History Main / NotTheFallThatKillsYou

17th Jun '17 4:27:33 PM Kartoonkid95
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* ''WesternAnimation/ThePowerpuffGirls'': In "Stuck Up, Up and Away", Princess plummets from a dizzying height after her flying power armor is destroyed, but Blossom grabs her right before she hits the ground.
17th Jun '17 7:46:51 AM Az_Tech341
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* In ''{{WebAnimation/RWBY}}'', the characters almost never get hurt, even when falling from immense heights. Season 2's opening credits has them falling from ''suborbital heights'', accelerating their falls, and then performing [[ThreePointLanding superhero landings]] with no ill effects at all. As early as the fifth episode, we see them all slowing down in various ways after being launched into a wooded area, and but for RuleOfCool, not one would survive. Ruby uses her scythe as a BladeBrake against a tree limb, which should have ripped her arms out of their sockets; Ren circles a tree trunk using his bladed [=SMGs=], and Yang uses her shotgun gauntlets to keep herself accelerated before bouncing off of two trees and rolling to a stop. Definitely justified by Aura and the strengthening effects it has on the human body, as evidenced by Yang surviving a fall at terminal velocity with no ill effects, (And it was only a FoodFight that propelled her so high!).

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* In ''{{WebAnimation/RWBY}}'', the characters almost never get hurt, even when falling from immense heights. Season 2's opening credits has them falling from ''suborbital heights'', accelerating their falls, and then performing [[ThreePointLanding superhero landings]] with no ill effects at all. As early as the fifth episode, we see them all slowing down in various ways after being launched into a wooded area, and but for RuleOfCool, not one would survive. Ruby uses her scythe as a BladeBrake against a tree limb, which should have ripped her arms out of their sockets; Ren circles a tree trunk using his bladed [=SMGs=], and Yang uses her shotgun gauntlets to keep herself accelerated before bouncing off of two trees and rolling to a stop. Definitely justified by Aura and the strengthening effects it has on the human body, as evidenced by Yang surviving a fall at terminal velocity with no ill effects, (And it was only a FoodFight that propelled her so high!).effects.
17th Jun '17 4:51:39 AM ElodieHiras
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* In ''{{WebAnimation/RWBY}}'', the characters almost never get hurt, even when falling from immense heights. Season 2's opening credits has them falling from ''suborbital heights'', accelerating their falls, and then performing [[ThreePointLanding superhero landings]] with no ill effects at all. As early as the fifth episode, we see them all slowing down in various ways after being launched into a wooded area, and but for RuleOfCool, not one would survive. Ruby uses her scythe as a BladeBrake against a tree limb, which should have ripped her arms out of their sockets; Ren circles a tree trunk using his bladed [=SMGs=], and Yang uses her shotgun gauntlets to keep herself accelerated before bouncing off of two trees and rolling to a stop. Probably justified by Aura and the strengthening effects it has on the human body.

to:

* In ''{{WebAnimation/RWBY}}'', the characters almost never get hurt, even when falling from immense heights. Season 2's opening credits has them falling from ''suborbital heights'', accelerating their falls, and then performing [[ThreePointLanding superhero landings]] with no ill effects at all. As early as the fifth episode, we see them all slowing down in various ways after being launched into a wooded area, and but for RuleOfCool, not one would survive. Ruby uses her scythe as a BladeBrake against a tree limb, which should have ripped her arms out of their sockets; Ren circles a tree trunk using his bladed [=SMGs=], and Yang uses her shotgun gauntlets to keep herself accelerated before bouncing off of two trees and rolling to a stop. Probably Definitely justified by Aura and the strengthening effects it has on the human body.body, as evidenced by Yang surviving a fall at terminal velocity with no ill effects, (And it was only a FoodFight that propelled her so high!).
10th Jun '17 9:18:18 PM Az_Tech341
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Amusingly, even works that take the stress of deceleration into account will paradoxically ignore the stress of ''acceleration''. Trauma from rapid velocity change works both ways. Getting [[PunchedAcrossTheRoom thrown halfway across a city square]] is pretty much equivalent to standing still and getting hit by a train. Even if ''Comicbook/{{Superman}}'' catches you at the other end, you still end up ripped apart like tissue paper by steel-hard fingers pushing at you like jackhammers. If writers considered the way vehicles work, they could avoid this. Don't want your hero bisecting flying civilians? Try having them travel at the same speed and gradually decelerate the target to a more reasonable velocity. Air braking is your friend.

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Amusingly, even works that take the stress of deceleration into account will paradoxically ignore the stress of ''acceleration''. Trauma from rapid velocity change works both ways. Getting [[PunchedAcrossTheRoom thrown halfway across a city square]] is pretty much equivalent to standing still and getting hit by a train. Even if ''Comicbook/{{Superman}}'' Comicbook/{{Superman}} catches you at the other end, you still end up ripped apart like tissue paper by steel-hard fingers pushing at you like jackhammers. If writers considered the way vehicles work, they could avoid this. Don't want your hero bisecting flying civilians? Try having them travel at the same speed and gradually decelerate the target to a more reasonable velocity. Air braking is your friend.
10th Jun '17 9:17:26 PM Az_Tech341
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...it's hitting the ground ("the deceleration trauma", "it's the sudden stop").

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...it's It's hitting the ground ("the deceleration trauma", "it's the sudden stop").



