History Main / OffOnATechnicality

9th Apr '16 1:51:32 PM Morgenthaler
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* In the final episode of ''HomicideLifeOnTheStreet'', Bayliss discovers that Luke Ryland, a child molester he'd arrested earlier in the series, had been released because court backlogs had delayed his trial so long that the case was thrown out (on the basis that you couldn't just detain someone indefinitely without trial). At the end of the episode, Bayliss quietly packs up his desk and leaves the department, just as two of the other detectives discover the body of Ryland.

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* In the final episode of ''HomicideLifeOnTheStreet'', ''Series/HomicideLifeOnTheStreet'', Bayliss discovers that Luke Ryland, a child molester he'd arrested earlier in the series, had been released because court backlogs had delayed his trial so long that the case was thrown out (on the basis that you couldn't just detain someone indefinitely without trial). At the end of the episode, Bayliss quietly packs up his desk and leaves the department, just as two of the other detectives discover the body of Ryland.
6th Apr '16 2:48:43 PM TairaMai
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* In the final episode of ''HomicideLifeOnTheStreet'', Bayliss discovers that Luke Ryland, a child molester he'd arrested earlier in the series, had been released because court backlogs had delayed his trial so long that the case was thrown out (on the basis that, at least prior to 9/11, you couldn't just detain someone indefinitely without trial). At the end of the episode, Bayliss quietly packs up his desk and leaves the department, just as two of the other detectives discover the body of Ryland.

to:

* In the final episode of ''HomicideLifeOnTheStreet'', Bayliss discovers that Luke Ryland, a child molester he'd arrested earlier in the series, had been released because court backlogs had delayed his trial so long that the case was thrown out (on the basis that, at least prior to 9/11, that you couldn't just detain someone indefinitely without trial). At the end of the episode, Bayliss quietly packs up his desk and leaves the department, just as two of the other detectives discover the body of Ryland.
2nd Apr '16 9:53:04 AM Joysweeper
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Added DiffLines:

* In the second case of ''VideoGame/AviaryAttorney'' a witness turns out to be a blackmailed accessory to murder. The [[CrusadingLawyer prosecutor]] claims that due to the highly irregular way this was discovered in the courtroom, nothing is admissible and she's free to go. Subverted as the defense attorney immediately knows that's a lie, but the prosecutor is more interested in justice and extenuating circumstances than throwing people in jail.
31st Mar '16 9:51:53 PM spectertv
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<<|CrimeAndPunishmentTropes|>>
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9th Mar '16 6:57:11 AM Hossmeister
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* In an episode of ''AllInTheFamily'' Archie Bunker is on trial after a policeman Archie called to report a mugging found a can of tear gas in Archie's home despite the latter not having the necessary license. During the trial, Archie asks what happened to the criminal who originally mugged him and the judge replies he was released due to him having had his Miranda rights read to him in English despite him not being a native English speaker. Gloria is then shocked at the thought of the criminal being released and her innocent father being jailed... until the discussion brings to light the fact that the officer who found the tear gas didn't have a warrant, which causes the case to be dismissed. The judge then states the episode's Aesop that despite the justice system not being perfect and sometimes letting criminals go free, it ensures that everyone's rights are respected.

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* In an episode of ''AllInTheFamily'' ''Series/AllInTheFamily'' Archie Bunker is on trial after a policeman Archie called to report a mugging found a can of tear gas in Archie's home despite the latter not having the necessary license. During the trial, Archie asks what happened to the criminal who originally mugged him and the judge replies he was released due to him having had his Miranda rights read to him in English despite him not being a native English speaker. Gloria is then shocked at the thought of the criminal being released and her innocent father being jailed... until the discussion brings to light the fact that the officer who found the tear gas didn't have a warrant, which causes the case to be dismissed. The judge then states the episode's Aesop that despite the justice system not being perfect and sometimes letting criminals go free, it ensures that everyone's rights are respected.
29th Jan '16 10:34:13 AM rjd1922
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* Franchise/AceAttorney:

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* Franchise/AceAttorney: ''Franchise/AceAttorney'':



* If the US government has spied on you illegally and they classified the spying as secret, you can't sue. Because the fact that they spied on you is classified, you can't prove they spied on you. [[Literature/CatchTwentyTwo If you could prove it, you could sue, but the evidence is secret, so you can't]].

