen answers and so on. He multitasks effortlessly until one of the computers asks the question "How do you feel?" and Spock is utterly stumped.
** In Dr Bashir's case, it was almost averted originally. When ''[[Series/StarTrekDeepSpaceNine Deep Space Nine]]'' first started, Dr Bashir was the medical expert who didn't even know everything about medicine (for example, he once had great difficult with a dying Cardassian patient due to his (at the time) lack of knowledge of Cardassian physiology). As a result, Bashir was used to play up the [[ImADoctorNotAPlaceholder "I'm a doctor, not a..."]] [[MemeticMutation tradition]] instead. Very late into the show, it was revealed Bashir was in fact a DesignerBaby and he was turned into a ridiculously Omnidisciplinary Scientist prone to LudicrousPrecision and capable of ImprobableAimingSkills almost overnight with the {{handwave}} that he'd been like this all along, but had simply been keeping it secret.
** Jadzia Dax was also an example. Her exact specialisation was almost impossible to tell because her scientific knowledge accommodated whatever the plot needed her to know. She received the Dax symbiote at the age of 26 and confirmed in the first series that she had obtained all her many degrees and vast scientific knowledge prior to receiving Dax. She was also Dax's first scientist, the closest thing to a scientist Dax had previously hosted had been an engineer. As a result, even Dax's 300 years worth of experience couldn't explain why Jadzia had such a vast knowledge of science by the age of 28 (the Jadzia host's age as of her first appearance). Though it's ''somewhat'' justified as the the small number of symbiotes means that the Symbiosis Commission goes out of its way to pick only geniuses as hosts. The Dax symbiote's life experiences were later used to waive the rest of Ezri Dax's training to become a fully qualified psychologist on the grounds that her training couldn't teach her anything her 300+ year old symbiote hadn't already experienced. This was despite Ezri being the first psychologist to have ever hosted Dax and the fact that, as an Trill unprepared for Joining, the Joining seriously messed her up for a while.
** Miles O'Brien was a non-com Chief Engineer with broad experience as both a soldier and technician, officially specializing in transporter operations (''not'' theory). As a child, he tested at the very low end for scientific and engineering aptitude, only discovering his skill as an engineer during a combat situation where his life and the life of his squad depended on getting a broken transporter to work in a matter of minutes. That said, whenever Dax isn't around to fill the role of this trope, O'Brien steps in seamlessly; like when he figures out now only ''how'' a bit of accidental time travel sent three people (including Dax) into the past, but also how to recreate the effect reliably and precisely in order to send a rescue team to check out the various time-periods they might have ended up in.
** Doctor Phlox on ''Enterprise'' had over a dozen different scientific degrees (but none in warp theory).
** A minor (never-seen) character, Dr. Vassbinder, is apparently an expert in temporal mechanics, warp propulsion inter-relays, warp particle ionization, physiognomy, and psychology (the last three mentioned in the same sentence, even). Physiognomy is the study of using a person's face to determine their personality. Mixed with warp theory and temporal mechanics is outright bizarre, and still unlikely mixed with psychology.
** Starfleet captains, but especially Picard and Janeway, tend to be this. They have science officers and engineers to do those jobs on a daily basis, but they know the disciplines well enough to keep up and contribute ideas when a specialist is explaining the latest TechnoBabble to them. In a pinch, they can take over any job on the ship. It's vaguely alluded to on-screen what their specialties were before they were captains - Picard used to be a helm officer, Riker was a tactical officer, Sisko was an engineer, and Janeway used to be a science officer. At the same time, Picard manages to be one of the most accomplished archeologists and paleontologists in the Federation (for example, his discoveries include ''the origin of human life'') despite him downplaying them as "hobbies".
** Janeway served as a Science Officer before switching to Command, Seven of Nine was primarily an Astrometrics expert but her prodigious intellect and Borg knowledge left her highly skilled in many other areas, Harry was an Operations Officer fresh from the Academy who had, or soon gained, Engineering knowledge great enough to rival the ''actual'' Chief Engineer B'Elanna, who seemed to specialise in every element of Engineering. The Doctor was the sum of all Federation medical knowledge, Chakotay was an accomplished archaeologist and anthropologist. Paris was not only a master pilot, but a starship designer as well. Plus he played medic on the side when the Doctor was not around. Tuvok was a Vulcan. Finally, Icheb retained the Borg capacity for information and knowledge, and quickly became a prodigy in Astrometrics, Cybernetics, Genetics, Geology and Engineering. Voyager may have been (unofficially, of course) a warship, but almost the entire command structure was made up of nothing but badass [[ScienceHero super-scientists]] that could put Reed Richards to shame.
** The Science Officer of each ship actually oversees a number of departments, each of which is devoted to a different scientific specialisation. Therefore, each Science Officer needs to be well versed in every field represented aboard the ship and many more besides. It seems that Starfleet churns out omnidisciplinary scientists by the dozens.

