History Main / OffOnATechnicality

3rd Dec '17 10:40:54 AM nombretomado
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** The murderer involved in the final case of ''VideoGame/ApolloJusticeAceAttorney'' was ''counting'' on this to happen. All the evidence and testimony amounts to the murderer very clearly being the murderer, and he gets called out on this. There's only one very big issue: [[spoiler:He's been locked away in prison during the whole time from when the case started, so how could he have done it if he was never at the scene of the crime? How could he get his hands on the murder weapon? How could he have it delivered to the crime scene? He knew the legal system inside and out and had an airtight alibi. It finally took a hidden camera to deliver a personal confession of the crime for the newly instated jury system to deliver the final verdict]].

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** The murderer involved in the final case of ''VideoGame/ApolloJusticeAceAttorney'' ''VisualNovel/ApolloJusticeAceAttorney'' was ''counting'' on this to happen. All the evidence and testimony amounts to the murderer very clearly being the murderer, and he gets called out on this. There's only one very big issue: [[spoiler:He's been locked away in prison during the whole time from when the case started, so how could he have done it if he was never at the scene of the crime? How could he get his hands on the murder weapon? How could he have it delivered to the crime scene? He knew the legal system inside and out and had an airtight alibi. It finally took a hidden camera to deliver a personal confession of the crime for the newly instated jury system to deliver the final verdict]].
26th Oct '17 3:08:56 PM darkemyst
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** Following Harry's trial for a CrimeOfSelfDefense where he was proven innocent since he was saving his and Dudley's ''souls'' by casting a patronus in front of his muggle cousin (who already knows about magic anyway) in ''Literature/HarryPotterAndTheOrderOfThePhoenix'' the Ministry spun the story to make it sound like he got Off on a Technicality. [[spoiler: It then turns out that one of their particularly nasty members is secretly responsible for the attack in the first place, precisely to provoke him into using magic so they could prosecute him for it, and she gets away with it]].
18th Oct '17 10:24:53 AM Daeolus
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* In ''WesternAnimation/TheVentureBros'', Captain Sunshine apprehends the Monarch, only for the villain to reappear in his lair soon afterwards. When Dr. Mrs. The Monarch asks what Sunshine did to him, he explains (visibly annoyed) that Captain Sunshine is an idiot with no understanding of "due process": he flew the Monarch to the state prison, dumped him in front of the guards in the courtyard, then flew away (this is a jab at Superman's use of this tactic). The prison guards, however, simply let him go...given that he hadn't been formally given a trial of any kind, or even ''formally arrested'' in the first place.

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* In ''WesternAnimation/TheVentureBros'', Captain Sunshine apprehends the Monarch, only for the villain to reappear in his lair soon afterwards. When Dr. Mrs. The Monarch asks her husband what Sunshine did to him, he explains (visibly annoyed) that Captain Sunshine is an idiot with no understanding of "due process": he flew the Monarch to the state prison, dumped him in front of the guards in the courtyard, then flew away (this is a jab at Superman's use of this tactic). The prison guards, however, simply let him go...given that he hadn't been formally given a trial of any kind, or even ''formally arrested'' in the first place.
16th Oct '17 10:28:39 PM Daeolus
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* In ''WesternAnimation/TheVentureBros'', Captain Sunshine apprehends the Monarch, only for the villain to reappear in his lair soon afterwards. When his minions ask how he escaped so quickly, with annoyance he explains that Captain Sunshine is an idiot with no understanding of "due process": he flew the Monarch to the state prison, dumped him in front of the guards in the courtyard, then flew away (this is a jab at Superman's use of this tactic). The prison guards, however, simply let him go...given that he hadn't been formally given a trial of any kind, or even ''formally arrested'' in the first place.

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* In ''WesternAnimation/TheVentureBros'', Captain Sunshine apprehends the Monarch, only for the villain to reappear in his lair soon afterwards. When his minions ask how he escaped so quickly, with annoyance Dr. Mrs. The Monarch asks what Sunshine did to him, he explains (visibly annoyed) that Captain Sunshine is an idiot with no understanding of "due process": he flew the Monarch to the state prison, dumped him in front of the guards in the courtyard, then flew away (this is a jab at Superman's use of this tactic). The prison guards, however, simply let him go...given that he hadn't been formally given a trial of any kind, or even ''formally arrested'' in the first place.
27th Sep '17 4:18:19 PM Crossover-Enthusiast
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** Sideshow Bob tries to pull this off when he kidnaps Bart with the intent to kill him at "five corners" (a fictional location where five states come together). His plan is to stand in one state, fire the gun in a second, the bullet travels through a third, hits Bart in the fourth and he falls and dies in the fifth. Bob thinks it would be impossible to convict him because no single act in any state would be illegal. He's completely wrong. In truth, he could be convicted of murder in ''any'' of those states (police from each of them arrive and arrest him ''simultaneously''). In fact, if anything, all he would do is make the case a ''federal'' murder trial.