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* If the US government has spied on you illegally and they classified the spying as secret, you can't sue. Because the fact that they spied on you is classified, you can't prove they spied on you. [[Literature/CatchTwentyTwo [[CatchTwentyTwoDilemma If you could prove it, you could sue, but the evidence is secret, so you can't]].
27th Jan '16 8:11:32 PM SKJAM
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* ''Literature/HonorHarrington'': In the first book of the series, Captain Lord Pavel Young attempted to set up Honor Harrington for public failure by withdrawing his own ship from their assigned station, leaving her to assume all responsibilities with her single vessel. When Honor subsequently discovers--and foils--a plot by the People's Republic of Haven to conquer the system through a staged native uprising, Captain Young is shamed by the rest of the nay, but is not actually demoted or court-martialed. In ''The Short Victorious War'', Harrington learns that the reason Young was not removed from command after the events in “On Basilisk Station” was because he had covered his withdrawal with a barely justified return to the shipyard for repairs, a legal move, shielding him from retribution.

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* ''Literature/HonorHarrington'': In the first book of the series, Captain Lord Pavel Young attempted to set up Honor Harrington for public failure by withdrawing his own ship from their assigned station, leaving her to assume all responsibilities with her single vessel. When Honor subsequently discovers--and foils--a plot by the People's Republic of Haven to conquer the system through a staged native uprising, Captain Young is shamed by the rest of the nay, navy, but is not actually demoted or court-martialed. In ''The Short Victorious War'', Harrington learns that the reason Young was not removed from command after the events in “On Basilisk Station” was because he had covered his withdrawal with a barely justified return to the shipyard for repairs, a legal move, shielding him from retribution.
27th Jan '16 8:10:39 PM SKJAM
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* ''Literature/HonorHarrington'': In the first book of the series, Captain Lord Pavel Young attempted to set up Honor Harrington for public failure by withdrawing his own ship from their assigned station, leaving her to assume all responsibilities with her single vessel. When Honor subsequently discovers--and foils--a plot by the People's Republic of Haven to conquer the system through a staged native uprising, Captain Young is shamed by the rest of the nay, but is not actually demoted or court-martialed. In ''The Short Victorious War'', Harrington learns that the reason Young was not removed from command after the events in “On Basilisk Station” was because he had covered his withdrawal to give his return to the shipyard for repairs a legal basis, shielding him from retribution.

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* ''Literature/HonorHarrington'': In the first book of the series, Captain Lord Pavel Young attempted to set up Honor Harrington for public failure by withdrawing his own ship from their assigned station, leaving her to assume all responsibilities with her single vessel. When Honor subsequently discovers--and foils--a plot by the People's Republic of Haven to conquer the system through a staged native uprising, Captain Young is shamed by the rest of the nay, but is not actually demoted or court-martialed. In ''The Short Victorious War'', Harrington learns that the reason Young was not removed from command after the events in “On Basilisk Station” was because he had covered his withdrawal to give his with a barely justified return to the shipyard for repairs repairs, a legal basis, move, shielding him from retribution.
27th Jan '16 1:36:07 PM JBK405
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* ''Literature/HonorHarrington'': In ''The Short Victorious War'', Harrington learns the reason Young was not removed from command after the events in “On Basilisk Station”. He used a [[LoopholeAbuse loophole]] to give his return to the shipyard for repairs a legal basis.

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* ''Literature/HonorHarrington'': In the first book of the series, Captain Lord Pavel Young attempted to set up Honor Harrington for public failure by withdrawing his own ship from their assigned station, leaving her to assume all responsibilities with her single vessel. When Honor subsequently discovers--and foils--a plot by the People's Republic of Haven to conquer the system through a staged native uprising, Captain Young is shamed by the rest of the nay, but is not actually demoted or court-martialed. In ''The Short Victorious War'', Harrington learns that the reason Young was not removed from command after the events in “On Basilisk Station”. He used a [[LoopholeAbuse loophole]] Station” was because he had covered his withdrawal to give his return to the shipyard for repairs a legal basis.basis, shielding him from retribution.
17th Jan '16 10:38:42 AM nombretomado
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In a PoliceProcedural, such as LawAndOrder, this will usually come in at the first quarter-hour mark, when the initial case falls through, and the DA tells the cops to find some non-tainted evidence or charges to rebuild a case from.

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In a PoliceProcedural, such as LawAndOrder, ''Franchise/LawAndOrder'', this will usually come in at the first quarter-hour mark, when the initial case falls through, and the DA tells the cops to find some non-tainted evidence or charges to rebuild a case from.



* ''Series/{{LawAndOrder}}'', as noted in the trope description, generally subverts this by the end of the episode or [[VigilanteExecution compensates with extreme prejudice]]. However, there are a few exceptions:

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* ''Series/{{LawAndOrder}}'', ''Series/LawAndOrder'', as noted in the trope description, generally subverts this by the end of the episode or [[VigilanteExecution compensates with extreme prejudice]]. However, there are a few exceptions:



* ''[[LawAndOrderSpecialVictimsUnit SVU]]'' has a few:

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* ''[[LawAndOrderSpecialVictimsUnit ''[[Series/LawAndOrderSpecialVictimsUnit SVU]]'' has a few:
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