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* Every version TheProfessor on ''Series/GilligansIsland'', by virtue of ''Franchise/StarTrek'' has at least one Omnidisciplinary Scientist and [[OpenHeartDentistry Open Heart Dentist]], always justified by some means or another: ''Series/StarTrekTheNextGeneration'' had SuperPrototype android Data, ''[[Series/StarTrekDeepSpaceNine Deep Space Nine]]'' had [[DesignerBabies Designer Baby]] Doctor Bashir. [[EveryoneCallsHimBarkeep his name]]. The rest only discipline he apparently neglected to learn was ship repair, no matter how many other engineering feats he performs.
* For the purposes
of the time they just called in a Vulcan, whose ''[[PlanetOfHats Hat]]'' seems plot (such as it was) Graeme Garden had to be "Omnidisciplinary '''''whatever I choose to study'''''", and an extensive amount of BackStory is devoted to justifying this. Vulcan neurochemistry has what would be in humans super-high levels of various hormones that facilitate learning, recall, analysis, and reflexes. They also result in [[HotBlooded hair-trigger tempers]]; prior to this for the coming of Surak, they were even more violent than ''[[ProudWarriorRaceGuy Klingons]]''. His Message was that all problems were solvable through AwesomenessByAnalysis, whereas DontThinkFeel would only lead to TheEndOfTheWorldAsWeKnowIt. He wasn't all that popular until he gained a {{Foil}}, T'Pel, who executed the story of ''Film/FightClub'' UpToEleven, freaking the ''entire planet'' out so badly that they've followed him ever since. The Foil then left Vulcan to found a Planet Of Hats that have been the Vulcans' Foil ever since - the [[MagnificentBastard Romulans]].
** This is rather elegantly demonstrated in the J.J. Abrams ''Film/StarTrek'' movie during the scene showing the Vulcan "learning pits." The schoolchildren are answering rapid-fire questions from many, many disparate disciplines, showing how Vulcan education is intensely omnidisciplinary from very early on. This scene is actually a CallBack to ''Film/StarTrekIVTheVoyageHome''. Spock, getting back in mental shape after his [[BackFromTheDead recent inconvenience]], stands encircled by multiple computers all of which are engaged in separate tests which he has to complete or solve at the same time in various different ways - some require verbal answers, others typed answers, others touch-screen answers and so on. He multitasks effortlessly until one of the computers asks the question "How do you feel?" and Spock is utterly stumped.
other ''[[Series/TheGoodies Goodies]]''.
** In Dr Bashir's case, it was almost averted originally. When ''[[Series/StarTrekDeepSpaceNine Deep Space Nine]]'' first started, Dr Bashir was the medical expert who didn't even know everything * Chase on ''Series/{{House}}'' apparently spent about medicine (for example, he once had great difficult with 60 years as a dying Cardassian patient due to resident. While his (at the time) lack of place on a diagnostic team does indicate he would have a wide knowledge base he has performed actual surgeries in virtually every conceivable surgical discipline.
** Everyone on House's staff is one, considering they run every test themselves, instead
of Cardassian physiology). As a result, Bashir was used asking technicians to play up perform whichever tests are needed. Not only have they done every type of surgery, in between they operate an MRI scanner and do all kinds of microbial cultures. Sheesh.
* ''Series/{{Intelligence|2014}}'' has Dr. Shenandoah Cassidy,
the [[ImADoctorNotAPlaceholder "I'm a doctor, not a..."]] [[MemeticMutation tradition]] instead. Very late into designer of the show, it was revealed Bashir was computer chip in fact a DesignerBaby and he was turned into a ridiculously Omnidisciplinary Scientist prone to LudicrousPrecision and capable of ImprobableAimingSkills almost overnight with the {{handwave}} that he'd been like this all along, but had simply been keeping it secret.
** Jadzia Dax was also an example. Her exact specialisation was almost impossible to tell because her scientific knowledge accommodated whatever the plot needed her to know. She received the Dax symbiote at the age of 26 and confirmed in the first series that she had obtained all her many degrees and vast scientific knowledge prior to receiving Dax. She was also Dax's first
Gabriel's head. Neurosurgeon, computer scientist, the closest thing to a scientist Dax had previously hosted had been an engineer. As a result, even Dax's 300 years worth of experience couldn't explain why Jadzia had such a vast knowledge of science by the age of 28 (the Jadzia host's age as of her first appearance). Though it's ''somewhat'' justified as the the small number of symbiotes means that the Symbiosis Commission goes out of its way to pick electronics engineer, pathologist, and that's only geniuses as hosts. The Dax symbiote's life experiences were later used to waive the rest of Ezri Dax's training to become a fully qualified psychologist on the grounds that her training couldn't teach her anything her 300+ year old symbiote hadn't already experienced. This was despite Ezri being the first psychologist to have ever hosted Dax and the fact that, as an Trill unprepared for Joining, the Joining seriously messed her up for a while.
** Miles O'Brien was a non-com Chief Engineer with broad experience as both a soldier and technician, officially specializing in transporter operations (''not'' theory). As a child, he tested at the very low end for scientific and engineering aptitude, only discovering his skill as an engineer during a combat situation where his life and the life of his squad depended on getting a broken transporter to work in a matter of minutes. That said, whenever Dax isn't around to fill the role of this trope, O'Brien steps in seamlessly; like when he figures out now only ''how'' a bit of accidental time travel sent three people (including Dax) into the past, but also how to recreate the effect reliably and precisely in order to send a rescue team to check out the various time-periods they might have ended up in.
** Doctor Phlox on ''Enterprise'' had over a dozen different scientific degrees (but none in warp theory).
** A minor (never-seen) character, Dr. Vassbinder, is apparently an expert in temporal mechanics, warp propulsion inter-relays, warp particle ionization, physiognomy, and psychology (the last three mentioned in the same sentence, even). Physiognomy is the study of using a person's face to determine their personality. Mixed with warp theory and temporal mechanics is outright bizarre, and still unlikely mixed with psychology.
** Starfleet captains, but especially Picard and Janeway, tend to be this. They have science officers and engineers to do those jobs on a daily basis, but they know the disciplines well enough to keep up and contribute ideas when a specialist is explaining the latest TechnoBabble to them. In a pinch, they can take over any job on the ship. It's vaguely alluded to on-screen what their specialties were before they were captains - Picard used to be a helm officer, Riker was a tactical officer, Sisko was an engineer, and Janeway used to be a science officer. At the same time, Picard manages to be one of the most accomplished archeologists and paleontologists in the Federation (for example, his discoveries include ''the origin of human life'') despite him downplaying them as "hobbies".
** Janeway served as a Science Officer before switching to Command, Seven of Nine was primarily an Astrometrics expert but her prodigious intellect and Borg knowledge left her highly skilled in many other areas, Harry was an Operations Officer fresh from the Academy who had, or soon gained, Engineering knowledge great enough to rival the ''actual'' Chief Engineer B'Elanna, who seemed to specialise in every element of Engineering. The Doctor was the sum of all Federation medical knowledge, Chakotay was an accomplished archaeologist and anthropologist. Paris was not only a master pilot, but a starship designer as well. Plus he played medic on the side when the Doctor was not around. Tuvok was a Vulcan. Finally, Icheb retained the Borg capacity for information and knowledge, and quickly became a prodigy in Astrometrics, Cybernetics, Genetics, Geology and Engineering. Voyager may have been (unofficially, of course) a warship, but almost the entire command structure was made up of nothing but badass [[ScienceHero super-scientists]] that could put Reed Richards to shame.
** The Science Officer of each ship actually oversees a number of departments, each of which is devoted to a different scientific specialisation. Therefore, each Science Officer needs to be well versed in every field represented aboard the ship and many more besides. It seems that Starfleet churns out omnidisciplinary scientists by the dozens.
six episodes.