In fiction, however, one must specifically hit the ground to get killed in a fall. [[LiteralCliffhanger Grabbed a ledge]]? Hooked an outcropping with your GrapplingHookPistol? [[CatchAFallingStar Got caught out of midair?]] [[GiantRobotHandsSaveLives (By a giant robot?)]] [[SoftWater Hit water instead of ground?]] [[GoombaSpringboard Landed on an enemy?]] [[CarCushion On a car?]] [[TrashLanding Fall in a dumpster?]] Congratulations, you're completely uninjured, no matter how far you fell beforehand! Some characters can fall dozens of stories or even out of aircraft, and survive more or less unrumpled as long as they perhaps ''fell through some trees'' before encountering the ground.

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In fiction, however, one must specifically hit the ground to get killed in a fall. [[LiteralCliffhanger Grabbed a ledge]]? Hooked an outcropping with your GrapplingHookPistol? [[CatchAFallingStar Got caught out of midair?]] [[GiantRobotHandsSaveLives (By midair]]? ([[GiantRobotHandsSaveLives By a giant robot?)]] robot]]?) [[SoftWater Hit water instead of ground?]] ground]]? [[GoombaSpringboard Landed on an enemy?]] enemy]]? [[CarCushion On a car?]] car]]? [[TrashLanding Fall in a dumpster?]] dumpster]]? Congratulations, you're completely uninjured, no matter how far you fell beforehand! Some characters can fall dozens of stories or even out of aircraft, and survive more or less unrumpled as long as they perhaps ''fell through some trees'' before encountering the ground.



Amusingly, even works that take the stress of deceleration into account will paradoxically ignore the stress of ''acceleration.'' Trauma from rapid velocity change works both ways. Getting [[PunchedAcrossTheRoom thrown halfway across a city square]] is pretty much equivalent to standing still and getting hit by a train. Even if the hero catches you carefully at the other end, you still end up ripped apart like tissue paper by steel-hard fingers pushing at you like jackhammers. If writers considered the way vehicles work, they could avoid this. Don't want your hero bisecting flying civilians? Try having them travel at the same speed and gradually decelerate the target to a more reasonable velocity. Air braking is your friend.

to:

Amusingly, even works that take the stress of deceleration into account will paradoxically ignore the stress of ''acceleration.'' ''acceleration''. Trauma from rapid velocity change works both ways. Getting [[PunchedAcrossTheRoom thrown halfway across a city square]] is pretty much equivalent to standing still and getting hit by a train. Even if the hero ''Comicbook/{{Superman}}'' catches you carefully at the other end, you still end up ripped apart like tissue paper by steel-hard fingers pushing at you like jackhammers. If writers considered the way vehicles work, they could avoid this. Don't want your hero bisecting flying civilians? Try having them travel at the same speed and gradually decelerate the target to a more reasonable velocity. Air braking is your friend.
7th May '17 4:40:59 PM GoblinCipher
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** And yet Leonard is correct - that's exactly what Superman does and Sheldon, having a PhotographicMemory, should know that already.
*** EideticMemory

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** And yet Leonard is correct - that's exactly what Superman does and Sheldon, having a PhotographicMemory, an EideticcMemory, should know that already.
*** EideticMemory
already.
23rd Apr '17 6:41:08 PM BonerBender
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* Averted in ''Literature/TheExpanse'', where ships can only accelerate and decelerate so fast without risking injury or death to their occupants. Gone into in detail in book 3, ''Caliban's War'', where an alien device creates a zone within which any object traveling faster than a certain speed is brought to an almost immediate stop. The aftermath when those objects are spaceships filled with people is described in gruesome detail.

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* Averted in ''Literature/TheExpanse'', where ships can only accelerate and decelerate so fast without risking injury or death to their occupants. Gone into in detail in book 3, ''Caliban's War'', ''Abaddon's Gate'', where an alien device creates a zone within which any object traveling faster than a certain speed is brought to an almost immediate stop. The aftermath when those objects are spaceships filled with people is described in gruesome detail.
23rd Apr '17 5:57:56 PM nombretomado
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* Dutch cyclist [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wim_van_Est Wim van Est]] fell into a 70-meter-deep ravine in the 1951 TourDeFrance. He survived the fall with no serious injuries thanks to the trees he fell into.

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* Dutch cyclist [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wim_van_Est Wim van Est]] fell into a 70-meter-deep ravine in the 1951 TourDeFrance.UsefulNotes/TourDeFrance. He survived the fall with no serious injuries thanks to the trees he fell into.
20th Apr '17 11:01:54 PM TheNicestGuy
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* ''WesternAnimation/TheVentureBrothers'': Brock Samson gets this treatment a few times, because he's just that badass.
** One especially impressive example was lateral, rather than vertical. Up against Myra, who was in a car when Brock was on foot, he stood in the middle of the road facing away from her. As she prepared to run him down, he did breathing exercises and maneuvers that looked like tai chi, positioning his left arm straight out in front of him and his right arm out to his side. Thus he was perfectly positioned when she collided with him: He crushed her into the driver's seat and grasped the wheel with his left hand, while his right arm restrained Dr. Venture in the passenger seat when he hit the brakes.
1st Apr '17 4:41:09 AM Hyoroemon
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** In the original manga version, the first time Mr. Kobayashi do that both of his arm bones are broken. Readers are treated with x-ray view of said bones broken.
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