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** Sideshow Bob tries to pull this off when he kidnaps Bart with the intent to kill him at "five corners" (a fictional location where five states come together). His plan is to stand in one state, fire the gun in a the second, the bullet travels through a the third, hits Bart in the fourth and he falls and dies in the fifth. Bob thinks it would be impossible to convict him because no single act in any state would be illegal. He's completely wrong. In wrong; in truth, he could be convicted of murder in ''any'' of those states (police from each of them arrive and arrest him ''simultaneously'').states. In fact, if anything, all he would do is make the case a ''federal'' murder trial.
27th Sep '17 4:13:28 PM Crossover-Enthusiast
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** A case of a KarmaHoudini occurred when a character who committed an outstandingly heinous (even for this show!) double murder, during which he buried a baby alive, got off because before he confessed and led the detectives to the corpses while waiving his right to counsel, he mentioned that he had an upcoming burglary case. Because the mention of the burglary case was an offhanded comment in the middle of a conversation, and the suspect didn't draw any attention to it, the detectives didn't connect that the upcoming case meant that an ordinary waiver of counsel wasn't enough, and so the judge ruled that the confession and bodies are inadmissible. Unlike the other examples from SVU, this was [[MagnificentBastard a deliberate plan by the suspect]] rather than a bit of good luck brought about by a spectacular IdiotBall from the detectives.

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** A case of a KarmaHoudini occurred when a character who committed an outstandingly heinous (even for this show!) double murder, during which he buried a baby alive, got off because before he confessed and led the detectives to the corpses while waiving his right to counsel, he mentioned that he had an upcoming burglary case. Because the mention of the burglary case was an offhanded comment in the middle of a conversation, and the suspect didn't draw any attention to it, the detectives didn't connect that the upcoming case meant that an ordinary waiver of counsel wasn't enough, and so the judge ruled that the confession and bodies are inadmissible. Unlike the other examples from SVU, this was [[MagnificentBastard a deliberate plan by the suspect]] rather than a bit of good luck brought about by a spectacular IdiotBall from or the detectives.detectives grasping the IdiotBall.
15th Sep '17 7:43:41 PM luiz4200
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* ''ComicBook/TeenTitansGo'': In Issue #41, Killer Moth is free and says he paid his debt to society. Raven says he "got off on some pointless technicality".
24th Aug '17 3:38:11 PM Fireblood
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* ''Series/TheEscapeArtist'': Played straight but seriously - Foyle is released due to this trope, but not because of any nefarious, underhanded tactic by Will, but instead due to [[spoiler: the Trial Judge's initial refusal to give Will's expert time to prepare his submissions]]. When this later becomes quite critical to the case, coupled with the leaking of details, the Judge accepts that Foyle cannot get a fair trial and is forced to stay the indictment.

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* ''Series/TheEscapeArtist'': Played straight but seriously - Foyle is released due to this trope, but not because of any nefarious, underhanded tactic by Will, but instead due to [[spoiler: the Trial Judge's initial refusal to give Will's expert time to prepare his submissions]]. When this later becomes quite critical to the case, coupled with the leaking of details, the Judge accepts that Foyle cannot get a fair trial and is forced to stay the indictment. Maggie also does the same thing when [[spoiler: Foyle is charged with murdering Kate.]]
23rd Aug '17 3:21:31 PM Fireblood
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* In the movie ''Film/CarlitosWay'', five years after drug dealer Carlito Brigante is sent to prison for murder, his lawyer gets him out because of prosecutorial misconduct and illegal wiretaps that led to the evidence being tainted. The judge that ordered Carlito's release made it quite clear this was the only reason he released him and deeply regrets having to do this (especially since it was the same judge who presided over his trial and sentenced Brigante to prison the first time anyway).

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* In the movie ''Film/CarlitosWay'', five years after drug dealer Carlito Brigante is sent to prison for murder, his lawyer gets him out because of prosecutorial misconduct and illegal wiretaps that led to the evidence being tainted. The judge that ordered Carlito's release made it quite clear this was the only reason he released him and deeply regrets having to do this (especially since it was the same judge who presided over his trial and sentenced Brigante to prison the first time anyway).anyway. In fact, he'd been forced to since the appeals court reversed his ruling).
9th Aug '17 6:00:58 AM newsguy95
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* Invoked in an episode of ''Series/{{Bull}}''. A woman charged with possession staunchly defends her drug-dealer brother...but eventually comes to realize that he really IS a drug dealer, and is willing to let her take the fall for drugs he'd stored on her property. She's ready to testify against him, but would likely die before getting into Witness Protection; so Dr. Bull orchestrates a way out for her. [[spoiler: With the cooperation of the prosecutor and the judge, the former submits his final piece of evidence -- the lab report verifying the contraband -- and rests his case. But then the defendant's attorney -- who isn't in on the plan -- finds what they want her to see: the final page of the report hadn't been notarized. And since the feds had already rested their case, the mistake couldn't be fixed...so the report was inadmissible, the case collapsed, and her brother thinks she simply got lucky. But a few minutes later, they slap the cuffs on him -- and it's safe for his sister to sing.]]
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