* On ''Series/CrossingJordan'' Nigel Townsend is a straight example of this. He knows everything about everything and readily admits it. It is even addressed by another character in one of the episodes. 'Dare I ask how he knows these things?' Another character responds, 'It's better not to question it.'

to:

* On ''Series/CrossingJordan'' Nigel Townsend ''Series/MelrosePlace'': Kimberly started out as a surgeon. Then after committing a myriad of offenses which should have sent her to jail for life, as well as cost her her medical license, she effortlessly resumed her medical career...in psychiatry.
* Played realistically on ''Series/{{NCIS}}'' when coroner Ducky is shown studying for his forensic psychology exam, which he passed. And...that's it. He hasn't gotten any more degrees, but that Master's FP degree comes in handy on several occasions.
* Dr. Morris in ''Series/NowAndAgain''
is a straight example brilliant medical doctor, able to create an artificial human from scratch with superhuman strength and nanotech-based HealingFactor. He also performed the first successful human brain transplant from a victim of this. He knows a subway accident to the new body. While being a clear case of OpenHeartDentistry, that's not all. First of all, there's the "nanotech" part, which requires one to be a computer engineer as well. One episode also has him demonstrate a prototype [[DeflectorShield anti-missile shield]] and explain why it's current applications are limited (it requires a highly-ionized atmosphere, such as during a thunderstorm). This also, apparently, makes him an expert on particle physics.
* Charlie Epps from ''Series/{{NUMB3RS}}'' is a mathematics prodigy. Besides being an Omnidisciplinary Mathematician (he seems to know
everything about every algorithm ever made) he also seems to be an expert on chemistry, sociology, computer programming and physics. The only reason that he needs such a wide variety of skills is that the team of FBI agents he works with are all {{idiot|Ball}}s.
** Charlie has the sort of knowledge in the computer and physical sciences that are required support for a mathematics degree at many universities. Really, Amita is the expert programmer and Larry the expert physicist ([[TheCameo and Bill Nye]] the expert chemist).
** Charlie is omnidisciplinary ''within'' mathematics, however (Omni''sub''disciplinary?).
* Standard procedure for most soap opera doctors. One on ''OneLifeToLive'' appeared to simultaneously be an internist, surgeon, OB/GYN, neonatologist, and pathologist.
* The hero of ''Series/QuantumLeap'', Sam Beckett, had seven doctorates, including Chemistry, Physics, Astronomy, Medicine, Archaeology, Ancient Languages...and Music. He knows an awful lot but the time-travel process has scrambled his mind a bit, which means that he'll know or not know as the plot demands.
* ''Franchise/{{Quatermass}}'': Bernard Quatermass develops into one of these over the course of three serials. In his first story he describes himself as just an engineer and relies on surgeon Dr. Briscoe for anything relating to biology, but by his third encounter with aliens he's done quite a bit of brushing up on other fields.
* ''Series/{{Sanctuary}}'':
** Dr Helen Magnus states in the first episode that she is "Any kind [of doctor] my patient need me to be." [[JustifiedTrope She has had]] [[ReallySevenHundredYearsOld plenty of time to learn]]. She seems to be any type of biological science, Will is brought in specifically to deal with the mental doctoring and Henry is the technical expert.
** UsefulNotes/NikolaTesla was brought in for additional technological and immunological expertise (being a [[spoiler:vampire]] might stimulate one's interest in biology, after all).
* Professor Arturo in ''Series/{{Sliders}}'', despite supposedly being a cosmologist or sometimes a more general theoretical physicist, successfully creates penicillin in an early episode (in a world where medicine was much less advanced). Later, quite unbelievably, he was capable of performing a Caesarean section on another (male) character, despite having no experience with any form of surgery, let alone such an exotic circumstance as a [[MisterSeahorse male pregnancy]]. And then there was the time he revived a deactivated android... However, each of these cases was lampshaded with dialogue about how hard and/or different from maths he found it.
* ''Series/{{Smallville}}'': Emil Hamilton's official role (and actual job) on the show is as the team's [[TheMedic doctor]]. However, he's also
everything and readily admits it. It is even addressed by another character in one of from GadgeteerGenius to biologist to [[TheCoroner coroner]] when the episodes. 'Dare I ask how he knows these things?' Another character responds, 'It's better not team needs him to question it.'be. If the team needs computer skills, they'll go to [[HollywoodHacking Chloe]] or [[TheCracker Tess]]. If they need anything else, they go to Emil.



* Professor Arturo in ''Series/{{Sliders}}'', despite supposedly being a cosmologist or sometimes a more general theoretical physicist, successfully creates penicillin in an early episode (in a world where medicine was much less advanced). Later, quite unbelievably, he was capable of performing a Caesarean section on another (male) character, despite having no experience with any form of surgery, let alone such an exotic circumstance as a [[MisterSeahorse male pregnancy]]. And then there was the time he revived a deactivated android... However, each of these cases was lampshaded with dialogue about how hard and/or different from maths he found it.
* On ''{{Series/Eureka}}'':
** Henry Deacon manages to be Omnidisciplinarian whenever the plot requires despite living in a town populated by scientific geniuses and which should, in theory, be able to field a team of specialists on whatever virus/natural disaster/temporal anomaly is threatening the town this week. He's also the town's mechanic. [[LampshadeHanging Lampshaded]] whenever he changes the patch he wears on his uniform to reflect whatever job he happens to be doing, as when he pulled a patch reading "Coroner" out of his pocket just as he walked into a morgue. The sheriff's dependence on Henry may be partially justified: given how eccentric most of the people he's met in Eureka appear to be, he might prefer to work with a guy who seems relatively "normal", and isn't going to wander off to play fetch with his robot dog or whatever.
** Fargo seems to wind up as the assistant to anyone at Global Dynamics who's doing anything interesting, dangerous, or plot-important. It helps him live up to his ButtMonkey status, though you have to wonder how someone who looks like he's just out of high school could possibly have had the ''time'' to learn that much. He also takes over from Henry on several occasions. Later in an {{AU}} timeline (but still the same Fargo) he's smart and composed enough to run Global Dynamics and keep track of everything.
** Interestingly subverted in one episode in which a disease that makes people stupid runs through Eureka. When Carter rounds up the scientists who weren't infected [[spoiler:on account of being vegetarians who didn't eat the broken ArtificialMeat]] and ask them to fix it, he quickly finds out that not every scientist is an expert in human immunology, winding up with a "chemist, a botanist, a math theorist, and a...lepipotamus[[note]] [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lepidoptera lepidopterist]][[/note]]".
* The hero of ''Series/QuantumLeap'', Sam Beckett, had seven doctorates, including Chemistry, Physics, Astronomy, Medicine, Archaeology, Ancient Languages...and Music. He knows an awful lot but the time-travel process has scrambled his mind a bit, which means that he'll know or not know as the plot demands.
* Dr. Jacob Hood, biophysicist and special science advisor to the FBI, from ''Series/EleventhHour''. Being an Omnidisciplinarian with an extra helping of awesomesauce is the entire role of his character.
* Fred in ''Series/{{Angel}}'' is presented as a physics student, but by the fifth season she's doing autopsies, examining things under microscopes, and boiling up chemicals. This despite the fact that she never even finished her ''first'' physics degree. Like other examples here, she does at least have a team that she works with.
* Reid on ''Series/CriminalMinds'' has Ph.D.s in chemistry, mathematics and engineering, [=BAs=] in psychology and sociology, and he is working on a bachelor's degree in philosophy.
** From the very first episode:
--> '''Hotchner:''' This is Special Agent Gideon; Special Agent Morgan, our expert obsessional crime; Special Agent Reid--\\
'''Gideon:''' ''Doctor'' Reid.\\
'''Hotch:''' --Doctor Reid, our expert on, well, everything.
* ''{{Series/Fringe}}'':
** Walter Bishop's expertise ranges from biology to teleportation technology but at least has the good grace to not build things that work perfectly on his first try. (the teleporter for example does [[NoodleIncident something very nasty, but non-lethal]], to you). His son is close enough to this that he can point out when Walter is ignoring the laws of physics and common sense.
** Fringe has actually been fairly consistent about it - Walter is mostly a trained biochemist, but he is also superintelligent and has spent a lot of time working with other disciplines. His more elaborate inventions were pretty explicitly developed in collaboration with other people. And he has a great deal of trouble with stuff outside his knowledge -- when given a stack of books that explain a time machine, he complains that it would take 20 years and a team of expert assistants for him to absorb all the information. But he's smart enough to get the gist of how it works, even if he couldn't build one.
** The show behaves as if "fringe science" were a single category of scientific endeavor, overlapping physics, biology, biochemistry, and a dozen or so others (Sonoma State University may have once offered a degree in fringe science, but Harvard not so much). Walter Bishop is shown as an expert on teleporters one minute and performing autopsies the next. They even occasionally send patients to his clearly unhygienic lab to have him perform surgeries. Not that the character isn't a hoot. He also knows a lot about LSD.
* ''Series/{{Sanctuary}}'':
** Dr Helen Magnus states in the first episode that she is "Any kind [of doctor] my patient need me to be." [[JustifiedTrope She has had]] [[ReallySevenHundredYearsOld plenty of time to learn]]. She seems to be any type of biological science, Will is brought in specifically to deal with the mental doctoring and Henry is the technical expert.
** UsefulNotes/NikolaTesla was brought in for additional technological and immunological expertise (being a [[spoiler:vampire]] might stimulate one's interest in biology, after all).
* Gaius Baltar in ''Series/BattlestarGalactica2003'' is possibly a {{deconstruction}}. He's a computer scientist who's too arrogant to admit that biochemistry (or whatever other science he's consulted on) is out of his area of expertise. It's even {{Lampshaded}} in one episode. After Baltar is left for dead on New Caprica, the job of plotting a course to Earth (previously one of Baltar's many responsibilities) is turned over to Lt. Gaeta, who, as ''Galactica'''s tactical officer, has an actual background in astronomy. Admiral Adama and President Roslin comment on the sudden improvement in efficiency.
* Leonard and Sheldon from ''Series/TheBigBangTheory'' are physicists, but seem well-versed enough in biology, genetics, robotics, and computer science to conduct experiments involving them as well. This is not including the various areas of science that they can discuss casually and in great depth.
** Most of the show's main characters are ''geeks''. While not absolving them of [[HollywoodNerd stereotyping]], their nerdy pursuits would allow them to have working knowledge of any geeky interest they enjoy, as they would want to know how something from comic books or science fiction would be plausible; indeed, many {{cold open}}s are the guys debating the workings of superpowers, TimeTravel, or science in general.
** Howard's being an engineer, not a physicist, is brought up fairly often by other characters disparaging him because he "only" has an M. Eng.
--->'''Howard:''' I have a master's degree!\\
'''Gablehauser:''' Who doesn't?
*** In fact, only Sheldon is a theoretical physicist. Leonard is an experimental physicist and Raj an astrophysicist.
** Subverted when Howard claimed that as the engineer he is, he will fix the elevator in no time. Then claims the elevator is beyond repair.
* Dr. Spaceman (pronounced "Spatchemmen") in ''Series/ThirtyRock'' performs work of all kinds; he's equally unskilled at all branches of science...
* Played realistically on ''Series/{{NCIS}}'' when coroner Ducky is shown studying for his forensic psychology exam, which he passed. And...that's it. He hasn't gotten any more degrees, but that Master's FP degree comes in handy on several occasions.
* ''Franchise/{{Quatermass}}'': Bernard Quatermass develops into one of these over the course of three serials. In his first story he describes himself as just an engineer and relies on surgeon Dr. Briscoe for anything relating to biology, but by his third encounter with aliens he's done quite a bit of brushing up on other fields.
* ''Series/{{Farscape}}'':
** Scorpius specializes in many different fields: originally a researcher in wormhole physics, he's also skilled enough in engineering, cybernetics and neuroscience to invent the Aurora chair and a neurochip containing a replica of his personality. And he's also WickedCultured.
** For that matter, Crichton himself. He holds no doctorates, calls himself a "God damned scientist" and gives his rank as "Commander" when he first encounters Aeryn (indicating he was the commander of the shuttle mission in which he disappeared through a wormhole). He's also a crack pilot proven to at ''least'' be on par with Aeryn in space and possibly a ''superior'' pilot in atmosphere, an engineer who designed and built the [=FarScape=] module (with his friend D.K.'s help) himself, is an accomplished enough technician to assist Gilina with repairing and installing a Peacekeeper defense screen salvaged from ''Zelbinion'' aboard Moya, heavily modified his module with Leviathan and Peacekeeper technology, even ''before'' having wormhole knowledge implanted in his head by the Ancients was well on his way towards single-handedly cracking wormhole travel (which entire ''races'' have attempted and failed), and built a ''nuclear bomb'', among other feats.
* Chase on ''Series/{{House}}'' apparently spent about 60 years as a resident. While his place on a diagnostic team does indicate he would have a wide knowledge base he has performed actual surgeries in virtually every conceivable surgical discipline.
** Everyone on House's staff is one, considering they run every test themselves, instead of asking technicians to perform whichever tests are needed. Not only have they done every type of surgery, in between they operate an MRI scanner and do all kinds of microbial cultures. Sheesh.

to:

* Professor Arturo in ''Series/{{Sliders}}'', despite supposedly being a cosmologist Every version of ''Franchise/StarTrek'' has at least one Omnidisciplinary Scientist and [[OpenHeartDentistry Open Heart Dentist]], always justified by some means or sometimes a more general theoretical physicist, successfully creates penicillin in an early episode (in a world where medicine was much less advanced). Later, quite unbelievably, he was capable another: ''Series/StarTrekTheNextGeneration'' had SuperPrototype android Data, ''[[Series/StarTrekDeepSpaceNine Deep Space Nine]]'' had [[DesignerBabies Designer Baby]] Doctor Bashir. The rest of performing a Caesarean section on another (male) character, despite having no experience with any form of surgery, let alone such an exotic circumstance as a [[MisterSeahorse male pregnancy]]. And then there was the time he revived they just called in a deactivated android... However, each Vulcan, whose ''[[PlanetOfHats Hat]]'' seems to be "Omnidisciplinary '''''whatever I choose to study'''''", and an extensive amount of these cases BackStory is devoted to justifying this. Vulcan neurochemistry has what would be in humans super-high levels of various hormones that facilitate learning, recall, analysis, and reflexes. They also result in [[HotBlooded hair-trigger tempers]]; prior to the coming of Surak, they were even more violent than ''[[ProudWarriorRaceGuy Klingons]]''. His Message was lampshaded with dialogue about that all problems were solvable through AwesomenessByAnalysis, whereas DontThinkFeel would only lead to TheEndOfTheWorldAsWeKnowIt. He wasn't all that popular until he gained a {{Foil}}, T'Pel, who executed the story of ''Film/FightClub'' UpToEleven, freaking the ''entire planet'' out so badly that they've followed him ever since. The Foil then left Vulcan to found a Planet Of Hats that have been the Vulcans' Foil ever since - the [[MagnificentBastard Romulans]].
** This is rather elegantly demonstrated in the J.J. Abrams ''Film/StarTrek'' movie during the scene showing the Vulcan "learning pits." The schoolchildren are answering rapid-fire questions from many, many disparate disciplines, showing
how hard and/or Vulcan education is intensely omnidisciplinary from very early on. This scene is actually a CallBack to ''Film/StarTrekIVTheVoyageHome''. Spock, getting back in mental shape after his [[BackFromTheDead recent inconvenience]], stands encircled by multiple computers all of which are engaged in separate tests which he has to complete or solve at the same time in various different from maths he found it.
* On ''{{Series/Eureka}}'':
** Henry Deacon manages to be Omnidisciplinarian whenever the plot requires despite living in a town populated by scientific geniuses
ways - some require verbal answers, others typed answers, others touch-screen answers and which should, in theory, be able to field a team of specialists on whatever virus/natural disaster/temporal anomaly is threatening the town this week. He's also the town's mechanic. [[LampshadeHanging Lampshaded]] whenever he changes the patch he wears on his uniform to reflect whatever job he happens to be doing, as when he pulled a patch reading "Coroner" out of his pocket just as he walked into a morgue. The sheriff's dependence on Henry may be partially justified: given how eccentric most so on. He multitasks effortlessly until one of the people he's met in Eureka appear to be, he might prefer to work with a guy who seems relatively "normal", computers asks the question "How do you feel?" and isn't going to wander off to play fetch with his robot dog or whatever.
Spock is utterly stumped.
** Fargo seems to wind up as the assistant to anyone at Global Dynamics who's doing anything interesting, dangerous, or plot-important. It helps him live up to his ButtMonkey status, though you have to wonder how someone who looks like he's just out of high school could possibly have had the ''time'' to learn that much. He also takes over from Henry on several occasions. Later in an {{AU}} timeline (but still the same Fargo) he's smart and composed enough to run Global Dynamics and keep track of everything.
** Interestingly subverted in one episode in which a disease that makes people stupid runs through Eureka.
In Dr Bashir's case, it was almost averted originally. When Carter rounds up ''[[Series/StarTrekDeepSpaceNine Deep Space Nine]]'' first started, Dr Bashir was the scientists who weren't infected [[spoiler:on account of being vegetarians medical expert who didn't eat even know everything about medicine (for example, he once had great difficult with a dying Cardassian patient due to his (at the broken ArtificialMeat]] time) lack of knowledge of Cardassian physiology). As a result, Bashir was used to play up the [[ImADoctorNotAPlaceholder "I'm a doctor, not a..."]] [[MemeticMutation tradition]] instead. Very late into the show, it was revealed Bashir was in fact a DesignerBaby and ask them he was turned into a ridiculously Omnidisciplinary Scientist prone to fix it, he quickly finds out LudicrousPrecision and capable of ImprobableAimingSkills almost overnight with the {{handwave}} that not every he'd been like this all along, but had simply been keeping it secret.
** Jadzia Dax was also an example. Her exact specialisation was almost impossible to tell because her scientific knowledge accommodated whatever the plot needed her to know. She received the Dax symbiote at the age of 26 and confirmed in the first series that she had obtained all her many degrees and vast scientific knowledge prior to receiving Dax. She was also Dax's first scientist, the closest thing to a
scientist is an expert in human immunology, winding up with a "chemist, a botanist, a math theorist, and a...lepipotamus[[note]] [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lepidoptera lepidopterist]][[/note]]".
* The hero of ''Series/QuantumLeap'', Sam Beckett,
Dax had seven doctorates, including Chemistry, Physics, Astronomy, Medicine, Archaeology, Ancient Languages...and Music. He knows previously hosted had been an awful lot but the time-travel process has scrambled his mind engineer. As a bit, which means that he'll know or not know as the plot demands.
* Dr. Jacob Hood, biophysicist and special science advisor to the FBI, from ''Series/EleventhHour''. Being an Omnidisciplinarian with an extra helping of awesomesauce is the entire role of his character.
* Fred in ''Series/{{Angel}}'' is presented as a physics student, but by the fifth season she's doing autopsies, examining things under microscopes, and boiling up chemicals. This despite the fact that she never
result, even finished her ''first'' physics degree. Like other examples here, she does at least have a team that she works with.
* Reid on ''Series/CriminalMinds'' has Ph.D.s in chemistry, mathematics and engineering, [=BAs=] in psychology and sociology, and he is working on a bachelor's degree in philosophy.
** From the very first episode:
--> '''Hotchner:''' This is Special Agent Gideon; Special Agent Morgan, our expert obsessional crime; Special Agent Reid--\\
'''Gideon:''' ''Doctor'' Reid.\\
'''Hotch:''' --Doctor Reid, our expert on, well, everything.
* ''{{Series/Fringe}}'':
** Walter Bishop's expertise ranges from biology to teleportation technology but at least has the good grace to not build things that work perfectly on his first try. (the teleporter for example does [[NoodleIncident something very nasty, but non-lethal]], to you). His son is close enough to this that he can point out when Walter is ignoring the laws of physics and common sense.
** Fringe has actually been fairly consistent about it - Walter is mostly a trained biochemist, but he is also superintelligent and has spent a lot of time working with other disciplines. His more elaborate inventions were pretty explicitly developed in collaboration with other people. And he has a great deal of trouble with stuff outside his knowledge -- when given a stack of books that explain a time machine, he complains that it would take 20
Dax's 300 years and a team worth of expert assistants for him to absorb all the information. But he's smart enough to get the gist of how it works, even if he experience couldn't build one.
**
explain why Jadzia had such a vast knowledge of science by the age of 28 (the Jadzia host's age as of her first appearance). Though it's ''somewhat'' justified as the the small number of symbiotes means that the Symbiosis Commission goes out of its way to pick only geniuses as hosts. The show behaves as if "fringe science" Dax symbiote's life experiences were a single category later used to waive the rest of Ezri Dax's training to become a fully qualified psychologist on the grounds that her training couldn't teach her anything her 300+ year old symbiote hadn't already experienced. This was despite Ezri being the first psychologist to have ever hosted Dax and the fact that, as an Trill unprepared for Joining, the Joining seriously messed her up for a while.
** Miles O'Brien was a non-com Chief Engineer with broad experience as both a soldier and technician, officially specializing in transporter operations (''not'' theory). As a child, he tested at the very low end for
scientific endeavor, overlapping physics, biology, biochemistry, and a dozen or so others (Sonoma State University may have once offered a degree in fringe science, but Harvard not so much). Walter Bishop is shown engineering aptitude, only discovering his skill as an expert on teleporters one minute engineer during a combat situation where his life and performing autopsies the next. They even occasionally send patients to life of his clearly unhygienic lab squad depended on getting a broken transporter to have him perform surgeries. Not that the character work in a matter of minutes. That said, whenever Dax isn't around to fill the role of this trope, O'Brien steps in seamlessly; like when he figures out now only ''how'' a hoot. He bit of accidental time travel sent three people (including Dax) into the past, but also knows how to recreate the effect reliably and precisely in order to send a lot about LSD.
* ''Series/{{Sanctuary}}'':
rescue team to check out the various time-periods they might have ended up in.
** Dr Helen Magnus states Doctor Phlox on ''Enterprise'' had over a dozen different scientific degrees (but none in warp theory).
** A minor (never-seen) character, Dr. Vassbinder, is apparently an expert in temporal mechanics, warp propulsion inter-relays, warp particle ionization, physiognomy, and psychology (the last three mentioned
in the first episode that she is "Any kind [of doctor] my patient need me to be." [[JustifiedTrope She has had]] [[ReallySevenHundredYearsOld plenty of time to learn]]. She seems to be any type of biological science, Will is brought in specifically to deal with the mental doctoring and Henry same sentence, even). Physiognomy is the technical expert.
** UsefulNotes/NikolaTesla was brought in for additional technological
study of using a person's face to determine their personality. Mixed with warp theory and immunological expertise (being a [[spoiler:vampire]] might stimulate one's interest in biology, after all).
* Gaius Baltar in ''Series/BattlestarGalactica2003''
temporal mechanics is possibly a {{deconstruction}}. He's a computer scientist who's too arrogant outright bizarre, and still unlikely mixed with psychology.
** Starfleet captains, but especially Picard and Janeway, tend
to admit that biochemistry (or whatever other be this. They have science he's consulted on) officers and engineers to do those jobs on a daily basis, but they know the disciplines well enough to keep up and contribute ideas when a specialist is out of his area of expertise. explaining the latest TechnoBabble to them. In a pinch, they can take over any job on the ship. It's even {{Lampshaded}} in one episode. After Baltar is left for dead on New Caprica, the job of plotting a course vaguely alluded to Earth (previously one of Baltar's many responsibilities) is turned over on-screen what their specialties were before they were captains - Picard used to Lt. Gaeta, who, as ''Galactica'''s be a helm officer, Riker was a tactical officer, has an actual background in astronomy. Admiral Adama and President Roslin comment on the sudden improvement in efficiency.
* Leonard and Sheldon from ''Series/TheBigBangTheory'' are physicists, but seem well-versed enough in biology, genetics, robotics, and computer science to conduct experiments involving them as well. This is not including the various areas of science that they can discuss casually and in great depth.
** Most of the show's main characters are ''geeks''. While not absolving them of [[HollywoodNerd stereotyping]], their nerdy pursuits would allow them to have working knowledge of any geeky interest they enjoy, as they would want to know how something from comic books or science fiction would be plausible; indeed, many {{cold open}}s are the guys debating the workings of superpowers, TimeTravel, or science in general.
** Howard's being
Sisko was an engineer, not a physicist, is brought up fairly often by other characters disparaging him because he "only" has an M. Eng.
--->'''Howard:''' I have a master's degree!\\
'''Gablehauser:''' Who doesn't?
*** In fact, only Sheldon is a theoretical physicist. Leonard is an experimental physicist
and Raj an astrophysicist.
** Subverted when Howard claimed that as
Janeway used to be a science officer. At the engineer he is, he will fix the elevator in no time. Then claims the elevator is beyond repair.
* Dr. Spaceman (pronounced "Spatchemmen") in ''Series/ThirtyRock'' performs work of all kinds; he's equally unskilled at all branches of science...
* Played realistically on ''Series/{{NCIS}}'' when coroner Ducky is shown studying for his forensic psychology exam, which he passed. And...that's it. He hasn't gotten any more degrees, but that Master's FP degree comes in handy on several occasions.
* ''Franchise/{{Quatermass}}'': Bernard Quatermass develops into
same time, Picard manages to be one of these over the course of three serials. In most accomplished archeologists and paleontologists in the Federation (for example, his first story he describes himself discoveries include ''the origin of human life'') despite him downplaying them as just "hobbies".
** Janeway served as a Science Officer before switching to Command, Seven of Nine was primarily
an engineer Astrometrics expert but her prodigious intellect and relies on surgeon Dr. Briscoe for anything relating to biology, but by his third encounter with aliens he's done quite a bit of brushing up on other fields.
* ''Series/{{Farscape}}'':
** Scorpius specializes
Borg knowledge left her highly skilled in many different fields: originally a researcher in wormhole physics, he's also skilled other areas, Harry was an Operations Officer fresh from the Academy who had, or soon gained, Engineering knowledge great enough in engineering, cybernetics and neuroscience to invent rival the Aurora chair and a neurochip containing a replica ''actual'' Chief Engineer B'Elanna, who seemed to specialise in every element of his personality. And he's also WickedCultured.
** For that matter, Crichton himself. He holds no doctorates, calls himself a "God damned scientist" and gives his rank as "Commander" when he first encounters Aeryn (indicating he
Engineering. The Doctor was the commander sum of the shuttle mission in which he disappeared through a wormhole). He's also a crack pilot proven to at ''least'' be on par with Aeryn in space and possibly a ''superior'' pilot in atmosphere, an engineer who designed and built the [=FarScape=] module (with his friend D.K.'s help) himself, is all Federation medical knowledge, Chakotay was an accomplished enough technician to assist Gilina with repairing archaeologist and installing anthropologist. Paris was not only a Peacekeeper defense screen salvaged from ''Zelbinion'' master pilot, but a starship designer as well. Plus he played medic on the side when the Doctor was not around. Tuvok was a Vulcan. Finally, Icheb retained the Borg capacity for information and knowledge, and quickly became a prodigy in Astrometrics, Cybernetics, Genetics, Geology and Engineering. Voyager may have been (unofficially, of course) a warship, but almost the entire command structure was made up of nothing but badass [[ScienceHero super-scientists]] that could put Reed Richards to shame.
** The Science Officer of each ship actually oversees a number of departments, each of which is devoted to a different scientific specialisation. Therefore, each Science Officer needs to be well versed in every field represented
aboard Moya, heavily modified his module with Leviathan the ship and Peacekeeper technology, even ''before'' having wormhole knowledge implanted in his head many more besides. It seems that Starfleet churns out omnidisciplinary scientists by the Ancients was well dozens.
* Averted
on his way towards single-handedly cracking wormhole travel (which entire ''races'' ''Series/{{Threshold}}'': fully half of the original red team are scientists, and a fourth is added later. All have attempted different areas of expertise - the fourth is a ''plant biologist''.
* ''Series/TotalRecall2070'': Dr. Olan Chang takes this trope
and failed), runs with it. Not only is she the Citizen's Protection Bureau's [[TheCoroner coroner]], but she's also depicted as an expert roboticist, virologist, computer scientist, and built a ''nuclear bomb'', neurologist, among other feats.
* Chase on ''Series/{{House}}'' apparently spent about 60 years as a resident. While his place on a diagnostic team does indicate he would have a wide knowledge base he has performed actual surgeries in virtually every conceivable surgical discipline.
** Everyone on House's staff is one, considering they run every test themselves, instead of asking technicians to perform whichever tests are needed. Not only have they done every type of surgery, in between they operate an MRI scanner and do all kinds of microbial cultures. Sheesh.
things.



* Natalie on ''Series/ForeverKnight'', although she's the medical examiner, is represented as doing a variety of science stuff (although not much is shown onscreen) in attempting to understand vampire Nick Knight's condition and "cure" him.
* TheProfessor on ''Series/GilligansIsland'', by virtue of [[EveryoneCallsHimBarkeep his name]]. The only discipline he apparently neglected to learn was ship repair, no matter how many other engineering feats he performs.
* Charlie Epps from ''Series/{{NUMB3RS}}'' is a mathematics prodigy. Besides being an Omnidisciplinary Mathematician (he seems to know everything about every algorithm ever made) he also seems to be an expert on chemistry, sociology, computer programing and physics. The only reason that he needs such a wide variety of skills is that the team of FBI agents he works with are all {{idiot|Ball}}s.
** Charlie has the sort of knowledge in the computer and physical sciences that are required support for a mathematics degree at many universities. Really, Amita is the expert programmer and Larry the expert physicist ([[TheCameo and Bill Nye]] the expert chemist).
** Charlie is omnidisciplinary ''within'' mathematics, however (Omni''sub''disciplinary?).
* Dr. Julia Hoffman of ''Series/DarkShadows'' qualifies. When first mentioned (but not yet seen), she's an expert on blood disorders, then turns up at Windcliff Sanitarium where she demonstrates psychiatric/psychological training, and in later episodes turns out to be a qualified surgeon, research scientist (her search for a cure for Barnabas), and electrical engineer.
* Topher Brink of ''{{Series/Dollhouse}}'' is an expert in neuroscience, computers, and electrical engineering. It's somewhat necessary for his job. He's also been to medical school, though we don't actually know if he's an MD.
** Echo is a more justified example - she has dozens of different personalities in her head, including a nurse and a few rocket scientists.
* Averted on ''Series/{{Threshold}}'': fully half of the original red team are scientists, and a fourth is added later. All have different areas of expertise - the fourth is a ''plant biologist''.
* Standard procedure for most soap opera doctors. One on ''OneLifeToLive'' appeared to simultaneously be an internist, surgeon, OB/GYN, neonatologist, and pathologist.
* ''Series/MelrosePlace'': Kimberly started out as a surgeon. Then after committing a myriad of offenses which should have sent her to jail for life, as well as cost her her medical license, she effortlessly resumed her medical career...in psychiatry.
* Averted in ''Series/{{Caprica}}''. Dr. Amanda Graystone works at the hospital as a ''plastic surgeon''. Therefore, when she sees a car accident, she does not rush over to offer first aid.
* Simon Campos on ''Series/Flashforward2009'' is a quantum physicist who also reads medical charts and breaks encryption.
* Lem and Phil on ''Series/BetterOffTed''.



* Dr. Morris in ''Series/NowAndAgain'' is a brilliant medical doctor, able to create an artificial human from scratch with superhuman strength and nanotech-based HealingFactor. He also performed the first successful human brain transplant from a victim of a subway accident to the new body. While being a clear case of OpenHeartDentistry, that's not all. First of all, there's the "nanotech" part, which requires one to be a computer engineer as well. One episode also has him demonstrate a prototype [[DeflectorShield anti-missile shield]] and explain why it's current applications are limited (it requires a highly-ionized atmosphere, such as during a thunderstorm). This also, apparently, makes him an expert on particle physics.
* ''Series/{{Smallville}}'': Emil Hamilton's official role (and actual job) on the show is as the team's [[TheMedic doctor]]. However, he's also everything from GadgeteerGenius to biologist to [[TheCoroner coroner]] when the team needs him to be. If the team needs computer skills, they'll go to [[HollywoodHacking Chloe]] or [[TheCracker Tess]]. If they need anything else, they go to Emil.
* ''Series/{{Intelligence|2014}}'' has Dr. Shenandoah Cassidy, the designer of the computer chip in Gabriel's head. Neurosurgeon, computer scientist, electronics engineer, pathologist, and that's only the first six episodes.
* ''Series/AgentsOfSHIELD''.
** Subverted. Fitz, Simmons, and Skye are an engineer, a biologist, and a hacker, respectively, and each tends to solve the problems most suited to their domain. Simmons skirts this trope as she often acts as TheMedic, but multiple episodes show her reaching the edge of her knowledge and seeking help from actual doctors.
** Season 2 plays this painfully straight with Simmons as the most qualified medical practitioner in S.H.I.E.L.D., even going so far as to have her perform surgery for a gunshot wound and check the work of actual medical professionals because "there's no one whose opinion" is more trusted. Compared to the more realistic limits on her medical skills in Season 1, it's a bit jarring.
** Subverted with Radcliffe. He's a roboticist with a strong interest in transhumanism and cybernetics, so he has broad mechanical, programming, and biological knowledge. He's still not completely omnidisciplinary, though; he needs Fitz's help putting the finishing touch on his prototype LMD (especially her social programming), and when ordered by the BigBad to fix a missile, he has absolutely no idea what he's doing. He ends up just grabbing the instruction manual and stalling until he gets a chance to surrender to S.H.I.E.L.D.
* ''Series/TotalRecall2070'': Dr. Olan Chang takes this trope and runs with it. Not only is she the Citizen's Protection Bureau's [[TheCoroner coroner]], but she's also depicted as an expert roboticist, virologist, computer scientist, and neurologist, among other things.
* For the purposes of the plot (such as it was) Graeme Garden had to be this for the other ''[[Series/TheGoodies Goodies]]''.
9th Mar '17 12:33:58 PM Discar
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Added DiffLines:

** Subverted with Radcliffe. He's a roboticist with a strong interest in transhumanism and cybernetics, so he has broad mechanical, programming, and biological knowledge. He's still not completely omnidisciplinary, though; he needs Fitz's help putting the finishing touch on his prototype LMD (especially her social programming), and when ordered by the BigBad to fix a missile, he has absolutely no idea what he's doing. He ends up just grabbing the instruction manual and stalling until he gets a chance to surrender to S.H.I.E.L.D.
7th Mar '17 9:17:41 AM avon
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See also SuperDoc for the medical version of this. In works of fiction, a doctor is almost always a hybrid between a medical doctor and something else (in the case of omniscience, everything else). In real life, a doctor is a physician with a doctorate of medicine (M.D.), or a Ph.D in any field, regardless of being a practitioner of medicine or not. And it should be stressed that a Ph.D is generally going to have the same fundamental core competencies (at least in theory) for their given field, but beyond that, most of their knowledge, skills, and abilities is limited to whatever was the subject of their dissertation. Generally speaking, any scientist can probably do basic statistical data analysis. But a dedicated statistician (even if he isn't a practicing scientist per se) is whom you would call for the important jobs where you really need an expert on the numbers.

to:

See also SuperDoc for the medical version of this. In works of fiction, a doctor is almost always a hybrid between a medical doctor and something else (in the case of omniscience, everything else). In real life, a doctor is a physician with a doctorate of medicine (M.D.), or a Ph.D in any field, regardless of being a practitioner of medicine or not. And it should be stressed that a Ph.D is generally going to have the same fundamental core competencies (at least in theory) for their given field, but beyond that, [[CripplingOverspecialization most of their knowledge, skills, and abilities is limited to whatever was the subject of their dissertation.dissertation]]. Generally speaking, any scientist can probably do basic statistical data analysis. But a dedicated statistician (even if he isn't a practicing scientist per se) is whom you would call for the important jobs where you really need an expert on the numbers.
7th Mar '17 9:14:06 AM avon
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See also SuperDoc for the medical version of this. In works of fiction, a doctor is almost always a hybrid between a medical doctor and something else (in the case of omniscience, everything else). In real life, a doctor is a physician with a doctorate of medicine (M.D.), or a Ph.D in any field, regardless of being a practitioner of medicine or not.

to:

See also SuperDoc for the medical version of this. In works of fiction, a doctor is almost always a hybrid between a medical doctor and something else (in the case of omniscience, everything else). In real life, a doctor is a physician with a doctorate of medicine (M.D.), or a Ph.D in any field, regardless of being a practitioner of medicine or not.
not. And it should be stressed that a Ph.D is generally going to have the same fundamental core competencies (at least in theory) for their given field, but beyond that, most of their knowledge, skills, and abilities is limited to whatever was the subject of their dissertation. Generally speaking, any scientist can probably do basic statistical data analysis. But a dedicated statistician (even if he isn't a practicing scientist per se) is whom you would call for the important jobs where you really need an expert on the numbers.
20th Feb '17 10:04:27 AM Kooshmeister
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* John Lowson in Guy N. Smith's ''The Slime Beast''. He begins the story searching for King John's treasure and is referred to as an archaeologist, but relentlessly pursues and tries to capture and study the title monster, suggesting a biologist or zoologist.

to:

* John Lowson in Guy N. Smith's ''The Slime Beast''. ''Literature/TheSlimeBeast''. He begins the story searching for [[UsefulNotes/KingJohnOfEngland King John's John]]'s treasure and is referred to as an archaeologist, but relentlessly pursues and tries to capture and study the title monster, suggesting a biologist or zoologist.
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Main.OmniDisciplinaryScientist